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Transcript
1
Running head: TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Team Teaching Project
Virginia Commonwealth University
SEDP 531, C92
Katie Best, Meera Mehtaji
2
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Team Teaching Project
Unit Plan:Title: - Cells: - Structure and function of cells and Plants and animal cells.
Grade: - Fifth Grade collaborative class of twenty students.
Time:- This is a three day unit plan. Each day the students will work on this unit for one
hour. This is a team taught unit, so there are two teachers, a general and a special
education teacher, who are working collaboratively.
SOL 5.5:- The student will investigate and understand that organisms are made of cells
and have distinguishing characteristics. Key concepts include
a.
basic cell structures and functions
b.
difference between plant cell and animal cell.
Cognitive Supports: Class content will be presented using multiple modalities:
audiovisual, kinesthetic, visual, and interactive. Teachers will provide guided notes and
visual organizers. Teachers will work cooperatively to monitor student progress and
ensure that students have access to individual support. Students will also have multiple
means of demonstrating knowledge and mastery of the content.
3
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Lesson Plan: - Day one.
CONTENT AREA: Parts of an animal cell.
CONTENT OBJECTIVE: At the end of a one hour lesson, students will learn the basic
parts of a cell: nucleus, nuclear membrane, cytoplasm, call membrane, vacuoles, and
mitochondria.
SOL: 5.5.a. Basic cell structures and functions
PROCEDURE:
A.
Introduction:
a.
The GE teacher introduces the lesson by asking students: What is the
smallest unit of life? The SE teacher will assist by writing student
responses on the board. After several answers have been given and
discussed, the GE teacher will explain that CELLS are the smallest unit of
life. This will signal the beginning of the Powerpoint presentation.
b.
At the beginning of the class all students are given a skeletal version
handout of the PowerPoint to fill out during the presentation. The GE
teacher will operate the computer and narrate and explain the Powerpoint
presentation, while the SE teacher will circulate among the students to
observe progress and assist students as they take notes.
4
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
B. Development:
a.Cell theory- presented on Powerpoint and explained by GE teacher: Living
things are made of cells. Cells carry out all life processes. New cells come
from existing cells. Cells are too small to be seen with the eye alone.
* All living things are composed of cells.
* All cells come from pre-existing cells.
* Cells are the smallest units of life.
b.
The class will discuss different cells in the human body and their
functions (blood cells, skin cells, etc.). This is reinforced by written
explanation and illustration on the Powerpoint.
c.
By using a microscope, many parts of a cell can be seen. This is
illustrated with computer images of cells that are part of Powerpoint
presentation given by the GE teacher.
d.
The GE teacher will explain the basic cell structure, using notes and
illustrations provided on the Powerpoint. The students will fill in
information on their guided notes.
e.
The teachers now divide the class into four centers. The GE teacher will
observe and help students at the “Computer” center and the “Artistic
Rendition of a Cell” center. The SE teacher will observe and help students
at the “Microscope” center and the “Study Card” center. These are group
activities (5 students at a station at a time)
5
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
o
Station #1: Computer: Using website (Cellsalive.com) loaded on to
5 classroom computers, each student will identify parts of cell and
then label on handout (diagram). Students will then complete
chart: organelles and their functions. Cellsalive.com shows
interactive plant and animal cells- video images. Students can
move cursor over images on screen (diagram of cell and its parts),
and the name of the organelles appear as student clicks on each
one. Also, there is a list of organelles at bottom of the image- when
student clicks on one, it defines the function(s).
o
Station #2: Artistic rendition of cell. Students will color and label
their own cell using art supplies provided. Students will follow a
“key” to identify parts.
o
Station #3: Looking at cells in microscope. There are four
microscopes A, B, C and D set up at this station. Students are
given pictures of four cells. The students have to look through the
microscope and match the images on the handout to the slides on
the four microscopes. Students will compare findings within the
group, and when they have reached consensus, SE teacher will
provide an answer key for them to evaluate accuracy.
o
Station #4: Flash Cards for future study. Students are provided
with supplies: index cards, printouts of cell parts, functions, and
other key terms for review. Students will match up cell parts and
functions, key terms and definitions, and key questions and
6
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
answers, and then students will create a set of study cards by
attaching (with glue sticks) each pair to opposite sides of an index
card. Students will then put completed sets into envelope provided
and label with heading “Cell Study Cards” and student’s name.
C.
Summary:
a.
The SE teacher will review cell theory and cell parts with the class.
b.
Students may choose to present artistic renditions of cell to
rest of class. This is optional.
RESOURCES:
Powerpoint, class handouts, internet website,
(http://www.cellsalive.com/mitosis.htm , index cards, microscopes, print
outs, art supplies (markers, colored pencils, glue sticks).
ACCOMMODATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS: Powerpoint
presentation contains both auditory and visual components in order to
meet the needs of the most students. A complete (rather than skeletal)
powerpoint note handout can be provided for any student for whom
writing is a significant challenge. The SE teacher will circulate to offer
individual assistance with notes for any students who are having difficulty
following along or staying on task. The students will work in collaborative
groups, with assistance from both the GE and SE teachers. The computers
7
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
at Station #1 have reading software for students with reading difficulties,
ad teachers and peers are available at other stations to offer reading
support. Students have the option to present artistic rendition to the class,
but this is not a universal requirement.
EVALUATION: The evaluation can be performed in several ways.
Teacher Assessment:
Do all students have enough time to complete all the four stations?

Have all students completed their guided notes?

The teachers will evaluate if at least 80% of the students have
achieved the goal. If not, the teachers will re-present the content.

Have the teachers accommodated the diverse needs of all students?
Student Assessment:
Have students completed the guided notes with 100% accuracy?

Have students worked at each station and collected the notes and
made their own flash cards?
8
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Lesson Plan: - Day two.
CONTENT AREA: Difference between plant and animal cells.
CONTENT OBJECTIVE: At the end of a one-hour lesson the students will be able to
differentiate plant and animal cells.
SOL: 5.5 a Difference between plant cell and animal cell.
PROCEDURE:
A. Introduction:

The SE teacher begins the second day class by reviewing the content taught on
the previous day. The students will use the previous day’s notes to answer
questions posed by the SE teacher.

At the beginning of the class all students are given a skeletal version handout of
the PowerPoint to fill out during the presentation. The SE teacher will operate
the computer and narrate and explain the Powerpoint presentation, while the GE
teacher will circulate among the students to observe progress and assist students
as they take notes. The SE teacher will explain that today they are going to learn
about the difference between plant cells and animal cells.

Using a visual aid (poster with side-by-side plant and animal cells), the SE
teacher will point out the exterior physical difference between plant cells and
animal cells: plant cells tend to be spherical or to be rectangular, while animal
are at times irregular in shape.
9
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
B.
Development

The SE teacher refers to the same visual aid (poster) that shows both plant
and animal cells. The students as a group observe the cells. The SE teacehr
asks the students to point out the cell parts in each diagram, witing the names
on the board under the headings “Plant Cell,” “Animal Cell,” and “Both.”

Using a brief (4-slide) powerpoint presentation, the SE teacher will show
that plant cells include the nucleus, cell wall, cell membrane, vacuole,
chloroplasts, and cytoplasm. Animal cells include the nucleus, cell
membrane, vacuole, and cytoplasm.

The teachers now divide the class into four centers. The SE teacher will
observe and help students at the “Computer” center and the “Venn diagram”
center. The GE teacher will observe and help students at the “Microscope”
center and the “Study Card” center. These are group activities (5 students at a
station at a time).
o
Station #1: Computer: Difference between Plant and Animal Cell: - The
students will view the website
http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/cells/insideacell/ to
understand the basic difference between plant and animal cells.
o
Station #2: Looking at cells in microscope- The teacher has set up two
microscopes. One has a plant cell, and another has an animal cell. The
students will state the difference between the two cells and discuss
reasons for their answers. The group must reach a consensus, and then the
group will verbally present its findings to the GE teacher.
10
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
o
Station #3: Venn diagram: - The students will complete a Venn diagram
to represent the differences between plant and animal cells.
o
Station #4: Flash Cards for future study: - The students will be provided
with supplies: index cards, printouts of plant and animal cells, and other
key terms for review. Students will create a set of study cards by
attaching each pair to opposite sides of an index card. Students will then
add completed sets to envelopes from the previous day’s lesson, labeled
“Cell Study Cards.”
C.
SUMMARY
 The GE teacher will review the differences between plant and animal
cells with the students.
D. RESOURCES:
Powerpoint, class handouts, teacher-made poster, internet website,
(http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/cells/insideacell/ , index cards, microscopes,
print outs, art supplies (markers, colored pencils, glue sticks).
E. ACCOMMODATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS: Powerpoint presentation contains
both auditory and visual components in order to meet the needs of the most students. A
complete (rather than skeletal) powerpoint note handout can be provided for any student
for whom writing is a significant challenge. The GE teacher will circulate to offer
individual assistance with notes for any students who are having difficulty following
along or staying on task. The students will work in collaborative groups, with assistance
from both the GE and SE teachers. The computers at Station #1 have reading software for
11
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
students with reading difficulties, and teachers and peers are available at other stations to
offer reading support.
F. EVALUATION:
1.
Teacher Assessment:-

Do all the students have enough time to complete all the four stations?

Have all the students completed their guided notes?

The teachers will evaluate if at least 80% of the students have achieved the goal.
If not, the teachers will re-present the content.

Have the teachers accommodated the diverse needs of all students?
2.
Student Assessment:-

Have the students completed the guided notes with 100% accuracy?

Have the students worked at each station, collected the notes, and made their own
flash cards?
12
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Lesson Plan: - Day three.
CONTENT AREA: Parts of animal and plant cells.
CONTENT OBJECTIVE: At the end of a one hour lesson, students will identify basic
cell structures, express the function of given cell structures, and create a model of a cell
that demonstrates recognition of cell parts.
SOL: 5.5.a. Basic cell structures and functions
PROCEDURE:
Introduction:
1. Before beginning the Edible Cell Project, students will complete Quiz on
A.
parts of the cell- Students must label the parts of a cell using teacherprovided diagram and terms provided in word bank. Given a diagram of a
plant cell and an animal cell, students must differentiate between them.
Students must answer 5 multiple-choice questions on cell parts and their
functions. This quiz is designed to take students approximately 15 minutes
to complete. Extended time will be afforded to students who need it.
B.
Development:
1. When students complete the quiz, and the quiz has been collected by the
SE teacher, the GE teacher will present directions to begin the Edible Cell
Project..Students will be divided into 4 groups (pre-determined by SE and
GE teachers) and will move to one of the 4 work stations to begin the
Edible Cell Project. The SE and GE teachers will move among the work
stations to answer questions and assist students.
2. Students will create an “edible cell” using an assortment of candy/snack
food.
13
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
3. Each student will complete a planning chart before he/she constructs the
actual cells. The student will write the function of each organelle and
choose candy that best depicts those parts (looking at shape, color, texture,
etc).
4. After planning charts are completed and approved, students will attach
edible parts to the cell (large sugar cookie) in order to create a relatively
accurate cell model. Students may need to reshape cookie, depending on
whether they are creating plant cell or animal cell.
C.
Summary:
1.
At the conclusion of this activity, each group will have one member
present their cells to the class, explaining their material choices for cells
parts, and they will identify their cell as either a plant cell or an animal
cell.
2.
GE and SE teachers will create an “Edible Cell Display” on one of the
work stations so that all students have the opportunity to see them.
RESOURCES:
Teacher-made quiz, teacher-made directions and planning
chart for Edible Cell Project, 20 large sugar cookies, , jelly beans, ribbon candy,
licorice, fruit leather, sprinkles, gumballs, smarties, cheerios, raisins, gumballs,
lifesavers, plastic butter knives, spatulas).
14
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
ACCOMMODATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS:
Cell quiz has a word bank to
assist students with spelling. The GE and SE teachesr will circulate to offer individual
assistance for any students who are having difficulty reading the test or providing written
responses. Also, class computers are available with quizzes for students who require
electronic assistance. Likewise, students who require electronic assistance may also use
abclass computer to complete the Edible Cell “planning chart.” The students will work in
collaborative groups, with assistance from both the GE and SE teachers. Students have
the option to present artistic rendition to the class, but this is not a universal requirement.
Because only one student from each group is needed to present.
EVALUATION: Teacher Assessment:
Do all the students have enough time to complete the quiz in the
15-minute time frame?

Have the teachers accommodated the diverse needs of all students?

Have teachers created collaborative groups that are balanced in
terms of skill level? Have they taken into account both the skills
and personalities of group members?
2.

Student Assessment:-
Have the students completed the Cell Quiz with at least 80%
accuracy?

Did students adequately and accurately completed the planning chart
before beginning to work on their edible cells?
15
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT

Have the students worked on the edible cell project as a collaborative
group? Have responsibilities been divided equally? Have the groups
worked efficiently and harmoniously?
16
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Classroom Environment/Logistics:

This is a mainstream collaboration classroom. There are 20 students in the class.
 Throughout the three-day lesson on cells, the general education (GE) and special
education (SE) teachers will alternate roles: presenting information and
circulating throughout the classroom to offer assistance to individual students.
When students are divided into small groups at learning stations, both the GE
and SE teachers will supervise students at two stations. The two teachers will
collaborate to create lessons in advance, and specific roles will be determined
prior to the class.

The classroom is spacious so that all students can move around easily.

The students sit in a semi- circle during the presentation part of the class in order
to give all students a clear view of the teacher and the board/powerpoint. This also
allows teachers to move easily from student to student in order to offer assistance
and keep students on task.

The SE teacher and the GE teacher will have desks at front and back of the class.

All the students face the teacher who is presenting at the front of the class.

The class has a projector that helps the teachers deliver PowerPoint presentations.

The class has a computer area, with five computers,

The students have an activity area where they can do artwork and other hands-on
activities.
17
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT

Student storage is easy to access and use for all students. Height is important in
order to allow access to students with physical limitations, and the manipulation
required to retrieve materials is minimized

All storage and shelves are along the wall to ensure wheelchair accessibility and
maximum visibility.

The class is well-lit.
Cognitive Supports

Powerpoint- narrated by teacher

Study cards

Venn Diagram to compare plant and animal cells

Study chart: Organelles and their functions

Visual Aid (poster): comparing plant and animal cells

Edible cell project planning chart
18
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Group Member Contributions

We met a total of five times to work together on this project. We also
communicated frequently by email in order to collaborate on all aspects of
planning and writing.

We collaborated to outline each lesson. After we had created the basic format,
Meera wrote out more detailed plans for days one and two, and Katie wrote out
more detailed plans for day three. We revised and edited these together, both
online and in person.

Meera created the powerpoint presentations (both for the daily lessons and for the
class presentation), guided notes, and Venn diagram. We revised and edited these
together, both online and in person. Meera also created the visual rendition of the
physical classroom space.

Katie created the study cards, study chart: organelles and their functions, visual
aid (poster): comparing plant and animal cells, cell quiz, and the edible cell
project planning chart. We revised and edited these together, both online and in
person. Katie put together the notebook, but we both contributed paper copies of
the plans/resources we had created.
19
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Cells
Cell Theory
Living
●
smallest
pre-existing
All _________________things are composed of
cells.
●
All cells come from ___________________cells.
●
Cells are the
______________________ units
of life.
Facts about Cells:
microscope
●
small
Cells are too ____________ to be seen with the
eye alone.
●
By using a______________________, many
parts of a cell can be seen (illustrate with
computer images of cells)
20
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Different cells in human body.
broken
●
liver cells
cellular specialized
muscle cells
Our muscles are made of
____________________, our livers of
________________________, and there are even
very ____________________________ types of
cells that make the enamel for our teeth or the
clear lenses in our eyes!
●
Everything from reproduction to infections to
repairing a broken _____________________
happens down at the cellular level.
21
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Parts of Cells
Controls
separates
shape
inside jellylike
control center
●
covering around,
instructions
Cell membrane is a thin ________________
________________the cell.
■
The cell membrane _____________________
the inside parts of the cell from the outside
environment,
■
It gives the cell its ______________________,
■
It __________________ what goes into and out
of it.
●
Located _______________ a cell is the
cytoplasm. Cytoplasm is a __________________
liquid.
22
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
●
Inside the cytoplasm is the cell's ______________ called
the nucleus. The nucleus contains all of the
______________ for running the cell.
food, water, or wastes,
Controls, oval,
kidney beans, change food into energy,
nucleus
●
The ________________________is surrounded by the
nuclear membrane. The nuclear membrane
__________________ what goes into and comes out of
the nucleus.
●
Mitochondria are shaped like
_______________________
Mitochondria are important parts of a cell because they
help
_____________________________________________.
The cell uses the energy to do its work.
23
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
●
Vacuole, are tiny ___________________
structures that store
_______________________________________.
Difference between Plant and Animal Cells
Irregular, cytoplasm, nucleus, rectangular, two
●
Plant cells tend to be spherical or
__________________, while animal cells at times
are _____________________.
●
All cells, whether plant or animal have these same
parts: cell membrane,
_________________________________, nuclear
membrane, vacuoles, and mitochondria.
●
Plant cells, however, have ________________ that
animal cells do not.
24
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Additional parts of Plant Cell
cell membrane
●
sunlight
Plant cells have a
cell walls
green
______________. This sturdy
layer around the cell membrane supports and protects the
cell.
●
Plant cells also contain _____________________.
■
Chloroplasts contain the green substance called
________________.
■
Chlorophyll traps__________ from sunlight and
enables a plant to make its own _____________.
25
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Complete the Venn diagram on the similarities
and differences in plant and animal cell.
[Plant cell]
[Animal cell]
[Both]
26
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Station #1: Cellsalive.com
Organelle
Nucleus
Cell wall
Cell membrane
Vacuole
Chloroplasts
Cytoplasm
Mitochondria
Function of Organelle
27
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Cell Theory
Student Study Cards
1. all organisms are composed of cells2. Cells are the
smallest units of life.3. All cells come from preexisting cells.
28
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Cell
Membrane
A thin covering around the cell that separates the
inside parts of the cell from the outside environment.It
gives the cell its shape and controls what goes into
and out of it.
Cytoplasm
a jelly-like liquid in cells
Nucleus
cell's control center: contains all of the instructions for
running the cell.
Nuclear Membrane
surrounds nucleus- controls what goes into and comes
out of the nucleus
Mitochondria
shaped like kidney beans- help
change food into energy
29
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Vacuole
oval structures that store food, water,
or wastes
Shape of Plant
Cells
tend to be spherical or to be
rectangular
Shape of Animal
Cells
irregular shape
2 additional parts of plant
cells
1. Cell Wall2. Chloroplasts
Cell Wall
*In plant cells only
sturdy layer around the cell membrane that supports
and protects the cell
30
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
Chloroplasts
* In plant cells only
* contain the green substance called chlorophyll that
traps energy from sunlight and enables a plant to make
its own food.
Quiz: Cell theory and Parts of a Cell
Student Name: ____________________________________________________
Part 1. Multiple Choice: Circle the letter of the best response to each
question.
31
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
1. Which of the following is not part of the Cell Theory?
a. Cells are the smallest units of life.
b. All living things are composed of cells.
c. Animal cells are larger than plant cells.
d. All cells come from pre-existing cells.
2. The parts of a cell are called
a. Cell bodies
b. Organelles
c. Organs
d. Cellular membranes
3. Which of the following is the control center of the cell?
a. Cytoplasm
b. Vacuole
c. Nucleus
d. Mitochondria
4. Which of the following is the jellylike liquid in a cell?
a. Cytoplasm
b. Cell Membrane
c. Nucleus
d. Mitochondria
5. All cells (plant and animal) are surrounded by
a. Chloroplasts
b. Cell Membrane
c. Nucleus
d. Cell Wall
32
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
6. Oval structures that sore food, water, or wastes in cells are called
a. Chloroplasts
b. Mitochondria
c. Nucleus
d. Vacuoles
7. Which of the following is not found in an animal cell?
a. Chloroplasts
b. Mitochondria
c. Nucleus
d. Vacuoles
Part 2. True/False. Read each statement and circle True or False.
8. All cells contain cytoplasm.
True
False
9. Cells are too small to be seen without a microscope.
True
False
10. Animal cells contain a Cell Wall but do not contain a Cell Membrane.
True
False
11. Cells vary in shape depending on their function.
True
False
12. Mitochondria are important parts of a cell because they help change food into
energy.
True
False
33
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
13. Chloroplasts are important parts of animal cells because they convert sunlight into
food.
True
False
Part 3. Label the parts of the cell by choosing terms from the word bank
provided and writing them on the appropriate blanks.
Nucleus
Mitochondria
Nuclear Membrane
Cytoplasm
Vacuole
Cell Membrane
34
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT
20. Is this diagram a Plant Cell or an Animal Cell?
35
TEAM TEACHING PROJECT