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Transcript
Science
Regional Prioritized Curriculum
Grade 5
Living Environment
Standard 4:
Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and
recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
Key Idea 1:
Background:
Living things are both similar to and different from each other and from nonliving things.
Living things are similar to each other yet different from nonliving things. The cell is the basic unit of structure and function of living things (cell theory).
For all living things, life activities are accomplished at the cellular level. Human beings are an interactive organization of cells, tissues, organs, and systems.
Viruses lack cellular organization.
Guiding Questions:
How are living things different from non-living things?
How does each body system provide for the survival of the organism?
How do classification systems allow scientists to identify organisms and group new organisms appropriately?
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
1
Standard 4: Key Idea 1: Performance Indicator 1:1 Compare and contrast the parts of plants, animals, and one-celled organisms.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
1.1a Living things are composed of cells. Cells provide the
structure and carry on the major functions to sustain
life. Cells are usually microscopic in size.
1.1d Some organisms are single cells; others, including
humans, are multicellular.
Classroom Ideas





Observe onion cells and complete a graphic organizer
based on that observation.
Use of microscope – label parts on a diagram.
Using a microscope, students will observe single and
multi-cell organisms.
Compare and contrast similarities and differences of
single and multi-cell organisms. Record using a graphic
organizer.
Observe pond water through a microscope and
identify the organisms in the water. Draw and label.
1.1f Many plants have roots, stems, leaves, and
reproductive structures. These organized groups of
tissues are responsible for a plant’s life activities.

Design a plant that would survive in a specific
environment that the teacher designates. For
example, reduced gravity, limited moisture, no
minerals, or reduced light.
1.1h Living things are classified by shared characteristics
on the cellular and organism level. In classifying
organisms, biologists consider details of internal and
external structures. Biological classification systems
are arranged from general (kingdom level) to specific
(species level).


Dichotomous Key Activity
Students identify an unknown organism based on the
key.
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries
Time/Notes
Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Ex. Assess diagrams for accuracy.

Ex. Assess graphic organizers for accuracy
and content using a compare and contrast
rubric.
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
2
Standard 4: Key Idea 1: Performance Indicator 1:2 Explain the functioning of the major human organ systems and their interactions.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
1.2a Each system is composed of organs and tissues which
perform specific functions and interact with each
other, e.g., digestion, gas exchange, excretion,
circulation, locomotion, control, coordination,
reproduction, and protection from disease.
Classroom Ideas

Create a lab based on pulse rate. Record, analyze, and
summarize the data.
1.2b Tissues, organs, and organ systems help to provide all
cells with nutrients, oxygen, and waste removal.

1.2g Locomotion, necessary to escape danger, obtain food
and shelter, and reproduce, is accomplished by the
interaction of skeletal muscular systems, and
coordinated by the nervous system.

Record and summarize results of an experiment that
tests the student’s reflexes using reaction time to a
stimulus.
1.2j Disease breaks down the structures or functions of
an organism. Some diseases are the result of failures
of the system. Others diseases are the result of
damage by infection by other organisms (germ
theory). Specialized cells protect the body from
infectious disease. The chemicals they produce
identify and destroy microbes that enter the body.

Construct a graph that compares the human life
expectancy of different countries. If possible, gather
the needed data using PC Globe.
Use Microsoft Power to summarize information on
diseases and life expectancy.

Create a matrix that can be used to record information
on organ systems and be used to compare data.
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
3
Standard 4:
Key Idea 3:
Background:
Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and
recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
Individuals organisms and species change over time.
Evolution is the change in species over time. Millions of diverse species are alive today. Generally this diversity of species developed through gradual processes of change occurring over many generations.
Species acquire many of their unique characteristics through biological adaptation, which involves the selection of naturally occurring variations in populations (natural selection). Biological adaptations are
differences in structures, behaviors, or physiology that enhance survival and reproductive success in a particular environment.
Guiding Questions:
What are the types of adaptations that allow an organism to survive?
How can human activity cause environmental change?
How does the loss of habitat affect extinction rates?
How can the fossil record show environmental change over time?
What would be the survival advantage to a species that made significant change in a short period of time?
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
4
Standard 4 Key Idea 3: Performance Indicator 3:2 Describe factors responsible for competition within species and the significance of that competition.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
3.2a In all environments, organisms with similar needs may
compete with one another for resources.
3.2b Extinction of a species occurs when the environment
changes and the adaptive characteristics of a species
are insufficient to allow this survival. Extinction of
species is common. Fossils are evidence that a great
variety of species existed in the past.
Classroom Ideas


Use population information on bison and humans and
analyze the effect that Westward Expansion had on
both populations. Create a graph to display the
information.
Complete a research report on the causes for the
destruction of certain ecosystems. Prepare an oral
presentation on information.
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Ex. Assess graphs for Westward expansion
activity for accuracy and reasoning.
3.2c Many thousands of layers of sedimentary rock provide
evidence for the long history of Earth and for the
long history of changing life-forms whose remains are
found in the rocks. More recently deposited rock
layers are more likely to contain fossils resembling
existing species.

3.2d Although the time needed for changes in a species is
usually great, some species of insects and bacteria
have undergone significant change in just a few years.


Observe local fossils by having students bring in
samples, or going on a local field trip to collect
samples.
Interpret local fossils to hypothesize what the local
environment consisted of. Summarize findings and
data.
Ex. Use an oral presentation rubric to
evaluate content of presentation and oral
presentation skills.
Research report on the worldwide decline of
amphibians. Pose possible solutions and provide
support for solutions.
Ex. Assess reports using a constructing
support rubric that evaluates content and
ability to provide support. (See Dimensions
of Learning manual for information on
“constructing support”.)
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
5
Standard 4:
Key Idea 4:
Background:
Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and
recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
The continuity of life is sustained through reproduction and development.
The survival of a species depends on the ability of a living organism to produce offspring. Living things go through a life cycle involving both reproductive and developmental stages.
Development follows an orderly sequence of events.
Guiding Questions:
What changes occur in the structure of a frog during the stages of metamorphosis and how does each structure aid in survival in that environment?
How does it compare to human development?
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
6
Standard 4: Key Idea 4: Performance Indicator 4:3 Observe and describe developmental patterns in selected plants and animals (e.g., insects, frogs,
humans, seed-bearing plants).
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
7
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
4.3d Patterns of development vary among animals. In some
species the young resemble the adult, while in others
they do not. Some insects and amphibians undergo
metamorphosis as they mature.


Classroom Ideas
Students observe and record the life cycle of meal
worms.
Compare and contrast the meal worm life cycle with
other life cycles (ex. monarch butterfly).
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Ex. Assess the recordings of the
mealworm life cycle for accuracy.
4.3e Patterns of development vary among plants. In seedbearing plants, seeds contain stored food for early
development. Their later development into adulthood is
characterized by varying patterns of growth from
species to species.

Students germinate a variety of seeds and observe
their growth at regular intervals and record in
science journals. Have students devise experiments
introducing new variables that may affect plant
growth. Hypothesize on the possible effects, record
results, and draw conclusions.
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
8
Standard 4: Key Idea 4: Performance Indicator 4.4: Observe and describe cell division at the microscopic level and its macroscopic effects.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
4.4a In multicellular organisms, cell division is responsible
for growth, maintenance, and repair. In some onecelled organisms, cell division is a method of asexual
reproduction.
Classroom Ideas



Observe and record models of frog-egg development.
Diagram and label the steps in cell division.
Have students comparing cell division to something
they are familiar with to create metaphors.
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Ex. Assess diagrams for accuracy and
inclusiveness of information.
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
9
Standard 4:
Key Idea 5:
Background:
Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment
and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
Organisms maintain a dynamic equilibrium that sustains life.
All organisms must be able to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment.
Organisms respond to internal or environmental stimuli.
Guiding Questions:
How do plants respond to their environment?
How do warm and cold-blooded animals maintain equilibrium?
What are the main components of a food web?
How does energy flow through an ecosystem?
How can you test to identify substances in food?
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
10
Standard 4: Key Idea 5: Performance Indicator 5.1: Compare the way a variety of living specimens carry out basic life functions and maintain dynamic
equilibrium.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
5.1a Animals and plants have a great variety of body plans
and internal structures that contribute to their ability
to maintain a balanced condition.
5.1d The methods for obtaining nutrients vary among
organisms. Producers, such as green plants, use light
energy to make their food, consumers, such as animals,
take in energy-rich foods.
Classroom Ideas



Use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast
animals from different environments. Summarize.
Create a mural of a rain forest and display the flow of
energy through the ecosystem. Examine other regions
also.
Use graphic organizers to organize information and
relationships between herbivores, carnivores and
omnivores. Pictorially represent these relationships.

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Ex. Assess summaries for accuracy and
meaningfulness of comparisons.
5.1e Herbivores obtain energy from plants. Carnivores obtain
energy from animals. Omnivores obtain energy from
both plants and animals. Decomposers, such a bacteria
and fungi, obtain energy by consuming wastes and /or
dead organisms.
5.1g The survival of an organism depends on its ability to
sense and respond to its external environment.
Assessment Ideas
Ex. Review pictorial representations for
accuracy of information.

Plant and Animal Response kits from BOCES
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
11
Standard 4: Key Idea 5: Performance Indicator 5.2: Describe the importance of major nutrients, vitamins, and minerals in maintaining health and
promoting growth, and explain the need for a constant input of energy for living organisms.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
5.2a Food provides molecules that serve as fuel and
building material for all organisms. All living things,
including plants, must release energy from their
food, using it to carry on their life processes.
5.2b Foods contain a variety of substances, which include
carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, proteins, minerals, and
water. Each substance is vital to the survival of the
organism.
Classroom Ideas


Use nutrition information from food labels to compare
the health risk or benefit from certain types of diets.
Create a healthy menu for a day using local grocery
store flyers.
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
12
Standard 4:
Key Idea 6:
Background:
Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and
recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
Plants and animals depend on each other and their physical environment.
An environmentally aware citizen should have an understanding of the natural world. All organisms interact with one another and are dependent upon their physical environment. Energy and matter flow from
one organism to another. Matter is recycled in ecosystems. Energy enters ecosystems as sunlight, and is eventually lost to the environment, mostly as heat.
Guiding Questions:
How are plants and animals dependent upon each other?
What is the relationship between living things and their physical environment?
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
13
Standard 4: Key Idea 6: Performance Indicator 6.2: Provide evidence that green plants make food and explain the significance of this process to other
organisms.
Essential Knowledge/Skills
(Major Understandings)
6.2a Photosynthesis is carried on by green plants and some
other organisms. In this process, the Sun’s energy is
converted into and stored as chemical energy is the
form of sugar. The quantity of sugar molecules
increases in green plants during photosynthesis in the
presence of sunlight.
6.2b The major source of atmospheric oxygen is
photosynthesis. Carbon dioxide is removed from the
atmosphere and oxygen is released during
photosynthesis.
Classroom Ideas




6.2c Green plants are the producers of food which is used
directly or indirectly by consumers.


Plants in classroom to demonstrate leaves and stems
grow toward light. Observe what happens when
rotated.
Demonstration-Use 2 leaves from a geranium, 1 that
has been in darkness for several days and 1 that has
been in sunlight for several days. Heat each leaf in a
beaker of water then place each leaf in a beaker of
alcohol. Heat the beaker of alcohol in a water bath.
Remove each and add iodine, which indicates the
presence of starch. The leaf in the sunlight will turn
blue-black.
Activity “What are Some of the Materials Needed
for Photosynthesis” Heath Life Science pg.134
Demonstration-Plants Give Off Oxygen-Use stem of
Elodea placed in a test tube filled with water. Allow
gas bubbles to collect. Place a glowing wood splint
into the test tube. It will flame in the presence of
oxygen.
Diagram information collected to illustrate the cycle
of photosynthesis.
Give students a picture of a mouse, a plant and water
in a sealed container. Explain that at the Toronto
Museum of Science this mouse lived for 180 days.
Have students provide an explanation of how this
could have happened.
Assessment Ideas

Teacher observations

Student responses

Journal entries

Student demonstrations

Lab reports/summaries

Teacher-developed and studentdeveloped rubrics for performance
tasks and projects
Time/Notes
Ex. Review photosynthesis diagrams for
accuracy.
Ex. Assess students’ museum mouse
explanations for reasoning and inclusion
of meaningful ideas.
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
14
Resource
Title
Materials
Source
*
Center for Instructional Support materials
available at 361-5660.
Title
Source
“Heart-Lungs” – Madison-Oneida BOCES
CIS - VHS #20562
“Survivors From the Past: Living Fossils”
CIS - VHS #24518
“Hemo the Magnificent”
CIS - VHS# 20357
“Food Web/Ocean Life”
CIS - VHS #24452
Hooked on Science by S. B. Sewall
ISBN #0-87628-404-7
“Discovering Nutrition”
CIS - SRK #41262
“The Cell: Structural Unit of Life” – Madison-Oneida
BOCES
“Cells and What They Do”
CIS - MP # 13002
Dimensions of Learning by Robert Marzano, et. al.
ASCD
1-800-933-2723
“Growth”
CIS - VHS #24050
“Plants and Animals”
CIS - CDR #37124
“Plants”
CIS - VHS #23533
“The Arctic Lands”
CIS - SRK #41005
“Adapting to Changes in Nature”
CIS - VHS #25334
“Seasons in the Woodlands”
CIS - VHS #23201
“Amphibians, Reptiles and Fish”
CIS - SRK #41312
Mammal Kit
CIS - SRK #4133
“A is for AIDS”
CIS - VHS #20351
“Fossils”
CIS - VHS #24038
The Heart (3-D Model)
CIS - SRK #41517
“The Bones & Skeleton”
CIS - SRK #41285
CIS - VHS #22971
Grade 5 Living Environment, Summer 2000
15