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Transcript
DISCLAIMER STATEMENT
Contributions of many individuals and from many written resources have collectively
made this curriculum guide possible. The major authors, however, do not claim or
guarantee that its contents will eliminate acts of malpractice or negligence. The
responsibility to adhere to safety standards and best professional practices is the duty
of the practitioners, teachers, students, and/or others who apply the contents of this
document.
This guide was developed with federal CARL D. PERKINS Career and Technical
Education ACT of 2006 funds.
Career and Technical Education
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
6361 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-6361
The materials in this guide were adapted from the course guide “Marketing
Principles” from the MBA Research and Curriculum Center. Materials may be
reproduced for use in NC Public Schools only.
FOREWORD
This curriculum framework guide, Marketing, was adapted to assist teachers in preparing
students to meet the North Carolina State Board of Education’s Guiding Mission “that every
public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and
postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st century.” The course is rigorous and
relevant, is based on state and national content standards, and engages technology to teach
today’s generation of students. Related business and industry partners have endorsed this
course as one that helps to prepare students for high-skill, high-wage, and/or high-demand
occupational opportunities. This curriculum framework guide was adapted from the course titled
Marketing Principles produced by the MBA Research & Curriculum Center, which is a non-profit
(501(c)3) consortium of state education departments.
In this course students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to
the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the
areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing,
product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of
marketing functions applications and impact on business operations. Mathematics and social
studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative
education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning,
and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for
Marketing Education students) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities
provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through
authentic experiences.
This course content will enhance the core academic areas of reading, writing, and mathematics.
It includes materials and performance assessments that are aligned to the course content.
Formative assessments provide continuous feedback to measure student learning throughout
the course. A companion classroom assessment bank — aligned, valid, and reliable — is
available and provides summative assessments for each essential standard.
We trust these significant efforts will guide North Carolina’s teachers in their mission to
prepare globally competitive students for a successful, 21st-century life.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Many Marketing and Entrepreneurship Educators and business and industry leaders
have given a great deal of time and energy to the development of the blueprint and
content/teaching outline for this course. Without the collaboration of knowledgeable and
committed professionals, it would not be possible to provide current curriculum
materials necessary for effective instruction in Marketing and Entrepreneurship
Education program. The continual advancement of technology and constant changes in
the technology industry make collaboration an essential part of the process of preparing
young people to become competent members of the workforce.
The following teachers participated in and collaborated during the Piloting of this course:
Pilot Teachers
Candace Cashwell-Nash Central High School
Tony Davis-Sun Valley High School
Julie Fox-W.A. Hough High School
Claudia Jenkins-Southern Nash High School
Ruth Wilson-Philips-Charles D. Owen High School
Karen Raliski-Mount Tabor High School
Amy Singletary-North Henderson High School
Project Director
Delores P. Ali, Consultant, Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education
State Staff for Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education
Delores P. Ali, Consultant, Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education
Pam O’Brien-DECA State Adviser
Atkins “Trey” Michael-Curriculum Specialist, CTE
Carol Short-Curriculum Section Chief, CTE
Jo Anne Honeycutt-Director, CTE
Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education
Career and Technical Education
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
6358 Mail Services Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-6358
Table of Contents
Marketing
Marketing Curriculum Guide Cover
State Board of Education (SBE) List
Disclaimer Statement
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Table of Contents
Course Description ................................................................................................. i
Adapted CTE Course Blueprint ............................................................................. ii
Post-assessment Specifications ........................................................................... vi
Equipment Lists and DPI Facilities Guidelines .................................................... vii
Program Area Professional Learning Community (PLC) Moodle...………………viii
Formative Assessment.. ....................................................................................... ix
Internet Policy ...................................................................................................... xi
Going Green: A Guide to Using CTE Curriculum for
Environment Sustainability ....................................................................... xii
Overview of Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO) ................... xiii
Overview of CTSO-Program Area Specific ........................................................ ivx
Integrating CTSO Competitive Events in Classroom Instruction ........................ xvi
MBA Research Curriculum Framework Guide is divided into six sections:
Introduction to Course
Course Philosophy and Goals
Course Descriptions and Learning Outcomes
Course Outline
Planning Guide Sheets
Using Project-Based Learning and Projects
Appendices
COURSE DESCRIPTION
6621 Marketing
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Hours of Instruction:
135 (block) 150 (regular)
Prerequisite:
None
In this course, students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to
the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the
areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing,
product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of
marketing functions applications and impact on business operations. Mathematics and social
studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative
education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning,
and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for
Marketing Education students) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities
provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through
authentic experiences.
The Marketing and Marketing Management courses can help prepare students for credentials:
Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (A*S*K) http://www.askinstitute.org/
Professional Certification http://www.nrffoundation.com
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
i
Career and Technical Education (CTE)
Adapted CTE Course Blueprint
of
Essential Standards and Indicators
Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education
6621 Marketing
Public Schools of North Carolina
State Board of Education  Department of Public Instruction
Academic Services and Instructional Support
Division of Career and Technical Education
Delores P. Ali, Project Director
Raleigh, North Carolina
Summer 2011, Version 2
Contact [email protected] for more information.
Pilot Teachers
Candace Cashwell-Nash Central High School
Tony Davis-Sun Valley High School
Julie Fox-W.A. Hough High School
Claudia Jenkins-Southern Nash High School
Ruth Wilson-Philips-Charles D. Owen High School
Karen Raliski-Mount Tabor High School
Amy Singletary-North Henderson High School
This Adapted CTE Course Blueprint has been reviewed by business and industry
representatives for technical content and appropriateness for the industry.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
iii
Adapted CTE Course Blueprint of Essential Standards
Essential standards are big, powerful ideas that are necessary and essential for students to know to be successful in a
course. Essential standards identify the appropriate verb and cognitive process intended for the student to accomplish.
Essential standards provide value throughout a student’s career, in other courses, and translate to the next level of
education or world of work.
The essential standards use Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) category verbs (remember, understand, apply, analyze,
evaluate, create) that reflect the overall intended cognitive outcome of the indicators. Each essential standard and indicator
reflects the intended level of learning through two dimensions; The Knowledge Dimension is represented with letters A-C,
and the Cognitive Process Dimension by numbers 1-6.
This document will help teachers plan for curriculum delivery for the course, prepare daily lesson plans, and construct valid
formative, benchmark, and summative assessments. Assessment for this course is written at the level of the ESSENTIAL
STANDARD and assesses the intended outcome of the sum of its indicators. Curriculum provider is MBA Research &
Curriculum Center.
For additional information about this blueprint, contact the Division of Career and Technical Education, North Carolina
Department of Public Instruction, 6361 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-6361.
Reference: Anderson, Lorin W. (Ed.), Krathwohl, David R. (Ed.), et al., A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing:
A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Addison Wesley Longman, Inc., New York, 2001.
Interpretation of Columns on the NCDPI Adapted CTE Course Blueprint
No.
1
Heading
Column
information
Essential Std #
Unique course
identifier and
essential standard
number.
2
Unit Titles, Essential
Standards, and Indicators
Statements of unit titles,
essential standards per
unit, and specific
indicators per essential
standard. If applicable,
includes % for each
indicator.
3
Course Weight
Shows the relative
importance of each unit
and essential standard.
Course weight is used to
help determine the
percentage of total class
time to be spent on each
essential standard.
In addition, included are
the assessment
references used by 3rd
party MBA Research and
Curriculum Center, The
assessment references
identify core or
supplemental content.
4
RBT
Designation
Classification of outcome behavior in
essential standards and indicators in
Dimensions according to the Revised
Bloom’s Taxonomy.
Cognitive Process Dimension:
1 Remember
2 Understand
3 Apply
4 Analyze
5 Evaluate
6 Create
Knowledge Dimension:
A Factual Knowledge
B Conceptual Knowledge
C Procedural Knowledge
Career and Technical Education conducts all activities and procedures without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, gender,
or disability. The responsibility to adhere to safety standards and best professional practices is the duty of the practitioners,
teachers, students, and/or others who apply the contents of this document.
Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO) are an integral part of this curriculum. CTSOs are strategies used to teach
course content, develop leadership, citizenship, responsibility, and proficiencies related to workplace needs.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
iv
Adapted CTE Course Blueprint Essential Standards for
6621 MARKETING
(Hours of instruction: 135-180)
Essential Std #
A
1.00
2.00
Units, Essential Standards, and Indicators
(The Learner will be able to:)
Total Course Weight
BUSINESS OF MARKETING, CAREERS IN MARKETING, FOUNDATION OF MARKET
PLANNING, CUSTOMER RELATIONS, AND SELLING
Understand marketing, career opportunities, market planning, and foundation of
marketing-information management.
1.01 Understand marketing’s role and functions in business to facilitate economic
exchanges with customers. (MK:001), (MK:002)
1.02 Understand career opportunities in marketing to make career decisions. (PD:024)
1.03 Read to acquire meaning from written material and to apply the information to a task.
(CO:057) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
1.04 Employ marketing-information to develop a marketing plan. (MP:001), (MP:003)
1.05 Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand
its nature and scope. (IM:012), (IM:184)
1.06 Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain information
effectively. (CO:133) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Understand selling, customer relations and product management.
2.01 Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope.
(SE:017), (SE:076)
2.02 Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image. (CR:004),
(CR:005), (CR:019), (CR:006) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.03 Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope.
(SE:932)
2.04 Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image. (CR:007)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.05 Resolve conflicts with/for customers to encourage repeat business. (CR:009),
(CR:010) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.06 Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings. (PM:019), (PM:020)
2.07 Reinforce company’s image to exhibit the company’s brand promise. (CR:001),
(CR:002)
2.08 Acquire product knowledge to communicate product benefits and to ensure
appropriateness of product for the customer. (SE:062), (SE:109)
2.09 Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships and
to increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:048)
2.10 Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships and to
increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:110), (SE: 111), (SE:114)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.11 Process the sale to complete the exchange. (SE:116)
2.12 Process the sale to complete the exchange. (SE:009), (SE:835) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
Course
Weight
100%
40%
RBT
Designation
15%
B2
4%
3%
0%
4%
4%
0%
25%
4%
B2
0%
3%
0%
0%
4%
4%
4%
3%
0%
3%
0%
iv
B
3.00
4.00
PRODUCT/SERVICE MANAGEMENT, PRICING, CHANNEL MANAGEMENT,
PROMOTION, MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, AND SELLING
Understand product/service management, pricing and channel management.
3.01 Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to understand its
nature and scope. (PM:001), (PM:024), (PM:039), (PM:040)
3.02 Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings. (PM:017)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
3.03 Employ product-mix strategies to meet customer expectations. (PM:003)
3.04 Position products/services to acquire desired business image. (PM:042), (PM:021)
3.05 Position company to acquire desired business image. (PM:206) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
3.06 Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in marketing.
(PI:001), (PI:015), (PI:016), (PI:017), (PI:002)
3.07 Acquire a foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role in
marketing. (CM:001), (CM:002), (CM:003), (CM:004)
3.08 Acquire a foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role in
marketing. (CM:005), (CM:006) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
3.09 Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively. (CO:039) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Understand promotion, marketing-information management, and selling
4.01 Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature and scope.
(PR:001), (PR:002), (PR:003), (PR:099), (PR:100), (PR:101)
4.02 Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted audiences.
(PR:007)
4.03 Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted audiences.
(PR:247), (PR:089) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.04 Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted audiences.
(PR:249), (PR:250)
4.05 Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively. (CO:040) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.06 Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand
its nature and scope. (IM:001)
4.07 Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand
its nature and scope. (IM:025) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.08 Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand
its nature and scope (IM:183)
4.09 Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to understand
its nature and scope (IM:419) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.10 Understand marketing-research activities to show command of their nature and
scope. (IM:010), (IM:282) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.11 Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their
appropriateness for the research problem/issue. (IM:284), (IM:281), (IM:285)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.12 Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue. (IM:289)
4.13 Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue. (IM:418), (IM:286)
4.14 Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope.
(SE:828) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.15 Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope.
(SE:106)
4.16 Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and scope.
(SE:107), (SE:108) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
60%
29%
7%
0%
3%
B2
4%
0%
9%
6%
0%
0%
31%
10%
B2
3%
0%
3%
0%
3%
0%
3%
0%
0%
0%
3%
3%
0%
3%
0%
v
POST-ASSESSMENT SPECIFICATIONS
The post-assessment will be administered through the Elements Instructional
Management System using a third party assessment provided by the MBA Research
and Curriculum Center. The post-assessment will be a 100-item multiple choice test.
The post-assessment will assess students’ knowledge and skills of the content at the
essential standard level as specified on the adapted blueprint.
Background Information on Essential Standards
Essential standards are big, powerful ideas that are necessary and essential for
students to know to be successful in a course. Essential standards identify the
appropriate verb and cognitive process intended for the student to accomplish.
Essential standards provide value throughout a student’s career, in other courses, and
translate to the next level of education or world of work.
Assessment for courses developed using the adapted CTE course blueprint is written at
the level of the essential standard using one RBT category verb (remember,
understand, apply, analyze, evaluate) that reflects the intended outcome of the sum of
its indicators. For example, the indicators copied from an industry credential for an
essential standard may use an immeasurable verb or may use a verb that is misaligned
with the true intent of the indicator. Those verbs would still be used, since they are
derived from the credential, but the assessment items would not necessarily reflect the
definition of that verb. However, NC CTE will review the items and ensure alignment
cognitively at the essential standard level.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
vi
EQUIPMENT LIST, TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS, and FACILITIES GUIDELINES
Access the equipment list, technical requirements, and facilities guidelines using the
following links:
Equipment list
http://ctpnc.org/cte/equipment/
Technical requirements
http://bit.ly/KwN1Lv
Facilities guidelines
http://www.schoolclearinghouse.org
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
vii
COURSE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY (PLC) MOODLE
Please join the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education Moodle PLC by
following these steps:
1. Obtain the Enrollment Key supplied by your local CTE Director or Administrator
or from the Program Area Consultant. Program Area Consultants may be
reached by email at: [email protected] .
2. Create a LearnNC account by going to this website:
http://accounts.learnnc.org
 Click on Create an Account (if you have used Moodle in the past, you can
use your existing username and password).
 You pick your own username and password.
 Enter your email address so that your username and password can be
emailed to you.
3. Join the Moodle Class by going to Moodle's website: http://moodle.learnnc.org
 Login using your username and password.
 In the upper left corner, click on All Courses.
 Click on DPI under the PLC tab.
 Click on the course PLC key.
 Enter the Enrollment Key supplied by your local CTE Director or
Administrator or from the Program Area Consultant. The Program Area
Consultant may be reached by email at: [email protected]
 Click on Enroll me in this Course
Teachers are encouraged to share ideas and activities in the course PLC and to
participate in the discussion forums provided for each essential standard.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
viii
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Frequently Asked Questions
Formative Assessment and North Carolina’s Formative Assessment Learning
Community’s Online Network (NC FALCON)
1. What is formative assessment?
Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that
provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve intended instructional
outcomes (CCSSO FAST SCASS, 2006).
2. What is the primary purpose of the formative assessment process?
The primary purpose of the formative assessment process is to provide evidence that is used by
teachers and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process.
How does formative assessment fit into North Carolina’s next generation
assessment system?
North Carolina’s next generation, comprehensive, balanced assessment system includes
formative assessment, interim/benchmark assessments, and summative assessments that are
aligned to state standards. Formative assessment is an essential component of this system
because it forms the foundation of teaching and learning. In contrast to summative assessment,
formative assessment is more focused on collaboration in the classroom and identifying learning
gaps that can be addressed before end-of-year assessments. Formative assessment should
occur in the classroom more often than any other assessment.
3.
4. Are there “formative tests”?
The definition that North Carolina has adopted defines formative assessment as a process. With
this in mind, there is no such thing as a “formative test.” Formative assessment is regarded as
an ongoing process rather than a particular kind of test.
5.
What formative assessment strategies can be implemented during classroom
instruction?
There are a number of formative assessment strategies that can be implemented during
classroom instruction. These range from informal observations and conversations to
purposefully planned instructionally embedded techniques designed to elicit evidence of student
learning to inform and adjust instruction. See the Collecting and Documenting Evidence
professional development module on North Carolina’s Formative Assessment Learning
Community’s Online Network (NC FALCON) for additional information on formative assessment
strategies.
6.
What resources are available to educators that will provide them with a basic
understanding of formative assessment and illustrate the role it may play in a
comprehensive, balanced assessment system?
The online professional development series modules located on NC FALCON are intended to
serve as a primer for teachers wishing to learn more about how formative assessment can
impact their instruction and help their students achieve targeted learning goals.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
ix
7. What professional development modules are available to educators on NC FALCON?
There are currently five different formative assessment modules in the online professional
development series located on NC FALCON. The following is a list and description of the
modules:
 Importance of Formative Assessment––An introduction to formative assessment and
its role in North Carolina’s 21st century balanced assessment system.
 Learning Targets and Criteria for Success––An exercise in writing clear learning
targets and defining criteria for success to help students answer the question, Where am
I going?
 Collecting and Documenting Evidence––An exercise in collecting and documenting
evidence of learning to help students answer the question, Where am I now?
 Analyzing Evidence and Descriptive Feedback––An exercise in analyzing evidence
and providing descriptive feedback to help students answer the question, How do I close
the gap?
 Administrator’s Role in Formative Assessment––An exploration of the
administrator’s role in formative assessment, as outlined by the North Carolina
Standards for School Executives, and its implementation in the school or district.
8. How much time does it take to complete the modules?
The modules and the activities contained within each module have been created so that the
series can be completed in approximately seven hours. Approximately forty-five minutes to one
hour of computer time is needed for each module. The modules are self-paced; therefore,
individual participants control the pace and location of their learning.
9.
Is it better to complete the modules individually or with a school or district learning
team?
The modules have been designed so that they can be used by individual educators working
independently or with a school or district learning team. The NCDPI recommends participants
work collaboratively in learning teams. Working together, teachers may assist one another as
they complete the modules and practice their formative assessment skills.
10. Is CEU credit available for participants who complete any or all of the NC FALCON
modules?
At the completion of each module, participants will be able to print a certificate of completion
which includes a recommendation for renewal credit or continuing education units (CEUs). Final
awarding of CEUs must be approved by the local education agency (LEA). The LEA determines
the content area and the number of CEUs granted.
11. How do educators access the modules on NC FALCON?
NC FALCON is located at http://center.ncsu.edu/falcon/. For more information about login and
password access, please visit the website or contact your LEA/school test coordinator.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
x
INTERNET POLICY
Career and Technical Education curricula and 21st Century Skills require students to
use many technologies, including the Internet. Each school should have an Internet use
policy, and all students should sign the school Internet policy prior to beginning any
class that uses such technologies. Students who violate the school’s Internet policy
must be held accountable for his/her actions and face appropriate consequences
deemed necessary by the school in accordance with the school’s policies.
Teachers must use extreme caution when assigning Internet activities to students.
Teachers must preview sites, which can change daily, prior to ANY activity. If the
teacher determines a website used in an activity is inappropriate, or students are not
mature enough to behave properly and according to the school’s Internet policy, the
teacher should make alternate arrangements for completing the activity.
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
xi
GOING GREEN: A GUIDE TO USING CTE CURRICULUM
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
Many of the Instructional Support Materials (ISMs) are developed to help students
organize and use the unpacked content relative to the designated Revised Bloom’s
Taxonomy (RBT) verb. These are designed to help students study and retain relevant
information.
Ideally, each ISM would be duplicated and handed to students in class. Realistically,
teachers may have to find alternative approaches for implementing the ISMs in the
classroom.
Teachers may have to “show” what each ISM looks like and rely on students drawing
each in either a journal or on paper that is accumulated in a notebook.
Consider these alternative approaches for using the Instructional Support Materials in
the classroom:
 Draw the ISM on the board.
 Duplicate the ISM and hand out one per group and collect at the end of class for
use in another. To add longevity, consider laminating or using sleeve protectors
for each ISM.
 Laminate and have students use dry-erase marker pens if they need to write on
the ISM. An alternative would be to place the ISM in a sleeve protector and have
the students use dry-erase marker pens.
 Prepare a transparency of the ISM and show it on an overhead projector.
 Display the file in electronic form (PowerPoint or Word) through a digital
projector.
 Display the file in electronic form on an interactive whiteboard.
 Display the file in electronic form via a document camera and digital projector.
 Deliver the file electronically via an internal network, Blackboard, Moodle, or
secure website. This would provide added benefit to homebound and absent
students needing to make up work.
Other helpful conservation hints…
 Always use both sides of the paper!!
 If a student needs to redo an assignment, whenever possible, have the student
use a different color pen or pencil and work on the same paper.
We hope these ideas will help conserve paper and other valuable resources!
6621 Marketing
Summer 2011, Version 2
xii
OVERVIEW OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS (CTSO)
Introduction
Career and Technical Student Organizations provide the opportunity for students to connect to business
and industry professionals and career options. Additionally, CTSOs motivate students to higher level
academic achievement and build interpersonal and employability skills. CTSOs are co-curricular,
meaning they complement the state curricula in the classroom and incorporate realistic educational
experiences not available through classroom instruction alone. Teachers must coordinate with local CTE
directors to enhance the delivery of state curricula through CTSO activities. Through this coordinated
effort, teachers improve student achievement on state and national Career and Technical Education
(CTE) accountability measures. The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 allows
CTE directors to fund certain CTSO activities as identified in the 2009 NC CTE Fiscal and Policy Guide.
What are CTSOs?
The three components of a quality Career and Technical Education program include classroom
instruction, workforce readiness and on-the-job training, and Career and Technical Student
Organizations. CTSOs have been a part of Career and Technical Education since the passage of the
Smith-Hughes Act of 1917. CTSOs are found in middle and high schools and post-secondary institutions
throughout the nation and around the world. It is important to realize that CTSOs are not just “clubs”, but
instructional tools that work best when integrated into the curricula. CTSOs:
 Support and enhance related school-based and work-based learning,

Provide students with skills and knowledge to succeed in the new global economy,

Provide career exploration and competence,

Provide students with the opportunity to experience competition related to classroom instruction,

Encourage students to experience community service projects, and

Provide and enhance the development of leadership skills in students.
Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Defined
“The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-270) is the vehicle
through which federal support is distributed to states, local school districts, and postsecondary institutions
to develop more fully the academic and technical skills of secondary and postsecondary students who
elect to enroll in career and technical educations programs.” (Source: CTSO Guide to accessing Federal
Perkins Funds, 2008)
What are the benefits of CTSOs?

Develop meaningful business partnerships

Develop school and community leaders

Enable students to achieve high academic and occupational standards

Enhance student self-esteem and self-confidence

Help students to integrate contextual and academic learning

Link school-based learning to the real world of work and family

Motivate youth to become better students and productive citizens
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Mission Statement
The mission of NC DECA is to enhance the co-curricular education of students who have an interest in
marketing, management, and entrepreneurship. DECA seeks to help students develop skills and
competence for entrepreneurial, finance, hospitality, management, and marketing careers, build selfesteem, experience leadership, and participate in community service. DECA is committed to the
advocacy and the growth of business and education partnerships.
What is NC DECA?
North Carolina DECA is the premiere student marketing association. NC DECA is a Career and
Technical Student Organization that serves students who are either currently enrolled or have
successfully completed at least one Marketing Education course. NC DECA is affiliated with the national
organization, DECA, Inc. DECA chapters operate in over 4,000 high schools across the U.S., Puerto
Rico, Guam and territories, Mexico, Germany and Canada, with over 180,000 members.
 DECA programs are co-curricular, meaning programs complement nationally recognized curriculum
standards in the classroom and incorporate real-world educational experiences not available through
classroom instruction alone.
 The high school division of DECA, Inc. is recognized and endorsed by all 50 State Departments of
Education and the U.S. Department of Education.
 The principles guiding DECA programs are curriculum related career skills, workplace experiences,
community service and the development of business leadership capabilities.
DECA as an Integral Part of the Marketing Education Program
The three major components of a Marketing Education program include:
 Marketing curriculum
 Work-based learning experiences
 DECA activities
DECA is co-curricular and its activities can be used as teaching tools or to reinforce skills. Integrating
DECA into the Marketing Education curriculum can be achieved successfully in many ways for meaningful
learning experiences.
DECA Student Membership Benefits
 DECA supports students define college and career goals and emphasizes the relevance of
academic studies.
 DECA promotes free enterprise and entrepreneurship and connects the importance of lifelong
learning with success.
 DECA directly serves Marketing Education students.
 DECA develops leadership skills by offering extensive training opportunities.
 DECA offers state, national, and international recognition through competition in 38 occupational
areas.
 DECA, Inc. awards more than $250,000 in scholarships each year.
 DECA’s student membership is a reflection of the nation’s student population.
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DECA Benefits from Business and Industry Participation
 A 60-member National Advisory Board provides financial resources and active personnel support.
 Thousands of business leaders support local DECA chapters as employers, guest speakers,
competitive event judges, and sponsors.
 Business leaders serve on local advisory committees.
 Business involvement aids local, state, and international members.
Competitive Events
DECA offers a comprehensive program of competitive events based on the occupational goals of its
student membership and on the activities of chapters in high schools and postsecondary institutions.
Competitive events offered by DECA Inc. are replicated at the state or provincial association level as well
as at the chapter level.
Purposes of DECA Competitive Events
 Contribute to the development of skills necessary for careers in marketing, management, and
entrepreneurship
 Evaluate student achievement of the skills through careful measurement devices (performance
indicators)
 Provide opportunities for student and team recognition
 Provide constructive avenues for individual or team expression, initiative, and creativity
 Motivate students to assume responsibility for self-improvement and self-discipline
 Provide a vehicle for students to demonstrate (via performance indicators) their acquired skills
through individual or team activities
 Assist students in acquiring a realistic self-concept through individual or team activities
 Help students participate in an environment of cooperation and competition
 Provide visibility for the educational goals and objectives of Marketing Education
DECA Websites
The North Carolina DECA website:
The National DECA website:
www.ncdeca.org
www.deca.org
Links to Specific Resources
 http://www.deca.org/membershipprocessing.html
 This walks you through the online membership submission process and provides needed
background information.
 http://www.deca.org/pdf/FAQs.pdf
 This provides answers to common registration questions.
 http://www.deca.org/celisting.html
 Complete, up-to-date event guidelines.
 This includes a list of all of the competitive events and the guidelines for undertaking them.
 Sample exams (Only 10 questions for a representative sample of the exam. The actual exams
have 100 questions.)
 Sample role-plays for each role-play event.
 Abbreviated versions of winning written event manuals.
 http://www.schoolbasedenterprises.org
 Certification, best practices and help for school-based businesses to provide students real-world
experience.
 www.deca.org/q&a.html
 Down-to-earth answers for down-to-earth questions.
 http://www.deca.org/advcornerresources.html
 http://www.deca.org/pdf/calendar.pdf
 Click on a topic to go to that page of calendar material.
 http://www.deca.org/pdf/DECAChapterManagement.pdf
 Provides basic background information for most aspects of running a chapter.
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INTEGRATING CTSO COMPETITIVE EVENTS
IN CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION
Co-curricular methodology of integrating curriculum and CTSO competitive events increases
opportunities for student achievement. DECA, the CTSO for Marketing Education students,
the comprehensive competitive events framework is aligned with the course adapted
blueprint indicators and curriculum framework guide performance elements and performance
indicators.
Teachers may facilitate competitive events with their students in the co-curricular classroom.
For example, if a student is planning to compete in the Principles of Business Management
and Administration (PBM) event, the teacher and student may want to become familiar with
the guidelines, performance elements (adapted blueprint indicators), and performance
indicators for the PBM event.
Competitive event guidelines and performance indicators (performance elements listed within
selected event document), sample exams, and sample events are available at
http://www.deca.org/competitions/highschool/ . A document titled Connecting DECA’s
Competitive Events to Curriculum that entails the comprehensive competitive events
framework and curricular structure is available at http://www.deca.org/_docs/college-careerready-attachments/EventstoCurriculum.pdfs .
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Marketing
MBA Research and Curriculum Center:
Marketing Principles
A curriculum development project developed and produced by
the MBA Research and Curriculum Center
©2012
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Table of Contents
Section
Page
1 — Introduction to Marketing Principles .......................................................... 1—01
Description of Marketing Principles .................................................................... 1—02
Premises of the Curriculum ................................................................................ 1—02
Business Administration Curriculum .................................................................. 1—03
Business Administration Core ............................................................................ 1—03
Cluster Core ....................................................................................................... 1—03
Pathways ............................................................................................................ 1—03
Specialties .......................................................................................................... 1—03
Curricular Organization ...................................................................................... 1—04
Knowledge and Skill Statements........................................................................ 1—04
Marketing Core ................................................................................................... 1—04
Performance Elements ....................................................................................... 1—05
Performance Indicators ...................................................................................... 1—06
Curriculum Planning Levels ............................................................................... 1—07
Curriculum Frameworks ..................................................................................... 1—07
2 — Course Philosophy, Purpose, and Goals .................................................. 2—01
Philosophy .......................................................................................................... 2—02
Student Organization ......................................................................................... 2—02
Purpose .............................................................................................................. 2—02
Goals .................................................................................................................. 2—02
3 — Course Description and Learning Outcomes ............................................. 3—01
Course .................................................................................................. 3—02
Credit ............................................................................................. 3—02
Suggested Grade Level ...................................................................... 3—02
Prerequisites .................................................................................... 3—02
Admission Requirements .................................................................... 3—02
Student Characteristics ....................................................................... 3—02
Description ...................................................................................... 3—02
Instructional Strategies ....................................................................... 3—02
Standards of Completion ..................................................................... 3—02
Learning Outcomes ........................................................................... 3—03
4 — Course Outline ......................................................................................... 4—01
Introduction ...................................................................................... 4—02
Student Ability Level .......................................................................... 4—02
Instructional Time .............................................................................. 4—02
Career-Technical Student Organization .................................................. 4—02
Course Outline ................................................................................. 4—03
Table of Contents (cont’d)
Section
Page
5 —Planning Guide Sheets .............................................................................. 5—01
6 — Using Project-Based Learning and Projects ............................................. 6—01
Overview ........................................................................................ 6—02
Resources ....................................................................................... 6—02
Introduction to Projects ....................................................................... 6—08
Project 1: Don’t Be Such an Oxymoron .................................................. 6—09
Project 2: Tick Tock, Tech Talk............................................................. 6—26
Project 3: Mascot Mystery ................................................................... 6—31
Appendix A: SCANS Competencies and Skills ............................................. A—01
Appendix B: 21st Century Skills ..................................................................... B—01
Appendix C: Sample Semester Exams for Marketing Principles.................... C—01
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Section 1
Section 1
Description of
Marketing
Principles
Introduction to Marketing Principles
“Marketing” is defined and used differently by individuals and
organizations. Some use it to mean exclusively “advertising/promotion,”
while others focus on its research aspect. Others include a mix of
activities that address product, place, price, and promotion
considerations.
The American Marketing Association redefined marketing in 2004 to
mean “an organizational function and a set of processes for creating,
communicating, and delivering value to customers and for managing
customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its
stakeholders.” At the end of 2007, the American Marketing Association
updated its marketing definition to “the activity, set of institutions, and
processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging
offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at
large.”
The United Kingdom’s Chartered Marketing Institute, the largest
marketing organization in the world in terms of membership, defines
marketing as the “management process of anticipating, identifying and
satisfying customer requirements profitably.” These definitions indicate
that marketing is a process that involves a variety of activities focused
on customers and profitable execution of those activities, including, but
not limited to, marketing research, promotion, pricing, product/service
management, channel management, and selling.
Marketing, therefore, is a multi-faceted, critical business function that is
under-girded by such social sciences as economics, psychology, and
sociology. Its successful performance depends on the application of
mathematics and English principles, the use of scientific problem
solving, and the application of technology to marketing situations and
problems.
The pace at which marketing activities are changing has accelerated
due to environmental shifts taking place in the business world:
downsizing, outsourcing, off-shoring, mergers, global competition, world
markets, and technological innovations. These changes impact the
skills, attitudes, and abilities needed for success in today’s workplace.
Effective Marketing Education provides those skills.
To that end, the Marketing Principles course has been developed to
introduce students to marketing functions and their application and
impact on business operations.
Premises
of the
Curriculum
The Marketing Principles curriculum should:
 Encourage students to think critically about the business world
 Stress the integration of and articulation with academics such as
language arts, mathematics, and social studies
 Provide a foundation to support advanced study in business
 Enable students to acquire broad understandings of and skills in
marketing
 Enable students to understand and use technology to perform
classroom activities
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 1-2
Section 1
Introduction to Marketing Principles
 Stress the importance of interpersonal skills in diverse societies
 Foster a realistic understanding of the business environment in which
marketing activities are performed
 Foster an understanding and appreciation of business ethics
 Utilize a variety of types of interactions with the business community
Business
Administration
Curriculum
Business
Administration
Core
Cluster Core
Pathways
Specialties
The business administration curricular structure consists of four tiers of
specificity: Business Administration Core, Cluster Core, Pathways, and
Specialties. The content of the broad-based Business Administration
Core is fundamental to an understanding of business and can be viewed
as co-requisites and as prerequisites for the Marketing Principles
course.
The content of the Business Administration Core should be mastered in
order for cluster-specific content to have relevance to student learning.
There are 13 Business Administration instructional areas: Business Law,
Communications, Customer Relations, Economics, Emotional
Intelligence, Entrepreneurship, Financial Analysis, Human-Resources
Management, Information Management, Marketing, Operations,
Professional Development, and Strategic Management.
The Cluster Core tier represents the skills and knowledge that were
identified as common across the Pathways in a cluster. For example, the
Finance Cluster Core is composed of seven instructional areas:
Compliance, Customer Relations, Financial Analysis, FinancialInformation Management, Product/Service Management, Professional
Development, and Risk Management.
The Pathways tier addresses the content of a variety of broad-based
occupational opportunities within a cluster. In the Finance Cluster, for
example, the skills and knowledge that are common across jobs in
banking services appear in the Banking Services Pathway.
The fourth tier, Specialties, focuses on specific job opportunities that are
tied to a pathway. The job opportunities identified in the Specialties
require knowledge and skills unique to a product or service. In
Marketing, for example, Specialties for the Professional Selling Pathway
include pharmaceutical sales, advertising sales, heavy-equipment sales,
and medical-equipment sales.
Thus, the business administration curriculum can be viewed as a
continuum that begins in the primary grades with career awareness and
exploration and continues through postsecondary education with the
emphasis becoming more specialized to the learner’s individual interest
in business administration. The graph depicting the relationship among
the four tiers is shown in Figure 1.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 1-3
Section 1
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Figure 1. Relationship of Tiers
Curricular
Organization
Knowledge
and Skill
Statements
Within each tier, the curricular content has been organized into
Knowledge and Skill Statements, Performance Elements, and
Performance Indicators. The Knowledge and Skill Statements are
broad-based content standards. They identify what students should
know and be able to do as a result of instruction in any of the businessrelated clusters. These statements encapsulate the overarching
intent/purpose of a work function. The Knowledge and Skill Statements
identified for the Business Administration Core are:
Business Law: Understands business’s responsibility to know,
abide by, and enforce laws and regulations that affect business
operations and transactions
Communication Skills: Understands the concepts, strategies, and
systems used to obtain and convey ideas and information
Customer Relations: Understands the techniques and strategies
used to foster positive, ongoing relationships with customers
Economics: Understands the economic principles and concepts
fundamental to business operations
Emotional Intelligence: Understands techniques, strategies, and
systems used to foster self-understanding and enhance
relationships with others
Entrepreneurship: Understands the concepts, processes, and
skills associated with identifying new ideas, opportunities, and
methods and with creating or starting a new project or venture
Financial Analysis: Understands tools, strategies, and systems
used to maintain, monitor, control, and plan the use of financial
resources
Human Resource Management: Understands the tools,
techniques, and systems that businesses use to plan, staff, lead,
and organize human resources
Information Management: Understands tools, strategies, and
systems needed to access, process, maintain, evaluate, and
disseminate information to assist business decision-making
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 1-4
Section 1
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Page 1-5
Marketing: Understands the tools, techniques, and systems that
businesses use to create exchanges and satisfy organizational
objectives
Operations: Understands the processes and systems implemented
to monitor, plan, and control the day-to-day activities required for
continued business functioning
Professional Development: Understands concepts, tools, and
strategies used to explore, obtain, and develop in a business career
Strategic Management: Understands tools, techniques, and
systems that affect a business’s ability to plan, control, and
organize an organization/department
Marketing
Core
The second tier of specificity represented those skills and knowledge
that were identified as common across the five marketing pathways. The
instructional areas addressed in this tier include Channel Management,
Marketing-Information Management, Market Planning, Pricing,
Product/Service Management, Promotion, and Selling. The Knowledge
and Skill Statements identified for the Marketing Core are:
Channel Management: Understands the concepts and processes
needed to identify, select, monitor, and evaluate sales channels
Marketing-Information Management: Understands the concepts,
systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate,
and disseminate information for use in making business decisions
Market Planning: Understands the concepts and strategies utilized
to determine and target marketing strategies to a select audience
Pricing: Understands concepts and strategies utilized in
determining and adjusting prices to maximize return and meet
customers’ perceptions of value
Product/Service Management: Understands the concepts and
processes needed to obtain, develop, maintain, and improve a
product or service mix in response to market opportunities
Promotion: Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or
ideas to achieve a desired outcome
Selling: Understands the concepts and actions needed to
determine client needs and wants and respond through planned,
personalized communication that influences purchase decisions
and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Elements
Each Knowledge and Skill Statement is composed of multiple Performance
Elements. These statements are broad-based work or cognitive performances that
aid in defining the Knowledge and Skill Statements. The Performance Elements
addressed in this course are:
Communication Skills
Read to acquire meaning from written material and to apply the information to
a task.
Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.
Customer Relations
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Resolve conflicts with/for customers to encourage repeat business.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 1
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Page 1-6
Reinforce company’s image to exhibit the company’s brand promise.
Marketing
Understand marketing’s role and function in business to facilitate economic
exchanges with customers.
Professional Development
Understand career opportunities in marketing to make career decisions.
Channel Management
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Marketing-Information Management
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Understand marketing-research activities to show command of their nature and
scope.
Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their
appropriateness for the research problem/issue.
Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue.
Interpret marketing information to test hypotheses and/or to resolve issues.
Market Planning
Develop marketing strategies to guide marketing tactics.
Select target market appropriate for product/business to obtain the best return
on marketing investment (ROMI).
Pricing
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in
marketing.
Product/Service Management
Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to
understand its nature and scope.
Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings.
Employ product-mix strategies to meet customer expectations.
Position products/services to acquire desired business image.
Promotion
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature and
scope.
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Selling
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Acquire product knowledge to communicate product benefits and to ensure
appropriateness of product for the customer.
Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer
relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Process the sale to complete the exchange.
Performance
Indicators
Performance Elements are defined through Performance Indicators that
are specific work-based actions—either knowledge or skills. They
specify what an individual worker must know or be able to do to achieve
the Performance Elements. For example, the Performance Indicators for
Market Planning’s Performance Element—Employ marketinginformation to develop a marketing plan—are:
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 1
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Explain the concept of marketing strategies (MP:001, MP LAP 2)
(CS)
Identify considerations in implementing global marketing strategies
(MP:002) (MN)
Explain the concept of market and market identification (MP:003,
MP LAP 3) (CS)
Identify market segments (MP:004) (MN)
Select target market (MP:005) (MN)
Explain the nature of marketing planning (MP:006) (SP)
Explain the nature of marketing plans (MP:007) (SP)
Explain the role of situational analysis in the marketing planning
process (MP:008) (SP)
Conduct market analysis (market size, area, potential, etc.)
(MP:009) (MN)
Conduct SWOT analysis for use in the marketing planning process
(MP:010) (MN)
Assess global trends and opportunities (MP:011) (MN)
Conduct competitive analysis (MP:012) (MN)
Explain the nature of sales forecasts (MP:013, IM LAP 3) (SP)
Forecast sales for marketing plan (MP:014) (MN)
Set marketing goals and objectives (MP:015) (MN)
Select marketing metrics (MP:016) (MN)
Set marketing budget (MP:017) (MN)
Develop marketing plan (MP:018) (MN)
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 1-7
Section 1
Curriculum
Planning
Levels
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Page 1-8
Each performance indicator is assigned to one of six curriculum-planning levels
that represent a continuum of instruction ranging from simple to complex. The
levels can serve as building blocks for curriculum development in that students
should know and be able to perform the performance indicators at one level before
tackling more complex skills and knowledge at the next level. The levels can also
be used as the basis for developing an unduplicated sequence of instruction for
articulation between high school and postsecondary business courses. In these
cases, instructors can agree as to how far along the continuum students will
advance in high school so that postsecondary instructors can initiate instruction at
that point in the continuum. This will enable students to focus on new, more
advanced subject matter rather than on content previously mastered. The
curriculum-planning level for each performance indicator is referenced on the
planning guide sheets found in Section 5. The six curriculum-planning levels are
described as follows:
Prerequisite
(PQ)
Content develops employability and job-survival skills and concepts, including work
ethics, personal appearance, and general business behavior.
CareerSustaining
(CS)
Content develops skills and knowledge needed for continued employment in or
study of business based on the application of basic academics and business skills.
Specialist
(SP)
Content provides in-depth, solid understanding and skill development in all
business functions.
Supervisor
(SU)
Content provides the same in-depth, solid understanding and skill development in
all business functions as in the specialist curriculum, and in addition, incorporates
content that addresses the supervision of people.
Manager (MN)
Content develops strategic decision-making skills in all business functions needed
to manage a business or department within an organization.
Owner (ON)
Content develops strategic decision-making skills in all aspects of business that
are needed to own and operate a business.
Curriculum
Frameworks
In general, a framework is a skeleton structure that supports or encloses something. In education, frameworks are used to support and enclose the curriculum of
a discipline by defining the discipline’s main elements, thereby providing a big
picture overview of the discipline’s curriculum. They can act as gatekeepers by
helping educators and curriculum developers make decisions about what should
be addressed or eliminated from consideration in a curriculum. Once educators
have determined what content should be addressed, they can use the scaffolding
that frameworks provide as a basis around which curricular content is developed,
organized, and implemented. Its visual presentation, or schematic, can serve as a
communications tool to share with those interested in a discipline. It quickly
communicates the main topics or areas of instruction that will be addressed.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 1
Introduction to Marketing Principles
Page 1-9
In the Marketing Principles course, four of the 13 Business Administration Core’s
Knowledge and Skills Statements and all six of the Marketing Core’s Knowledge
and Skill Statements are addressed. The title of each Knowledge and Skill
Statement in the entire Business Administration Core and the Marketing Core are
depicted in the schematic in Figure 2. The schematic also shows that the study of
marketing integrates academic concepts from Language Arts, Mathematics, Social
Sciences, and Social Studies. The successful application of these academic skills
is imperative for obtaining a marketing career and advancing in business.
Figure 2: Schematic of Curriculum Framework for the Business Administration Core and
Marketing Core
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Course Philosophy, Purpose, and Goals
Section 2
Section 2
Philosophy
Course Philosophy, Purpose, and Goals
Page 2-2
Marketing Principles should introduce students to the dynamic processes and
activities involved in marketing. The course should provide core content applicable
to all aspects of marketing so that students acquire a deep understanding of all
marketing activities.
A primary contributor to course success should be the use of and involvement with
the local business community. Putting the activities and projects in the context of
the local community should make them real to students, thereby creating student
interest in the course.
To complete the activities and projects, students should use technological
business tools. Tools will be recommended; however, the instructor should modify
the activity or project so that the most current, available technology can be used. In
addition, this course should integrate academic skills such as writing, reading,
communication, and research.
Student
Organization
A business-oriented student organization should be an integral part of the
Marketing Principles course. Through membership in a student organization,
students should develop respect for education that contributes to competence in
the application of marketing knowledge and skills. In addition, membership should
promote leadership development and an understanding of the responsibilities of
citizens in a private-enterprise system.
Purpose
The purpose of the Marketing Principles course is to enable students to acquire a
realistic understanding of marketing processes and activities. The course is
designed to introduce students to all marketing activities so that they can begin to
identify and focus on those activities of interest. Students will investigate marketing
functions, analyze ethical and legal issues associated with each marketing
function, recognize how technology is used in marketing, acquire in-depth
knowledge of marketing-information, product/service management, and selling.
Goals
The broad goals of the Marketing Principles course are to accomplish the
following:
 Reinforce academic skills in such areas as communication, reading, and writing
 Encourage creative thought, problem solving, and decision making
 Enable students to understand and appreciate marketing and its application in
business
 Stimulate student interest in marketing careers
 Increase student awareness of the increasingly complex business world
 Assist students in developing appropriate attitudes about marketing
 Encourage the use of technology in classroom projects
 Assist students with enhancing their teamwork skills
 Stimulate reflection on processes, performance, and outcomes
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Section 3
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-2
Course
Marketing Principles
Credit
One unit
Suggested
Grade Level
11
Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites for enrollment in the Marketing Principles course.
Admission
Requirements
Admission to the course should be open to all students who are interested in
pursuing a career in marketing. Students with special needs should be admitted to
the course after an individual educational plan (IEP) has been prepared. The
course instructor should have input into the prescription process.
Student
Characteristics
Students in Marketing Principles should represent a cross section of the student
body in terms of gender, race, handicap, and academic ability. Students are 16- to
17-years old and have an interest in pursuing a career in marketing.
Description
This course develops student understanding and skills in such areas as channel
management, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing,
product/service management, promotion, and selling. Through the use of three
projects, students acquire an understanding and appreciation of marketing
activities. Current technology will be used to acquire information and to complete
the projects. Throughout the course, students are presented problem-solving
situations for which they must apply academic and critical-thinking skills. Formal
reflection is an on-going component of the course.
Instructional
Strategies
To encourage immediate excitement about a future in marketing, Marketing
Principles utilizes project-based learning for optional content delivery for some
aspects of the course. During these projects, students work individually and in
teams to conduct primary and secondary research to obtain the necessary
knowledge required to complete the projects. Information about using projectbased learning as an instructional method is found in Section 6.
A variety of additional strategies should be utilized to deliver instruction effectively.
Examples of these instructional strategies include, but are not limited to, small- and
large-group activities, discussions, brainstorming, oral and written reports, online
research, and community/school interactions.
Use of instructional aids such as presentation software programs/transparencies,
handouts, videotapes/DVDs, Internet access, CD-ROMs, and guest speakers is
recommended.
Standards of
Completion
Instructors should use formative and summative tests to evaluate student
progress. Rubrics are provided to evaluate specified aspects of projects and
appear in Section 6. Objective tests should be used for quizzes and end-of-year
testing.
Remedial activities should be planned and provided for students who do not meet
the mastery level designated by the instructor. Successful completion of Marketing
Principles requires mastery of all learning outcomes identified in the course outline.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-3
Unit
COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Performance
Element
Read to acquire meaning from written material and to apply the information
to a task.
Performance
Indicators
Analyze company resources to ascertain policies and procedures (CO:057) (CS)
Performance
Element
Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.
Performance
Indicators
Write business letters (CO:133) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Write information messages (CO:039) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Write inquiries (CO:040) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Unit
CUSTOMER RELATIONS
Performance
Element
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Performance
Indicators
Demonstrate a customer-service mindset (CR:004) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Reinforce service orientation through communication (CR:005) (CS)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Respond to customer inquiries (CO:006) (CS)
Adapt communication to the cultural and social differences among clients (CR:019)
(CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Interpret business policies to customers/clients (CR:007) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Performance
Element
Resolve conflicts with/for customers to encourage repeat business.
Performance
Indicators
Handle difficult customers (CR:009, CR LAP 3) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Handle customer/client complaints (CR:010) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Performance
Element
Reinforce company’s image to exhibit the company’s brand promise.
Performance
Indicators
Identify company’s brand promise (CR:001) (CS)
Determine ways of reinforcing the company’s image through employee
performance (CR:002) (CS)
Unit
MARKETING
Performance
Element
Understand marketing’s role and function in business to facilitate economic
exchanges with customers.
Performance
Indicators
Explain marketing and its importance in a global economy (MK:001, MK LAP 4)
(CS)—Review
Describe marketing functions and related activities (MK:002, MK LAP 1) (CS)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-4
Unit
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Performance
Element
Understand career opportunities in marketing to make career decisions.
Performance
Indicators
Explain employment opportunities in marketing (PD:024) (CS)
Unit
CHANNEL MANAGEMENT
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its
role in marketing.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the nature and scope of channel management (CM:001, CM LAP 2) (CS)
Explain the relationship between customer service and channel management
(CM:002) (CS)
Explain the nature of channels of distribution (CM:003, CM LAP 1) (CS)
Describe the use of technology in the channel management function (CM:004)
(CS)
Explain legal considerations in channel management (CM:005) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Describe ethical considerations in channel management (CM:006) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Unit
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicators
Describe the need for marketing data (IM:012, IM LAP 12) (CS)
Identify data monitored for marketing decision making (IM:184, IM LAP 11) (SP)
Explain the nature and scope of the marketing information management function
(IM:001, IM LAP 2) (SP)
Explain the role of ethics in marketing-information management (IM:025) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Describe the use of technology in the marketing-information management function
(IM:183) (SP)
Describe the regulation of marketing-information management (IM:419) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research activities to show command of their nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the nature of marketing research (IM:010, IM LAP 5) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Discuss the nature of marketing research problems/issues (IM:282, IM LAP 13)
(SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-5
Unit
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (cont’d)
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their
appropriateness for the research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicators
Describe methods used to design marketing research studies (i.e., descriptive,
exploratory, and causal) (IM:284, IM LAP 14) (SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Describe options businesses use to obtain marketing-research data (i.e., primary
and secondary research) (IM:281, IM LAP 15) (SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Discuss the nature of sampling plans (i.e., who, how many, how chosen) (IM:285)
(SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Performance
Element
Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicators
Describe data-collection methods (e.g., observations, mail, telephone, Internet,
discussion groups, interviews, scanners) (IM:289) (SP)
Explain characteristics of effective data-collection instruments (IM:418) (SP)
Describe types of scales (including rating scales such as Likert scales, semantic
differential scales, behavior intention scales; and ranking scales such as paired
comparison, forced choice, and comparative scale) (IM:286)
Unit
MARKET PLANNING
Performance
Element
Employ marketing-information to develop a marketing plan.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the concept of marketing strategies (MP:001, MP LAP 2) (CS)
Explain the concept of market and market identification (MP:003, MP LAP 3) (CS)
Unit
PRICING
Performance
Element
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in marketing.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the nature and scope of the pricing function (PI:001, PI LAP 2) (SP)
Describe the role of business ethics in pricing (PI:015) (SP)
Explain the use of technology in the pricing function (PI:016) (SP)
Explain legal considerations for pricing (PI:017) (SP)
Explain factors affecting pricing decisions (PI:002, PI LAP 3) (SP)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-6
Unit
PRODUCT/SERVICE MANAGEMENT
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the nature and scope of the product/service management function
(PM:001, PM LAP 17) (SP)
Identify the impact of product life cycles on marketing decisions (PM:024) (SP)
Describe the use of technology in the product/service management function
(PM:039) (SP)
Explain business ethics in product/service management (PM:040) (SP)
Performance
Element
Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings.
Performance
Indicators
Describe the uses of grades and standards in marketing (PM:019, PM LAP 8) (CS)
Explain warranties and guarantees (PM:020, PM LAP 4) (CS)
Identify consumer protection provisions of appropriate agencies (PM:017) (SP)
Performance
Element
Employ product-mix strategies to meet customer expectations.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the concept of product mix (PM:003, PM LAP 3) (SP)
Performance
Element
Position products/services to acquire desired business image.
Performance
Indicators
Describe factors used by marketers to position products/services (PM:042) (SP)
Explain the nature of product/service branding (PM:021, PM LAP 6) (SP)
Performance
Element
Position company to acquire desired business image.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the nature of corporate branding (PM:206) (SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Unit
PROMOTION
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the role of promotion as a marketing function (PR:001, PR LAP 2) (CS)
Explain the types of promotion (PR:002, PR LAP 4) (CS)
Identify the elements of the promotional mix (PR:003, PR LAP 1) (SP)
Describe the use of business ethics in promotion (PR:099) (SP)
Describe the use of technology in the promotion function (PR:100) (SP)
Describe the regulation of promotion (PR:101) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-7
Unit
PROMOTION (cont’d)
Performance
Element
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Performance
Indicator
Explain types of advertising media (PR:007, PR LAP 3) (SP)
Describe word of mouth channels used to communicate with targeted audiences
(PR:247) (SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Explain the nature of direct marketing channels (PR:089) (SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Identify communications channels used in sales promotion (PR:249) (SP)
Explain communications channels used in public-relations activities (PR:250) (SP)
Unit
SELLING
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the nature and scope of the selling function (SE:017, SE LAP 117) (CS)
Explain the role of customer service as a component of selling relationships
(SE:076, SE LAP 130) (CS)
Explain key factors in building a clientele (SE:828, SE LAP 115) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Explain company selling policies (SE:932) (CS)
Explain business ethics in selling (SE:106, SE LAP 129) (SP)
Describe the use of technology in the selling function (SE:107) (SP)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Describe the nature of selling regulations (SE:108) (SP) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Performance
Element
Acquire product knowledge to communicate product benefits and to ensure
appropriateness of product for the customer.
Performance
Indicators
Acquire product information for use in selling (SE:062) (CS)
Analyze product information to identify product features and benefits
(SE:109, SE LAP 113)
Performance
Element
Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer
relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Performance
Indicators
Explain the selling process (SE:048, SE LAP 126) (CS)
Establish relationship with client/customer (SE:110) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Determine customer/client needs (SE:111) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Recommend specific product (SE:114, SE LAP 111) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Performance
Element
Process the sale to complete the exchange.
Performance
Indicators
Calculate miscellaneous charges (SE:116) (CS)
Process special orders (SE:009) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Process telephone orders (SE:835) (CS) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-8
Introduction
To aid with instructional planning, a listing of supporting objectives for each of the
performance indicators is provided. The performance indicators are sequenced by
instructional area and are not intended to provide instructional sequence for the
course. That information is found in Section 4 of the course guide.
Instructional
Area
COMMUNICATIONS: Understands the concepts, strategies, and systems
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Analyze company resources to ascertain policies and procedures (CO:057)
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Write business letters (CO:133) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Identify types of business letters.
b. Describe the components of an effective business letter.
c. Explain the guidelines for business-letter writing.
d. Write a business letter.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Write informational messages (CO:039) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term informational messages.
b. Identify examples of informational messages used by businesses.
c. Explain the purposes of informational messages.
d. Demonstrate procedures for writing informational messages.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Write inquiries (CO:040) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term inquiries.
b. Identify occasions when inquiries are written by businesses.
c. Describe the importance of writing inquiries.
d. Demonstrate procedures for writing inquiries.
Instructional
Area
CUSTOMER RELATIONS: Understands the techniques and strategies used
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Demonstrate a customer-service mindset (CR:004) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Identify beliefs held by employees who have a customer-service mindset.
b. Describe the importance of exhibiting a customer-service mindset.
c. Identify occasions when marketing employees can exhibit a customer-service
mindset.
d. Describe guidelines for exhibiting a customer-service mindset.
e. Demonstrate a customer-service mindset.
used to obtain and convey ideas and information
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Distinguish between policies and procedures.
Discuss the need for company policies and procedures.
Describe the impact of ineffective policies and procedures.
Explain the importance of understanding company policies and procedures.
Identify company resources that can be accessed for policies and procedures.
Demonstrate how to analyze company resources to ascertain policies and
procedures.
to foster positive, ongoing relationships with customers
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-9
CUSTOMER RELATIONS: Understands the techniques and strategies used
to foster positive, ongoing relationships with customers
Reinforce service orientation through communication (CR:005)
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
Define the term service orientation.
Explain the relationship between communication and service.
Identify ways in which employees in business and marketing can demonstrate
a service orientation.
Demonstrate procedures for reinforcing a service orientation through
communication.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Respond to customer inquiries (CR:006) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Explain the nature of customer inquiries.
b. Identify the types of customer inquiries.
c. Discuss the importance of possessing knowledge of the company (e.g.,
policies, history, capabilities, etc.).
d. Discuss the importance of possessing adequate product knowledge.
e. Describe guidelines for handling customer inquiries.
f.
Demonstrate use of proper procedure for solving a customer inquiry in a
marketing situation.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Adapt communication to the cultural and social differences among clients
(CR:019) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Discuss the purpose of adapting communication to a client’s cultural or social
community.
b. Explain the importance of context in communication.
c. Discuss reasons for adapting communication to the cultural or social
differences among clients.
d. Explain skills associated with adapting communication (e.g., empathy, risk
taking, problem solving, etc.).
e. Describe ways to adapt communication to the cultural or social environment
of clients.
f.
Demonstrate how to adapt communication to the cultural or social differences
among clients.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Interpret business policies to customers/clients (CR:007) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term business policy.
b. Identify characteristics of effective business policies.
c. Describe reasons for having business policies.
d. Explain types of business policies that affect customers.
e. Discuss the role of employees in interpreting business policies.
f.
Explain when business policies should be interpreted.
g. Explain guidelines for interpreting business policies to customers.
h. Demonstrate procedures for interpreting business policies to customers.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-10
CUSTOMER RELATIONS: Understands the techniques and strategies used
to foster positive, ongoing relationships with customers
Handle difficult customers (CR:009, CR LAP 3) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the following terms: disagreeable customer, domineering/ superior
customers, dishonest customers.
b. Identify types of difficult customers.
c. Describe categories of disagreeable customers.
d. Discuss categories of domineering/superior customers.
e. Describe ways in which customers are dishonest.
f.
Identify situations in which customers become difficult.
g. Explain reasons for handling difficult customers.
h. Describe general guidelines for handling difficult customers.
i.
Explain specific guidelines for handling types of difficult customers.
j.
Demonstrate procedures for handling difficult customers.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Handle customer/client complaints (CR:010) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term complaint.
b. Identify the costs associated with customer complaints.
c. Identify reasons for customer complaints.
d. Describe the benefits of customer complaints.
e. Explain the importance of appropriately handling customer complaints.
f.
Explain procedures for handling customer complaints.
g. Demonstrate procedures for handling customer complaints.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Identify company’s brand promise (CR:001)
a. Define the terms touch points, brand, and brand promise.
b. Explain the importance of a company’s brand promise.
c. Describe factors impacting a company’s brand promise.
d. Demonstrate how to identify a company’s brand promise.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Determine ways of reinforcing the company’s image through employee
performance (CR:002)
a. Discuss types of company images.
b. Describe factors that affect a company’s image.
c. Explain the importance of reinforcing the company’s image.
d. Describe ways that employees can reinforce the company’s image through
their performance.
e. Demonstrate how to determine ways to reinforce the company’s image
through employee performance.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-11
Instructional
Area
MARKETING: Understands the tools, techniques, and systems that businesses
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain marketing and its importance in a global economy (MK:001,
MK LAP 4)--REVIEW
a. Define the following terms: marketing and marketing concept.
b. Identify marketing activities.
c. Categorize items that are marketed.
d. Explain where marketing occurs.
e. Explain the elements of the marketing concept.
f.
Explain the role of marketing in a private enterprise system.
g. Describe ways in which consumers and businesses would be affected if
marketing did not exist.
h. Explain how marketing benefits our society.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe marketing functions and related activities (MK:002, MK LAP 1)
a. Define the following terms: channel management, marketing-information
management, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling.
b. Explain the purposes of each marketing function.
c. Describe the importance of each marketing function to marketing.
d. Explain the interrelationships among marketing functions.
Instructional
Area
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Understands concepts, tools, and
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain employment opportunities in marketing (PD:024)
a. Identify types of businesses that offer careers in marketing.
b. Contrast marketing careers with careers in medicine.
c. Explain why jobs in marketing provide career potential.
d. Describe the following marketing careers:
(1) Marketing research
(2) Advertising
(3) Product management
(4) Channel management
(5) Sales
(6) Retailing
(7) Service marketing
(8) Customer service
(9) Public relations
e. Describe well-recognized traits and skills needed for success in marketing
careers.
use to create exchanges and satisfy organizational objectives
strategies used to explore, obtain, and develop in a business career
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-12
Instructional
Area
CHANNEL MANAGEMENT: Understands the concepts and processes
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature and scope of channel management (CM:001, CM LAP 2)
a. Define the following terms: channel, channel intensity, channel length,
distribution patterns, exclusive distribution, selective distribution, and intensive
distribution.
b. Explain how channel members add value.
c. Discuss channel functions (e.g., information, promotion, contact, matching,
negotiation, physical distribution, financing, and risk taking).
d. Explain key channel tasks (e.g., marketing, packaging, financing, storage,
delivery, merchandising, and personal selling).
e. Describe when a channel will be most effective.
f.
Distinguish between horizontal and vertical conflict.
g. Describe channel management decisions (i.e., selecting channel members,
managing and motivating channel members, and evaluating channel
members).
h. Explain channel design decisions (i.e., analyzing customer needs, setting
channel objectives, identifying major alternatives—types of intermediaries,
number of intermediaries, responsibilities of intermediaries).
i.
Discuss the relationship between the product being distributed and the pattern
of distribution it uses.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature of channels of distribution (CM:003)
a. Define the following terms: channels of distribution, producer, ultimate
consumer, industrial user, middlemen, intermediaries, retailers, wholesalers,
agents, direct channels, and indirect channels.
b. Identify types of channel members/intermediaries/middlemen.
c. Explain the importance of middlemen in the channel of distribution.
d. Describe types of channels for consumer goods and services.
e. Describe types of channels for industrial goods and services.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the use of technology in the channel management function
(CM:004)
a. Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the channel management
function.
b. Explain specific applications of technology in channel management.
c. Discuss ways that the use of technology in channel management impacts
relationships with channel members.
d. Explain ways that the use of technology in channel management facilitates
global trade.
e. Describe benefits associated with the use of technology in channel
management.
f.
Explain barriers to the use of technology in channel management.
needed to identify, select, monitor, and evaluate sales channels
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-13
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
CHANNEL MANAGEMENT: Understands the concepts and processes
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain legal considerations in channel management (CM:005)
needed to identify, select, monitor, and evaluate sales channels
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Define the following terms: exclusive dealing, tying agreements, full-line
forcing, and closed territories.
Describe illegal channel management activities.
Identify laws that govern channel management activities.
Explain the impact of regulation on channel management activities.
Describe ethical considerations in channel management (CM:006)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Define the following terms: exploitation, coercion, gray market, and slotting
allowance.
Discuss reasons that marketers should not manipulate the availability of a
product for the purpose of exploitation.
Describe ethical issues associated with serving markets with low profit
potential.
Explain when ethical issues can arise in a distribution channel.
Explain the ethical implications of the gray market on U.S. businesses.
Describe how communication relates to channel management ethics.
Instructional
Area
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the need for marketing data (IM:012, IM LAP 12)
a. Define the following terms: facts, estimates, predictions, relationships, and
marketing information.
b. Identify types of information used in marketing decision-making.
c. Identify types of marketing information useful to marketers.
d. Describe ways that marketers use marketing information.
e. Explain the impact of marketing information on marketers.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Identify data monitored for marketing decision making (IM:184, IM LAP 11)
a. Define the following terms: request and complaint reports, lost sales reports,
call reports, and activity reports.
b. Explain information contained in sales and expense reports that is monitored
for marketing decision-making.
c. Describe information in reports provided by salespeople that is monitored for
use in marketing decision-making.
d. Discuss information about customers that is monitored for marketing decisionmaking.
e. Explain information about competitors that is monitored for marketing
decision-making.
f.
Demonstrate procedures for identifying information to monitor for marketing
decision-making.
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-14
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature and scope of the marketing information management
function (IM:001, IM LAP 2)
a. Define the following terms: marketing information, marketing-information
management system, and marketing research.
b. Describe the need of marketing information.
c. Classify types of marketing information as primary or secondary.
d. Describe the types of information marketers should obtain.
e. Categorize internal sources of marketing information.
f.
Discuss external sources of marketing information.
g. Explain why marketers should collect information.
h. Describe the characteristics of useful marketing information.
i.
Describe reasons that marketers need to gather accurate information.
j.
Explain the functions of a marketing-information management system.
k. Contrast marketing research with a marketing-information system.
l.
Describe the use of a marketing-information system.
m. Explain the benefits of a marketing-information management system.
n. Discuss the requirements of a marketing-information management system.
o. Explain the role of marketing-information management in marketing.
p. Describe limitations of marketing-information management systems.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the role of ethics in marketing-information management (IM:025)
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
(cont’d)
Describe the importance of credibility and objectivity in marketing-information
management.
Explain why the integrity of the marketing information must be protected.
Explain types of ethical conflicts in marketing-information management.
Discuss ethical issues associated with obtaining information about
competitors.
Describe ethical issues created by the use of technology in data collection.
Describe the use of technology in the marketing-information management
function (IM:183)
a. Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the marketing-information
management function.
b. Describe how the use of the Internet for marketing-information management
tracks and monitors customer website activities.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Discuss how customer-to-business communications on the Internet can be
used in marketing-information management (e.g., email reminders, popup
notices, online focus groups, etc.)
Explain how the Internet provides services for conducting research (e.g.,
search engines, tools for online surveys, database access, blogs, etc.)
Discuss marketers’ use of virtual realties and simulations in marketinginformation management.
Describe how the use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) can facilitate
marketing-information management.
Explain the use of data analysis software in marketing-information
management.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
Describe the regulation of marketing-information management (IM:419)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Page 3-15
Define the following terms: self-regulation, SUGGING, FRUGGING, privacy
Explain the role of self-regulation for marketing researchers.
Discuss privacy concerns associated with the collection, storage, mining, and
use of data.
Describe the legalities associated with the collection of marketing data from
children.
Discuss legal issues associated with the collection and sharing of health-care
data.
Explain legal issues associated with the protection of information held by
financial institutions.
Discuss why marketing researchers are excluded from governance under the
CAN-SPAM Act.
Explain how marketing researchers are protected from SUGGING and
FRUGGING.
Describe legal issues associated with callbacks.
Discuss legal issues associated with the use of automatic dialers when
collecting data.
Ascertain the current status of privacy/data security legislation.
Discuss reasons that marketing researchers must consider state, federal, and
international laws when collecting data.
Explain the nature of marketing research (IM:010, IM LAP 5) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the following terms: marketing research, secondary research, primary
research, personal interview, mail interview, telephone interview,
questionnaire, and focus group.
b. Identify characteristics of effective marketing research.
c. Describe the importance of marketing research.
d. Explain how marketing research is carried out.
e. Explain the uses of marketing research.
f.
Describe shortcomings of marketing research.
g. Describe types of marketing research objectives.
h. Describe the contents of a research plan or design.
i.
Classify types of marketing research data.
j.
Distinguish between internal and external sources of data.
k. Describe types of data collection methods.
l.
Explain how data can be analyzed.
m. Describe steps in the marketing research process.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-16
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Discuss the nature of marketing research problems/issues (IM:282,
IM LAP 13) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term marketing research problem, decision problem, variables, unit
of analysis, research objectives.
b. Explain the importance of determining the actual marketing research
problem/issue.
c. Discuss the need to determine the “real” issue/problem rather than its
symptoms.
d. Describe the steps involved in determining the marketing research
problem/issue (e.g., clarifying and identifying the information needs,
redefining the decision problem as a research problem, and setting research
objectives.
e. Discuss activities involved in identifying the information needs (e.g.,
determining the purpose of the research, understanding the complete
problem, identifying measurable symptoms, determining the unit of analysis,
and determining relevant variables).
f.
Explain why researchers need to adjust the decision problem into a research
problem.
g. Describe the purposes of setting marketing research objectives.
h. Explain the relationship between the research problem/issue and the
marketing research objectives.
i.
Discuss how determining the marketing research problem/issue aids in
determining whether to conduct the study.
j.
Describe situations in which conducting a marketing research study would be
inappropriate.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe methods used to design marketing research studies (i.e.,
descriptive, exploratory, and causal) (IM:284, IM LAP 14)
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Define the following terms: research design, descriptive design, exploratory
design, causal design.
Describe general purposes of marketing research (e.g., explain, predict,
monitor, discover, test hypotheses).
Explain the relationship between the research design and the purpose of the
research.
Discuss the purposes of using descriptive research.
Explain the purposes of using exploratory research.
Distinguish between descriptive and exploratory research.
Describe the purposes of using causal research.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-17
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe options businesses use to obtain marketing-research data (i.e.,
primary and secondary research, quantitative and qualitative research)
(IM:281, IM LAP 15) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Distinguish between primary and secondary marketing research.
b. Describe occasions for using primary sources of marketing research data.
c. Discuss primary sources of marketing research data.
d. Describe advantages/disadvantages of primary marketing research.
e. Explain types of primary research (i.e., quantitative and qualitative).
f.
Explain occasions for using secondary sources of marketing research data.
g. Describe secondary sources of marketing research data (i.e., internal and
external).
h. Describe advantages/disadvantages with using internal sources of secondary
data.
i.
Explain reasons that businesses need to analyze external data.
j.
Explain advantages/disadvantages of secondary marketing research.
k. Discuss reasons for outsourcing marketing research activities.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Discuss the nature of sampling plans (i.e., who, how many, how chosen)
(IM:285) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the terms population, sample, probability sampling, non-probability
sampling, and sampling plan.
b. Discuss the advantages of using a sample to represent the population.
c. Explain when it is appropriate to use a sample of the population.
d. Distinguish between probability and non-probability sample designs.
e. Explain types of non-probability sample designs.
f.
Describe types of probability sample designs.
g. Explain types of sampling bias/errors.
h. Discuss the purpose of sampling plans.
i.
Explain the components of a sampling plan.
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-18
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe data-collection methods (e.g., observations, mail, telephone,
Internet, discussion groups, interviews, diaries scanners) (IM:289)
a. Explain reasons for having a variety of data-collection methods.
b. Describe forms of quantitative data collection (e.g., surveys, tracking,
experiments).
c. Describe forms of qualitative data collection (e.g., personal interviews, focus
groups, observational research).
d. Explain limitations associated with qualitative research.
e
Explain advantages/disadvantages with using observational techniques to
collect marketing data.
f
Describe advantages/disadvantages associated with using mail techniques to
collect marketing data.
g
Discuss advantages/disadvantages associated with using telephone datacollection methods.
h
Describe ways to use the Internet to collect data.
i.
Explain advantages/disadvantages associated with using the Internet as a
data-collection method.
j
Describe advantages/disadvantages of using discussion groups to collect
data.
k. Discuss advantages/disadvantages associated with using interviews to collect
data.
l.
Explain advantages/disadvantages associated with using scanners to collect
data.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain characteristics of effective data-collection instruments (IM:418)
a. Explain why data-collection instruments must be carefully designed and
administered.
b. Discuss challenges in developing effective data-collection instruments (e.g.,
cultural differences between researcher and source, resources required for
the study, intangible nature of some types of information, difficulty accessing
some sources of information).
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
(cont’d)
c.
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
d.
e.
f.
g.
Explain elements of surveys (i.e., a statement to respondents about how
information will be used and why it is valuable; clear instructions, including for
any skip patterns; appealing format; logical sequence of questions;
consideration of how answers to previous items might affect later items).
Describe qualities of a good survey item (e.g., clear questions, single focus
for each question, neutral questions, balanced questions, appropriate
language for the intended respondent, appropriately broad or narrow in
scope).
Explain how to ensure the quality of observations.
Discuss considerations for collecting data online.
Describe considerations in using a pre-existing data collection instrument.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-19
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
MARKETING-INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Understands the
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe types of scales (including rating scales such as Likert scales,
semantic differential scales, behavior intention scales; and ranking
scales such as paired comparison, forced choice, and comparative
scale) (IM:286)
a. Explain the use of scaling in marketing research.
b. Distinguish between rating and ranking scales.
c. Distinguish between nominal data and ordinal scales.
d. Discuss when ordinal scales are used.
e. Describe characteristics of interval rating scales.
f.
Distinguish between interval and ratio scales.
g. Distinguish between continuous and itemized rating scales.
h. Discuss types of itemized rating scales (e.g., Likert, semantic differential,
Stapel’s Scale, and multi dimensional scaling).
i.
Explain advantages/disadvantages of the types of itemized rating scales.
j.
Explain types of ranking scales (i.e., paired comparison, forced choice, and
comparative scale).
Instructional
Area
MARKET PLANNING: Understands the concepts and strategies utilized to
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the concept of marketing strategies (MP:001, MP LAP 2)
a. Define the following terms: marketing mix, product, place, promotion, price,
goals, strategies, and tactics.
b. Identify the components of the marketing mix.
c. Describe the importance of each of the components of the marketing mix.
d. Explain the relationship of goals, strategies, and tactics.
e. Describe the importance of marketing strategies.
f.
Explain the factors that may cause marketing strategies to change.
g. Explain the importance of strategies in the marketing mix.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the concept of market and market identification (MP:003, MP LAP 3)
a. Define the following terms: market, target market, mass marketing, marketing
segments, market segmentation, demographic segmentation, geographic
segmentation, psychographic segmentation, and behavioral segmentation.
b. Explain the importance of target markets to businesses.
c. Describe advantages and disadvantages of mass marketing.
d. Describe advantages and disadvantages of using market segments.
e. Explain why the use of market segments is increasing.
f.
Describe demographic characteristics that are analyzed by marketers.
g. Explain the value of geographic segmentation.
h. Discuss the value of psychographic segmentation.
i.
Describe types of behavioral segmentation.
concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and
disseminate information for use in making business decisions
determine and target marketing strategies to a select audience
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-20
Instructional
Area
PRICING: Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature and scope of the pricing function (PI:001, PI LAP 2)
a. Describe the characteristics of effective pricing.
b. Explain what is being priced when prices are set for products.
c. List factors that affect a product's price.
d. Describe how pricing affects product decisions.
e. Explain how pricing affects place (distribution) decisions.
f. Describe how pricing affects promotion decisions.
g. Explain pricing objectives.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the role of business ethics in pricing (PI:015)
a. Define the following terms: price fixing, predatory pricing.
b. Identify ethical considerations in setting prices.
c. Explain ethical concerns associated with the use of complex prices that are
confusing to consumers.
d. Explain how pricing tactics can relate to social responsibility.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the use of technology in the pricing function (PI:016)
a. Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the pricing function.
b. Explain specific applications of technology in pricing.
c. Describe benefits of automating the pricing process.
d. Discuss risks associated with automating the pricing process.
e. Explain how automating pricing facilitates targeted pricing
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain legal considerations for pricing (PI:017)
a. Define the following terms: bait-and-switch advertising, deceptive pricing,
dumping, loss-leader pricing, predatory pricing, price discrimination, and price
fixing.
b. Describe laws affecting pricing.
c. Explain positive effects of pricing laws.
d. Discuss negative effects of pricing laws.
e. Explain the impact of anti-dumping laws on consumers.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain factors affecting pricing decisions (PI:002, PI LAP 3)
a. Define the term selling price.
b. Distinguish between price and selling price.
c. Describe the importance of selling price.
d. Identify factors affecting selling price.
e. Explain how consumers can affect selling price.
f. Describe how government affects selling price.
g. Discuss how competition can affect selling price.
h. Explain how the nature of a business can affect selling price.
i. Identify pricing objectives.
j. Explain how pricing objectives affect selling price.
adjusting prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-21
Instructional
Area
PRODUCT/SERVICE MANAGEMENT: Understands the concepts and
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature and scope of the product/service management function
(PM:001, PM LAP 17)
a. Define the term product/service management.
b. Explain who is responsible for managing products/services.
c. Describe the benefits of product/service managing.
d. Describe the phases of product/service managing.
e. Describe factors affecting product/service managing.
f.
Explain the role product/service management plays in marketing.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Identify the impact of product life cycles on marketing decisions (PM:024)
a. Define the following terms: product life cycle, introduction, growth, maturity,
decline, pricing decisions, promotion decisions, place decisions, and product
decisions.
b. Identify stages of the product life cycle.
c. Describe the characteristics of each stage of the product life cycle.
d. Discuss the impact of each stage of the product life cycle on marketing
decision-making.
e. Explain how a company can extend a product's life cycle.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the use of technology in the product/service management function
(PM:039)
a. Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the product/service
management function.
b. Explain specific applications of technology in product/service management.
c. Describe how technology is used to manage the product life cycle.
d. Discuss how technology is used in market testing.
e. Explain how technology is used in product labeling and packaging.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain business ethics in product/service management (PM:040)
a. Describe ethical considerations in product packaging.
b. Explain how planned obsolescence is an ethical issue for businesses.
c. Explain ethical issues associated with product labeling.
d. Discuss ethical issues associated with changing a product’s quality.
e. Describe ethical issues associated with failing to inform customers about
product risks.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the uses of grades and standards in marketing (PM:019, PM LAP 8)
a. Define the terms grades and standards.
b. Explain the interrelationship of grades and standards.
c. Describe what businesses do with products that fail to meet the lowest
standards.
d. Explain reasons for using grades and standards.
e. Describe ways that grades and standards aid the buying and selling process.
f.
Explain the importance of grades and standards in global trade.
g. Identify groups that develop grades and standards.
h. Describe types of standards.
i.
Identify examples of graded products.
processes needed to obtain, develop, maintain, and improve a product or service
mix in response to market opportunities
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-22
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
PRODUCT/SERVICE MANAGEMENT: Understands the concepts and
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain warranties and guarantees (PM:020, PM LAP 4)
a. Define the following terms: warranty, express warranty, implied warranty, full
warranty, limited warranty, and guarantee.
b. Identify the provisions of a full warranty.
c. Distinguish between warranties and guarantees.
d. Identify the characteristics of an effective guarantee.
e. Describe the purposes of warranties and guarantees.
f.
Explain the benefits of warranties and guarantees.
g. Describe government regulation of warranties and guarantees.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Identify consumer protection provisions of appropriate agencies (PM:017)
processes needed to obtain, develop, maintain, and improve a product or service
mix in response to market opportunities
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Instructional
Area
Describe forms of consumer protection associated with product/service
management.
Describe the need for consumer protection in product/service management.
Discuss the role of governmental agencies in protecting consumers.
Explain laws that protect consumers.
Explain how consumer protection affects businesses.
Describe expenses that can be incurred by businesses as a result of
consumer protection.
Explain the concept of product mix (PM:003, PM LAP 3)
a. Define the following terms: product mix, product item, product line, width,
depth, consistency, expansion, contraction, alteration, trading up, trading
down, and positioning.
b. Identify ways in which product lines can be organized.
c. Describe product mix dimensions.
d. Identify reasons that a business would offer a narrow product mix.
e. Identify reasons that a business would offer a broad product mix.
f.
Identify reasons that a business would offer a deep product mix.
g. Identify reasons that a business would offer a shallow product mix.
h. Explain the importance of a business’s product mix.
i.
Describe advantages of expansion product-mix strategies.
j.
Describe disadvantages of expansion product-mix strategies.
k. Describe advantages of contraction product-mix strategies.
l.
Describe disadvantages of contraction product-mix strategies.
m. Describe advantages of alteration product-mix strategies.
n. Describe disadvantages of alteration product-mix strategies.
o. Describe advantages of trading up product-mix strategies.
p. Describe disadvantages of trading up product-mix strategies.
q. Describe advantages of trading down product-mix strategies.
r.
Describe disadvantages of trading down product-mix strategies.
s. Describe advantages of positioning product-mix strategies.
t.
Describe disadvantages of positioning product-mix strategies.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-23
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
PRODUCT/SERVICE MANAGEMENT: Understands the concepts and
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe factors used by marketers to position products/services (PM:042)
a. Define the following terms: competitive advantage and positioning.
b. Describe the purpose of positioning.
c. Explain the relationship between the target market and positioning.
d. Discuss the relationship between the competition and positioning.
e. Describe types of positioning strategies (e.g., product attributes, benefits,
usage occasions, users, competitive, product classes).
f.
Discuss how marketing mix elements can be differentiated to position
products/businesses.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature of product/service branding (PM:021, PM LAP 6)
a. Define the following terms: brand, brand name, brand symbol, trade
character, brand recognition, brand preference, brand insistence, product
brands, generic brand, national brand, private/distributor brand, brand
strategies, family branding, individual branding, brand extensions, brand
licensing, and co-branding.
b. List the characteristics of a good brand name.
c. Explain levels of brand loyalty.
d. Identify types of brand strategies.
e. Describe considerations for international branding.
f.
Explain the impact of the Internet on branding.
g. Discuss employees’ role in branding.
processes needed to obtain, develop, maintain, and improve a product or service
mix in response to market opportunities
Explain the nature of corporate branding (PM:206) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the following terms: brand identity, values, brand cues, brand
personality, touch points, brand promise, and corporate brands.
b. Describe the elements that make up a brand’s identity.
c. Explain the use of values in brand development.
d. Discuss the significance of a brand’s personality.
e. Describe the use of brand touch points.
f.
Distinguish between corporate and distributor brands.
Instructional
Area
PROMOTION: Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the role of promotion as a marketing function (PR:001, PR LAP 2)
a. Define the term promotion.
b. List users of promotion.
c. Describe the benefits of using promotion.
d. Describe the costs associated with the use of promotion.
e. Describe types of promotional objectives.
f.
Discuss the relationship of promotion and marketing.
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to
achieve a desired outcome
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-24
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
PROMOTION: Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the types of promotion (PR:002, PR LAP 4)
a. Define the following terms: product promotion, primary product promotion,
secondary product promotion, institutional promotion, public service, public
relations, and patronage.
b. Identify types of product promotion.
c. Describe the uses of product promotion.
d. Identify types of institutional promotion.
e. Describe uses of institutional promotion.
f.
Discuss the advantages of promotional activities.
g. Discuss the disadvantages of promotional activities.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Identify the elements of the promotional mix (PR:003, PR LAP 1)
a. Define the following terms: promotional mix, advertising, personal selling,
publicity and sales promotion.
b. Identify the elements of the promotional mix.
c. Categorize examples of promotions according to the elements of the
promotional mix.
d. Describe the importance of the promotional mix.
e. Identify factors affecting the promotional mix.
f.
Describe how the product being sold affects the promotional mix.
g. Explain how the product's market affects the promotional mix.
h. Discuss how the distribution system affects the promotional mix.
i.
Explain how the product's company affects the promotional mix.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the use of business ethics in promotion (PR:099)
a. Explain ethical issues associated with fear-based advertising.
b. Discuss sexism/stereotyping in advertising.
c. Explain ethical issues associated with promotion to children.
d. Discuss ethical issues associated with sales promotion sweepstakes,
samples, rebates, and premiums.
e. Explain the use of stealth marketing.
f.
Discuss ethical issues associated with use of customer information obtained
on the Internet.
g. Describe ways that businesses use socially responsible promotions.
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to
achieve a desired outcome
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-25
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
PROMOTION: Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the use of technology in the promotion function (PR:100)
a. Explain how the use of technology in promotion has changed the way
marketers communicate with customers.
b. Identify ways that the use of technology positively impacts the promotion
function.
c. Discuss ways that the use of technology negatively impacts the promotion
function.
d. Describe ways that businesses use the Internet as a promotional tool.
e. Describe how technology has enhanced opportunities to contact customers
with promotional messages.
f.
Discuss ways that technology has facilitated the use of sales promotions.
g. Explain specific applications of technology in promotion.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the regulation of promotion (PR:101)
a. Explain the need for truthfulness in promotional messages and claims.
b. Discuss how the use of misleading or inaccurate statements in promotion is
regulated.
c. Explain laws that protect customers from unwanted promotions.
d. Discuss laws that protect children from promotional messages.
e. Explain the regulation of telemarketing.
f.
Discuss the regulation of data privacy.
g. Describe actions that can be taken by the Federal Trade Commission to
correct misleading advertising.
h. Discuss reasons for the regulation of products used in advertising.
i.
Explain how the legality of products used in advertising can vary from country
to country.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain types of advertising media (PR:007, PR LAP 3)
a. Define the term advertising media.
b. Categorize advertising media.
c. Identify types of publications.
d. Describe factors on which newspapers vary.
e. Categorize types of magazines.
f.
Describe the two categories of broadcast media.
g. Categorize purchase options for television advertising.
h. Discuss the difference between local and network advertising.
i.
Describe types of direct-mail advertising.
j.
Explain types of Web advertising.
k. Identify types of out-of-home media.
l.
Describe specialty advertising.
m. Discuss the use of directory advertising.
n
Explain the use of movie theater advertising.
o. Describe the use of product placement for advertising.
p. Discuss the use of telemarketing for advertising.
q. Explain the use of videotapes, DVDs, and CD-ROM advertising.
r.
Explain trends that are affecting advertising media.
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to
achieve a desired outcome
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-26
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
PROMOTION: Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe word of mouth channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences (PR:247) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term word of mouth marketing, buzz marketing, viral marketing,
community marketing, grassroots marketing, evangelist marketing, product
seeding, influencer marketing, cause marketing, conversation creation, brand
blogging, referral programs, social networks.
b. Discuss the need for honesty and transparency in word of mouth marketing.
c. Explain the philosophy of word of mouth marketing.
d. Describe types of word of mouth marketing.
e. Distinguish between organic and amplified word of mouth marketing.
f.
Discuss techniques businesses can use to foster organic word of mouth
marketing.
g. Explain techniques businesses can use to foster amplified word of mouth
marketing.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature of direct marketing channels (PR:089) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the term direct marketing.
b. Identify communication channels used for direct marketing.
c. Describe advantages/disadvantages associated with direct marketing.
d. Explain how the Internet has changed businesses’ ability to communicate
directly with customers.
e. Describe the importance of databases to direct marketing.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Identify communications channels used in sales promotion (PR:249)
a. Define the following terms: free-standing insert (FSI), coupons, rebates, push
money, point-of-sale displays, trade allowances, dealer loaders, contests,
sweepstakes, games, loyalty programs, demonstrations, personal
appearances, advertising-support programs, co-op advertising, trade-in
promotions, samples, premiums, free products, promotional products, trade
shows, push strategies, pull strategies.
b. Discuss differences between advertising and sales promotion.
c. Explain reasons that businesses use sales promotions.
d. Describe types of consumer sales promotions.
e. Discuss types of trade sales promotions.
f.
Explain types of business-to-business sales promotions.
g. Describe types of point-of-purchase (POP) displays that are used for sales
promotion.
h. Compare the similarities and differences between coupons and rebates.
i.
Distinguish between push and pull sales promotion strategies.
j.
Explain how contests, sweepstakes, and games differ.
k. Describe trends in sales promotions.
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to
achieve a desired outcome
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-27
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
PROMOTION: Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain communications channels used in public-relations activities
(PR:250)
a. Define the following terms: press kits, audio/video releases, matte release,
website press room, special events, sponsorships, community relations,
philanthropy, crisis management.
b. Explain the role of public relations in business.
c. Discuss advantages/disadvantages associated with public relations.
d. Describe the main tools used in public relations to communicate with targeted
audiences (i.e., media relations, media tours, newsletters, special events,
speaking engagements, sponsorships, employee relations, and community
relations and philanthropy).
e. Explain tools used to communicate public relations messages to the media
(i.e., press kits, audio/video releases, matte releases, website press room).
f.
Discuss reasons that public relations specialists monitor markets.
g. Describe the purpose of crisis management in public relations.
h. Explain trends in public relations.
i.
Describe the use of blogs for public relations activities.
j.
Discuss the use of web forums in public relations activities.
k. Explain how RSS feeds can be used for public relations activities.
l.
Describe the use of podcasting for public relations activities.
m. Explain how search engine optimization (SEO) can be used for public
relations activities.
Instructional
Area
SELLING: Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the nature and scope of the selling function (SE:017, SE LAP 117)
a. Define the term selling.
b. Identify individuals, groups, or agencies that sell.
c. Explain reasons that customers buy goods and services.
d. Identify types of items that are sold.
e. Explain where selling occurs.
f.
Describe how products are sold.
g. Describe the role of selling in a market economy.
h. Explain personal characteristics of salespeople that are essential to selling.
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to
achieve a desired outcome
needs and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-28
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
SELLING: Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the role of customer service as a component of selling relationships
(SE:076, SE LAP 130)
a. Distinguish between customer service as a process and customer service as
a function.
b. Describe how businesses can use customer service to beat their competition.
c. Discuss factors that influence customer expectations of customer service.
d. Explain how customer service facilitates sales relationships.
e. Identify pre-sales opportunities for providing customer service that can
facilitate sales relationships.
f.
Identify post-sales opportunities when customer service can be provided to
facilitate sales relationships.
g. Discuss actions a salesperson can take to make the most of her/his customer
service activities.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain key factors in building a clientele (SE:828, SE LAP 115)
needs and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Identify company benefits of building a clientele.
Identify salesperson benefits from building a clientele.
Cite examples of costs that can be incurred by businesses for failing to build a
clientele.
Identify attitudes of salespeople that help to build a clientele.
Describe ways that salespeople exhibit a service attitude.
Describe the activities of salespeople that can help to build a clientele.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain company selling policies (SE:932)
a. Define the following terms: selling policies, selling-activity policies, terms-ofsale policies and service policies.
b. Identify types of selling-activity policies.
c. Identify types of terms-of-sale policies.
d. Identify types of service policies.
e. Explain the importance of selling policies.
f.
Describe the characteristics of selling policies.
g. Explain why selling policies are needed.
h. Describe external factors that affect selling policies.
i.
Describe internal factors that affect selling policies.
j.
Describe regulatory factors that affect selling policies.
k. Explain problems encountered with the use of selling policies.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain business ethics in selling (SE:106, SE LAP 129)
a. Explain the importance of business ethics in selling.
b. Describe ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with the company.
c. Explain ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with coworkers.
d. Explain ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with customers/clients.
e. Describe ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with the competition.
f.
Describe ethical concerns of employers in dealing with salespeople.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-29
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
SELLING: Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the use of technology in the selling function (SE:107)
needs and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Describe capabilities that the use of technology provides salespeople.
Explain how technology impacts a salesperson’s planning skills.
Describe how technology can impact a salesperson’s targeting skills.
Discuss how technology can impact a salesperson’s presentation skills.
Explain how technology can impact a salesperson’s ability to adapt or tailor a
sales presentation to a particular customer.
Explain the use of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) software in
selling.
Discuss the use of tablet PCs in selling.
Explain the use of web-based visits between customers and sales staff.
Describe the use of the Internet in sales administration activities.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Describe the nature of selling regulations (SE:108) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Identify reasons that sales activities are regulated.
b. Describe unfair or deceptive sales practices that are regulated.
c. Explain state and federal regulations that affect sales activities.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Acquire product information for use in selling (SE:062)
a. Identify sources of product information that provide information for use in
selling.
b. Identify types of product information that can be useful in selling.
c. Cite occasions when product information can be used in sales presentations.
d. Describe guidelines to follow when acquiring product information.
e. Demonstrate procedures for acquiring product information for use in selling.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Analyze product information to identify product features and benefits
(SE:109, SE LAP 113)
a. Define the following terms: feature, benefit, obvious benefits, unique benefits,
hidden benefits, feature-benefit selling, and feature-benefit chart.
b. Identify sources of feature/benefit information.
c. Identify an example of an obvious or apparent benefit.
d. Identify an example of a unique or exclusive benefit.
e. Identify an example of a hidden benefit.
f.
Describe how to prepare a feature-benefit chart for a product.
g. Prepare a feature-benefit chart for a product.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-30
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
SELLING: Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Explain the selling process (SE:048, SE LAP 126)
a. Identify the components of the selling process.
b. Describe the importance of establishing relationships with customers.
c. Describe ways to discover customer needs.
d. Describe the components of prescribing solutions to customer needs.
e. Explain the importance of reaching closure in sales situations.
f.
Describe aspects of reaching closure in sales situations.
g. Describe the importance of reaffirming the buyer-seller relationship.
h. Describe ways to reaffirm the buyer-seller relationship.
i.
Explain similarities/differences in the ways businesses implement the selling
process.
j.
Explain the importance of using a selling process.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Establish relationship with client/customer (SE:110) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Describe the importance of establishing relationships with customers/clients
during the initial contact with them.
b. Explain techniques for establishing relationships with customers/clients during
the initial contact with them.
c. Identify factors affecting the choice of techniques to use in establishing
relationships with customers/clients during initial contact.
d. Describe characteristics of effective sales openings.
e. Explain procedures for establishing relationships with customers/clients
during initial contacts.
f.
Demonstrate how to establish relationships with customers/clients during the
initial contact with them.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Determine customer/client needs (SE:111) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define the following terms: open-ended questions, assumptive questions, and
interpretive questions.
b. Identify examples of the types of questions used in sales situations.
c. Explain the importance of questioning in selling.
d. Explain the timing of questions in selling.
e. Describe the relationship of customer type to questioning style.
f.
Explain guidelines for questioning customers.
g. Question customers to obtain information that will help to satisfy their needs.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Recommend specific product (SE:114, SE LAP 111)
a. Define the following terms: product substitution, trading-up, and trading down.
b. Explain the importance of meeting customers’ needs when recommending
specific products.
c. Explain guidelines for using buying motives when recommending specific
products.
d. Identify occasions when product substitution should be used.
e. Explain guidelines for recommending a specific product to customers.
f.
Demonstrate procedures for recommending specific products to customers.
needs and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 3
Course Description and Learning Outcomes
Page 3-31
Instructional
Area (cont’d)
SELLING: Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Calculate miscellaneous charges (SE:116)
a. Identify types of charges/discounts associated with purchases.
b. Explain how charges and discounts affect the price of purchases.
c. Read a tax table to determine the amount of tax on purchases.
d. Calculate tax on purchases.
e. Read shipping/delivery tables to determine the amount of shipping/delivery
charges.
f.
Read an alterations chart to determine alterations fees.
g. Explain how the use of technology can speed up calculations of charges and
discounts.
h. Explain the impact of incorrectly calculating charges/discounts.
i.
Manually calculate miscellaneous charges on purchases.
j.
Manually calculate discounts.
k. Calculate flat-rate charges and discounts.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Process special orders (SE:009) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Define special order.
b. Explain how acceptance of special orders affects retailers.
c. Explain criteria for accepting special orders.
d. Identify paperwork required to process special orders.
e. Explain the need to obtain specific information when processing special
orders.
f.
Explain how selling skills can be used in relation to special orders.
g. Explain procedures for handling special orders.
h. Demonstrate procedures for processing special orders.
Performance
Indicator and
Objectives
Process telephone orders (SE:835) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
a. Describe the nature of telephone orders in selling.
b. Discuss the importance of speaking slowly and clearly when processing
telephone orders.
c. Explain the need for accuracy when processing telephone orders in selling.
d. Discuss procedures for processing telephone orders.
e. Demonstrate how to process a telephone order.
needs and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Course Outline
Section 4
Section 4
Introduction
Course Outline
Page 4-2
An outline is provided to identify a recommended instructional sequence/schedule
for Marketing Principles. The outline identifies the week in which a learning outcome
should be taught and an abbreviated version of the performance indicators, or
learning outcomes. Immediately following the performance indicator, page numbers
are referenced for the planning guide sheets in Section 5 that provide detailed
information about each performance indicator.
Since the best curriculum is one that has been designed for a specific situation,
instructors should examine local considerations when making final curricular
decisions. These considerations involve such factors as:
Student
Ability
Level
Marketing Principles was developed with the assumption that students enrolled in
the course are average in ability and motivation. If an individual or a class does not
meet that assumption, the instructor should modify the curriculum by addressing
fewer learning outcomes at a slower pace than that recommended or by adding
more general business outcomes to increase the pace.
Instructional
Time
The amount of instructional time devoted to each performance indicator will vary.
The amount of time should be increased or decreased based on the overall ability
level of students and the complexity of the performance indicator, or learning
outcome. For example, less time might be spent on prerequisite performance
indicators and more time on specialist-level indicators.
CareerTechnical
Student
Organization
Use of a co-curricular student organization may affect the sequence of instruction
presented in the course outline. The instructor should carefully examine the make-up
of competitive events to ensure proper alignment with course content. In DECA, for
example, written tests are used at each level of competition, with the tests
progressing from general, core content to more industry-specific knowledge as
students progress from district/regional, to state, to national events.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Course Outline
Section 4
Week
Blueprint
Indicators
Page 4-3
Performance Indicators
Course Orientation [i.e., classroom expectations/procedures, major course
outcomes, and student organization]
1
2
1.01
Review of marketing and its importance (MK:001) [p. 5-3]
1.01
Marketing Functions (MK:002) [p. 5-5]
1.01
Marketing Functions (MK:002) [p. 5-5] (cont’d)
Employment Opportunities in Marketing (PD:024) [p. 5-7]
Analysis of Company Resources (CO:057) [p. 5-9] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
1.02
1.03
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
1.04
Marketing Strategies (MP:001) [p. 5-11]
1.04
Market Identification (MP:003) [p. 5-13]
1.05
Need for Marketing Data (IM:012) [p. 5-15]
1.05
Data Monitored for Marketing Decision-making (IM:184) [p. 5-17]
1.06
Writing Business Letters (CO:133) [p. 5-19] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.01
Nature and Scope of Selling (SE:017) [p. 5-21]Role of Customer Service in
2.01
Selling (SE:076) [p. 5-23]
2.02
Customer-service Mindset (CR:004) [p. 5-25] (SUPPLEMENTAL)Service
2.02
Orientation Through Communication (CR:005) [p. 5-27] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.02
2.02
Adapting Communication to Social/Cultural Differences of Clients (CR:019)
[p. 5-29 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Customer Inquiries (CR:006) [p. 5-31] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.03
Company Selling Policies (SE:932) [p. 5-33]
2.04
Interpreting Business Policies (CR:007) [p. 5-35] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.05
Handling Difficult Customers (CR:009) [p. 5-36] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.05
Handling Customer Complaints (CR:010) [p. 5-38] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.06
Grades and Standards (PM:019) [p. 5-40]
2.06
Warranties and Guarantees (PM:020) [p. 5-42]
2.07
Brand Promise (CR:001) [p. 5-44]
2.07
Reinforcing Company Image (CR:002) [p. 5-46]
2.08
Acquiring Product Information (SE:062) [p. 5-48]
2.08
Analyzing Product Information for Features and Benefits (SE:109) [p. 5-50]
2.09
Selling Process (SE:048) [p. 5-52]
2.10
Establishing Customer Relationship (SE:110) [p. 5-54] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.10
Determining Customer Needs (SE:111) [p. 5-56] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.10
Recommending Specific Product (SE:114) [p. 5-58] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Course Outline
Section 4
Blueprint
Week
12
13
14
15
Indicators
2.11
Calculating Miscellaneous Charges (SE:116) [p. 5-60]
2.12
Processing Special Orders (SE:009) [p. 5-62] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2.12
Processing Telephone Orders (SE:835) [p. 5-64] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
3.01
3.01
18
3.01
Technology in Product/Service Management (PM:039) [p. 5-70]
3.01
Ethics in Product/Service Management (PM:040) [p. 5-72]
3.02
Consumer Protection (PM:017) [p. 5-74] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Product Mix (PM:003) [p. 5-76]
3.04
Factors Used to Position Products (PM:042) [p. 5-78]
Product Branding (PM:021) [p. 5-80]
3.05
Corporate Branding (PM:206) [p. 5-83] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
3.06
Nature and Scope of Pricing (PI:001) [p. 5-85]
3.06
Ethics in Pricing (PI:015) [p. 5-87]
3.06
Technology in Pricing (PI:016) [p. 5-89]
Legal Considerations in Pricing (PI:017) [p. 5-91]
3.06
3.06
19
20
21
Product Life Cycles (PM:024) [p. 5-68]
Product Life Cycles (PM:024) [p. 5-68] (cont’d)
3.04
17
Nature and Scope of Product/Service Management (PM:001) [p. 5-66]
3.01
3.03
16
Performance Indicators
Factors Affecting Pricing Decisions (PI:002) [p. 5-93]
3.07
Nature and Scope of Channel Management (CM:001) [p. 5-95]
3.07
Customer Service and Channel Management (CM:002) [p. 5-97]
3.07
Channels of Distribution (CM:003) [p. 5-99]
3.07
Technology in Channel Management (CM:004) [p. 5-101]
3.08
3.08
Legal Considerations in Channel Management (CM:005) [p. 5-103]
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Ethical Considerations in Channel Management (CM:006) [p. 5-105]
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
22
23
24
3.09
Writing Informational Messages (CO:039) [p. 5-107] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.01
4.01
Role of Promotion (PR:001) [p. 5-109]
4.01
4.01
Promotional Mix (PR:003) [p. 5-113]
4.01
4.01
Technology in Promotion (PR:100) [p. 5-117]
Regulation of Promotion (PR:101) [p. 5-119]
Types of Promotion (PR:002) [p. 5-111]
Ethics in Promotion (PR:099) [p. 5-115]
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 4-4
Course Outline
Section 4
Week
Blueprint
Page 4-5
Performance Indicators
Indicators
25
26
27
28
4.02
4.03
Types of Advertising Media (PR:007) [p. 5-121]
Word of Mouth Channels (PR:247) [p. 5-123] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.03
4.04
Direct Marketing Channels (PR:089) [p. 5-125] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Sales Promotion Channels (PR:249) [p. 5-127]
4.04
Public-relations Channels (PR:250) [p. 5-129]
4.05
Writing Inquiries (CO:040) [p. 5-131] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.06
Nature and Scope of Marketing-information Management (IM:001) [p. 5-133]
4.07
Ethics in Marketing-Information Management (IM:025) [p. 5-135]
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
29
30
4.08
Technology in Marketing-Information Management (IM:183) [p. 5-137]
4.09
Regulation of Marketing-Information Management (IM:419) [p. 5-139]
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.10
Nature of Marketing Research (IM:010) [p. 5-141] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Nature of Marketing Research Problems/Issues (IM:282) [p. 5-144]
4.10
4.11
31
4.11
Marketing Research Design Methods (IM:284) [p. 5-146] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Options for Obtaining Marketing-research Data (IM:281) [p. 5-148]
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.12
Nature of Sampling Plans (IM:285) [p. 5-150] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Data-collection Methods (IM:289) [p. 5-152]
34
4.13
4.13
4.14
Characteristics of Effective Data-collection Instruments (IM:418) [p. 5-154]
Types of Rating Scales (IM:286) [p. 5-156]
Factors in Building a Clientele (SE:828) [p. 5-158] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
35
4.15
4.16
Ethics in Selling (SE:106) [p. 5-160]
Technology in Selling (SE:107) [p. 5-162] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4.16
Selling Regulations (SE:108) [p. 5-164] (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Course Evaluation
32
36
4.11
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Planning Guide Sheets
Section 5
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-2
Overview
The following planning guide sheets were developed for each of the performance
indicators in the Marketing Principles course guide. Each guide sheet identifies a
Knowledge and Skill Statement (standard), a Performance Element (topic), a
Performance Indicator, a Curriculum Planning Level, SCANS crosswalk, 21 st Century
Skills crosswalk, Objectives, a Sample Activity, and a listing of resources. The LAPs
and presentation software packages identified in the resource listing can be
purchased separately from MBAResearch to support instruction.
Sample
Activities
A sample activity is provided for each performance indicator. These activities can be
used to reinforce concepts, practice skills, extend knowledge, and/or assess student
performance. Considerations made in developing the activities are as follows:

The activities should promote critical thinking, decision-making, and
teamwork.

A variety of activities should be developed to appeal to different learning and
teaching styles and to maintain student interest.

The activities should reflect the intent of the performance indicators; e.g.,
concept-oriented activities should be developed for concept-oriented
performance indicators.

The activities should enable students to integrate and apply academic
content.

The activities should encourage the use of technology.

The activities should be viewed as examples that can be used for instructional
assistance. They should not be considered mandatory or all inclusive.

The activities should be developed from the student’s point of view; i.e., the
activities are for a student to complete, rather than instructional directions for
a teacher to implement.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-3
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the tools, techniques, and systems that businesses use to create
exchanges and satisfy organizational objectives
Performance
Element
Understand marketing’s role and function in business to facilitate economic
exchanges with customers.
Performance
Indicator
Explain marketing and its importance in a global economy (MK:001,
MK LAP 4)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Thinking Skills 12; Personal
Qualities 15
21st Century
Skills
Global Awareness 1; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: marketing and marketing concept.
Identify marketing activities.
Categorize items that are marketed.
Explain where marketing occurs.
Explain the elements of the marketing concept.
Explain the role of marketing in a private enterprise system.
Describe ways in which consumers and businesses would be affected if
marketing did not exist.
Explain how marketing benefits our society.
Identify ways in which local businesses apply the marketing concept
domestically and abroad, and determine how this affects the businesses’
customers. Write an article depicting your findings, and compete with
classmates to have the best paper selected for publication in the school/local
paper.
Keep a journal for one day to identify how marketing affects your life. Start the
journal the moment that you wake up. When finished, underline areas that are
impacted by global marketing. Discuss your journal entries with the class.
Locate an article about global marketing in the newspaper or on the Internet.
Summarize the article, and present it to the class.
Develop a list of ways that a school-based enterprise or a local business could
apply the marketing concept. Write a one-page report of your
recommendations and provide a rationale for those recommendations. Submit
the paper to your teacher for feedback.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Have it your way (Marketing)
[LAP: MK-004]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Have it your way (Marketing):
Instructor copy [LAP: MK-004]. Columbus, OH: Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-4
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 5-10).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Brown, B.J. & Clow, J.E. (2006). Introduction to business (pp. 196-205).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 4-11, 16-25]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp.17-22, 46-48]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [pp.
236-238]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 3-24]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 4-19, 116). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 4-7, 12-14, 20-26). New
York:McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Ivancevich, J. M., & Duening, T. N. (2007). Business principles, guidelines,
and practices (2nd ed.) [pp. 374-376]. Mason, OH: Thomson.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 6, 9-14, 18-20]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 4-27]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 4-18). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
American Marketing Association (2008, January 14). Definition of marketing.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Documents/American%20Ma
rketing%20Association%20Releases%20New%20Definition%20for%20M
arketing.pdf
Bell, A. (2008, April 12). Are you a marketing octopus or a marketing worm?
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.andrebell.com/blog/are-you-amarketing-octopus-or-a-marketing-worm
Business Owner’s Toolkit. (1995-2011). Overview: The marketing challenge.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.toolkit.cch.com/text/P03_1000.asp
Lake, L. (2011). Marketing basics for the small business. Retrieved May 2,
2011 from http://marketing.about.com/cs/sbmarketing/l/aa060103a.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Have it your way (Marketing)
[LAP: MK-004: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Magos, A. (1995-2011). Ask Alice about marketing 101. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.toolkit.cch.com/advice/mark101.asp
NetMBA. (2002-2010). The marketing concept. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.netmba.com/marketing/concept/
Tutor2u.net. (n.d.). Free marketing study resources. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.tutor2u.net/marketing/default.html
WiseGeek.com. (2003-2011). What is marketing? Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-marketing.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-5
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the tools, techniques, and systems that businesses use to create
exchanges and satisfy organizational objectives
Performance
Element
Understand marketing’s role and function in business to facilitate economic
exchanges with customers.
Performance
Indicator
Describe marketing functions and related activities (MK:002, MK LAP 1)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5; Systems 15; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: channel management, marketing-information
management, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and
selling.
Explain the purposes of each marketing function.
Describe the importance of each marketing function to marketing.
Explain the interrelationships among marketing functions.
Make a list of all of the goods and services that you have used in the past 24
hours, and respond to the following questions:
a. How did you come to use these goods/services?
b. How did you find out about these goods/services?
c. Where did you obtain these goods/services?
d. How much did these goods/services cost?
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2006). Work the big six (Marketing
functions) [LAP: MK-001]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2006). Work the big six (Marketing
functions): Instructor copy [LAP: MK-001]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 23-24).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 6-8, 473]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 46-48]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company,
Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [pp.
236-238]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
4-7). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Ivancevich, J. M., & Duening, T. N. (2007). Business principles, guidelines,
and practices (2nd ed.) [p. 371]. Mason, OH: Thomson.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 5-6, 35-36, 88-89, 110,
117, 132-133, 140-144). Mason, OH: South-Western/Thomson Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-6
Business Technology Curriculum. (n.d.). International marketing. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from
http://www.educ.uidaho.edu/bustech/International_Business/Advance/mar
keting.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Distribution decisions. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/distribution-decisions.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Managing products. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/managingproducts.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Marketing research. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/marketingresearch.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Personal selling. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/personalselling.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Pricing decisions. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/pricingdecisions.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Promotion decisions. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/promotiondecisions.htm
Mccormack, R. W. (2011). Functions of marketing - market and marketing
philosophies. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://ezinearticles.com/?Functions-of-Marketing---Market-and-Marketing-Philosophies&id=3681188
Marketing basics. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
www.mjsd.k12.wi.us/mhs/depts/business/teachers/bruechert/documents/
MarketingBasics1.ppt
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2006). Work the big six (Marketing
functions) [LAP: MK-001: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-7
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands concepts, tools, and strategies used to explore, obtain, and
develop in a business career
Performance
Element
Understand career opportunities in marketing to make career decisions.
Performance
Indicator
Explain employment opportunities in marketing (PD:024)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12; Personal
Qualities 13, 16
21st Century
Skills
Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy 1, Critical Thinking
and Problem Solving 1, Communication and Collaboration 1, Information
Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Identify types of businesses that offer careers in marketing.
Contrast marketing careers with careers in medicine.
Explain why jobs in marketing provide career potential.
Describe the following marketing careers:
(1) Marketing research
(2) Advertising
(3) Product management
(4) Distribution/Warehousing
(5) Sales
(6) Retailing
(7) Service marketing
(8) Customer service
(9) Public relations
Describe well-recognized traits and skills needed for success in marketing
careers.
Select a marketing occupation of interest, and collect information about it from
as many resources as possible. Obtain the following pieces of information:
a. Marketing occupation
b. Duties and responsibilities
c. Educational requirements
d. Recommended courses
e. Employment outlook
f.
Salary range
g. Schools offering training
h. Perquisites (Perks)
i.
Lifestyle associated with the occupation
j.
Geographic availability of jobs
k. Personal traits needed
l.
Work environment
m. Example of a positive/negative work experience
n. Pictures of people in the occupation
o. List of sources of career information
Create a notebook from the collected information. Present the information to
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-8
the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp xlix - liv).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 4-8]. Mason, OH: Thomson/SouthWestern.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
20, 42, 68, 90, 118, 142, 172, 192, 212, 230, 250, 272, 288, 308, 328,
352, 376, 394, 416, 434, 476, 496, 516, 5387, 560, 582, 604, 624, 648,
668, 688, 712, 732,797-799). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Kelly-Plate, J. & Volz-Patton, R. (2004). Exploring careers (4th ed.) [p. 313].
Woodland Hills, CA: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 18-20]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Software/
Online
CareerOverview.com. (2011). Marketing careers, jobs, and training
information. Retrieved May 16, 2011, from
http://www.careeroverview.com/marketing-careers.html
Careers-in-Marketing.com. (1997-2011). Careers in marketing. Retrieved May
16, 2011, from http://www.careers-in-marketing.com/
Lake, L. (2011). Exploring careers and jobs in marketing. Retrieved May 16,
2011, from
http://marketing.about.com/od/exploremarketingcareers/l/aa052103a.htm
Northern Illinois University. (2011). Marketing careers. Retrieved May 16,
2011, from http://www.cob.niu.edu/mktg/careers.asp
University of Southern California Marshall School of Business. (2001-2011).
Marketing career paths and descriptions. Retrieved May 16, 2011, from
http://www.marshall.usc.edu/marketing/resources/resources-overview.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-9
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, strategies, and systems used to obtain and convey
ideas and information
Performance
Element
Read to acquire meaning from written material and to apply the information to
a task.
Performance
Indicator
Analyze company resources to ascertain policies and procedures (CO:057)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1; Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Distinguish between policies and procedures.
Discuss the need for company policies and procedures.
Describe the impact of ineffective policies and procedures.
Explain the importance of understanding company policies and
procedures.
Identify company resources that can be accessed for policies and
procedures.
Demonstrate how to analyze company resources to ascertain policies and
procedures.
Obtain samples of a business’s materials (e.g., handbook, employee policies,
departmental policies/procedures) from your teacher or place of employment.
Participate in a small-group activity to compare company policies/procedures
with those of your team members. As a group, record the policies and
procedures the group would want employees to follow in its own business.
Resources
Textbooks
Daft, R.L., & Marcic, D. (2009). Understanding management: Instructor’s
edition (6th ed.) [p.139]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
DuBrin, A. (2009). Essentials of management: Instructor’s edition (8th ed.) [pp.
135-139]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 106-107). New
York: AMACOM.
Lesikar, R.V. & Flatley, M.E. (2005). Basic business communication: Skills for
empowering the Internet generation (10th ed.) [pp. 98-99]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lussier, R.N. (2003). Management fundamentals: Concepts, applications, skill
development (2nd ed.) [p. 129]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Williams, C.R. (2009). Management (5th ed.) [pp. 168, 290, 487]. Mason, OH:
Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
Amico, S. (n.d.) Employer policies & procedures. Retrieved May 26, 2011,
from http://smallbusiness.chron.com/employer-policies-procedures2704.html
Bartridge, T. (2005, March 9). Why are policies and procedures so important?
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-10
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.ameinfo.com/55422.html
Business Plan Hut. (2009). Types of business policies. Retrieved May 26,
2011, from http://www.businessplanhut.com/types-business-policies
Fox, T. (2011). Policies and procedures with customer focus. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Policies-And-Procedures-WithCustomer-Focus&id=1099245
Bizmanualz.com. ( 1999-2011). What’s the difference between policies and
procedures? Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://www.bizmanualz.com/information/2005/04/26/what%E2%80%99sthe-difference-between-policies-and-procedures.html
Safety 1st. (n.d.). Policies and procedures. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.angelfire.com/on3/safety1st/pol.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Performance
Element
Understands the concepts and strategies utilized to determine and target
marketing strategies to a select audience
Performance
Indicator
Explain the concept of marketing strategies (MP:001, MP LAP 2)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8-9, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication &
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
Employ marketing-information to develop a marketing plan.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-11
Define the following terms: marketing mix, product, place, promotion,
price, goals, strategies, and tactics.
Identify the components of the marketing mix.
Describe the importance of each of the components of the marketing mix.
Explain the relationship of goals, strategies, and tactics.
Describe the importance of marketing strategies.
Explain the factors that may cause marketing strategies to change.
Explain the importance of strategies in the marketing mix.
Imagine that you are the marketing manager for your school’s play or other
school activity. Identify strategies that you would use to market the
play/activity. Explain why you would use them, and summarize your plan in a
brief presentation for the play/activity directors.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Pick the mix (Marketing
strategies) [LAP: MP-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Pick the mix (Marketing
strategies): Instructor copy [LAP: MP-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 207-215). Woodland Hills, CA: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 37-49).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 19-20, 94-97, 220-231]. Mason,
OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 20-25, 61, 183-185, 250-251, 317-318, 328-329, 414415, 469]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [p.
239]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 16-17]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
16-19). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 7-12, 38-41). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-12
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 16-18]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp. 61-62,
142]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 32-40]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 32-36). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Exforsys. (2011, January 4). The importance of marketing. Retrieved May 4,
2011, from http://www.exforsys.com/career-center/marketingmanagement/importance-of-marketing.html
Free World Academy. (2005). FW15—marketing mix. Retrieved May 4, 2011,
from http://www.freeworldacademy.com/newbizzadviser/fw15.htm
Harris, B., Jr. (2000-2011). “Strategies, missions and goals…oh my!” The
importance of getting your planning terminology right. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.marketingprofs.com/3/harris3.asp?sp=1#split
Kyle, B. (2001-2011). 7 ways to improve profit through both long- and shortterm strategies. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.websitemarketingplan.com/small_business/marketingmix.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Pick the mix (Marketing
strategies) [LAP: MP-002: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing mix. (2002-2007). Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://universityessays.tripod.com/marketing_mix.html
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Marketing mix. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_marketing_mix.htm
Osterberg, L. (2007). Change your small business marketing strategy even if
it’s working. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.sideroad.com/Small_Business_Marketing/small-businessmarketing-strategy.html
QuickMBA. (1999-2010). The marketing mix. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/mix/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-13
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies utilized to determine and target
marketing strategies to a select audience
Performance
Element
Employ marketing-information to develop a marketing plan.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the concept of market and market identification (MP:003, MP LAP 3)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 8-9, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication &
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: market, target market, mass marketing,
marketing segments, market segmentation, demographic segmentation,
geographic segmentation, psychographic segmentation, and behavioral
segmentation.
Explain the importance of target markets to businesses.
Describe advantages and disadvantages of mass marketing.
Describe advantages and disadvantages of using market segments.
Explain why the use of market segments is increasing.
Describe demographic characteristics that are analyzed by marketers.
Explain the value of geographic segmentation.
Discuss the value of psychographic segmentation.
Describe types of behavioral segmentation.
Create a phrase or description that you would use to promote a new skin
cream to the following markets:
a. Female athletes
b. Physicians
c. Men over 40
d. Teenage girls
e. Women in other global regions (e.g., Asia, Europe, Latin America, etc.)
Select a national company, and search online to determine its target market.
Identify five things the business does to appeal to that market. Record your
findings, and discuss them with a classmate, identifying additional things the
business could do to attract its target market.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Have we met? (Market
identification) [LAP: MP-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Have we met? (Market
identification): Instructor copy [LAP: MP-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 118, 125). Woodland Hills, CA: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 47-48.
287-295, 300). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-14
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 166-170, 248]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 183-184, 185, 193-202]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 142-157]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G. & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
12-17, 37-41, 741, 743). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 36-37, 209-222). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 158-161, 163-166, 182-196]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp.151154]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 60-84]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Bangs, D.H., Jr. (2002). The market planning guide (6th ed.) [p. 18]. Marketing
Education Resource Center (Distributor).
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 33-34). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Targeting markets. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/targetingmarkets.htm
Lake, L. (2011). Marketing basics for the small business. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from
http://marketing.about.com/od/marketingbasics/a/smmktgbasics.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Customers and marketing. Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=30%3Aseg
mentation-targeting-and-positioning&catid=2%3Amarketinglectures&Itemid=1
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Segmentation, targeting, and positioning. Retrieved May
4, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=30%3Aseg
mentation-targeting-and-positioning&catid=2%3Amarketinglectures&Itemid=1
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Have we met? (Market
identification) [LAP: MP-003: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Peppers, D. & Rogers, M. (2010). Mass marketing reaches for customer value.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.1to1media.com/printview.aspx?ItemID=29127#a1
Tutor2U. (n.d.). Market segmentation—Targeting strategies. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.tutor2u.net/business/marketing/segmentationtargeting-strategies.html
Tutor2U. (n.d.). Market segmentation—Why segment markets? Retrieved May
2, 2011, from
http://www.tutor2u.net/business/marketing/segmentation_why.asp
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-15
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the need for marketing data (IM:012, IM LAP 12)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 9, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication
Objectives
a. Define the following terms: facts, estimates, predictions, relationships, and
marketing information.
b. Identify types of information used in marketing decision-making.
c. Identify types of marketing information useful to marketers.
d. Describe ways that marketers use marketing information.
e. Explain the impact of marketing information on marketers.
Sample
Activity
Identify a current problem in marketing. Ask another student to describe types
of marketing information that could be obtained to resolve the problem. Ask the
class to react to the recommendations.
Resources
LAPs
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Data do it (Need for marketing
data) [LAP: IM-012]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Data do it (Need for marketing
data): Instructor copy [LAP: IM-012]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
32-35, 59-60, 94-96]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 250-251,
254, 266-267). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 116-123]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp.46-47, 242, 244-245]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 170-171]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
6, 592-603). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 215-217]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 208-209]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[pp. 35-36]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
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Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 22-23, 39-40). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
ARDictionary. (2004-2010). Estimate. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://ardictionary.com/Estimate
Jacobs, P. (2006, April 26). Predicting your company’s future. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://www.microsoft.com/ireland/midsizebusiness/businessvalue/predictfut
ure.mspx
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=22:marketin
g-research&catid=2:marketing-lectures
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Data do it (Need for marketing
data) [LAP: IM-012: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Tutor2u.net. (n.d.). Market research—uses. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://tutor2u.net/business/marketing/research_uses.asp
What is a fact? (n.d.). Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.chisagolakes.k12.mn.us/schools/middle_school/msmediacenter
factopinion.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-17
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Identify data monitored for marketing decision making (IM:184, IM LAP 11)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8-9, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication 1; Information
Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: request and complaint reports, lost sales
reports, call reports, and activity reports.
Explain information contained in sales and expense reports that is
monitored for marketing decision-making.
Describe information in reports provided by salespeople that is monitored
for use in marketing decision-making.
Discuss information about customers that is monitored for marketing
decision-making.
Explain information about competitors that is monitored for marketing
decision-making.
Demonstrate procedures for identifying information to monitor for
marketing decision-making.
Talk with a businessperson about how her/his company monitors competitors’
activities. Find out what activities are monitored and what techniques are used
to monitor them. Discuss how web sites are being used to monitor competitors.
Write a one-page report of your findings.
Resources
LAPs
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Data diving (Identifying
information monitored for marketing decision making) [LAP: IM-011].
Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Data diving (Identifying
information monitored for marketing decision making): Instructor copy
[LAP: IM-011]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
112-113]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 252).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 304,
598-600].Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
594). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 242-250). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Section 5
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Hair, J.F., Anderson, R.E., Mehta, R., & Babin, B.J. (2009). Sales
management: Building customer relationships and partnerships (pp. 391399). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 64-65). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Johnston, M.W., & Marshall, G.W. (2009). Sales force management (9th ed.)
[pp. 164-167, 171-172, 444-446]. New York: McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Manning, G.L., Reece, B.L., & Ahearne, M. (2010). Selling today: Creating
customer value (11th ed.) [pp. 197, 335, 359-362]. Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall.
Software/
Online
Aware. (1995 - 2011). Competitor analysis—A brief guide. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.marketing-intelligence.co.uk/resources/competitoranalysis.htm
Business Owner’s Toolkit. (1995-2011). Internal secondary market research.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.toolkit.com/small_business_guide/sbg.aspx?nid=P03_3020
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Data diving (Identifying
information monitored for marketing decision making) [LAP: IM-011:
Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Early 2011).
MMC Learning. (1996-2009). Market research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.multimediamarketing.com/mkc/marketresearch/
Moran, R. (2009, December 5). Market research trends for 2010. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://www.pollster.com/blogs/market_research_trends_for_201.php
WannaLearn.com. (2003, July 10). Marketing tutorial: Marketing research.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.wannalearn.com/Business_and_Careers/Marketing/Marketing
_Tutorial/marketing-research.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-19
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, strategies, and systems used to obtain and convey
ideas and information
Performance
Element
Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.
Performance
Indicator
Write business letters (CO:133) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Write a business letter, and transmit it as an e-mail attachment to your teacher.
The letter should describe a target market you have identified for a good,
service, or idea that you intend to market to or should explain the nature of a
business that you are interested in owning.
Identify types of business letters.
Describe the components of an effective business letter.
Explain the guidelines for business-letter writing.
Write a business letter.
Resources
Textbooks
Bovée, C. L., & Thill, J.V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.) [pp.
98, 169, 180, 219-220, 231-232, 234-235, 272-274,277, 472, 605-607, A-1
– A-16]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Clark, B.; Sobel, J.; & Basteria, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics (2nd ed.) (pp.
676-679). Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
189). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Gorman, T. (2005). The complete idiot’s guide to business letters and memos
(2nd ed.) [pp. 15-26]. Indianapolis: Alpha Books/Penguin Group.
Kimball, C. & Van Gelder, J. (2007). Ultimate book of business letters
(pp. 1-17). Madison, WI: Entrepreneur Press.
Lesikar, R.V. & Flatley, M.E. (2005). Basic business communication: Skills for
empowering the Internet generation (10th ed.) [pp. 94-95, 554-572]. New
York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Locker, K.O., & Kaczmarek, S.K. (2007). Business Communication: Building
critical skills (3rd ed.) [pp. 129-137]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Souter, N. (2007). Persuasive writing: How to make words work for you
(pp. 111-127). New York: Sterling.
Software/
Online
Business-letters.com. (2011). How to write an effective business letter.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.business-letters.com/businessletters.htm
Connor, P. (1993-2011). Guides to writing business letters. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from
http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/documents/business_writing/business_l
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-20
etter/
EnglishClub.com. (1997-2011). Business Letters in English. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.englishclub.com/business-english/businessletters.htm
Fawcett, S. (2009). Business letters: Do you really know what they are?
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.marketingsource.com/articles/view/3939
Trawick, L. (1995-2011). Writing the basic business letter. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/653/01/
The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (1998-2007).
Business Letters. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/business.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-21
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs
and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature and scope of the selling function (SE:017, SE LAP 117)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy 2; Critical
Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Sample
Activity
Write a brief paper about how selling affects economic decision making in
society. Submit the paper to your teacher for review.
Define the term selling.
Identify individuals, groups, or agencies that sell.
Explain reasons that customers buy goods and services.
Identify types of items that are sold.
Explain where selling occurs.
Describe how products are sold.
Describe the role of selling in a market economy.
Explain personal characteristics of salespeople that are essential to
selling.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Sell away (The nature and
scope of selling) [LAP: SE-117]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Sell away (The nature and
scope of selling): Instructor copy [LAP: SE-117]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 563571). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 413-414, 454-459]. Mason,
OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 563-568]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.)
[pp. 237-238]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 498-502]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 260-264). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 1-2,
8-9, 26-28]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 479-481]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 396398]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 140-141). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 4-7, 9-12). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Dolak, D. (1999-2010). Sales and personal selling. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.davedolak.com/psell.htm
Jensen, D. (n.d.). Retail vs wholesale. Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://www.jenetek.com/Papers/Retail%20vs%20Wholesale.pdf
Mansfield Sales Partners. (2011, March 7). B2b vs b2c sales, similarities
and differences. Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://www.mansfieldsp.com/mansfield-sales-blog/bid/50959/B2B-vsB2C-Sales-Similarities-and-Differences
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Sell away (The nature and
scope of selling) [LAP: SE-117: Presentation Software]. Columbus,
OH: Author.
McCall, K.L. (2011). Top five traits you gotta have to sell. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://sbinformation.about.com/cs/sales/a/uutraits.htm
Stowe, T. (2007). A simple sales strategy: Define what selling is! Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.salesconversation.com/issue5.html
ZeroMillion.com (2002-2009). 3. How to understand your customers.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.zeromillion.com/business/sales-marketing/understandingcustomers.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Page 5-22
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-23
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs
and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the role of customer service as a component of selling relationships
(SE:076, SE LAP 130)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6;
Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a. Distinguish between customer service as a process and customer
service as a function.
b. Describe how businesses can use customer service to beat their
competition.
c. Discuss factors that influence customer expectations of customer
service.
d. Explain how customer service facilitates sales relationships.
e. Identify pre-sales opportunities for providing customer service that can
facilitate sales relationships.
f. Identify post-sales opportunities when customer service can be
provided to facilitate sales relationships.
g. Discuss actions a salesperson can take to make the most of her/his
customer service activities.
Sample
Activity
Analyze the role of customer service in a business's sales training program
to determine how the business emphasizes customer service as a
component of selling. Write a synopsis of the findings.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Go beyond the sale
(Customer service in selling) [LAP: SE-130]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Go beyond the sale
(Customer service in selling): Instructor copy [LAP: SE-130].
Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 434,
577). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 461-464]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 620-628]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 504-505]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 320-327). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-24
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams,
M.R. (2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp.
42, 240-252]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 403404]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 51-52, 114-117). Mason,
OH: South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Alessandra, T. (n.d.). After-sale follow through: A juggling act that pays off.
Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://getmotivation.com/articlelib/articles/talessandra_sales_followup.
htm
BusinessTown.com. (2001-2003). Customer-focused selling. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.businesstown.com/sales/facecustomer.asp
Hoagland-Smith, L. (n.d.). Increase sales to your business by consistent
excellent customer service. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.evancarmichael.com/Business-Coach/137/Increase-Salesto-Your-Business-By-Consistent-Excellent-Customer-Service.html
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Go beyond the sale
(Customer service in selling) [LAP: SE-130: Presentation Software].
Columbus, OH: Author.
Ward, S. (2011). 4 ways to provide customer service that outshines your
competitor. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://sbinfocanada.about.com/cs/marketing/a/shinycustserv.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-25
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Performance
Indicator
Demonstrate a customer-service mindset (CR:004) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Interpersonal 11,14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 5-6; Thinking Skills 12; Personal
Qualities 14-15,17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Identify beliefs held by employees who have a customer-service mindset.
Describe the importance of exhibiting a customer-service mindset.
Identify occasions when marketing employees can exhibit a customerservice mindset.
Describe guidelines for exhibiting a customer-service mindset.
Demonstrate a customer-service mindset.
Select an employee whom you can observe to identify that person’s efforts in
exhibiting a customer-service mindset. Record your observations, and share
them with a small group of classmates. As a group, create a list of the five
most unique ways that employees exhibited a customer-service mindset.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 238-246). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p.168, 319,
459). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 620-627]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 108-111, 208-209,
221). New York: AMACOM.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 324-327). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [p. 240-252].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 37, 527]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Art of customer service. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/Mastering-the-Artof-Customer-Service.id-5548.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-26
Fast Company. (2007, February 22). Customer service is a mindset. Retrieved
May 26, 2011, from http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/fast-companystaff/fast-company-blog/customer-service-mindset-0
Kelly, J. (2011, May 13). Today’s customer service requires new mindset, new
technology. Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://wikibon.org/blog/today%E2%80%99s-customer-service-requiresnew-mindset-new-technology/
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Customer service and marketing—Managing
customers. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/managingcustomers/customer-service-and-marketing.htm
Miller, A. (1999-2011). Customer service tips and techniques. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://www.businessknowhow.com/marketing/cstips.htm
Mindtools.com. (1996-2011). Customer service mindset. Retrieved May 26,
2011, from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCDV_77.htm
Smikle, J.L. (2002, September). Creating the service mindset: Where does it
start? Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.thinkhdi.com/hdi2003/downloads/CreatetheServiceMindset.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Performance
Indicator
Reinforce service orientation through communication (CR:005)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2,5-6; Thinking
Skills 12; Personal Qualities 15
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
d.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-27
Define the term service orientation.
Explain the relationship between communication and service.
Identify ways in which employees in business and marketing can
demonstrate a service orientation.
Demonstrate procedures for reinforcing a service orientation through
communication.
Select a job in marketing, and write five ways or statements that an employee
in that role could reinforce a service orientation through communication.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p.168, 319,
459). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 620-627]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 108-111, 208-209,
221). New York: AMACOM.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 324-327). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Gorman, T. (2005). The complete idiot’s guide to business letters and memos
(2nd ed.) [pp. 195-208]. Indianapolis: Alpha Books/Penguin Group.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 30, 240252]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 37, 527]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
AICPA. (2006, September 19). Customer service tips—cultivatiing a service
orientation. Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://www.aicpa.org/Career/Marketing/Pages/ClientService4.aspx
Pedersen, J. (2011). Communication and customer service. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.enotalone.com/article/2540.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-28
Pham, L. (2010, July 23). Customer service orientation. Retrieved May 26,
2011, from http://www.suite101.com/content/customer-service-orientationa265132
Ross, G. (2008, February 17). Three communication tips to help maintain
customer loyalty. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.allbusiness.com/technology/software-services-applicationsinternet-social/6789119-1.html
Service orientation. (n.d.). Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.uncg.edu/hrs/serorien.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
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Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Performance
Indicator
Adapt communication to the cultural and social differences among clients
(CR:019) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Interpersonal 11, 14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 5-6; Thinking Skills 12; Personal
Qualities 15, 17
21st Century
Skills
Global Awareness 2; Communication and Collaboration 1, 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Discuss the purpose of adapting communication to a client’s cultural or
social community.
Explain the importance of context in communication.
Discuss reasons for adapting communication to the cultural or social
differences among clients.
Explain skills associated with adapting communication (e.g., empathy, risk
taking, problem solving, etc.).
Describe ways to adapt communication to the cultural or social
environment of clients.
Demonstrate how to adapt communication to the cultural or social
differences among clients.
Participate with a team member to develop a skit showing how you would
adapt your communication to the cultural/social differences among clients.
Explain the situation to the class. Present the skit to classmates, while they
identify and record how you adapted communication to the situation. At the
end of the skit, ask classmates to explain what they observed and how they
could improve communication.
Resources
Textbooks
Beebe, S.A.; Beebe, S.J.; & Redmond, M.V. (2008). Interpersonal
communication: Relating to others (5th ed.) [pp. 88-120]. Boston:
Pearson/A and B.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 149-153).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Bovée, C. L., & Thill, J.V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.) [pp.
68-83]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 177]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
86). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Lesikar, R.V. & Flatley, M.E. (2005). Basic business communication: Skills for
empowering the Internet generation (10th ed.) [pp. 452-467]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Locker, K.O., & Kaczmarek, S.K. (2007). Business Communication: Building
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
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critical skills (3rd ed.) [pp. 40-50]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Morrison, T. & Conaway, W.A. (2006). Kiss, bow, or shake hands: The
bestselling guide to doing business in more than 60 countries. Avon, MA:
Adams Media.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 108, 172-173, 377].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Advanced cross cultural communication. (2008, Winter). Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.sba.pdx.edu/faculty/amlei/alaccess/576/Class8.pdf
Brown, S. (2009, May 14). Understanding cultural differences in business.
Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://www.suite101.com/content/understanding-cultural-differences-inbusiness-a117469
Cultural differences and international business communication. (n.d.).
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.content4reprint.com/business/communication/culturaldifferences-and-international-business-communication.htm
Hurley, L. (2009, March 8). The importance of understanding cultural
differences in business. Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://www.helium.com/items/657179-the-importance-of-understandingcultural-differences-in-business
Ngomsi, E. (2003-2009). Bridging cultures in the business workplace.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.yan-koloba.com/articles.html
Wilson, B. (n.d.). Cross-cultural communications in business. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://faculty.business.utsa.edu/bjwilson/CrossCultural%20Comm%20in%20Business.ppt
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-31
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Performance
Indicator
Respond to customer inquiries (CR:006) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Interpersonal 11, 14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 5-6; Thinking Skills 12; Personal
Qualities 15, 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1
Objectives
Sample
Activity
a. Explain the nature of customer inquiries.
b. Identify the types of customer inquiries.
c. Discuss the importance of possessing knowledge of the company (e.g.,
policies, history, capabilities, etc.).
d. Discuss the importance of possessing adequate product knowledge.
e. Describe guidelines for handling customer inquiries.
f. Demonstrate use of proper procedure for solving a customer inquiry in a
marketing situation.
Observe your teacher’s demonstration of the guidelines for handling customer
inquiries. Using a performance checklist, evaluate the teacher’s demonstration.
Discuss your ratings with the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Beebe, S.A.; Beebe, S.J.; & Redmond, M.V. (2008). Interpersonal
communication: Relating to others (5th ed.) [pp. 154-155]. Boston:
Pearson/A and B.
Bovée, C. L., & Thill, J.V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.) [pp.
22-23, 223-226, 266-271, 604-605, 607]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson
Prentice Hall.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 588-590]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 8-9). New York:
AMACOM.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 266, 324-327). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Software/
Online
Anton Systems. (2011). Customer inquiry management. Retrieved May 26,
2011, from http://www.antonsystems.com/solutions-customer-servicecustomer-inquiries/
BNET. (2007, May 2). Dealing with customer inquiries. Retrieved May 26,
2011, from http://www.bnet.com/article/dealing-with-customerinquiries/64264
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-32
English, T. (2011, January 13). How tow handle customer inquires and
complaints. Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://www.ehow.com/how_7775711_handle-customer-inquiriescomplaints.html
Hicks, T. (2010, December 29). Benefits of keeping good records on customer
service inquiries. Retrieved May 26, 2011, from
http://www.gzyn.com/cmp/contentReadingActions.do?method=readArticle
&id=9781&edition=1&title=Benefits+of+Keeping+Good+Records+on+Cust
omer+Service+Inquiries%0D%0A
Online Business Advisor. (2006). Respond to customer inquiries and
complaints promptly. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.onlinebusadv.com/index.php?PAGE=161
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-33
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain company selling policies (SE:932)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: selling policies, selling-activity policies, termsof-sale policies and service policies.
Identify types of selling-activity policies.
Identify types of terms-of-sale policies.
Identify types of service policies.
Explain the importance of selling policies.
Describe the characteristics of selling policies.
Explain why selling policies are needed.
Describe external factors that affect selling policies.
Describe internal factors that affect selling policies.
Describe regulatory factors that affect selling policies.
Explain problems encountered with the use of selling policies.
Determine the selling policies followed by two direct competitors. Discuss the
similarities and differences between their policies.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 306-310, 325-326, 420-423). Boston: Houghton
Mifflin Company.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
270, 350-351, 555-556). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Futrell, C. M. (2006) Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through service
(9th ed.) [p. 184]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Gitman, L. J., & McDaniel, C. (2008). The future of business: The essentials (3rd
ed.) [pp. 540-541]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (p. 526). New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 41-42].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Levy, M., & Weitz, B. A. (2007). Retailing management (6th ed.) [pp. 251-252,
262]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Manning, G.L., Reece, B.L., & Ahearne, M. (2010). Selling today: Creating
customer value (11th ed.) [pp. 100-101]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice
Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-34
Bahls, S.C. & Bails, J.E. (2010). In a fix: How to set competitive prices without
being accused of price-fixing. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0DTI/is_5_28/ai_62710684
Consumer and environmental law. (n.d.). Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.shsu.edu/~klett/ch%2044%20new.htm
Dell. (2011). Dell’s online policies. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/policy/en/policy?c=us&l=e
n&s=gen&~section=012
eBay. (1995-2011). Selling practices policy. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://pages.ebay.ie/help/policies/selling-practices.html
Fasanella, K. (2006, May 19). Selling clothes to stores. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/selling_clothes_to_stores/
Grimes, K.D. (2007, April 6). Door-to-door sales. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.yoursolutions.net/mlm_articles/mlm_article_31.inc.php
International Chamber of Commerce. (2007). ICC international code of direct
selling. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.iccwbo.org/uploadedFiles/ICC/policy/marketing/pages/534%20
Direct%20selling%20code%202007%20edition.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-35
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance company image.
Performance
Indicator
Interpret business policies to customers/clients (CR:007) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 7; Interpersonal 11,14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2,5-6; Thinking
Skills 8,12; Personal Qualities 14-15,17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1; Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Sample
Activity
Keep a record of the policies that have to be interpreted for customers at a
school-based or work-based enterprise. Discuss the findings with the class.
Define the term business policy.
Identify characteristics of effective business policies.
Describe reasons for having business policies.
Explain types of business policies that affect customers.
Discuss the role of employees in interpreting business policies.
Explain when business policies should be interpreted.
Explain guidelines for interpreting business policies to customers.
Demonstrate procedures for interpreting business policies to customers.
Resources
Textbooks
Bovée, C.L., Thill, J.V., & Schatzman, B.E. (2004). Business communication
essentials (p. 271). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 106-107). New
York: AMACOM.
Gorman, T. (2005). The complete idiot’s guide to business letters and memos
(2nd ed.) [pp. 201-203]. Indianapolis: Alpha Books/Penguin Group.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 41-42].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
Bartridge, T. (2005, March 9). Why are policies and procedures so important?
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.ameinfo.com/55422.html
Council of Better Business Bureau, Inc. (2003). Sample privacy notice.
Retrieved April 28, 2008, from http://www.bbbonline.org/reliability/privacy/
Customer Expressions Corporation. (1999-2011). How to create a refund and
exchange policy? Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.customerexpressions.com/cex/cexweb.nsf/(GetPages)/dc2a6e
b176d042bb8525701200521182
Fox, T. (2011). Policies and procedures with customer focus. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Policies-And-Procedures-WithCustomer-Focus&id=1099245
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Resolve conflicts with/for customers to encourage repeat business.
Performance
Indicator
Handle difficult customers (CR:009, CR LAP 3) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 7; Interpersonal 11,14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 5-6; Thinking
Skills 9,12; Personal Qualities 14-15,17
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1,3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-36
Define the following terms: disagreeable customer, domineering/ superior
customers, dishonest customers.
Identify types of difficult customers.
Describe categories of disagreeable customers.
Discuss categories of domineering/superior customers.
Describe ways in which customers are dishonest.
Identify situations in which customers become difficult.
Explain reasons for handling difficult customers.
Describe general guidelines for handling difficult customers.
Explain specific guidelines for handling types of difficult customers.
Demonstrate procedures for handling difficult customers.
Write a description of a situation you have encountered involving a difficult
customer in marketing. Give the description to the instructor who will select
three of the most representative examples written by the class.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Making mad glad (Handling
difficult customers) [LAP: CR-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Making mad glad (Handling
difficult customers): Instructor copy [LAP: CR-003]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 244-248). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 168).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 626-627]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
226). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 245248]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-37
McCalla, P. (2005). Retailing (p. 272). Woodland Hills CA: Glencoe/McGrawHill.
Software/
Online
Abrams, R. (2005, June 2). Dealing with difficult customers. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from
http://www.rhondaonline.com/content/hmrArticles_view.asp?sect=column
&did=460
Business-Software.com. (2011). Customer service tactics to handle difficult
customers. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.businesssoftware.com/crm/customer-service-tactics-to-handle-difficultcustomers.php
eHow Business Editor. (1999-2011). How to handle difficult clients. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_15404_handle-difficultclients.html
James, N. (2011). Handling difficult customers—Eight strategies. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Handling-DifficultCustomers---8-Strategies&id=20132
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2006). Making mad glad (Handling
difficult customers) [LAP: EI-001: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-38
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Resolve conflicts with/for customers to encourage repeat business.
Performance
Indicator
Handle customer/client complaints (CR:010) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 7; Interpersonal 11, 14; Systems 15; Basic Skills 5-6; Thinking
Skills 9, 12; Personal Qualities 14-15, 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1, Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Talk to a supervisor or manager of a local business to find out the nature of
frequently voiced complaints. Determine how the business responds to the
complaints. Report the findings to the class.
Define the term complaint.
Identify the costs associated with customer complaints.
Identify reasons for customer complaints.
Describe the benefits of customer complaints.
Explain the importance of appropriately handling customer complaints.
Explain procedures for handling customer complaints.
Demonstrate procedures for handling customer complaints.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 249-250). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 168).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 626-627]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
226). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 245248]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (p.150). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Buttle, F. (2008, March 11). Your customer complaints could be costing you
more than you realize. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.customerthink.com/article/your_customer_complaints_costing
_more
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-39
Customer Expressions. (1999-2011). Handling consumer complaints: Best
practice guides to consumer complaints handling. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from
http://www.customerexpressions.com/cex/cexweb.nsf/(GetPages)/2FEE2
95CD6D0BB1B85256FE900568660
Kurtus, R. (2007, June 6). Dealing with customer complaints. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://www.school-for-champions.com/tqm/complaints.htm
Marvell, C. (2003). Complaint handling is easy—Just make it memorable.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://customerservicezone.com/cgibin/links/jump.cgi?ID=5775
Rand, S. (2005, July 15). Customer complaints: How to handle them and keep
customers happy. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/5111/customer_complaints_how
_to_handle_them.html
Reeher, T. (n.d.). Handling customer complaints. Retrieved May 17, 2011,
from http://www.dhhs.state.nc.us/cstf/intranet/article_complaints.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the uses of grades and standards in marketing (PM:019,
PM LAP 8)
Level
Career-Sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Define the terms grades and standards.
Explain the interrelationship of grades and standards.
Describe what businesses do with products that fail to meet the lowest
standards.
Explain reasons for using grades and standards.
Describe ways that grades and standards aid the buying and selling
process.
Explain the importance of grades and standards in global trade.
Identify groups that develop grades and standards.
Describe types of standards.
Identify examples of graded products.
Participate in a scavenger hunt to find and collect as many grades and
standards for goods and services as possible. For each, identify its
purpose and the agency responsible (if applicable). Display and discuss
your collection.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Raise the bar (Grades and
standards) [LAP: PM-008]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Raise the bar (Grades and
standards): Instructor copy [LAP: PM-008]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 256-257]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
58].Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(p. 666). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Hoffman, K.D., & Bateson, J. (2006). Services marketing: Concepts,
strategies, & cases (3rd ed.) [pp. 335-338]. Mason, OH: Thomson
South-Western.
Lovelock, C., Wirtz, J., & Chew, P. (2009). Essentials of services marketing
(pp. 369-374). Singapore: Prentice Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-40
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 10, 246-247].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
ASTM International. (n.d.). Handbook of standardization. Retrieved May 4,
2011, from http://www.astm.org/NEWS/handbook02/index.html
Hearst Communications (2011). About the GHRI and the seal. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/producttesting/history/
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Raise the bar (Grades and
standards) [LAP: PM-008: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Toolcritic.com (2011). How we grade products. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.toolcritic.com/grades.html
United States Consumer Product Safety Commission. (n.d.). Find CPSC
product safety standards or guidance. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.cpsc.gov/cgi-bin/regs.aspx
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service.
(2011, January 28). Grading, certification, and verification. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from
http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ams.fetchTemplateData.do?templa
te=TemplateG&navID=GradingCertificationandVerfication&leftNav=Gr
adingCertificationandVerfication&page=Standards&description=Standa
rds&acct=AMSPW
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-41
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings.
Performance
Indicator
Explain warranties and guarantees (PM:020, PM LAP 4)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: warranty, express warranty, implied
warranty, full warranty, limited warranty, and guarantee.
Identify the provisions of a full warranty.
Distinguish between warranties and guarantees.
Identify the characteristics of an effective guarantee.
Describe the purposes of warranties and guarantees.
Explain the benefits of warranties and guarantees.
Describe government regulation of warranties and guarantees.
Find and read a product warranty, and answer the following questions:
a. Is the warranty full or limited?
b. If a manufacturer defect is found, how is the purchaser protected?
c. What is the procedure for obtaining repairs?
d. What disclaimers are cited?
e. Does the warranty expire? If so, when?
Resources
LAPs
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Promises, promises
(Warranties and guarantees) [LAP: PM-004]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Promises, promises
(Warranties and guarantees): Instructor copy [LAP: PM-004].
Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 95, 226, 266]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 257]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company,
Inc.
Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
584, 590-593]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 674-678). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 281-282]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
Marketing: A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp.
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Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
257-258]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Difference Between (2011). Difference between guarantee and warranty.
Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://www.differencebetween.net/business/difference-betweenguarantee-and-warranty/
Federal Trade Commission. (2006, December). A businessperson’s guide
to federal warranty law. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/business/adv/bus01.shtm
Federal Trade Commission. (2011). Consumer law: Warranty FAQ.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://consumerlaw.lawyers.com/warranty-law/Consumer-Law-Warranty-FAQ.html
Gustke, C. (2011). Guide to offering guarantees and warranties. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.business.com/guides/offeringguarantees-and-warranties-172/
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Warranties and guarantees
[LAP: PM-008: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
(Available Late Summer 2011).
Stone, D. (n.d.). Guarantees. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.davidstonelawyer.co.nz/legalbrochures/guarantees.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Reinforce company’s image to exhibit the company’s brand promise
Performance
Indicator
Identify company’s brand promise (CR:001)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 7, 10, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Select a local business to identify its brand promise. Record the brand
promise, and write a rationale for your findings. Participate in a small-group
activity to share your findings and rationale.
Page 5-44
Define the terms touch points, brand, and brand promise.
Explain the importance of a company’s brand promise.
Describe factors impacting a company’s brand promise.
Demonstrate how to identify a company’s brand promise.
Resources
Textbooks
Chiaravalle, B. & Schenck, B.F. (2007). Branding for dummies (pp. 96-98).
Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing, Inc.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 271-272, 274-285). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Kotler, P. & Keller, K.L. (2006). Marketing management (12th ed.) [pp. 274278]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated
brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 21-24, 212-213]. Mason, OH: South-Western
Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 249]. Boston: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Adamson, A. (2010, April 30). CMOs: Make a connection between brand
promise and purpose. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.forbes.com/2010/04/30/iceland-cisco-aflac-basf-brandingellen-page-cmo-network-allen-adamson.html
Asacker, T., VanAuken, B. & Daye, D. (2008, February 6). The language of
branding: “Brand promise”. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.brandingstrategyinsider.com/2008/02/the-language-of.html
George, R. (2003, September 16). Tapping into brand touchpoints. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://www.marketingprofs.com/3/george2.asp
Krueger, J.R. (2007, March 1). Brand promise: Providing the “second wow”.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.jckonline.com/article/CA6429130.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Smith, G. (2004, September 28). A brand is the sum of all touchpoints.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.marketingprofs.com/4/smith1.asp
Thakare, M. (2009, August 13). What is brand promise? Retrieved May 27,
2011, from http://communications.webalue.com/2009/08/13/what-isbrand-promise/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-46
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the techniques and strategies used to foster positive, ongoing
relationships with customers
Performance
Element
Reinforce company’s image to exhibit the company’s brand promise.
Performance
Indicator
Determine ways of reinforcing the company’s image through employee
performance (CR:002)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5, 7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8-9, 12, 13,
15, 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1, 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Discuss types of company images.
Describe factors that affect a company’s image.
Explain the importance of reinforcing the company’s image.
Describe ways that employees can reinforce the company’s image
through their performance.
Demonstrate how to determine ways to reinforce the company’s image
through employee performance.
Use the local business and its brand promise previously identified to determine
ways that the company’s employees reinforce the business’s image through
their performance. Record your findings and suggest additional ways for
employees to reinforce the company’s image.
Resources
Textbooks
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 360-367]. Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 14-15, 70-71, 114115). New York: AMACOM.
Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2008). Principles of marketing (12th ed.) [p. 206,
434]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Kotler, P. & Keller, K.L. (2006). Marketing management (12th ed.) [pp. 320322]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated
brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 399, 409-410]. Mason, OH: South-Western
Cengage Learning.
Performance Research Associates. (2007). Delivering knock your socks off
service (4th ed.) [pp. 3-7]. New York: AMACOM.
Zeithaml, V.A., Bitner, M.J., & Gremler, D.D. (2009). Services marketing:
Integrating customer focus across the firm (5th ed.) [pp. 492-508]. New
York: McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Software/
Online
Devarajan, R. (2003). Image is everything. Retrieved May 12, 2011, from
http://www.blonnet.com/2003/05/28/stories/2003052800180900.htm
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Section 5
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Encyclopedia of Business (2nd ed.). (2011). Corporate identity. Retrieved May
12, 2011, from http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/encyclopedia/ConCos/Corporate-Identity.html#IMPORTANCE_OF_CORPORATE_IMAGE
Hromadka, E. (2011). Brand awareness: Tips on building your company’s
image. Retrieved May 12, 2011,, from http://www.allbusiness.com/northamerica/united-states-indiana/1194553-1.html
Jena, C. (Feb. 26, 2007. Linking employees to organisational brand. Retrieved
May 12, 2011, from
http://www.aspiresys.com/newsevents/webpages/ExpressComputer/Linki
ng_employees.htm
Marken Communications. (2011). Corporate image, we all have one, but few
work to protect, project it. Retrieved May 12, 2011, from
http://www.markencom.com/docs/03mar13.htm
Robles, L. (2008, October 14). Employee image essential aspect of growing
your business. Retrieved May 12, 2011, from
http://utahpulse.com/featured_article/employee-image-essential-aspectgrowing-your-business
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-48
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire product knowledge to communicate product benefits and to ensure
appropriateness of product for the customer.
Performance
Indicator
Acquire product information for use in selling (SE:062)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Information Literacy 1, 2; ICT Literacy 1, 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Identify sources of product information that provide information for use in
selling.
Identify types of product information that can be useful in selling.
Cite occasions when product information can be used in sales
presentations.
Describe guidelines to follow when acquiring product information.
Demonstrate procedures for acquiring product information for use in
selling.
Examine product information accompanying five products sold by local
businesses. Record the sources and the types of product information
accompanying the products, and explain how the information can be used in
sales situations.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 311-314). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 575, 578579). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 465-467]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 588-590]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
266, 268). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 114-116, 184-185]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 42, 44,
72, 195-196]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Manning, G.L., Reece, B.L., & Ahearne, M. (2010). Selling today: Creating
customer value (11th ed.) [pp. 28-131]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice
Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-49
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 411]. Boston: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 10, 54-56, 131). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Bradley. S. V. (2011). The importance of top notch sales training. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://www.dealix.com/corporate/shownews.aspx?pressID=505
Deane, S. (2011). The importance of sales training on a daily basis. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Importance-Of-SalesTraining-On-A-Daily-Basis&id=945400
Vanover, T. (2011). Product knowledge—A true story that supports its
importance. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://ezinearticles.com/index.php?Product-Knowledge---A-True-Storythat-Supports-Its-Importance&id=1102494
Waters, S. (2011). Benefits of product knowledge. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from
http://retail.about.com/od/marketingsalespromotion/qt/product_knowldg.ht
m
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-50
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire product knowledge to communicate product benefits and to ensure
appropriateness of product for the customer.
Performance
Indicator
Analyze product information to identify product features and benefits (SE:109,
SE LAP 113)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 7, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1, 5; ICT Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: feature, benefit, obvious benefits, unique
benefits, hidden benefits, feature-benefit selling, and feature-benefit chart.
Identify sources of feature/benefit information.
Identify an example of an obvious or apparent benefit.
Identify an example of a unique or exclusive benefit.
Identify an example of a hidden benefit.
Describe how to prepare a feature-benefit chart for a product.
Prepare a feature-benefit chart for a product.
Create a feature-benefit chart for a product of interest to you. Review the chart
with a classmate, and discuss how the information could be used in a sales
situation.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Find features, boost benefits
(Feature-benefit selling) [LAP: SE-113]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Find features, boost benefits
(Feature-benefit selling): Instructor copy [LAP: SE-113]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 593-594]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 261-263). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 317-318]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 172,
185-187]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Kotler, P. & Keller, K.L. (2006). Marketing management (12th ed.) [pp. 256.
376]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Manning, G.L.; Reece, B.L.; & Ahearne, M. (2010). Selling today: Creating
customer value (11th ed.) [pp. 130-133]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice
Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-51
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 48-49, 55-56). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Brown, L. (2008, July 7). Sales 101: Features vs benefits. Retrieved May 27,
2011, from http://biznik.com/articles/sales-101-features-vs-benefits
Chance, J. (2007, January 22). Are you selling features or benefits? Retrieved
May 27, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Are-You-Selling-Features-orBenefits?&id=426582
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Consumable product features. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/product-decisions/consumable-product-features.htm
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Find features, boost benefits
(Feature-benefit selling) [LAP: SE-113: Presentation Software]. Columbus,
OH: Author.
Spitfire. (2002). Features and benefits chart. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.spitfire.us/training6.htm
The Negotiation Institute. (n.d.). Selling benefits & selling value: Demonstrating
the value of your product. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.negotiation.com/value.html
The Person to See. (n.d.). Features tell, Benefits sell. Retrieved May 27, 2011,
from http://www.thepersontosee.com/tpts/2007/03/features_tell_b.html
The State of Queensland. (2011). Why product feature and benefit lists help
sell products. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://skills.business.qld.gov.au/planning/614.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-52
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer
relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the selling process (SE:048, SE LAP 126)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Sample
Activity
Identify the components of the selling process.
Describe the importance of establishing relationships with customers.
Describe ways to discover customer needs.
Describe the components of prescribing solutions to customer needs.
Explain the importance of reaching closure in sales situations.
Describe aspects of reaching closure in sales situations.
Describe the importance of reaffirming the buyer-seller relationship.
Describe ways to reaffirm the buyer-seller relationship.
Explain similarities/differences in the ways businesses implement the
selling process.
Explain the importance of using a selling process.
Observe a sales presentation in which the salesperson used a selling process.
Given a list of the components of the selling process, identify what was said or
took place during the presentation that constituted each phase of the selling
process. Discuss the responses with the class.
Resources
LAPS
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Set your sales (Selling process)
[LAP: SE-126]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Late Summer 2011).
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Set your sales (Selling process):
Instructor copy [LAP: SE-126]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Late
Summer 2011).
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 573-577).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 468-472]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 576-584]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 508510]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009) Marketing essentials (pp.
278-287, 294-307, 314-319). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-53
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (p. 518). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [p. 12-15,
66]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 481-490]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 415]. Boston: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Franz, C. (n.d.). Dr. Seuss’s 3-step selling process. Retrieved May 4, 2011,
from http://www.statssheet.com/articles/article43052.html
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Activities in the selling process. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/theselling-process/1.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Principles of Marketing—The Selling Process.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principlesof-marketing/the-selling-process.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Selling and sales management. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=29:sales&cat
id=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Lesson—Personal selling. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_personal_selling.htm
Matthews, P. (n.d.). The selling process: Steps to success. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.sbdc.uga.edu/pdfs/matthews04.pdf
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Set your sales (Selling process)
[LAP: SE-126: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available
Late Summer 2011).
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-54
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Performance
Indicator
Establish relationship with client/customer (SE:110) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2,5-6; Thinking
Skills 7,12; Personal Qualities 15
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1; Social and Cross-cultural Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Describe the importance of establishing relationships with
customers/clients during the initial contact with them.
Explain techniques for establishing relationships with customers/clients
during the initial contact with them.
Identify factors affecting the choice of techniques to use in establishing
relationships with customers/clients during initial contact.
Describe characteristics of effective sales openings.
Explain procedures for establishing relationships with customers/clients
during initial contacts.
Demonstrate how to establish relationships with customers/clients during
the initial contact with them.
Given situations in which a salesperson is about to open the sales
presentation, write two openings that could be used for each situation. Discuss
the responses with the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 115-125). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 574-575).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 578-580]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
279-282). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 308-323]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 174175]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-55
Brooks, M. (2008, April 1). The five best sales openings. Retrieved May 27,
2011, from
http://www.eyesonsales.com/content/article/the_5_best_sales_call_openi
ngs/
Galper, A. (2000-2010). How to build great relationships through cold calling.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.hooverwebdesign.com/articles/cold-calling-tips.html
Initial contact. (n.d.). Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://media.techtarget.com/searchCRM/downloads/CyberSelling_Chapte
r_VII.pdf
Parinello, T. (2011). Crafting an opening sales statement. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from
http://www.entrepreneur.com/sales/presentations/article78614.html
Silverstein, R. (2007, July 25). How do I build customer rapport? Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from
http://www.entrepreneur.com/sales/salescolumnistraysilverstein/article182
144.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-56
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Performance
Indicator
Determine customer/client needs (SE:111) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 7, 12; Personal Qualities 15
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 4, Communication and Collaboration 1,
Information Literacy 1, Social and Cross-cultural Skills 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: open-ended questions, assumptive questions,
and interpretive questions.
Identify examples of the types of questions used in sales situations.
Explain the importance of questioning in selling.
Explain the timing of questions in selling.
Describe the relationship of customer type to questioning style.
Explain guidelines for questioning customers.
Question customers to obtain information that will help to satisfy their
needs.
Create a list of five products that you sell, and write three questions that could
be asked customers to determine their needs. Discuss the responses with the
class.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 336-344). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 581-583]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
285-287, 305). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 112-119]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N.; LaForge, R.W.; Avila, R.A.; Schwepker, C.H., Jr.; & Williams,
M.R. (2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp.
107-116, 221-222]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 78-80). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Brooks, M. (2006, November 21). Inside sales tip—how to use assumptive
questions. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?InsideSales-Tips---How-to-Use-Assumptive-Questions&id=365722
Daly, D. (2010, January 16). A questioning model for sales. Retrieved May 27,
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-57
2011, from http://sales20network.com/blog/?p=414
Graham, J.R. (2011). How to improve sales productivity: Asking questions
makes the sale. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.edwardlowe.org/index.elf?page=sserc&storyid=7520&function
=story
James, G. (2007, August 9). How to uncover customer needs. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://blogs.bnet.com/salesmachine/?p=98
JustSell.com. (1998-2011). Top 30 open-ended questions. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.justsell.com/salestools/openendedquestions.aspx
Rudin, A. (2007, November 26). The right sales questions will get the right
answers. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.customerthink.com/article/right_sales_question_get_right_ans
wers
Terrone, P. (2007, January). The four types of questions when dealing with
customers. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from http://earticles.info/e/a/title/The-four-types-of-questions-when-dealing-withcustomers/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-58
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales.
Performance
Indicator
Recommend specific product (SE:114, SE LAP 111) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-7; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 7, 12; Personal Qualities 15
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1, Communication and Collaboration 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: product substitution, trading-up, and trading
down.
Explain the importance of meeting customers’ needs when
recommending specific products.
Explain guidelines for using buying motives when recommending specific
products.
Identify occasions when product substitution should be used.
Explain guidelines for recommending a specific product to customers.
Demonstrate procedures for recommending specific products to
customers.
Develop a role-play situation in which product substitutions are suggested for
products with which you are familiar. Implement the role-play situation.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Recommend specific product
[LAP: SE-111]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Spring 2012)
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Recommend specific product:
Instructor copy [LAP: SE-111]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Spring
2012)
Textbooks
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 591-592]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials [p.
305]. Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 112-114]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 520-522). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N.; LaForge, R.W.; Avila, R.A.; Schwepker, C.H., Jr.; & Williams,
M.R. (2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp.
172, 185]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 48-50, 80-81, 149). Mason,
OH: South-Western/Thomson Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-59
Boyette, M. (2010, April 23). Upselling techniques that close new sales with old
prospects. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://rapidlearninginstitute.com/top-sales-dog/upselling-techniques-closenew-sales-old-prospects/
Chitwood, R.E. (2004). A buying motive feature-benefit matrix helps determine
a buyer’s “hot buttons”. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.maxsacks.com/tstimes/tstimes34.html#feature
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Recommend specific product
[LAP: SE-111: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author. (Available
Spring 2012)
West Cork Enterprise Board. (n.d.). Growing your sales. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.wceb.ie/download/1/growing%20your%20sales.doc
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-60
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Process the sale to complete the exchange.
Performance
Indicator
Calculate miscellaneous charges (SE:116)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5, 7-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-3, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
Sample
Activity
Identify types of charges/discounts associated with purchases.
Explain how charges and discounts affect the price of purchases.
Read a tax table to determine the amount of tax on purchases.
Calculate tax on purchases.
Read shipping/delivery tables to determine the amount of shipping/delivery
charges.
Read an alterations chart to determine alterations fees.
Explain how the use of technology can speed up calculations of charges
and discounts.
Explain the impact of incorrectly calculating charges/discounts.
Manually calculate miscellaneous charges on purchases.
Manually calculate discounts.
Calculate flat-rate charges and discounts.
Determine the types of special charges and discounts that are frequently
calculated at your place of employment. Discuss your findings with the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Brechner, R. (2009). Contemporary mathematics for business and consumers:
Annotated instructor’s edition (5th ed.) [pp. 225-234, 239-241, 650-652].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 436-437]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
335-341, 343, 574-581). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Hanson, M. (2010). Business math (17th ed.) [pp. 240, 425-431]. Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
ForYouForHome. (n.d.). Shipping rates/delivery. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.foryouforhome.com/GiftCerficatesWrapping.html
Lesson 42: Purchase and sales discounts, purchase and sales allowances.
(n.d.). Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.newlearner.com/courses/hts/baf3m/term3_class01b.htm
Mathematics How-to Library. (n.d.). Discount. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.teacherschoice.com.au/Maths_Library/Money/discount.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-61
NGP Printing Professionals. (n.d.). 6.5% Ohio retail sales tax chart. Retrieved
May 27, 2010, from http://www.ngpco.com/pdf/salestax.pdf
Ralph Lauren. (2008). Customer assistance: Clothing alteration pricing
schedule. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.ralphlauren.com/helpdesk/index.jsp?display=shopping&subdis
play=product
Yahoo Small Business. (2011). Creating a flat rate shipping rule. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/smallbusiness/store/manage/ordersettin
gs/ordersettings-22.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-62
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Process the sale to complete the exchange.
Performance
Indicator
Process special orders (SE:009) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 7-9, 12; Personal Qualities 15
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Sample
Activity
Define special order.
Explain how acceptance of special orders affects retailers.
Explain criteria for accepting special orders.
Identify paperwork required to process special orders.
Explain the need to obtain specific information when processing special
orders.
Explain how selling skills can be used in relation to special orders.
Explain procedures for handling special orders.
Demonstrate procedures for processing special orders.
Visit a local retailer to determine the following about special orders:
a. Types of special orders handled by the store
b. Importance of processing special orders
c. Procedures used in processing special orders
d. Forms used in processing special orders
Discuss the findings with the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Berman, B., & Evans, J.R. (2004). Retail management: A strategic approach
(9th ed.) [pp. 357, 371]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Cash, R. P., Thomas, C., Wingate, J. W., & Friedlander, J. S. (2006).
Management of retail buying (p. 208). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 54-57). New York:
AMACOM.
Software/
Online
Cooley, A. (2008). Special orders simplified. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.nurseryretailer.com/Article_Archives/article_detail.asp?Key=11
99
Hilti.com (2009-2010). Hilti special order products. Retrieved May 27, 2011,
from
http://www.us.hilti.com/holus/page/module/home/browse_main.jsf?lang=e
n&nodeId=-114823
Hotel-Towel.com. (n.d.). Custom orders: How to place a special order.
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from http://www.hotel-towel.com/custom.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-63
Pet Product News. (2008). Tip of the day: Tips from award winning retailers.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.marketingmypetbusiness.com/2008/01/tip-of-day-tips-fromaward-winning.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-64
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Process the sale to complete the exchange.
Performance
Indicator
Process telephone orders (SE:835) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-3, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 12; Personal Qualities 15, 17
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Describe the nature of telephone orders in selling.
Discuss the importance of speaking slowly and clearly when processing
telephone orders.
Explain the need for accuracy when processing telephone orders in
selling.
Discuss procedures for processing telephone orders.
Demonstrate how to process a telephone order.
Participate in a small-group activity composed of three students. As a group,
determine and record the actions that are important to take when processing
incoming telephone orders. Convert the actions into a “Yes/No” checklist that
can be used to evaluate someone’s processing of telephone orders. Identify
three incoming-call scenarios, and choose one scenario to role-play. Rotate
through the roles of salesperson, customer, and evaluator. After all scenarios
are presented, discuss the strengths and areas needing improvement.
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 47-48). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 54-57). New York:
AMACOM.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [p. 27].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Kotler, P. & Keller, K.L. (2006). Marketing management (12th ed.) [p. 611].
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Ogden, J.R. & Ogden, D.T. (2005). Retailing: Integrated retail management (p.
428). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
Performance Research Associates. (2007). Delivering knock your socks off
service (4th ed.) [pp. 78-86]. New York: AMACOM.
Software/
Online
Docstoc. (n.d.). Telephone sales order form template. Retrieved May 27, 2011,
from http://www.officearrow.com/sales-marketing/telephone-sales-orderoaiur-4797/preview.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-65
Egelhoff, T. (2004). How to sell on the phone. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://smalltownmarketing.com/phone.html
Griffin, L. (2011, March 29). Retail businesses take advantage of mobile phone
orders. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://coachjaynine.com/blog/?p=740
Lee, A. (2011, March 17). How to take orders by phone. Retrieved May 27,
1011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_8074074_orders-phone.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-66
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature and scope of the product/service management function
(PM:001; PM LAP 17)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Resources 3; Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Participate on a product team to identify a consumer product that your
team’s company wants to put on the market in two years. The team should
determine what the product is, why it is needed, who could use it, and what
steps the team will take in product planning. Team members should
propose product-related services that need to be considered for the product
and other products the company might add to this product’s line. Appoint a
group representative to present the team’s recommendations to the class.
Define the term product/service management.
Explain who is responsible for managing products/services.
Describe the benefits of product/service managing.
Describe the phases of product/service managing.
Describe factors affecting product/service managing.
Explain the role product/service management plays in marketing.
Resources
LAPs
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Rapping up products (Nature
of product/service management) [LAP: PM-017]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Rapping up products (Nature
of product/service management): Instructor copy [LAP: PM-017].
Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 207-209, 218-220). Woodland Hills, CA: McGrawHill/Glencoe.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 396397). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 6-7, 94-97, 473, 498, 625].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 47, 302]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 6, 634-647). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-67
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 262-267, 283285, 578-579 ]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Soloman, M. R., Marshall, G. W., & Stuart, E. W. (2008). Marketing: Real
people, real choices (5th ed.) [pp. 271-303]. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Pearson Prentice Hall.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 5, 62-63). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Haines, S. (2004, July 28). Product management and project management:
Two functions, two vital roles. Retrieved May 2, 2011,from
http://www.aipmm.com/html/newsletter/archives/000034.php
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Managing products. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/managing-products.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Products and services. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=26:
product&catid=2:marketing-lectures
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Rapping up products (Nature
of product/service management) [LAP: PM-017: Presentation
Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
McNamara, C. (n.d.). Product and service management (recurring activities
to manage a product or service). Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.managementhelp.org/prod_mng/prod_mng.htm
Sequent Learning Networks. (2010). Product manager’s resource guide for
organizations pursuing product management excellence. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.sequentlearning.com/articles.php
Sequent Learning Networks. (2010). Product management life cycle model.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.sequentlearning.com/templates.php
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Identify the impact of product life cycles on marketing decisions (PM:024)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Resources 3; Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1;
Flexibility and Adaptability 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: product life cycle, introduction, growth,
maturity, decline, pricing decisions, promotion decisions, place
decisions, and product decisions.
Identify stages of the product life cycle.
Describe the characteristics of each stage of the product life cycle.
Discuss the impact of each stage of the product life cycle on marketing
decision-making.
Explain how a company can extend a product's life cycle.
Participate in a class discussion to select a product to sell at school, sell the
product, and observe its product life cycle. Write a summary of your
observations depicting each phase.
Resources
Textbooks
Page 5-68
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 363369). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 229-231]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B.; Sobel, J.; & Basteria, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics:
Teacher’s edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 303-308]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 241-248]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 549-551, 642-647). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 315-321). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Katz, J. & Green, R. (2011). Entrepreneurial small business (3rd ed.) [pp.
283-287]. New York: McGraw-Hill Irwin ADD
Kuratko, D.F. (2009). Entrepreneurship: Theory, process, practice (8th ed.)
[p. 303]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 301-306]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 264275]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-69
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 73-76). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
The Irish Times Business 2000. (2005/2006). Extending the product life
cycle through repositioning. Retrieved June 1, 2011, from
http://www.business2000.ie/images/pdfs/pdf_9th/cadbury_9th_ed.pdf
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Planning with the product life cycle. Retrieved
June 1, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/marketing-planning-and-strategy/5.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2008). Product decisions. Retrieved June 1, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/productdecisions.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Product. Retrieved June 1, 2011, from
http://www.marketingmasters.co.uk/geoff/
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). The product life cycle (PLC). Retrieved
June 1, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_plc.htm
NetMBA. (2002-2010). The product life cycle. Retrieved June 1, 2011, from
http://www.netmba.com/marketing/product/lifecycle/
QuickMBA. (1999-2010). Product life cycle. Retrieved June 1, 2011, from
http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/product/lifecycle/
12Manage. (2011). Product life cycle (Levitt). Retrieved June 1, 2011, from
http://www.12manage.com/methods_product_life_cycle.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the use of technology in the product/service management
function (PM:039)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Technology 18; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6;
Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1; ICT Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the product/service
management function.
Explain specific applications of technology in product/service
management.
Describe how technology is used to manage the product life cycle.
Discuss how technology is used in market testing.
Explain how technology is used in product labeling and packaging.
Read two articles in Brandweek to identify examples of technology used in
bringing and keeping products on the market. Report your findings to the
class.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 281284, 391, 397, 399). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [p. 281]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 205-211). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 313, 345-346). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 281, 295]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 287, 281-284,
287]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Ameri, F. & Dutta, D. (2005). Product lifecycle management: Closing the
knowledge loops. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.cadanda.com/V2No5_01.pdf
Business Wire. (2003, February 20). Product service management market
will near $2 billion by 2008 per ARC Advisory Group’s new market
research survey. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_2003_Feb_20/ai_97886
512
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-70
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Cimalore, C. (2007, January). Defining enterprise resource planning and
product lifecycle management: Creating a collaborative environment
for success. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.dmreview.com/dmdirect/20070119/1073513-1.html
GlobalSpec. (1999-2011). Packaging and labeling equipment. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://packagingequipment.globalspec.com/ProductFinder/Material_Handling_Packagi
ng_Equipment/Packaging_Labeling
IdeaTestLab.com. (2007). Complete internet market testing. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://ideatestlab.com/
Montes de Oca, W. (2007, May 23). Online market testing that can save
you time and money. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.earlytorise.com/2007/05/23/online-market-testing-that-cansave-you-time-and-money.html
Siemans. (n.d.). White paper: Six critical factors for PML deployment.
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.plm.automation.siemens.com/en_us/Images/17543_tcm10
23-83344.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-71
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of product/service management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain business ethics in product/service management (PM:040)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1; Information Literacy 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Tell students to imagine that the development of a new product will result
in a huge profit for a business; however, its production will result in
hazardous wastes. Arrange for students to conduct a class debate about
whether a company should move forward with product development.
Implement the debate, and debrief following the activity.
Describe ethical considerations in product packaging.
Explain how planned obsolescence is an ethical issue for businesses.
Explain ethical issues associated with product labeling.
Discuss ethical issues associated with changing a product’s quality.
Describe ethical issues associated with failing to inform customers
about product risks.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, L.E. & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 [pp. 86,
98, 157, 390]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 96, 258, 270]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 257, 284]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 248-252, 273, 275-276]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 661-667). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 256,
276]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
BBC News. (2003, April 7). Patients warned over net drugs. Retrieved May
17, 2011, from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/2924785.stm
Clark, A. (2007, April 24). A review of “Made to break: Technology and
obsolescence in America.” Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.thewip.net/contributors/2007/04/review_made_to_break_te
chnolog.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-72
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Encyclopedia of Business and Finance. (2001-2011). Fair Packaging and
Labeling Act of 1966. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.bookrags.com/Fair_Packaging_and_Labeling_Act#br_1
French, J. (2006, April 11). Planned obsolescence: Aesthetic over
functional. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/Annie05/planned-obsolescence-aestheticover-functional-presentation-707861
McMinn, D.(n.d.). Planned obsolescence: The ultimate economic
inefficiency. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.davidmcminn.com/ngc/pages/obsol.htm
Thorton, L.F. (2010, June 30). Planned obsolescence: Is it ethical? no. can
we still have the newest gadgets? yes!. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://leadingincontext.com/2010/06/30/planned-obsolescence-is-itethical-no-can-we-still-have-the-newest-gadgets-yes/
Upshaw, L. (n.d.). The trouble with food: Ethics and integrity in food
marketing. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.brandbuilding.com/articles_food.php
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-73
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Apply quality assurances to enhance product/service offerings.
Performance
Indicator
Identify consumer protection provisions of appropriate agencies (PM:017)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Information Literacy 2
Objectives
a.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Describe forms of consumer protection associated with
product/service management.
Describe the need for consumer protection in product/service
management.
Discuss the role of governmental agencies in protecting consumers.
Explain laws that protect consumers.
Explain how consumer protection affects businesses.
Describe expenses that can be incurred by businesses as a result of
consumer protection.
Use the Internet to locate information about a recent case involving the
Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Record the following
information:
a. Name of company
b. Nature of product safety issue
c. Outcome of case
Present your findings to the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, L.E. & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 [pp. 8285, 651]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B.; Sobel, J.; & Basteria, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics:
Teacher’s edition (2nd ed.) (pp. 67-69, 400). Tinley Park, IL:
Goodheart-Willcox.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 666-667, 678-68). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 107, 292-294). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Kotler, P. & Keller, K.L. (2006). Marketing management (12th ed.) [pp. 394395]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 105108, 279]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-74
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-75
Brady, J.G. & Waller, S.W. (2011). Consumer protection in the United
States: An overview. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1000226#PaperD
ownload
Federal Trade Commission. (2007, December 20). Business information.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/business.shtm
Nolo. (2011). Consumer protection laws and your business. Retrieved May
27, 2011 from http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/consumerprotection-laws-business-29641.html
The Social Studies Help Center. (2001-2011). Government protection of
the consumer. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.socialstudieshelp.com/Economic_Govt_Protections.htm
United States Consumer Product Safety Commission. (n.d.). Find CPSC
product safety standards or guidance. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.cpsc.gov/cgi-bin/regs.aspx
U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2010, June). Food allergies: What
you need to know. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/U
CM220117.pdf
USA.gov. (n.d.). Consumer guides and protection. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.usa.gov/Citizen/Topics/Consumer_Safety.shtml
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Employ product-mix strategies to meet customer expectations.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the concept of product mix (PM:003, PM LAP 3)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
s.
t.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: product mix, product item, product line,
width, depth, consistency, expansion, contraction, alteration, trading
up, trading down, and positioning.
Identify ways in which product lines can be organized.
Describe product mix dimensions.
Identify reasons that a business would offer a narrow product mix.
Identify reasons that a business would offer a broad product mix.
Identify reasons that a business would offer a deep product mix.
Identify reasons that a business would offer a shallow product mix.
Explain the importance of a business’s product mix.
Describe advantages of expansion product-mix strategies.
Describe disadvantages of expansion product-mix strategies.
Describe advantages of contraction product-mix strategies.
Describe disadvantages of contraction product-mix strategies.
Describe advantages of alteration product-mix strategies.
Describe disadvantages of alteration product-mix strategies.
Describe advantages of trading up product-mix strategies.
Describe disadvantages of trading up product-mix strategies.
Describe advantages of trading down product-mix strategies.
Describe disadvantages of trading down product-mix strategies.
Describe advantages of positioning product-mix strategies.
Describe disadvantages of positioning product-mix strategies.
Access a company’s web site to identify its product lines; for each product
line, identify product items. Company web sites can be accessed through
Hoover’s Online at http://www.hoovers.com/ and Infospace at
http://www.infospace.com/bizweb.htm. Print the information obtained, and
write a one-page report about the company’s product mix and its
advantages and disadvantages for the company.
Resources
LAPs
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). Mix & match (Nature of the
product mix) [LAP: PM-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). Mix & match (Nature of the
product mix): Instructor copy [LAP: PM-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-76
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 360363). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 265-271]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 302-303, 308-310]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 234-241]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 635-641). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 271-274). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Soloman, M. R., Marshall, G. W., & Stuart, E. W. (2008). Marketing: Real
people, real choices (5th ed.) [pp. 273-278]. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Pearson Prentice Hall.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 269-272]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp.
318-320]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 240-241].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Galler, L. (2011). Analyze the product mix just like a bowl of nuts.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Analyze-theProduct-Mix-Just-Like-a-Bowl-of-Nuts&id=197887
How Stuff Works. (1999-2011). Positioning. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://money.howstuffworks.com/marketing-plan21.htm
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). Mix & match (Nature of the
product mix) [LAP: PM-003: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
QuickMBA. (1999-2010). Product positioning. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/ries-trout/positioning/
Tutor2u. (n.d.). Marketing presentation: Product mix. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from
http://www.tutor2u.net/business/presentations/marketing/productmix/d
efault.html
Washington University in St. Louis. (2010). Right mix in product line
increases profits for the firm. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://newsinfo.wustl.edu/tips/page/normal/176.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-77
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Position products/services to acquire desired business image.
Performance
Indicator
Describe factors used by marketers to position products/services (PM:042)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 7-8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-78
Define the following terms: competitive advantage and positioning.
Describe the purpose of positioning.
Explain the relationship between the target market and positioning.
Discuss the relationship between the competition and positioning.
Describe types of positioning strategies (e.g., product attributes,
benefits, usage occasions, users, competitive, product classes).
Discuss how marketing mix elements can be differentiated to position
products/businesses.
Select two automobile manufacturers: one offers luxury cars, the other
offers economy cars. Identify factors that the two companies use to position
the cars. Participate in a small-group activity to discuss your responses.
Resources
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 126, 209). Woodland Hills, CA: McGrawHill/Glencoe.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 43,
392-393). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 171-174]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 268-269, 281, 491-492]. Tinley Park, IL:
Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 157-159, 235-236]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 645-646). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Kazanjian, K. (2007). Exceeding customer expectations (pp. 27-56). New
York: Doubleday.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 201-205]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp. 5051, 308]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-79
McKain, S. (2005). What customers really want: How to bridge the gap
between what your organizations and what your clients crave.
Nashville: Thomas Nelson.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 48, 54,
81-84]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Jantsch, J. (1999-2010). These simple strategies for positioning your small
business are a must. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.ducttapemarketing.com/strategies_for_positioning.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Product positioning. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/principles-of-marketingtutorials/targeting-markets/product-positioning/
Levis, D. (1997-2011). Product positioning—4 differentiation tips. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from
http://www.davetalks.com/articles/syndicated/product-positioningdifferentiation-tips.htm
Markgraf, B. (n.d.). Lesson 2: Positioning your product or service. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.suite101.com/lesson.cfm/16709/294
MindTools. (1996-2011). The marketing mix and 4 Ps: Understanding how
to position your market offering. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newSTR_94.htm
Ortyn, A. (2005). Market position, positioning, and profitability! Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.rusmart.com/MANTECbgs/source/Market_Position_Article_Oct_2006.pdf
Pellow, B. (2003-2010). Differentiate yourself. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://digitaloutput.net/content/ContentCT.asp?P=792
QuickMBA (1999-2010). Positioning. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/ries-trout/positioning/
Tutor2u. (n.d.). Strategy—Competitive advantage. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from
http://www.tutor2u.net/business/strategy/competitive_advantage.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Position product/service to acquire desired business image.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature of product/service branding (PM:021, PM LAP 6)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 7-8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-80
Define the following terms: brand, brand name, brand symbol, trade
character, brand recognition, brand preference, brand insistence,
product brands, generic brand, national brand, private/distributor
brand, brand strategies, family branding, individual branding, brand
extensions, brand licensing, and co-branding.
List the characteristics of a good brand name.
Explain levels of brand loyalty.
Identify types of brand strategies.
Describe considerations for international branding.
Explain the impact of the Internet on branding.
Discuss employees’ role in branding.
Select a brand name and identify the characteristics that make it an
effective brand name. Then, determine the brand’s stage of brand loyalty:
recognition, preference, or insistence. Obtain materials from your instructor
to prepare visuals featuring symbols, names, and characters associated
with the product/service’s brand identity. Discuss the visual with a
classmate.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). It’s a brand, brand, brand
world! (Nature of product/service branding) [LAP: PM-006]. Columbus,
OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). It’s a brand, brand, brand
world! (Nature of product/service branding): Instructor copy [LAP: PM006]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (p. 208). Woodland Hills, CA: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 379386). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 270-271, 428]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 262-272]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-81
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [p.
377]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 258-272]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 654-659). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 274-276, 281-290, 290-292).
New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 272-278]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp.
314-316]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 248254]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (p. 65). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Brighter Naming. (2011). Top 10 characteristics of a good name. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from
http://www.brighternaming.com/Top_10_Naming_Factors.html
Charland, B. (1996-2011). The role of employees in brand definition and
promotion. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.ameinfo.com/16901.html
Greenwood, T. (2011). The importance of brand strategy. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Importance-of-BrandStrategy&id=764211
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Advantages of brands. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/principles-of-marketingtutorials/product-decisions/advantages-of-brands/
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Approaches to Branding. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/principles-of-marketingtutorials/managing-products/approaches-to-branding/
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). International marketing. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19:intern
ational-marketing&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). It’s a brand, brand, brand
world! (Nature of product/service branding) [LAP: PM-006:
Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Sales Creators. (1997-2007). Branding the company. Retrieved May 2,
2011, http://www.salescreators.com/Section1/branding.html
Segal, B. (2011). Designing a brand strategy—How to get recognized and
stay recognized in a noisy world. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://ezinearticles.com/?Designing-a-Brand-Strategy---How-to-GetRecognized-and-Stay-Recognized-in-a-Noisy-World&id=785619
www.studyMARKETING.org. (n.d.). Brand loyalty. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from
http://www.studymarketing.org/articles/Brand_Management/Brand_Loy
alty.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-82
www.studyMARKETING.org. (n.d.). Types of brand extension. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from
http://www.studymarketing.org/articles/Brand_Management/Types_of_
Brand_Extension.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to obtain, develop,
maintain, and improve a product or service mix in response to market
opportunities
Performance
Element
Position company to acquire desired business image.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature of corporate branding (PM:206) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 7-8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-83
Define the following terms: brand identity, values, brand cues, brand
personality, touch points, brand promise, and corporate brands.
Describe the elements that make up a brand’s identity.
Explain the use of values in brand development.
Discuss the significance of a brand’s personality.
Describe the use of brand touch points.
Distinguish between corporate and distributor brands.
Using the visual developed for the previous activity, add to the visual by
featuring its brand values, brand personality, and touch points. Discuss the
visual with a classmate.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 382383). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 270-271, 428]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 266-267]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.)
[pp. 245, 377]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 258-272]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 654-659). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Kazanjian, K. (2007). Exceeding customer expectations (pp. 195-218). New
York: Doubleday.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 248249]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (p. 65). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-84
Bloise, J.D. (2011). Successful brand development. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.powerhomebiz.com/vol102/brand.htm
Dorreststeijn, T. (n.d.). Creating a brand personality. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://visual-branding.com/eight-outlines/creating-a-brandpersonality/
George, R. (2000-2011). Tapping into brand touchpoints. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.marketingprofs.com/3/george2.asp
Glatstein, S. (2011). 5 steps to brand building: Touchpoints are key to
building a strong brand. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://sbinfocanada.about.com/od/marketing/a/brandbuildingsg.htm
Jones, J. (2011). Build a brand identity—5 key elements. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Build-a-Brand-Identity---5-KeyElements&id=704234
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Build your corporate brand . . .
before someone builds it for you (Corporate branding) [LAP: PM-010:
Presentation software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Salerno, J. (2011). Corporate branding—Recipe for a successful business.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?CorporateBranding---Recipe-For-A-Successful-Business&id=836060
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and adjusting
prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value
Performance
Element
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in
marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature and scope of the pricing function (PI:001, PI LAP 2)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-3, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Prepare a brief presentation about the goals of pricing. Target the
presentation to a group of elementary or middle-school students who are
involved in a service-learning project. Deliver the presentation.
Page 5-85
Describe the characteristics of effective pricing.
Explain what is being priced when prices are set for products.
List factors that affect a product's price.
Describe how pricing affects product decisions.
Explain how pricing affects place (distribution) decisions.
Describe how pricing affects promotion decisions.
Explain pricing objectives.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2008). The price is right (Nature of
pricing) [LAP: PI-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2008). The price is right (Nature of
pricing): Instructor copy [LAP: PI-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 605613, 624-625). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 96-97, 180, 378-379, 392-394].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 414-421, 430-436]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.)
[pp. 25-26, 238, 250-251]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 318-330]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 526-536). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 358-361). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 501-507, 507-509]. Mason, OH: South6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-86
Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp.
331-339]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 456510]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 456510]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 110-114). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Abeysingha, R. (2009, June 13). Factors influencing the pricing decision.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.articlealley.com/article_934039_15.html
GCSE Business Studies for CCEA. (n.d.). Introduction to the marketing
mix—Pricing. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.hoddersamplepages.co.uk/pdfs/cceabus6.pdf
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). External factors: Competitive and other
products. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/principles-of-marketing-tutorials
/pricing-decisions/external-factors-competitive-and-related-products/
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Importance of price. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/pricingdecisions/3.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Pricing decisions. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/principles-of-marketing-tutorials/pricingdecisions/
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Pricing. Received May 2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=25:
pricing&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2008). The price is right (Nature of
pricing) [LAP: PI-002: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Pricing strategies. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_pricing.htm
NetMBA. (2002-2010). Pricing strategy. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.netmba.com/marketing/pricing/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and adjusting
prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value
Performance
Element
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in
marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the role of business ethics in pricing (PI:015)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-3, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8-9, 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-87
Define the following terms: price fixing, predatory pricing.
Identify ethical considerations in setting prices.
Explain ethical concerns associated with the use of complex prices that
are confusing to consumers.
Explain how pricing tactics can relate to social responsibility.
Participate in a class debate about the ethics of pricing a product as high as
possible due to high demand. Examples to consider are oil prices and
popular cars.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 99100). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 382-385]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 421-422]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 351, 355-356, 360-361]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2006). Marketing essentials
(pp. 138-139, 536-537). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 478481, 503, 506, 510]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Capozzi, C. (2011, January 11). Ethics & strategy. Retrieved May 27, 2011,
from http://www.ehow.com/info_7751895_ethics-strategy.html
Curry, T. (2006, April 26). What is ‘price gouging’ and can it be stopped?
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12498071/ns/politics-tom_curry/t/whatprice-gouging-can-it-be-stopped/
Ethical Pricing. (n.d.). Pricing and ethics. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.ethicalpricing.info/home.htm
Maxi-Pedia.com. (2011). Predatory pricing. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
http://www.maxi-pedia.com/predatory+pricing
Smith, S.E. & Wallace, O. (n.d.). What is price fixing? Retrieved May 27,
2011, from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-price-fixing.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-88
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-89
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and adjusting
prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value
Performance
Element
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in
marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the use of technology in the pricing function (PI:016)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Technology 18; Basic Skills 1-2,5-6; Thinking
Skills 8-9,12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Listen to a businessperson discuss the use of technology in pricing. Record
responses to the following questions:
a. What technology is used in setting prices?
b. What technology is used in marking prices on products?
c. How has the use of technology in pricing changed in the past 10 years?
d. How has the use of technology affected the pricing process?
Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the pricing function.
Explain specific applications of technology in pricing.
Describe benefits of automating the pricing process.
Discuss risks associated with automating the pricing process.
Explain how automating pricing facilitates targeted pricing.
Resources
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (p. 233). Woodland Hills, CA: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe.
Boone, L.E. & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 [p. 625].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 558-559). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
McCalla, P. (2005). Retailing (pp. 11, 30, 202, 261). Woodland Hills CA:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 223-224, 350-351,
483, 513]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Bhaskar, R. & Krishnamurthi, M. (2004, March). Pricing strategy—A
technology perspective. Retrieved May 27, 2010, from
http://www.allbusiness.com/sales/300324-1.html
O’Reilly, T.J. (n.d.). The role of technology in pricing strategies. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://members.pricingsociety.com/articles/TheRole-of-Technology-in-Pricing-Strategies.pdf
Oricchio, R. (2007, February 1). Software to help you set your prices.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://technology.inc.com/2007/02/01/software-to-help-you-set-prices/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Signal Demand, Inc. (2008). Case study: Transforming the pricing function.
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.signaldemand.com/resources/documents/signaldemandprice-management.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-90
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and adjusting
prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value
Performance
Element
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in
marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain legal considerations for pricing (PI:017)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: bait-and-switch advertising, deceptive
pricing, dumping, loss-leader pricing, predatory pricing, price
discrimination, and price fixing.
Describe laws affecting pricing.
Explain positive effects of pricing laws.
Discuss negative effects of pricing laws.
Explain the impact of anti-dumping laws on consumers.
Search the Internet to find an article about a company recently accused of
pricing violations. Write a summary of the article, identifying the company,
what it was accused of doing, and what the outcome of the case has been.
Present the summary to the class, asking students to identify the law that
had been violated.
Resources
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 232-233). Woodland Hills, CA: McGrawHill/Glencoe.
Boone, L.E. & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 [625p.].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 45, 382-383]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 421-422]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 355-356, 360-361]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp.139-140, 536-537). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 401-404). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 519-521]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 478481]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-91
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-92
Bizhelp. (2009). The loss leader. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.bizhelp24.com/marketing/the-loss-leader-3.html
Ellis-Christensen, T. (n.d.). What is a bait and switch? Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-bait-and-switch.htm
Ellis-Christensen, T. & Wallace, O. (n.d.). What is price discrimination?
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-pricediscrimination.htm
FindLaw for Small Business. (2011). Consumer protection laws. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://smallbusiness.findlaw.com/business-lawsregulations/business-laws-all/consumer-protection-lawsoverview(1).html
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Government regulation. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/pricing-decisions/11.htm
McGee, R.W. (2002, February). Anti-dumping laws. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.fff.org/freedom/fd0202f.asp
Maxi-Pedia.com. (2011). Predatory pricing. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.maxi-pedia.com/predatory+pricing
U.S. Department of Justice. (n.d.) Price fixing, bid rigging, and market
allocation schemes: What they are and what to look for. Retrieved May
27, 2011, from http://www.justice.gov/atr/public/guidelines/211578.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and adjusting
prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value
Performance
Element
Develop a foundational knowledge of pricing to understand its role in
marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain factors affecting pricing decisions (PI:002, PI LAP 3)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 9, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Sample
Activity
Given a list of 10 grocery items that can be found in grocery stores,
convenience stores, warehouse clubs, etc., determine the price of each
product at the locations specified by your teacher. Discuss reasons for the
differences in prices at the various locations.
Define the term selling price.
Distinguish between price and selling price.
Describe the importance of selling price.
Identify factors affecting selling price.
Explain how consumers can affect selling price.
Describe how government affects selling price.
Discuss how competition can affect selling price.
Explain how the nature of a business can affect selling price.
Identify pricing objectives.
Explain how pricing objectives affect selling price.
Imagine that you are starting a business. Identify factors that would affect
your business’s pricing decisions. Record these factors, and discuss them
with a classmate.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Make cents (Factors affecting
pricing decisions) [LAP: PI-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Make cents (Factors affecting
pricing decisions): Instructor copy [LAP: PI-003]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 230-235). Woodland Hills, CA: McGrawHill/Glencoe.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 606619). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 378, 380-383, 386-389].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-93
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-94
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 415-424]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.)
[p. 251]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 321-327, 336-340, 346-351]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 531-536, 544-556). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 375-376). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Kuratko, D.F. & Hodgetts, R.M. (2001). Entrepreneurship: A contemporary
approach (5th ed.) [pp. 243-244]. Mason, OH: South-Western/Thomson
Learning.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 511-516]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [pp.
331-337]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 486511]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 112-114). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Business Resource Software, Inc. (1994-2011). Issues affecting price.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.businessplans.org/Pricing.html
Hofstrand, D. (2010, March). Setting your price. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.extension.iastate.edu/agdm/wholefarm/html/c517.html
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Pricing decisions. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/pricingdecisions.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Pricing. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view
=article&id=25:pricing&catid=2:marketing-lectures
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Make Cents (Factors affecting
pricing decisions) [LAP: PI-003: Presentation Software]. Columbus,
OH: Author.
Slideshare.net (2011). Pricing products: Pricing considerations and
approaches. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/mehmetcihangir/pricing-products-pricingconsiderations-and-approaches-presentation-765073
Witiger.com (2001, May). Pricing objectives. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.witiger.com/marketing/pricingobjectives.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-95
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to identify, select, monitor,
and evaluate sales channels
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature and scope of channel management (CM:001; CM LAP 2)
Level
Career-Sustaining
SCANS
Information 5; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: channel, channel intensity, channel length,
distribution patterns, exclusive distribution, selective distribution, and
intensive distribution.
Explain how channel members add value.
Discuss channel functions (e.g., information, promotion, contact, matching,
negotiation, physical distribution, financing, and risk taking).
Explain key channel tasks (e.g., marketing, packaging, financing, storage,
delivery, merchandising, and personal selling).
Describe when a channel will be most effective.
Distinguish between horizontal and vertical conflict.
Describe channel management decisions (i.e., selecting channel
members, managing and motivating channel members, and evaluating
channel members).
Explain channel design decisions (i.e., analyzing customer needs, setting
channel objectives, identifying major alternatives—types of intermediaries,
number of intermediaries, responsibilities of intermediaries).
Discuss the relationship between the product being distributed and the
pattern of distribution it uses.
Identify examples of channel-management activities that take place at local
businesses. Discuss similarities and differences across types of businesses and
industries.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Chart your channels (Channel
management) [LAP: CM-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Chart your channels (Channel
management): Instructor copy [LAP: CM-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 416-430).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 103-104, 342-353]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [pp.
237, 250, 252-254]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-96
[pp. 43-44, 377-401]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
444-456). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 411-415). New York: McGraw-Hill
Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 322-325]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 290-309]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 88-92). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Armstrong, Kotler & da Silva. (2011). Marketing channels and supply chain
management. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/kkjjkevin03/9/
Direct and channel marketing and distribution. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.jpec.org/handouts/jpec122.pdf
Georgetown University—McDonough School of Business. (n.d.). Distribution
strategy. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://faculty.msb.edu/homak/HomaHelpSite/WebHelp/Distribution_Strateg
y.htm
Go-To-Market Strategies. (2001-2011). What is channel management anyway?
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.gtmsinc.com/tip_WhatIsChannelMgt.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Chart your channels (Channel
management) [LAP: CM-002: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Tutor2u. (n.d.). Distribution—Channel strategy. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.tutor2u.net/business/marketing/distribution_channel_strategy.a
sp
Tutor2u. (n.d.). Distribution—Types of distribution intermediary. Retrieved May
2, 2011, from
http://www.tutor2u.net/business/marketing/distribution_intermediaries.asp
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-97
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to identify, select, monitor,
and evaluate sales channels
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the relationship between customer service and channel management
(CM:002)
Level
Career-Sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 9, 12;
Personal Qualities 13, 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3; Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
Sample
Activity
Explain how customer service facilitates order processing.
Identify actions that customer service can take to facilitate order
processing.
Describe the role of customer service in following up on orders.
Interview two people who have had experiences getting late delivery of
products or have received the wrong products. Compare how the companies
that shipped the products handled the situations. Find out the roles that
customer service played in the situations. Share the information with a small
group of students in your class.
Resources
Textbooks
Allen, K.R., & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 279-281). New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Coyle, J.J.; Bardi, E.J.; & Langley, C.J., Jr. (2003). The management of
business logistics: A supply chain perspective (7th ed.) [pp. 92-103].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Evenson, R. (2007). Award-winning customer service (pp. 12-13). New York:
AMACOM.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 334-335]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Lawrence, F.B.; Jennings, D.F.; & Reynolds, B.E. (2003). eDistribution (pp.
218-224). Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Monczka, R.M., Handfield, R.B., Giunipero, L.C., & Patterson, J.L. (2009).
Purchasing and supply chain management (4th ed.) [pp. 16-17, 613-617,
720, 721]. South-Western Cengage Learning.
Rosenbloom, B. (2004). Marketing channels: A management view (7th ed.) [pp.
391-392, 394-395]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-98
Baker, M.( 2006, March 15). The importance of customer follow up. Retrieved
Many 27, 2011, from http://www.marketingwithmiles.com/the-importanceof-customer-follow-up/
eHow Business Editor. (1999-2011). How to create a customer order process
workflow diagram. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.ehow.com/how_2145497_create-customer-order-processworkflow.html?ref=fuel&utm_source=yahoo&utm_medium=ssp&utm_camp
aign=yssp_art
Lowery, S. (1997-2011). Customer service—Following up with your customers.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.web-source.net/followup.htm
Small Business CRM. (2011). How to serve your customers with channel
management. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.businesscrm.net/customer-service/how-to-serve-yourcustomers-with-channel-management.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-99
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to identify, select, monitor,
and evaluate sales channels
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature of channels of distribution (CM:003, CM LAP 1)
Level
Career-Sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3; Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: channels of distribution, producer, ultimate
consumer, industrial user, middlemen, intermediaries, retailers,
wholesalers, agents, direct channels, and indirect channels.
Identify types of channel members/intermediaries/middlemen.
Explain the importance of middlemen in the channel of distribution.
Describe types of channels for consumer goods and services.
Describe types of channels for industrial goods and services.
Select a product of interest, and chart its distribution from the point of
production to the final consumer/user. Explain your chart to the class.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Channel it (Channels of
distribution) [LAP: CM-001]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Channel it (Channels of
distribution): Instructor copy [LAP: CM-001]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 416-422).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 347-363]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 322-327, 336, 345]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [pp.
106-107, 252-253]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 378-386]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
444-453). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 314-322]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 338-363]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-100
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 89-90). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Chopra, S. (n.d.). Lesson 18: Channels of distribution. Retrieved May 4, 2011,
from http://web.du.ac.in/course/material/ug/ba/esb/Lesson_18.pdf
Lancaster, G, (n.d.). Channels of distribution. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=17:marketin
g-channels&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Place, distribution, channel, or intermediary.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_place.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2009). Channel it (Channels of
distribution) [LAP: CM-001: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Olson, J. (2011). Types of wholesale distribution and sales channels.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Types-OfWholesale-Distribution-And-Sales-Channels&id=704341
University of Delaware. (n.d.). Chapter 15: Class notes. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.udel.edu/alex/chapt15.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-101
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to identify, select, monitor,
and evaluate sales channels
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Level
Describe the use of technology in the channel management function (CM:004)
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Technology 18; Basic Skills 1-2,
5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Global Awareness 1; Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial
Literacy 2; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1
Objectives
a.
Career-Sustaining
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the channel
management function.
Explain specific applications of technology in channel management.
Discuss ways that the use of technology in channel management impacts
relationships with channel members.
Explain ways that the use of technology in channel management
facilitates global trade.
Describe benefits associated with the use of technology in channel
management.
Explain barriers to the use of technology in channel management.
Visit a local business or email a business partner to discuss how the use of
technology has impacted channel management at that business. Determine
the types of technology the business uses and how their use has benefited the
business. Report the findings to the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Allen, K.R., & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (pp. 212-213). New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 431-432).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 341-342]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Coyle, J.J.; Bardi, E.J.; & Langley, C.J., Jr. (2003). The management of
business logistics: A supply chain perspective (7th ed.) [pp. 463-474].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009) Marketing essentials:
Teacher wraparound edition (pp. 447, 460, 474). Woodland Hills, CA:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 415-418). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 340-341, 342]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Lawrence, F.B.; Jennings, D.F.; & Reynolds, B.E. (2003). eDistribution (pp. 76,
85-99, 136, 206-216). Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-102
Monczka, R.M., Handfield, R.B., Giunipero, L.C., & Patterson, J.L. (2009).
Purchasing and supply chain management (4th ed.) [pp. 143, 667-701,
754-756]. South-Western Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 303, 214-315, 321323, 332]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Rosenbloom, B. (2004). Marketing channels: A management view (7th ed.) [pp.
754-756]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Software/
Online
Distribution Software. (n.d.). Distribution technology—On demand. Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://www.distributionsoftwarereview.com/keyDTechnology-On-Demand.htm
eCommerce Program. (2007). eBusiness—Information. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.ecommerceprogram.com/ecommerce/EbusinessInfo.asp
LXE. (n.d.). RFID technology for warehouse and distribution operations.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.logisticsit.com/absolutenm/articlefiles/90-0156%20RFID.pdf
Piasecki, D. (2011). Warehouse management systems (WMS). Retrieved May
17, 2011, from
http://www.inventoryops.com/warehouse_management_systems.htm
Wailgum, T. (1994-2011). ABC: An introduction to CRM. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.cio.com/article/40295
Wailgum, T. (2008, April 17). ABC: An introduction to ERP. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.cio.com/article/40323
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-103
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to identify, select, monitor,
and evaluate sales channels
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Explain legal considerations in channel management (CM:005)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3
Objectives
a.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: exclusive dealing, tying agreements, full-line
forcing, and closed territories.
Describe illegal channel management activities.
Identify laws that govern channel management activities.
Explain the impact of regulation on channel management activities.
Participate in a group activity to identify the federal and state laws that govern
channel management of a product of interest to the group. Search the Internet
to locate examples of violations to each of those regulations. Present the
group’s findings to the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 424-425).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 68]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
456-457). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 401-403]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 343]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Monczka, R.M., Handfield, R.B., Giunipero, L.C., & Patterson, J.L. (2009).
Purchasing and supply chain management (4th ed.) [pp. 565-566]. SouthWestern Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 305-307]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Answers.com. (2011). Clayton Antitrust Act. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.answers.com/topic/clayton-antitrust-act
Bunn, P. (2011). Robinson-Patman Act (1936). Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.answers.com/topic/robinson-patman-act-1936?cat=biz-fin
Chapter 15: Managing marketing channels and wholesaling. (n.d.). Retrieved
May 17, 2011, from http://www6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-104
rohan.sdsu.edu/~renglish/370/notes/chapt15/
Federal Trade Commission. (2010). Promoting competition, protecting
consumers: A plain English guide to antitrust laws. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.ftc.gov/bc/compguide/index.shtm
Johnson, A. (1995-2011). Tying agreements: Illegal tying is one of the most
common antitrust claims. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.aurorawdc.com/arj_cics_tying_arrangements.htm
The Linux Information Project. (2004, June 17). The Sherman Antitrust Act.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from http://www.linfo.org/sherman.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-105
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and processes needed to identify, select, monitor,
and evaluate sales channels
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of channel management to understand its role
in marketing.
Performance
Indicator
Describe ethical considerations in channel management (CM:006)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 9,12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy 2; Critical Thinking
and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1; Ethics 3, 4
Objectives
a.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: exploitation, coercion, gray market, and
slotting allowance.
Discuss reasons that marketers should not manipulate the availability of a
product for the purpose of exploitation.
Describe ethical issues associated with serving markets with low profit
potential.
Explain when ethical issues can arise in a distribution channel.
Explain the ethical implications of the gray market on U.S. businesses.
Describe how communication relates to channel management ethics.
Talk with a business partner about questionable practices that s/he has
encountered in channel management. Examples might relate to manipulation
of the availability of products, use of coercion, and exertion of undue influence
over a channel member’s decision about carrying a product. Write a summary
of your findings, and present them to the class. As a group, draw conclusions
about the nature of ethics in channel management and the frequency with
which unethical practices occur.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 95, 98-99,
424, 427). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [p. 47]. Mason, OH: Thomson/SouthWestern.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 346]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company,
Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 70-71, 383]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2006). Marketing essentials (pp.
456-457). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Monczka, R.M., Handfield, R.B., Giunipero, L.C., & Patterson, J.L. (2009).
Purchasing and supply chain management (4th ed.) [pp. 568-573]. SouthWestern Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 308-309, 471-472].
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-106
New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Anderson, S. (2006, February 10). Coercion. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/coercion/#WroCoe
Bergen, M. (2006, May 19-20). Branding between the lines: Protecting your
brand and managing gray markets. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.csom.umn.edu/Assets/75892.pdf
Beshouri, C.P. (2006, November). A grassroots approach to emerging-market
consumers. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/article_page.aspx?ar=1866&L2=21&L3
=34&srid=17&gp=0
Exploitation. (2002). Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://bovination.com/cbs/exploitation.jsp
Kessler, M. (2006, December 10). Bargain sounds too good? Stay away.
Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/2006-12-10-gray-marketstories_x.htm
Sudhir, K. & Rao, V.R. (2005, August). Are slotting allowances efficiencyenhancing or anti-competitive? Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://faculty.som.yale.edu/ksudhir/papers/Slot-JMR-4round-Final.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-107
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, strategies, and systems used to obtain and convey
ideas and information
Performance
Element
Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.
Performance
Indicator
Write informational messages (CO:039) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Write a letter to the school or local newspaper to inform the paper of the
student organization’s latest activities.
Define the term informational messages.
Identify examples of informational messages used by businesses.
Explain the purposes of informational messages.
Demonstrate procedures for writing informational messages.
Resources
Textbooks
Bovée, C. L., & Thill, J.V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.) [p.
230-233]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 679]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company,
Inc.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
11). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Gorman, T. (2005). The complete idiot’s guide to business letters and memos
(2nd ed.) [pp. 145-170]. Indianapolis: Alpha Books/Penguin Group.
Kimball, C. & Van Gelder, J. (2007). Ultimate book of business letters
(pp. 71-114, 119, 122, 127-133, 137-141, 143-165). Madison, WI:
Entrepreneur Press.
Locker, K.O., & Kaczmarek, S.K. (2007). Business Communication: Building
critical skills (3rd ed.) [pp. 6, 11]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lesikar, R.V. & Flatley, M.E. (2005). Basic business communication: Skills for
empowering the Internet generation (10th ed.) [pp. 84-104]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Souter, N. (2007). Persuasive writing: How to make words work for you
(pp. 89-99). New York: Sterling.
Software/
Online
DePaul University. (n.d.). Informative and positive messages: Writing in the
professions. Retrieved May 10, 2011, from
http://condor.depaul.edu/~hgraves/eng494/positivemessages/frame.htm
Edmontech. (2011, March 7). Business communication: Business trends and
message types. Retrieved May 24, 2011, from
http://www.edmontonnaoshweek.com/communications/businesscommunication-business-trends-and-message-types.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-108
eHow.com (1999-2011).How to write a business announcement. Retrieved
May 10, 2011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_4884479_write-businessannouncement.html
Guffey, M.E. (2006). Chapter 5: Preparing to write business messages.
Retrieved May 10, 2011, from
www.calstatela.edu/faculty/pthomas/BUS305/Chapter567.ppt
Mind Tools. (1995-2011). Writing skills: Getting your message across clearly.
Retrieved May 10, 2011, from
http://www.mindtools.com/CommSkll/WritingSkills.htm
National Institute of Justice. (2007, December 6). Creating a public service
announcement. Retrieved May 10, 2011, from
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/topics/courts/restorative-justice/marketingmedia/psa.htm
Rudick, M., & O’Flahavan, L. (2007).Six tips for writing concisely. Retrieved
May 10, 2011, from http://www.hodu.com/concise.shtml
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-109
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the role of promotion as a marketing function (PR:001, PR LAP 2)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Participate in an activity in which the class has been divided into three
groups and assigned to one of the following promotional objectives: to
inform, to persuade, to remind. Focus on the group’s promotional objective,
locating and/or identifying promotional messages targeted at accomplishing
the group’s objective. Identify at least four promotional messages for the
objective. Present the findings to the class.
Define the term promotion.
List users of promotion.
Describe the benefits of using promotion.
Describe the costs associated with the use of promotion.
Describe types of promotional objectives.
Discuss the relationship of promotion and marketing.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2010). Razzle dazzle (Promotion)
[LAP: PR-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2010). Razzle dazzle (Promotion):
Instructor copy [LAP: PR-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 496498). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 7, 20, 404-406, 473, 499].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 469-480]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.)
[pp. 237-238, 255-259]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 474-476, 485-486]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 362-363). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 419-421]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-110
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 368375, 390-391]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 132-134). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Hofstrand, D. (2005, January). Promoting your business. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.extension.iastate.edu/AgDM/wholefarm/html/c543.html
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Cost effectiveness. Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/promotion-decisions/15.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Objectives of marketing promotions.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/promotiondecisions/3.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Types of promotion objectives. Retrieved May
2, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/promotion-decisions/4.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). What is promotion? Retrieved May 2, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/promotion-decisions/1.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Above- and below-the-line promotion. Retrieved May
2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18:thecommunication-mix&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2010). Razzle dazzle (Nature of
Promotion)
[LAP: PR-002: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Sands, M. (n.d.). What’s the difference between marketing and promotion.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=15&Itemi
d=3
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-111
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the types of promotion (PR:002, PR LAP 4)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: product promotion, primary product
promotion, secondary product promotion, institutional promotion, public
service, public relations, and patronage.
Identify types of product promotion.
Describe the uses of product promotion.
Identify types of institutional promotion.
Describe uses of institutional promotion.
Discuss the advantages of promotional activities.
Discuss the disadvantages of promotional activities.
Locate examples of institutional and product promotions in magazines, in
newspapers, or on the Internet. Affix the promotions to paper, and label each
by its type of promotion. Obtain feedback from a classmate.
Create a list of different examples of institutional and product promotions that
you could use to promote a business you would be interested in opening.
Participate in a small-group discussion to examine your ideas, and add to/
subtract from the list based on input from your group members. Create a
multi-column table using a spreadsheet software program in which you
create the following headings:
a. Institutional/Product
b. Promotion Idea
c. Purpose
d. Advantages/Disadvantages (of Promotion Idea)
Complete the table, and submit it to your instructor.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Know your options (Types of
promotion) [LAP: PR-004]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Know your options (Types of
promotion): Instructor copy [LAP: PR-004]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 496-498,
501, 527). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 410-415]. Mason, OH:
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-112
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B.; Sobel, J.; & Basteria, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 473, 502-503]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 476-477, 525]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 363-367). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 491-495). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 440-442]. Mason, OH: South-Western. .
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 369-371, 429]. New
York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Crystal, G., & Foster, N. (2011, April 4). What is public relations? Retrieved
May 4, 2011, from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-publicrelations.htm
Edward Lowe Foundation. (1992-2008). How to establish a promotional mix.
Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://www.esmalloffice.com/SBR_template.cfm?docNumber=PL12_360
0.htm
Hofstrand, D. (2005, January). Promoting your business. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from http://www.extension.iastate.edu/AgDM/wholefarm/html/c543.html
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Communication mix: Above- and below-the-line
promotion. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18:thecommunication-mix&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Lister, J., & Harris, B. (n.d.). What is institutional advertising? Retrieved May
4, 2011, from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-institutionaladvertising.htm
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Know your options (Types of
promotion) [LAP: PR-004: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Identify the elements of the promotional mix (PR:003, PR LAP 1)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: promotional mix, advertising, personal
selling, publicity and sales promotion.
Identify the elements of the promotional mix.
Categorize examples of promotions according to the elements of the
promotional mix.
Describe the importance of the promotional mix.
Identify factors affecting the promotional mix.
Describe how the product being sold affects the promotional mix.
Explain how the product's market affects the promotional mix.
Discuss how the distribution system affects the promotional mix.
Explain how the product's company affects the promotional mix.
Identify two businesses similar to one that you might be interested in
starting. Determine their promotional mix; examine their similarities and
differences. Based on your assessment, identify the promotional mix that
would be effective for your business. Write a rationale for your selection,
identifying the promotional mix and explaining how it is similar to and/or
different than that of the two businesses. Submit the rationale to your
teacher.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Spread the word (Nature of
the promotional mix) [LAP: PR-001]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Spread the word (Nature of
the promotional mix): Instructor copy [LAP: PR-001]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 498503, 509-512). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 416-421]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 485-490]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
476-477, 483-488]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-113
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 363-368). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 411-413, 424-428]. Mason, OH: SouthWestern.
Longenecker, J.G., Moore, C.W., Petty, J.W., & Palich, L.E. (2006). Small
business management: An entrepreneurial emphasis (13th ed.) [p.
354]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 37-38,
368-371, 374-375]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G. & d’Amico, M. (2001). Marketing: Creating and keeping
customers in an e-commerce world (7th ed.) [pp. 456-457]. Cincinnati:
South-Western College Publishing/Thomson Learning.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 135-150). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Bovey, C. (2011). Marketing mix—top 4 promotion mix tactics. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Marketing-Mix---Top-4Promotion-Mix-Tactics&id=1398510
Dolak, D. (1999-2010). The marketing communications or promotional mix.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.davedolak.com/promix.htm
Edward Lowe Foundation. (2011). How to establish a promotional mix.
Retrieved May 4, 2011, from
http://edwardlowe.org/index.elf?page=sserc&function=story&storyid=8
816
Hofstrand, D. (2005, January). Promoting your business. Retrieved May 2,
2011, from
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/AgDM/wholefarm/html/c5-43.html
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Types of promotion—Promotion mix.
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/promotiondecisions/16.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Communication mix: Above- and below-the-line
promotion. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18:thecommunication-mix&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Promotion. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_promotion.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Spread the word (Nature of
the promotional mix) [LAP: PR-001: Presentation Software].
Columbus, OH: Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-114
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the use of business ethics in promotion (PR:099)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1; ICT Literacy 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-115
Explain ethical issues associated with fear-based advertising.
Discuss sexism/stereotyping in advertising.
Explain ethical issues associated with promotion to children.
Discuss ethical issues associated with sales promotion sweepstakes,
samples, rebates, and premiums.
Explain the use of stealth marketing.
Discuss ethical issues associated with use of customer information
obtained on the Internet.
Describe ways that businesses use socially responsible promotions.
Watch television advertisements, and identify five deceptive techniques you
see. Discuss your observations with the class, identifying the product being
advertised and what you consider deceptive.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 99,
535-536, 552-553). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 47-49, 433-434]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 525-526]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc..
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 393-397]. Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 490-493]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 16, 133, 138-139 383, 425). Woodland Hills, CA:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 502-503). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T. & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising and
integrated brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 123-126]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-116
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 377378, 432, 444-445]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Wells, W., Burnett, J. & Moriarty, S. (2003). Advertising principles and
practice (6th ed.) [pp. 32-43]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Software/
Online
American Marketing Association. (2003, October 15-16). AMA code of
ethics. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.helleniccomserve.com/marketingcodeofethics.html
Anderson, N. (2006, December 13). FTC says stealth marketing unethical.
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2006/12/8413.ars
Blair, J.D., Stephenson, J.D., Hill, K.L., & Green, J.S. (2006, January-July).
Ethics in advertising: Sex sells, but should it? Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1TOS/is_12_9/ai_n25009596
Direct Marketing Association. (2009, January). Do the right thing. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from http://www.thedma.org/guidelines/dotherightthing.pdf
Witherspoon, J. (1999-2005). The demise and removal of the Aunt Jemima
icon. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.petitiononline.com/aj461153/petition.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the use of technology in the promotion function (PR:100)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Technology 18-19; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6;
Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication and
Collaboration 1; ICT Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-117
Explain how the use of technology in promotion has changed the way
marketers communicate with customers.
Identify ways that the use of technology positively impacts the
promotion function.
Discuss ways that the use of technology negatively impacts the
promotion function.
Describe ways that businesses use the Internet as a promotional tool.
Describe how technology has enhanced opportunities to contact
customers with promotional messages.
Discuss ways that technology has facilitated the use of sales
promotions.
Explain specific applications of technology in promotion.
Conduct research on how the Internet is changing the way businesses
promote their products. Write a one-page paper on the topic, and submit it
to your teacher.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 129130, 505-509, 537-541, 543-544). Mason, OH: South-Western
Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 546-552, 554-557]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox Company, Inc.
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 251-264, 397]. Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 206-207, 406-407). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T. & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising and
integrated brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 97-105, 413, 453, 526-548,
554]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
Marketing: A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 435438]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-118
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Trends: Electronic delivery, tracking.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/salespromotion/18.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Trends: Internet communication, clutter.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/salespromotion/19.htm
Miller, R. (n.d.). The Internet: Exceptional promotional tools. Retrieved May
19, 2011, from
http://www.dynamicwebpromotions.com/information/internetwebsites.h
tml
Novak, D. (2003, December). White paper on Internet search engine
optimization. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://spireproject.com/white.htm
Web Marketing. (2007, August 26). 10 reasons marketing strategy should
include the Internet. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://webmarketingtoday.blogspot.com/2006/08/10-reasonsmarketing-strategy-should.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of promotion to understand its nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the regulation of promotion (PR:101)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2,5-6; Thinking Skills 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1; ICT Literacy 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-119
Explain the need for truthfulness in promotional messages and claims.
Discuss how the use of misleading or inaccurate statements in
promotion is regulated.
Explain laws that protect customers from unwanted promotions.
Discuss laws that protect children from promotional messages.
Explain the regulation of telemarketing.
Discuss the regulation of data privacy.
Describe actions that can be taken by the Federal Trade Commission
to correct misleading advertising.
Discuss reasons for the regulation of products used in advertising.
Explain how the legality of products used in advertising can vary from
country to country.
Access the United States’ Federal Trade Commission web site at
http://www.ftc.gov, and use its search engine to link to articles/transcripts
related to advertising. Select an article that discusses the actions the
Federal Trade Commission has taken to ensure fair advertising practices by
a business/industry, and write a one-page summary of your findings.
Submit your summary to the teacher.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 82-83,
552-553). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 433-434]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 69, 523-525]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
490-493]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 384-390]. Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp.129-130, 666-667). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-120
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 479-480). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T. & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising and
integrated brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 126-145]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 444445]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Wells, W., Burnett, J. & Moriarty, S. (2003). Advertising principles and
practice (6th ed.) [pp. 34-57]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 101-105). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Advertising Educational Foundation. (2000-2011). Industry regulations.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.aef.com/on_campus/classroom/speaker_pres/data/3006
Fawkner, K. (2005-2006). Not just 6 lines, 65 characters. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.ahbbo.com/adsftc.html
Federal Trade Commission. (2007, November 28). Bureau of Consumer
Protection—Division of Advertising Practices. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/bcpap.shtm
Gajda, M. (n.d.). Federal regulation of advertising in the context of
constitutional freedom of speech in the United States. Retrieved May
19, 2011, from http://www.newschool.edu/tcds/malgorza.htm
Lewczak, J. (2007, July 1). Legal issues before going global. Retrieved May
19, 2011, from
http://promomagazine.com/legal/marketing_going_global_3/
Lewczak, J., Fitzpatrick, A., & Smith, M. (2008). Advertising, marketing, and
promotions law year in review. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.metrocorpcounsel.com/current.php?artType=view&artMont
h
=December&artYear=2007&EntryNo=7565
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-121
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Performance
Indicator
Explain types of advertising media (PR:007, PR LAP 3)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2,5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication and
Collaboration 1; Media Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n
o.
p.
q.
r.
Sample
Activity
Create a list of print and broadcast media available in your area. Determine
how often they are published/broadcast, who their target audiences are,
and what type(s) of businesses could benefit from using each medium.
Collect examples of their advertisements.
Define the term advertising media.
Categorize advertising media.
Identify types of publications.
Describe factors on which newspapers vary.
Categorize types of magazines.
Describe the two categories of broadcast media.
Categorize purchase options for television advertising.
Discuss the difference between local and network advertising.
Describe types of direct-mail advertising.
Explain types of Web advertising.
Identify types of out-of-home media.
Describe specialty advertising.
Discuss the use of directory advertising.
Explain the use of movie theater advertising.
Describe the use of product placement for advertising.
Discuss the use of telemarketing for advertising.
Explain the use of videotapes, DVDs, and CD-ROM advertising.
Explain trends that are affecting advertising media.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). Ad-quipping your business
(Types of promotional media) [LAP: PR-003]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). Ad-quipping your business
(Types of promotional media): Instructor copy [LAP: PR-003].
Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 539543, 559). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 438, 440-441]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-122
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 503-507]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
531-534]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009) Marketing essentials
(3rd ed.) [pp. 401-408]. Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 448-452]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Software/
Online
Business Owner’s Toolkit. (1995-2011). Advertising media. Retrieved May
3, 2011, from
http://www.toolkit.com/small_business_guide/sbg.aspx?nid=P03_7031
Encyclopedia of Small Business. (2011). Advertising media—Audio.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/small/A-Bo/Advertising-MediaAudio.html
Encyclopedia of Small Business. (2011). Advertising media—Informercials.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/small/A-Bo/Advertising-MediaInfomercials.html
Encyclopedia of Small Business. (2011). Advertising media—Print.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/small/A-Bo/Advertising-MediaPrint.html
Encyclopedia of Small Business. (2011). Advertising media—Video.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/small/A-Bo/Advertising-MediaVideo.html
eNotes.com. (2011). Advertising. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.enotes.com/business-finance-encyclopedia/advertising
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Trends: Changing media choices. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/advertising/10.htm
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2009). Ad-quipping your business
(Types of promotional media) [LAP: PR-003: Presentation Software].
Columbus, OH: Author.
Petrecca, L. (2011). Product placement—You can’t escape it. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.usatoday.com/money/advertising/200610-10-ad-nauseum-usat_x.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Performance
Indicator
Describe word of mouth channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences (PR:247) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-123
Define the term word of mouth marketing, buzz marketing, viral
marketing, community marketing, grassroots marketing, evangelist
marketing, product seeding, influencer marketing, cause marketing,
conversation creation, brand blogging, referral programs, social
networks.
Discuss the need for honesty and transparency in word of mouth
marketing.
Explain the philosophy of word of mouth marketing.
Describe types of word of mouth marketing.
Distinguish between organic and amplified word of mouth marketing.
Discuss techniques businesses can use to foster organic word of
mouth marketing.
Explain techniques businesses can use to foster amplified word of
mouth marketing.
Select a business or product, and develop a plan for how you could
creatively create buzz about the business or product. Share your plan with
a classmate, and discuss similarities/differences between your plan and
that of your classmate. Identify the top three buzz techniques the two of you
created. Share your ideas with the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 22,
161, 323, 502). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp.210, 492-493]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 270-274, 289]. Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Lane, W.R., King, K.W., & Russell, J.T. (2005). Kleppner’s advertising
procedure (16th ed.) [pp. 714-716]. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Pearson/Prentice Hall.
O’Guinn, T.C.; Allen, C.T.; & Semenik , R.J. (2009). Advertising and
integrated brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 7, 11, 48, 534, 552, 662-666].
Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-124
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 386-387].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Guldimann, M. (2008, March 3). How marketers can start speaking with –
not to – customers. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.adotas.com/2008/03/how-to-marketers-can-start-speakingwith-%E2%80%93-not-to-%E2%80%93-customers/
Marketing Minefield. (2007). Word of mouth marketing. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.marketingminefield.co.uk/unusual-ideas/wordof-mouth-marketing.html
Sernovitz, A. (2006). The word of mouth marketing manifesto. Retrieved
May 2, 2008, from
http://www.wordofmouthbook.com/docs/WOM_Sernovitz_Manifesto.pd
f
Shin, A. (2006, December 12). FTC moves to unmask word-of-mouth
marketing. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wpdyn/content/article/2006/12/11/AR2006121101389.html
Word of Mouth Marketing Association. (2006, February 1). An introduction
to word of mouth marketing. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://womma.org/wom101/
Word of Mouth Marketing Association. (2009). The WOMMA code of ethics.
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from http://womma.org/ethics/code/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-125
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature of direct marketing channels (PR:089) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication and
Collaboration 1; ICT Literacy
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Define the term direct marketing.
Identify communication channels used for direct marketing.
Describe advantages/disadvantages associated with direct marketing.
Explain how the Internet has changed businesses’ ability to
communicate directly with customers.
Describe the importance of databases to direct marketing.
Collect samples of direct marketing delivered to your home or e-mail
address. Share your samples with a team composed of two or three other
classmates. Determine what conclusions the team can make about the use
of direct marketing channels—e.g., types of products promoted, forms of
direct marketing used, effectiveness of direct marketing techniques, etc.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 472475, 505-509). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 504]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company,
Inc.
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 312-316, 318,357]. Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 363-364, 403-405). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (p. 473). New York: McGraw-Hill
Irwin.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated
brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 110-111, 138-141, 623-645]. Mason,
OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 347, 378-380,
433]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Lake, L. (n.d.). Mobile marketing—getting a grasp on the basics. Retrieved
May 27, 2011, from
http://marketing.about.com/od/marketingmethods/a/Mobile-MarketingBasics-For-the-Small-Business.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-126
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Direct marketing. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_direct_marketing.htm
Melissa Data. (n.d.). Research on direct marketing database. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from http://www.melissadata.com/articles/research-ondirect-marketing-database.htm
Pollick, M. (2003-2011). What is direct marketing? Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-direct-marketing.htm
Thomsonlocal.com. (n.d.). Great marketing ‘uses a range of channels.’
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://directmarketing.thomsonlocal.com/Win/Why-Use-DirectMarketing/Great-marketing-uses-a-range-of-channels/
Thomsonlocal.com. (n.d.). Why use direct marketing? Retrieved May 27,
2011, from http://directmarketing.thomsonlocal.com/Win/Why-UseDirect-Marketing/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Performance
Indicator
Identify communications channels used in sales promotion (PR:249)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-127
Define the following terms: free-standing insert (FSI), coupons,
rebates, push money, point-of-sale displays, trade allowances, dealer
loaders, contests, sweepstakes, games, loyalty programs,
demonstrations, personal appearances, advertising-support programs,
co-op advertising, trade-in promotions, samples, premiums, free
products, promotional products, trade shows, push strategies, pull
strategies.
Discuss differences between advertising and sales promotion.
Explain reasons that businesses use sales promotions.
Describe types of consumer sales promotions.
Discuss types of trade sales promotions.
Explain types of business-to-business sales promotions.
Describe types of point-of-purchase (POP) displays that are used for
sales promotion.
Compare the similarities and differences between coupons and
rebates.
Distinguish between push and pull sales promotion strategies.
Explain how contests, sweepstakes, and games differ.
Describe trends in sales promotions.
Visit a brick or a click consumer business to determine the types of sales
promotions being used. Record your findings. Do the same for a trade
business, and record your findings. Share your findings with a group of two
or three classmates. Create a poster of the team’s sales promotion findings.
Show the poster to the class, and discuss the team’s findings.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 500501, 512-513, 586-590). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 475-479, 490-491]. Tinley Park, IL: GoodheartWillcox Company, Inc.
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 284-286, 289, 324-349].
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-128
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
538-543]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009) Marketing essentials
(pp. 365, 369-375). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 503-507). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 472-479]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated
brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 562-584]. Mason, OH: South-Western
Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
Marketing: A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 445450]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Business Owner’s Toolkit. (1995-2011). Coupons and rebates. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from
http://www.toolkit.com/small_business_guide/sbg.aspx?nid=P03_7016
Dolak, D. (1999-2010). Sales promotion. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.davedolak.com/promo.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Business-to-business sales promotions.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/salespromotion/16.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Consumer sales promotion. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/sales-promotion/4.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Contests and sweepstakes. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/sales-promotion/10.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). POP displays and advertising support.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/salespromotion/13.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Trade sales promotions. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/sales-promotion/12.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Trends in sales promotion. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/sales-promotion/17.htm
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). What is sales promotion? Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/sales-promotion/1.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-129
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate
information about products, services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a
desired outcome
Performance
Element
Understand promotional channels used to communicate with targeted
audiences.
Performance
Indicator
Explain communications channels used in public-relations activities
(PR:250)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication and
Collaboration 1; ICT Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
Sample
Activity
Develop a listing of the public-relations activities your school could use to
develop a positive relationship with the local business community. Write a
rationale for your choice of public-relations activities. Share your ideas with
a team of two or three students, have the team select the best ideas, and
present those ideas to the class and to a panel of experts. Ask the experts
to select the best ideas to be implemented during the school year.
Define the following terms: press kits, audio/video releases, matte
release, website press room, special events, sponsorships, community
relations, philanthropy, crisis management.
b. Explain the role of public relations in business.
c. Discuss advantages/disadvantages associated with public relations.
d. Describe the main tools used in public relations to communicate with
targeted audiences (i.e., media relations, media tours, newsletters,
special events, speaking engagements, sponsorships, employee
relations, and community relations and philanthropy).
e. Explain tools used to communicate public relations messages to the
media (i.e., press kits, audio/video releases, matte releases, website
press room).
f. Discuss reasons that public relations specialists monitor markets.
g. Describe the purpose of crisis management in public relations.
h. Explain trends in public relations.
i.
Describe the use of blogs for public relations activities.
j. Discuss the use of web forums in public relations activities.
k. Explain how RSS feeds can be used for public relations activities.
l.
Describe the use of podcasting for public relations activities.
m. Explain how search engine optimization (SEO) can be used for public
relations activities.
Select a company of interest, and access its website. Download press
releases and/or press kits. Write a brief summary of what you learned about
the company’s public-relations activities. Present your summary to the
class.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-130
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 503,
517, 546-547). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 73, 479-480]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Clow, K.E, & Baack, D. (2010). Integrated advertising, promotion, and
marketing communications (4th ed.) [pp. 356-368]. Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
544-546]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 365-367). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 473-475). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of
marketing (3rd ed.) [pp. 458-462]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
O’Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated
brand promotion (5th ed.) [pp. 650-662]. Mason, OH: South-Western
Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 372]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Crystal, G. (2003-2011). What is public relations? Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-public-relations.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Advantages of P.R. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/publicrelations/2.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Disadvantages of P.R. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/public-relations/3.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Public relations. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/publicrelations.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Public relations tools. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/public-relations/5.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). PR trends: Blogs. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/publicrelations/12.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Trends: RSS, podcasting. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/public-relations/13.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Trends: SEO. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/publicrelations/14.htm
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Public relations. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_public_relations.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-131
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, strategies, and systems used to obtain and convey
ideas and information
Performance
Element
Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.
Performance
Indicator
Write inquiries (CO:040) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Career-sustaining
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sample
Activity
Write an inquiry to obtain membership information in a professional
organization of interest to you.
Define the term inquiries.
Identify occasions when inquiries are written by businesses.
Describe the importance of writing inquiries.
Demonstrate procedures for writing inquiries.
Resources
Textbooks
Bovée, C. L., & Thill, J. V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.)
[pp. 483, 604-605]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Gorman, T. (2005). The complete idiot’s guide to business letters and memos
(2nd ed.) [pp. 158-164]. Indianapolis: Alpha Books/Penguin Group.
Hyden, J. S., Jordan, A. K., Steinauer, M. H., & Jones, M. J. (2006).
Communicating for success (3rd ed.) [pp. 286, 316-317]. Mason, OH:
Thomson South-Western.
Kimball, C. & Van Gelder, J. (2007). Ultimate book of business letters
(pp. 33-68, 115-117, 120-121, 142). Madison, WI: Entrepreneur Press.
Lesikar, R.V. & Flatley, M.E. (2005). Basic business communication: Skills for
empowering the Internet generation (10th ed.) [pp. 112-119]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Locker, K.O. (2006). Business and administrative communication (7th ed.) [pp.
218-221]. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Software/
Online
Beare, K. (2011). Business letter writing: Inquiries—Asking for information.
Retrieved April 11, 2011, from
http://esl.about.com/library/writing/blwrite_make_enquire.htm
Foundation Center. (2010). Frequently asked questions: What should be
included in a letter of inquiry/intent? Retrieved April 11, 2011, from
http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/letter.html
Fritz, J. (2011). How to make your letter of inquiry a winner. Retrieved April 11,
2011, from http://nonprofit.about.com/od/fundraising/a/LOI.htm
McMurrey, D.A. (n.d.). Chapter 1: Business correspondence—Inquiry letters.
Retrieved April 11, 2011, from
http://www.gel.ulaval.ca/~poussart/gel64324/McMurrey/texte/inquire.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
WriteExpress. (1996-2011). Inquiry letters. Retrieved April 11, 2011, from
http://www.writeexpress.com/inquiry.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-132
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
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Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature and scope of the marketing information management
function (IM:001, IM LAP 2)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1, 3; Communication 1;
Information Literacy 1, 2; Media Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: marketing information, marketing-information
management system, and marketing research.
Describe the need of marketing information.
Classify types of marketing information as primary or secondary.
Describe the types of information marketers should obtain.
Categorize internal sources of marketing information.
Discuss external sources of marketing information.
Explain why marketers should collect information.
Describe the characteristics of useful marketing information.
Describe reasons that marketers need to gather accurate information.
Explain the functions of a marketing-information management system.
Contrast marketing research with a marketing-information system.
Describe the use of a marketing-information system.
Explain the benefits of a marketing-information management system.
Discuss the requirements of a marketing-information management
system.
Explain the role of marketing-information management in marketing.
Describe limitations of marketing-information management systems.
Listen to a guest speaker discuss her/his company’s marketing-information
management system, its components, and how the components work together.
Write a synopsis of the presentation.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Get the facts straight (Marketinginformation management) [LAP: IM-002]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Get the facts straight (Marketinginformation management): Instructor copy [LAP: IM-002]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 7-8, 119-127]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 236-241]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [pp.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-134
238-239, 243-245]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 170-181]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
594-595, 612-617). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 208-230]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 6, 22-23, 101-102).
Mason, OH: South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Abraham, M. (2001-2004). You do have a sales and marketing database?
Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://www.sticky-marketing.net/articles/smdbases.htm
Crawford, I.M. (n.d.). Chapter 9: Marketing information systems. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from
http://www.fao.org/docrep/W3241E/w3241e0a.htm#chapter%209:%20ma
rketing%20information%20systems
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Marketing information systems and forecasting. Retrieved
May 2, 2011, from http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=23%3Amar
keting-is-and-forecasting&catid=2%3Amarketing-lectures&Itemid=3
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Marketing research. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=22%3Amar
keting-research&catid=2%3Amarketing-lectures&Itemid=1
Management-Hub.com. (2005-2011). Concept and components of a marketing
information system. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from
http://www.management-hub.com/marketing-information-managementsystem.html
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Get the facts straight (Marketinginformation management) [LAP: IM-002: Presentation Software].
Columbus, OH: Author.
McNamera, C. (n.d.). Some major sources of market research information.
Retrieved May 2, 2011,
http://managementhelp.org/mrktng/mk_rsrch/sources.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-135
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the role of ethics in marketing-information management (IM:025)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 9, 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication 1; Information
Literacy 2; Media Literacy 3
Objectives
a.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
b.
c.
d.
e.
Sample
Activity
Describe the importance of credibility and objectivity in marketinginformation management.
Explain why the integrity of the marketing information must be protected.
Explain types of ethical conflicts in marketing-information management.
Discuss ethical issues associated with obtaining information about
competitors.
Describe ethical issues created by the use of technology in data
collection.
Given a series of marketing-information management case studies, determine
the ethical violations involved in collecting, analyzing, and using data. Discuss
your responses with the class.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 97-98,
125). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [p. 123]. Mason, OH: Thomson/SouthWestern.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 191-192]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
139, 594). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 244-245). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Leedy, P.D. & Ormrod, J.E. (2005). Practical research: Planning & design (8th
ed.) [pp. 101-104]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 228-229]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
Connon, D.A. (2010). The ethics of database marketing. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3937/is_200205/ai_n9031641
Cyber Ethics. (2007). Surveillance: Cookies. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.tc.umn.edu/~ptace002/cyberethics/cookies.html
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
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Fodness, D. (2005, January 4). The ethics of marketing research: Can I?
Should I? Would I? (n.d.). Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.marketingprofs.com/5/fodness1.asp
Forbes Research PTE LTD. (2002). Marketing research: Competitive edge in
an information age. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.forbes.com.sg/reference.htm
Howard, K. (2005). Marketing credibility—The difference. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from
http://www.abipr.com/thought_leadership_reg_marketing_credibility.php
Slideshare. (n.d.). Information ethics: Chapter 4. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/mgraham213/information-ethics-2106985
Tanner, J. & Raymond, M.A. (n.d.). Ethics, laws, and customer empowerment.
Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://www.flatworldknowledge.com/pub/1.0/principlesmarketing/401766#web-0
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-137
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the use of technology in the marketing-information management
function (IM:183)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Technology 18; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication 1; ICT Literacy
1, 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Identify ways that the use of technology impacts the marketinginformation management function.
Describe how the use of the Internet for marketing-information
management tracks and monitors customer website activities.
Discuss how customer-to-business communications on the Internet can
be used in marketing-information management (e.g., email reminders,
popup notices, online focus groups, etc.)
Explain how the Internet provides services for conducting research (e.g.,
search engines, tools for online surveys, database access, blogs, etc.)
Discuss marketers’ use of virtual realties and simulations in marketinginformation management.
Describe how the use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) can facilitate
marketing-information management.
Explain the use of data analysis software in marketing-information
management.
Prepare a list of ways that your company can use the Internet to assist with the
marketing-information management function. Share the list with a classmate.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 20-21,
255-256, 262-263). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 21-27, 170, 213-218]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 174177]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
594-595, 602). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 243-244). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 214, 240-243]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic Marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 80-81, 209-213].
Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-138
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.)
[pp. 30-34, 41]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
Bulkeley, W.M. (2005, June 23). Marketers scan blogs for brand insights.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB111948406207267049QIY04xo_fhhh9HisD5AYE1NP_3Q_20060622.html
eHow Business Editor. (1999-2011). How to conduct market research online.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.ehow.com/how_16595_conduct-market-research.html
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Other technologies. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/marketingresearch/trends-other-technologies-and-affordable-research.htm
MaCorr Research (2003-2011). Online focus groups. Retrieved May 27, 2011,
from http://www.macorr.com/online_focus_groups.htm
Morris, M. (2008, April 21). Putting customers in charge of your
communications. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from http://www.econsultancy.com/news-blog/365473/putting-customers-in-charge-of-yourcommunications.html
Social Research Foundation. (2006-2007). SRF pioneers virtual research
panel. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from http://socialresearchfoundation.org/
Reistma, R. (2009, December 28). Trends that will shape market research in
2010. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://blogs.forrester.com/market_research/2009/12/trends-that-willshape-market-research-in-2010.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-139
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Acquire foundational knowledge of marketing-information management to
understand its nature and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the regulation of marketing-information management (IM:419)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 11, 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Civic Literacy 1; Information Literacy 2; Media Literacy 3
Objectives
a.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: self-regulation, SUGGING, FRUGGING,
privacy
Explain the role of self-regulation for marketing researchers.
Discuss privacy concerns associated with the collection, storage, mining,
and use of data.
Describe the legalities associated with the collection of marketing data
from children.
Discuss legal issues associated with the collection and sharing of healthcare data.
Explain legal issues associated with the protection of information held by
financial institutions.
Discuss why marketing researchers are excluded from governance under
the CAN-SPAM Act.
Explain how marketing researchers are protected from SUGGING and
FRUGGING.
Describe legal issues associated with callbacks.
Discuss legal issues associated with the use of automatic dialers when
collecting data.
Ascertain the current status of privacy/data security legislation.
Discuss reasons that marketing researchers must consider state, federal,
and international laws when collecting data.
Search the Internet to locate information about current regulations impacting
marketing-information management or marketing research. (Good sources to
search include the Marketing Research Association and the Council of
American Survey Research Organizations [CASRO].) Divide a page into two
columns—the one on the left labeled “Findings”; the other column labeled
“Implications.” For each piece of regulation (both self-regulation and
government regulation), determine how the regulation will impact your data
collection, storage, and use. Submit the completed document to your teacher.
Conduct an Internet search to determine your state’s laws governing the
collection, storage, and use of marketing data. Record your findings, and
discuss them with a classmate.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
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Resources
Textbooks
Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business
management (p. 299). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 83-85
124-125, 260). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 191-192]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
210, 281). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 379]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.)
[pp. 89-95]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
CASRO. (2004, September). “Fruggers” join “suggers” in FTC regulations.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.casro.org/pdfs/Research%20&%20Regulation%20September
%202004.pdf
Federal Trade Commission. (2007, February). Implementing the children’s
online privacy protection act. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.ftc.gov/reports/coppa/07COPPA_Report_to_Congress.pdf
Fienberg, H. (n.d.). Individual privacy: How laws impact researchers, whether
the laws apply or not. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.fcsm.gov/07papers/Fienberg.IV-B.pdf
Rubinstein, I.S., Lee, R.D., & Schwartz, P.M. (2008, February 19). Data mining
and Internet profiling: Emerging regulatory and technological approaches.
Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1116728#PaperDow
nload
SubscriberMail. (2009). The great CAN-SPAM freak out. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://www.optinnews.com/spam_freak_out.html
Wei, D.L.T. (2006). Regulating access to databases through antitrust law: A
missing perspective in the database debate. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://stlr.stanford.edu/pdf/lim-antitrust.pdf
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-142
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research activities to show command of their nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain the nature of marketing research (IM:010, IM LAP 5) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8-9, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication 1; Information
Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: marketing research, secondary research,
primary research, personal interview, mail interview, telephone interview,
questionnaire, and focus group.
Identify characteristics of effective marketing research.
Describe the importance of marketing research.
Explain how marketing research is carried out.
Explain the uses of marketing research.
Describe shortcomings of marketing research.
Describe types of marketing research objectives.
Describe the contents of a research plan or design.
Classify types of marketing research data.
Distinguish between internal and external sources of data.
Describe types of data collection methods.
Explain how data can be analyzed.
Describe steps in the marketing research process.
Determine the types of marketing-research activities that an assigned local
business conducts. Discuss your findings with the class. Contrast the
marketing-research activities of large businesses with those of small
businesses. Write a synopsis of your findings.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Seek and Find (Nature of
marketing research) [LAP: IM-005]. Columbus, OH: Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Seek and Find (Nature of
marketing research): Instructor copy [LAP: IM-005]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.)
[pp.48-66, 78--84, 110-131]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 251-264).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 116-123, 128-137]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 235-243]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-143
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 7, 37-42, 56-70, 83-91, 143-150]. Mason, OH: SouthWestern Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.)
[pp. 170-172, 178-189]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
592-603, 610-623). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 242-243, 245-246). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 4, 34-36, 62-65). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [p. 215]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing:
Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 208-230]. New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[pp. 5-6, 102-110, 133-144]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Burrow, J.L. (2003). Marketing: Business 2000 (pp. 38-43). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Kaden, R.J. (2011). The case for marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from http://www.marketingprofs.com/5/kaden3.asp?sp=1#split
Kaden, R.J. (2000-2011). Discovering needs, wishes, wants, desires: The
marketing research challenge. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.marketingprofs.com/6/kaden4.asp?sp=1#split
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/marketingresearch.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Finding secondary research. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/finding-secondary-research.htm
Lancaster, G. (n.d.). Marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.dagroup.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=22:marketin
g-research&catid=2:marketing-lectures
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Introduction to marketing research. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_marketing_research.htm
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Primary marketing research. Retrieved May
3, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_marketing_research_primar
y.htm
Marketing Teacher. (2000-2011). Secondary marketing research. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://marketingteacher.com/Lessons/lesson_marketing_research_second
ary.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2010). Seek and find (Nature of
marketing research) [LAP: IM-005: Presentation Software]. Columbus,
OH: Author.
McNamara, C. (n.d.). Market research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.managementhelp.org/mrktng/mk_rsrch/mk_rsrch.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
QuickMBA. (1999-2010). Marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/research/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 5-144
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-145
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research activities to show command of their nature
and scope.
Performance
Indicator
Discuss the nature of marketing research problems/issues (IM:282,
IM LAP 13) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 9
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1,2; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Sample
Activity
Define the term marketing research problem, decision problem, variables,
unit of analysis, research objectives.
Explain the importance of determining the actual marketing research
problem/issue.
Discuss the need to determine the “real” issue/problem rather than its
symptoms.
Describe the steps involved in determining the marketing research
problem/issue (e.g., clarifying and identifying the information needs,
redefining the decision problem as a research problem, and setting
research objectives.
Discuss activities involved in identifying the information needs (e.g.,
determining the purpose of the research, understanding the complete
problem, identifying measurable symptoms, determining the unit of
analysis, and determining relevant variables).
Explain why researchers need to adjust the decision problem into a
research problem.
Describe the purposes of setting marketing research objectives.
Explain the relationship between the research problem/issue and the
marketing research objectives.
Discuss how determining the marketing research problem/issue aids in
determining whether to conduct the study.
Describe situations in which conducting a marketing research study would
be inappropriate.
Access the Social Science Research Network site for the Harvard Business
School Marketing Unit at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640. Select a marketing-research paper of interest and
download it from the Social Science Research Network. Read the study to
determine the nature of the research problem/issue. Work with a classmate to
determine the problem/issue, unit of analysis, and variables. Determine
whether the research problem/issue aligns with the research objectives. Share
your findings with the class. Save the research study for future use.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-146
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). What’s the problem? (Nature of
marketing research problems/issues) [LAP: IM-013]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). What’s the problem? (Nature of
marketing research problems/issues): Instructor copy [LAP: IM-013].
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
50-60, 95]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 128-129]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 37, 58-66, 70-71]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 179180].Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p.
612). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 28-32). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[pp. 51-52, 55, 125]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
Hollander, T. (2008, February 24). Fatal flaw in online survey design: Poorly
defined objectives. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://toddhollander.com/blog/online-surveys-the-importance-of-definingobjectives/
KnowThis.com (1998-2011). Identify what is to be learned. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/planning-for-market-research/identify-what-is-to-be-learned.htm
Kumar, R. (2011). Defining the problem and determining research objectives.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/anna.rohit/defining-the-problem-anddetermining-research-objectives
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2011). Nature of marketing research
problems/issues [LAP: IM-013: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author. (Available Spring 2011).
Polaris Marketing Research (2001-2011). Marketing research steps: Identifying
the problem. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.polarismr.com/education/step1_identifyproblem.html
University of Alabama in Huntsville College of Administrative Science. (n.d.).
Problem formulation. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://cas.uah.edu/wrenb/mkt343/Problem.ppt
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-147
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their
appropriateness for the research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicator
Describe methods used to design marketing research studies (i.e., descriptive,
exploratory, and causal) (IM:284, IM LAP 14) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication 1; Information
Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Sample
Activity
Define the following terms: research design, descriptive design,
exploratory design, causal design.
Describe general purposes of marketing research (e.g., explain, predict,
monitor, discover, test hypotheses).
Explain the relationship between the research design and the purpose of
the research.
Discuss the purposes of using descriptive research.
Explain the purposes of using exploratory research.
Distinguish between descriptive and exploratory research.
Describe the purposes of using causal research.
Access the Social Science Research Network site for the Harvard Business
School Marketing Unit at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640. Select a marketing research paper of interest, and
download it from the Social Science Research Network. Read the paper to
determine the general purpose of the study (i.e., explain, predict, monitor,
discover or test hypotheses). Determine whether the research design is
descriptive, exploratory, or causal. Determine whether the research design is
appropriate for the purpose of the research. Record your findings, and write a
summary of the research paper. Submit your paper to your teacher for
feedback. Save the research study for future use.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Methods for designing marketing
research studies—Temporary title [LAP: IM-014]. Columbus, OH: Author.
(Available Spring 2012)
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Methods for designing marketing
research studies—Temporary title: Instructor copy [LAP: IM-014].
(Available Spring 2012)
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
78-81, 345-351]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 252-253).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-148
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 81,107-110, 116-120,]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 32-33, 50-54,104-105). New York, McGraw-Hill
Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[p. 44-50, 53, 55-58]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
DJS Research Ltd. (2005-2011). What is causal research? Retrieved May 3,
2011, from
http://www.marketresearchworld.net/index.php?option=com_content&task
=view&id=799&Itemid=64
DJS Research Ltd. (2005-2011). What is descriptive research? Retrieved May
3, 2011, from
http://www.marketresearchworld.net/index.php?option=com_content&task
=view&id=800&Itemid=64
DJS Research Ltd. (2005-2011). What is exploratory research? Retrieved May
3, 2011, from
http://www.marketresearchworld.net/index.php?option=com_content&task
=view&id=798
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Descriptive research. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-of-marketing/planningfor-market-research/descriptive-research.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Exploratory, causal research. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/planning-for-market-research/exploratory-and-causalresearch.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Step 1: Identify the research purpose. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/planning-for-market-research/identify-the-researchpurpose.htm
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Methods for designing marketing
research studies—Temporary title [LAP: IM-014: Presentation Software].
Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Spring 2012).
Picciano, A.G. (n.d.). EDSTATS primer: Session 6—Descriptive research.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/edu/apiccian/edstat06.html
Tyman Space Online Course Notes. (2005, June 21). Marketing research.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.sykronix.com/tsoc/courses/prin/pr_res.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-149
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their
appropriateness for the research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicator
Describe options businesses use to obtain marketing-research data (i.e.,
primary and secondary research, quantitative and qualitative research)
(IM:281, IM LAP 15) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication 1; Information
Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
Sample
Activity
Distinguish between primary and secondary marketing research.
Describe occasions for using primary sources of marketing research data.
Discuss primary sources of marketing research data.
Describe advantages/disadvantages of primary marketing research.
Explain types of primary research (i.e., quantitative and qualitative).
Explain occasions for using secondary sources of marketing research
data.
Describe secondary sources of marketing research data (i.e., internal and
external).
Describe advantages/disadvantages with using internal sources of
secondary data.
Explain reasons that businesses need to analyze external data.
Explain advantages/disadvantages of secondary marketing research.
Discuss reasons for outsourcing marketing research activities.
Using the marketing research paper obtained from the Social Science
Research Network at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640, analyze the paper to determine whether the author
conducted primary or secondary research and from what resources the author
obtained data—internal or external and primary or secondary. Discuss your
findings with a group of two or three other classmates.
Resources
LAP
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Ways to obtain marketing
research data—Temporary title [LAP: IM-015]. Columbus, OH: Author.
(Available Spring 2012)
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Ways to obtain marketing
research data—Temporary title: Instructor copy [LAP: IM-015]. (Available
Spring 2012)
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
84, 124-131, 188-217]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 251-270).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-150
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 119-123]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 38-39, 143-146, 149, 177-178, 186]. Mason, OH: SouthWestern Cengage Learning.
Churchill, G.A., Jr.; & Iacobucci, D. (2002). Marketing research:
Methodological foundations) (8th ed.) [pp. 196-239, 243-270]. Fort Worth:
Harcourt College Publishers.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 235-243]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 180181]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
596-597, 612-614). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 80-84). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 219-227]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Leedy, P.D. & Ormrod, J.E. (2005). Practical research: Planning & design (8th
ed.) [pp. 89-90]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic Marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 215-218, 219-226].
Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Software/
Online
AllBusiness. (1999-2011). Secondary vs. primary market research. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.allbusiness.com/marketing/marketresearch/1310-1.html
Business Owner’s Toolkit. (1995-2011). Secondary market research. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://www.toolkit.com/small_business_guide/sbg.aspx?nid=P03_3010
Canada Business. (2011, March 9). Primary market research techniques.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.canadabusiness.ca/servlet/ContentServer?cid=108626109470
6&pagename=CBSC_YT%2Fdisplay&lang=en&c=GuideInfoGuide
Entrepreneur.com. (2011). Primary market research. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from http://www.entrepreneur.com/encyclopedia/term/82400.html
MBAResearch and Curriculum Center. (2012). Ways to obtain marketing
research data—Temporary title [LAP: IM-015: Presentation Software].
Columbus, OH: Author. (Available Spring 2012).
McCullough, D. (n.d.). Quantitative vs. qualitative marketing research.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.macroinc.com/html/art/s_qua.html
Tutor2u. (n.d.). Market research—Secondary research. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://tutor2u.net/business/marketing/research-secondary.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-151
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand marketing-research design considerations to evaluate their
appropriateness for the research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicator
Discuss the nature of sampling plans (i.e., who, how many, how chosen)
(IM:285) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1, 2; Communication and
Collaboration 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Define the terms population, sample, probability sampling, non-probability
sampling, and sampling plan.
Discuss the advantages of using a sample to represent the population.
Explain when it is appropriate to use a sample of the population.
Distinguish between probability and non-probability sample designs.
Explain types of non-probability sample designs.
Describe types of probability sample designs.
Explain types of sampling bias/errors.
Discuss the purpose of sampling plans.
Explain the components of a sampling plan.
Use the marketing-research study previously downloaded from the Social
Science Research Network at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640 to explore the study’s sampling plan. Determine whether
a probability or non-probability sample was used; the type of sample design
used; and the steps the research took to overcome sampling bias/error.
Record your findings, and submit them to your teacher. Save the research
study for future use.
Resources
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
386-398, 411-422]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 257-258).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [p. 130]. Mason, OH: Thomson/SouthWestern.
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 39, 326-328, 330, 334-343, 363-364, 375-384]. Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
614-615). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 128-142). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Kemp, S.M. & Kemp, S. (2004). Business statistics demystified: A selfteaching guide (pp. 36-41). New York: McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-152
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003) Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 236-238]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Leedy, P.D. & Ormrod, J.E. (2005). Practical research: Planning & design (8th
ed.) [pp. 199-206]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 227]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Pyrczak, F. (2006). Making sense of statistics (4th ed.) [pp. 11-15]. Glendale,
CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[pp. 58-59, 301-321]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
Bineham, G. (2006, March). Sampling in research. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from
http://www.thh.nhs.uk/documents/_Departments/Research/InfoSheets/16
_sampling_research.pdf
Castillo, J. (2008-2011). Sampling error in research. Retrieved May 3, 2011,
from http://www.experiment-resources.com/sampling-error.html
McIntosh, J. (2008, February 26). Probability sampling techniques. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from
http://scientificresearchmethods.suite101.com/article.cfm/probability_sam
pling_techniques
Mugo, F.W. (n.d.). Sampling in research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/tutorial/Mugo/tutorial.htm
Thomson Gale. (2011). Marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Mar-No/MarketingResearch.html
Trochim, W.M.K. (2006, October 20). Nonprobability sampling. Retrieved May
3, 2011, from http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/sampnon.php
Trochim, W.M.K. (2006, October 20). Probability sampling. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/sampprob.php
Wadsworth Cengage Learning. (2005). Sampling methods: Research methods
workshops. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.wadsworth.com/psychology_d/templates/student_resources/w
orkshops/res_methd/sampling/sampling_01.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Planning Guide Sheets
Section 5
Page 5-153
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicator
Describe data-collection methods (e.g., observations, mail, telephone, Internet,
discussion groups, interviews, diaries, scanners) (IM:289)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Information Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e
f
g
h
i.
j
k.
l.
Sample
Activity
Textbooks
Explain reasons for having a variety of data-collection methods.
Describe forms of quantitative data collection (e.g., surveys, tracking,
experiments).
Describe forms of qualitative data collection (e.g., personal interviews,
focus groups, observational research).
Explain limitations associated with qualitative research.
Explain advantages/disadvantages with using observational techniques to
collect marketing data.
Describe advantages/disadvantages associated with using mail
techniques to collect marketing data.
Discuss advantages/disadvantages associated with using telephone datacollection methods.
Describe ways to use the Internet to collect data.
Explain advantages/disadvantages associated with using the Internet as a
data-collection method.
Describe advantages/disadvantages of using discussion groups to collect
data.
Discuss advantages/disadvantages associated with using interviews to
collect data.
Explain advantages/disadvantages associated with using scanners to
collect data.
Using the marketing research paper obtained from the Social Science
Research Network at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640, determine what method(s) the author used to collect the
data. Identify the advantages/disadvantages associated with that datacollection method. Determine additional ways the author could have collected
the data. Discuss your ideas with a classmate.
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
245-282]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 258-265).
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 134-137]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-154
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 137-150]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 237-241]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Etzel, M.J.; Walker, B.J.; & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 181187]. Burr Ridge, IL: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (3rd
ed.) [pp. 614-616]. Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 252-258). New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Hair, J.F.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Ortinau, D.J.; & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of
marketing research (pp. 60-73, 84-96). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Kemp, S.M. & Kemp, S. (2004). Business statistics demystified: A selfteaching guide (pp. 116-117). New York: McGraw-Hill.
Lamb, C.W., Jr.; Hair, J.F., Jr.; & McDaniel C. (2003). Essentials of marketing
(3rd ed.) [pp. 228-236, 237-239]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
Leedy, P.D. & Ormrod, J.E. (2005). Practical research: Planning & design (8th
ed.) [pp. 179-185]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 216-226]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[pp. 102-119, 133-142]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
InSites. (2007, May). Tips on qualitative and quantitative data collect methods.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.insites.org/CLIP_v1_site/downloads/PDFs/TipsQualQuanMthd
s.4B.8-07.pdf
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Types of qualitative data collection. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/planning-for-market-research/qualitative-data-collectiontypes.htm
KnowThis.com. (1998-2011). Types of quantitative data collection. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://www.knowthis.com/tutorials/principles-ofmarketing/planning-for-market-research/quantitative-data-collectiontypes.htm
Otlacan, O. (2011) Overview on qualitative data collection techniques in
international marketing research. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://ezinearticles.com/?Overview-on-Qualitative-Data-Collection-Techniques-in-International-Marketing-Research&id=26285
SurveyBounty (2011). 23 advantages of online surveys. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from http://www.surveybounty.com/articles/surveyadvantages.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-155
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicator
Explain characteristics of effective data-collection instruments (IM:418)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-7; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 1, Communication and Collaboration 1
Objectives
a. Explain why data-collection instruments must be carefully designed and
administered.
b. Discuss challenges in developing effective data-collection instruments
(e.g., cultural differences between researcher and source, resources
required for the study, intangible nature of some types of information,
difficulty accessing some sources of information).
c. Explain elements of surveys (i.e., a statement to respondents about how
information will be used and why it is valuable; clear instructions, including
for any skip patterns; appealing format; logical sequence of questions;
consideration of how answers to previous items might affect later items).
d. Describe qualities of a good survey item (e.g., clear questions, single
focus for each question, neutral questions, balanced questions,
appropriate language for the intended respondent, appropriately broad or
narrow in scope).
e. Explain how to ensure the quality of observations.
f. Discuss considerations for collecting data online.
g. Describe considerations in using a pre-existing data collection instrument.
Sample
Activity
Use the research study previously downloaded from the Social Science
Research Network at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640 to examine the effectiveness of the study’s datacollection instrument. Determine what data-collection instrument was used and
whether the researcher developed a quality data-collection instrument. Record
your findings, and provide a rationale for your assessment. Discuss your
findings with a classmate.
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
316-338]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 253, 258263). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 237-239]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company.
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 186-190, 210-218, 287-312, 384-388]. Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-156
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp.616-616, 618-623). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D., & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 250-257). Boston: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 219-228]. Boston:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.)
[pp. 64, 188-207, 210-240, 244-261]. Mason, OH: South-Western
Cengage Learning.
Software/
Online
Creative Research Systems. (2007-2010). Survey design. Retrieved May 16,
2011, from http://www.surveysystem.com/sdesign.htm
CustomInsights.com . (n.d.) Writing effective survey questions. Retrieved May
16, 2011, from http://www.custominsight.com/articles/effective-surveyquestions.asp
Kaden, B. (2007, November 20). Guidelines for writing an effective
questionnaire. Retrieved May 16, 2011, from
http://www.customerthink.com/blog/guidelines_writing_effective_question
naire
Kawulich, B. (2005, May). Participant observation as a data collection method.
Retrieved May 16, 2011, from http://www.qualitativeresearch.net/index.php/fqs/article/viewArticle/466/996
QuickMBA.com. (1999-2010). Questionnaire design. Retrieved May 16, 2011,
from http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/research/qdesign/
Robert Woods Johnson Foundation. (2008). Qualitative research guidelines
project: Observation. Retrieved May 16, 2011, from
http://www.qualres.org/HomeObse-3594.html
Sildeshare.net. (n.d.). Key survey elements: Organization. Retrieved May 16,
2011, from http://www.slideshare.net/Shelly38/key-survey-elementsorganization
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-157
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts, systems, and tools needed to gather, access,
synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate information for use in making business
decisions
Performance
Element
Understand data-collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the
research problem/issue.
Performance
Indicator
Describe types of scales (including rating scales such as Likert scales,
semantic differential scales, behavior intention scales; and ranking scales such
as paired comparison, forced choice, and comparative scale) (IM:286)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 8, 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1; Communication & Collaboration
1; Information Literacy 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Sample
Activity
Explain the use of scaling in marketing research.
Distinguish between rating and ranking scales.
Distinguish between nominal data and ordinal scales.
Discuss when ordinal scales are used.
Describe characteristics of interval rating scales.
Distinguish between interval and ratio scales.
Distinguish between continuous and itemized rating scales.
Discuss types of itemized rating scales (e.g., Likert, semantic differential,
Stapel’s Scale, and multi dimensional scaling).
Explain advantages/disadvantages of the types of itemized rating scales.
Explain types of ranking scales (i.e., paired comparison, forced choice,
and comparative scale).
Using the marketing research paper obtained from the Social Science
Research Network at
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalbrows
e&journal_id=334640, analyze the paper to determine whether the author used
a rating scale. Determine the type of scale used and its appropriateness for the
research problem.
Resources
Textbooks
Aaker, D.A., Kumar, V., & Day, G.S. (2007). Marketing research (9th ed.) [pp.
287-290, 300-302, 442]. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research
(7th ed.) [pp. 250, 275-282]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage
Learning.
Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp.
619-620). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Hair, J.F., Bush, R.P., & Ortinau, D.J. (2009). Marketing research in a digital
information environment (4th ed.) [pp. 340-356, 370-384]. New York:
McGraw-Hill Irwin.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B. (2010). Essentials of marketing research (4th ed.)
[pp. 240-266]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.)
[pp. 329, 348-356]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Software/
Online
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-158
Chapter 6: Standardized measurement and assessment. (n.d.) Retrieved May
5, 2011, from http://www.slideshare.net/kjhatzi/chapter-6-standardizedmeasurement-assessment-presentation
Chapter 8: Scales and attitude measurement (n.d.). Retrieved May 5, 2011,
from http://www.scribd.com/doc/7179739/Scales-and-AttitudeMeasurement#
exporters-sources.com (2011). Attitude measurement—Types of attitude rating
scales. Retrieved May 5, 2011, from http://exporterssources.com/attitude-measurement-types-of-attitude-rating-scales/
FAO Corporate Document Repository (n.d.) Chapter 3: Levels of measurement
and scaling. Retrieved May 5, 2011, from
http://www.fao.org/docrep/W3241E/w3241e04.htm#TopOfPage
Lecture seven--Measurement of variables: Operational definition and scales.
(n.d.). Retrieved May 5, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/mehtabmr/lecture-07-2498485
Management Study Guide (1998-2011). Attitude scales—Rating scales to
measure data. Retrieved May 5, 2011, from
http://www.managementstudyguide.com/attitude-scales.htm
Parashar, Vivek (n.d.). Scaling. Retrieved May 5, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/looksvivek/scaling
Yadov, Kuldeep (n.d.). Attitude scales. Retrieved May 5, 2011, from
http://www.slideshare.net/kuldeepatibs/attitude-scales-presentation
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-159
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain key factors in building a clientele (SE:828, SE LAP 115)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Interpersonal 11; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving 1, 5; Communication & Collaboration 1,
3; Social & Cross-Cultural Skills 1; Leadership & Responsibility 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Identify company benefits of building a clientele.
Identify salesperson benefits from building a clientele.
Cite examples of costs that can be incurred by businesses for failing to
build a clientele.
Identify attitudes of salespeople that help to build a clientele.
Describe ways that salespeople exhibit a service attitude.
Describe the activities of salespeople that can help to build a clientele.
Observe the activities of a local business to determine what activities the
business uses to build its clientele. Record your observations. Discuss the
responses with the class.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center (2007). Keep them loyal (Building
clientele) [LAP: SE-115]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center (2007). Keep them loyal (Building
clientele): Instructor copy [LAP: SE-115]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving
customer satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 256-262). Boston: Houghton
Mifflin Company.
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 563,
567-568). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp.
132-133, 504-505, 510].Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 323-326). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 446-460]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R.
(2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 1, 9,
36-47]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Perreault, W. D., Cannon, J. P., & McCarthy, E. J. (2008). Basic marketing: A
marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 399-400, 402].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-160
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 114-117). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Burchill, J. (2011). How to build stellar customer relationships. Retrieved
May 3, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?How-To-Build-StellarClient-Relationships&id=41289
BusinessKnowledgeSource.com. (2003-2010). How to use marketing
strategies to build your clientele. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from
http://www.businessknowledgesource.com/marketing/how_to_use_mar
keting_strategies_to_build_your_clientele_022686.html
Charles, C. (n.d.). 10 tips on building a loyal clientele. Retrieved May 3,
2011, from
http://www.ideamarketers.com/?10_Tips_on_Building_a_Loyal_Clientel
e&articleid=287168
eHow Business Editor. (1999-2011). How to build a clientele. Retrieved May
3, 2011, from http://www.ehow.com/how_2060715_build-clientele.html
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Keep them loyal (Building
clientele) [LAP: SE-115: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
NetReal. (2002-2011). How to build and maintain customer loyalty.
Retrieved May 3, 2011, from http://www.netreal.net/articles/customerservice/how-to-build-and-maintain-customer-loyalty.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs
and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Explain business ethics in selling (SE:106, SE LAP 129)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Leadership & Responsibility 3
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Sample
Activity
Page 5-161
Explain the importance of business ethics in selling.
Describe ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with the company.
Explain ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with coworkers.
Explain ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with
customers/clients.
Describe ethical concerns of salespeople that deal with the
competition.
Describe ethical concerns of employers in dealing with salespeople.
Working in a group of three or four students, think of a salesperson you or a
family member may have encountered who made you question his/her
ethics in regard to selling. Prepare and present a report for the class on
each instance and the principles violated.
Resources
LAP
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Keep it real—in sales
(Selling ethics) [LAP: SE-129]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Keep it real—in sales
(Selling ethics): Instructor copy [LAP: SE-129]. Columbus, OH: Author.
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 582584). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [pp. 47-49]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 614-615]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 139-140, 269, 271). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 525-526). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N.; LaForge, R.W.; Avila, R.A.; Schwepker, C.H., Jr.; & Williams,
M.R. (2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp.
45-51]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-162
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 418419]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 104-105). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Chapter 3: Ethical and legal considerations in selling. (n.d.). Retrieved May
19, 2011, from http://wwwrohan.sdsu.edu/~renglish/377/notes/chapt03/index.htm
Direct Selling Association. (2010, June). DSA’s code of ethics. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from http://www.dsa.org/ethics/code/
Ethical and legal issues in selling. (n.d.). Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://jobfunctions.bnet.com/thankyou.aspx?&scname=
Sales+Regulations&docid=69551&view=69551
Ethics in selling. (n.d.). Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.econ.iastate.edu/classes/econ336/Deiter/Responsibilities.p
pt
Marketing Education Resource Center. (2007). Keep it real—in sales
(Selling ethics) [LAP: SE-129: Presentation Software]. Columbus, OH:
Author.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-163
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs and
wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the use of technology in the selling function (SE:107)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Technology 18-19; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking
Skills 12
21st Century
Skills
ICT Literacy 1, 2
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
f.
g.
h.
i.
Sample
Activity
Describe capabilities that the use of technology provides salespeople.
Explain how technology impacts a salesperson’s planning skills.
Describe how technology can impact a salesperson’s targeting skills.
Discuss how technology can impact a salesperson’s presentation skills.
Explain how technology can impact a salesperson’s ability to adapt or
tailor a sales presentation to a particular customer.
Explain the use of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) software
in selling.
Discuss the use of tablet PCs in selling.
Explain the use of web-based visits between customers and sales staff.
Describe the use of the Internet in sales administration activities.
Listen to a professional salesperson or sales manager discuss the use of
technology in selling. Record responses to the following questions:
a. What technology is used in prospecting?
b. How has the use of technology in selling changed in the past 10 years?
c. What technology is used in demonstrating products to clients?
d. What technology is used in processing clients’ orders?
e. What technology is used in determining whether requested
models/brands are available?
f.
How has the use of technology affected the selling process?
Resources
Textbooks
Anderson, R.E. & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer
satisfaction and loyalty (pp. 107-110, 325-326, 386-387). Boston:
Houghton Mifflin Company.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [p. 568]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company,
Inc.
Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through
service (9th ed.) [pp. 129-130, 193-201, 359, 400]. New York: McGrawHill/Irwin.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 514-518, 524-525). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-164
Ingram, T.N.; LaForge, R.W.; Avila, R.A.; Schwepker, C.H., Jr.; & Williams,
M.R. (2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.)
[pp. 237-240, 242, 275-279]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic Marketing:
A marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 406-409]. Burr
Ridge, IL: McGraw-hill Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 28-40). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
Cadwell, A. (n.d.). Sales technology—Helping sales sell. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from
http://www.kickstartall.com/documents/KS_Articles/SalesTechnology.html
Hammond, K. (2004). Using technology to sell. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.tamba.co.uk/expert-articles/expert-articles.asp?id=4
McMahon, T. (2010). Death of a salesman? Technology and selling. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from
http://www.salesvantage.com/article/view.php?w=533&Death_of_a_Sales
man_Technology_Selling/
Obringer, L.A. (1998-2011). Customer relationship management. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from http://communication.howstuffworks.com/salestechnique7.htm
Obringer, L.A. (1998-2011). Technology to enhance selling. Retrieved May 19,
2011, from http://communication.howstuffworks.com/salestechnique6.htm
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-165
Knowledge/
Skill
Statement
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client needs
and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication that
influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities
Performance
Element
Acquire a foundational knowledge of selling to understand its nature and
scope.
Performance
Indicator
Describe the nature of selling regulations (SE:108) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Level
Specialist
SCANS
Information 5-8; Systems 15; Basic Skills 1-2, 5-6; Thinking Skills 12;
Personal Qualities 17
21st Century
Skills
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills 1
Objectives
a.
b.
c.
Sample
Activity
Access the Federal Trade Commission’s web site at http://www.ftc.gov, and
use its links to research five selling regulations currently affecting business
sales activities. Write a short report that explains each of the regulations,
and submit it to the teacher.
Identify reasons that sales activities are regulated.
Describe unfair or deceptive sales practices that are regulated.
Explain state and federal regulations that affect sales activities.
Resources
Textbooks
Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 582584). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
Burrow, J.L. (2006). Marketing (2nd ed.) [p. 45]. Mason, OH:
Thomson/South-Western.
Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher’s
edition (2nd ed.) [pp. 614-615]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox
Company, Inc.
Farese, L.S.; Kimbrell, G.; & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials
(pp. 139-140, 269, 271). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Grewal, D. & Levy, M. (2008). Marketing (pp. 525-526). New York:
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Ingram, T.N.; LaForge, R.W.; Avila, R.A.; Schwepker, C.H., Jr.; & Williams,
M.R. (2008). Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp.
45-51]. Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.
Perreault, W.D., Jr.; Cannon, J.P.; & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic
marketing: Marketing strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 418419]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Workbooks/
Manuals
Greene, C.L. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 104-105). Mason, OH:
South-Western/Thomson Learning.
Software/
Online
ABA Section of Business Law. (n.d.). Selling out of state and
internationally. Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://www.safeselling.org/international.shtml
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 5
Planning Guide Sheets
Page 5-166
Chapter 3: Ethical and legal considerations in selling. (n.d.). Retrieved May
19, 2011, from http://wwwrohan.sdsu.edu/~renglish/377/notes/chapt03/index.htm
Encyclopedia of everyday law. (2011). Deceptive sales practices. Retrieved
May 19, 2011, from http://www.enotes.com/everyday-lawencyclopedia/deceptive-trade-practices
Ethical and legal issues in selling. (n.d.). Retrieved May 19, 2011, from
http://jobfunctions.bnet.com/thankyou.aspx?&scname=
Sales+Regulations&docid=69551&view=69551
Jackson, J.B. (2006). Legal issues and selling. Retrieved May 19, 2011,
from http://ezinearticles.com/?Legal-Issues-and-Selling&id=675026
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Using Project-Based Learning and Projects
Section 6
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Overview
Using Project-Based Learning
Page 6-2
Project-Based Learning Research
Many studies support the importance of project-based learning. Some areas that
have been investigated include learning content within a relevant context, meeting
the needs of different styles of learners, and inquiry as a foundation for life-long
learning. Numerous sources for research are cited in this appendix. These sources
have been divided into sections identifying where the source was found. Many
were on the websites of nonprofit organizations dedicated to project-based
learning and/or to educational advancement. Be sure to periodically check these
websites (listed at the start of each section) for new research on this up-andcoming field.
Resources
▪ Compiled by Novel Approach Consulting Group,
Grant, M. (2002). Getting a Grip on Project-Based Learning Theory, Cases and
Recommendations. Meridien (5):1. Overview: This article examines the theoretical
foundations of project-based learning, particularly constructivism and
constructionism, and notes the similarities and differences among
implementations, including project-based science.
Gubels, D; Dochy, F.; Van Den Bossche, P.; & Segers, M. (2005). Effects of
Problem-Based Learning: A Meta-Analysis from the Angle of Assessment. Review
of Education Research. (75):1 Overview: This is a rigorous meta-analysis of
dozens of studies. While it focuses on assessment in particular, it does provide
readers with a few defining principles of PBL.
Wolff, S. (2002). Design Features for Project-Based Learning. Design Share.Com
(2002). http://www.designshare.com/Research/Wolff/Project_Learning.htm.
Accessed 8-14-05. Overview: This publication is a condensed version of a doctoral
research study by Susan Wolff entitled "Relationships among People and
Spaces: Design Features for the Optimal Collaborative, Project-Based Learning
Experience." Although the study was directed primarily at the community college
level, the findings of the study are pertinent to all levels of education and have
implications for physical learning environments for other types of active learning
processes. The findings from the study included a synthesis of 32 design features
of the physical learning environment that support and enhance collaborative,
project-based learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Using Project-Based Learning
Page 6-3
▪ Compiled by Edutopia Staff, http://www.edutopia.org/project-basedlearning-research published 11/1/2001
A growing body of academic research supports the use of project-based learning
in schools as a way to engage students, cut absenteeism, boost cooperative
learning skills, and improve test scores. Those benefits are enhanced when
technology is used in a meaningful way in the projects. Following are synopses of
a range of studies on project-based learning:
British Math Study
A three-year 1997 study (To view this study, you must be a registered user on the
Edweek site. Registration is free.) of two British secondary schools -- one that
used open-ended projects and one that used more traditional, direct instruction -found striking differences in understanding and standardized achievement data in
mathematics. The study by Jo Boaler, now associate professor of education at
Stanford University, found that students at the project-based school did better than
those at the more traditional school both on math problems requiring analytical or
conceptual thought and on those considered rote, that is, those requiring memory
of a rule or formula. Three times as many students at the project-based school
received the top grade achievable on the national examination in math.
Challenge 2000
In a five-year study, researchers at SRI International found that technology-using
students in Challenge 2000 Multimedia Project classrooms outperformed nontechnology-using students in communication skills, teamwork, and problem
solving. The Center for Learning in Technology researchers, led by Bill Penuel,
found increased student engagement, greater responsibility for learning, increased
peer collaboration skills, and greater achievement gains by students who had been
labeled low achievers. The project conducted a performance assessment designed
to measure students' skills in constructing a presentation aimed at a particular
audience. Students from Multimedia Project classrooms outperformed comparison
classrooms in all three areas scored by researchers and teachers: student content,
attention to audience, and design. The Multimedia Project involves completing one
to four interdisciplinary multimedia projects a year that integrate real-world issues
and practices.
Cognition and Technology Group
A 1992 study of 700 students from 11 school districts in Tennessee found that
students doing projects using videotaped problems over a three-week period
performed better in a number of academic areas later in the school year. The
study, by the Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt University, examined
student competence in basic math, word problems, planning capabilities, attitudes,
and teacher feedback. Students who had experience in the project work performed
better in all categories. The study appeared in Educational Psychologist, 27 (3):
291-315.
Co-nect
A 1999 study by the Center for Research in Educational Policy at the University of
Memphis and University of Tennessee at Knoxville found that students using the
Co-nect program, which emphasizes project-based learning and technology,
improved test scores in all subject areas over a two-year period on the Tennessee
Value-Added Assessment System. The Co-nect schools outperformed control
schools by 26 percent.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Using Project-Based Learning
Page 6-4
Does It Compute?
Analyzing data from the math portion of the 1996 National Assessment of
Educational Progress test given to students nationwide, Educational Testing
Services researcher Harold Wenglinsky found that the effectiveness of computers
in the classroom depended on how they were used. In his report, "Does It
Compute?" Wenglinsky found that if computers were used for drill or practice, they
typically had a negative effect on student achievement. If they were used with realworld applications, such as spreadsheets, or to simulate relationships or changing
variables, student achievement increased. Data were drawn from the samples of
6,227 fourth graders and 7,146 eighth graders.
Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound
Three elementary schools in Dubuque, Iowa, showed significant test score gains
after incorporating the Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound (ELOB) program. At
ELOB schools, students conduct three-to-six-month-long studies of a single topic
with an emphasis on learning by doing. After two years in the program, two of the
three schools advanced from "well below average" to "well above the district
average" on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills. One elementary school raised its
average score from the 39th to the 80th percentile. After four years in the program,
student scores were "above the district average in almost every area." Separate
analyses showed similar test score gains in ELOB programs in Denver, Boston,
and Portland, Maine.
Laptops
Since 1996, ROCKMAN ET AL, an independent research firm in San Francisco,
has studied the impact of widespread use of laptop technology on teaching and
learning. The focus of the firm's multiyear studies has been on dozens of public
and private K-12 schools participating in a pilot laptop program sponsored jointly
by the Microsoft and Toshiba corporations. Through both observation and
feedback from laptop-using teachers and students, researchers have documented
a shift from lectures and other teacher-centered forms of delivery to lessons that
are more collaborative and project-oriented. Teachers, researchers note, become
facilitators in project-oriented classrooms, with students increasingly assuming the
role of directors of their own learning.
In a 1998 report, researchers note that three-fourths of the teachers who
participated in a ROCKMAN ET AL survey reported that project-based instruction
had increased since the introduction of the laptops in their classrooms. Among the
many reported benefits of this project-based approach to learning are greater
student engagement, improved analytic abilities, and a greater likelihood to apply
high-order thinking skills.
Laptop-using students also performed better on a ROCKMAN ET AL-administered
writing examination. The research firm did not, however, identify significant
differences in the standardized test scores of laptop-using students. Researchers
offered two possible explanations for the lack of significant improvement in this
area: 1. Standardized tests are not designed to reflect the types of learning that
laptops support. 2. Because the students had been using their laptops for less than
two years, it might have been too soon to see noticeable gains in areas that are
covered by standardized tests.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Using Project-Based Learning
Page 6-5
Successful School Restructuring
A five-year study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers found that
structural school reform works only under certain conditions: 1. Students must be
engaged in activities that build on prior knowledge and allow them to apply that
knowledge to new situations. 2. Students must use disciplined inquiry. 3. School
activities must have value beyond school. In their report, "Successful School
Restructuring," the researchers at Wisconsin's Center on Organization and
Restructuring of Schools found that even innovative school improvements, such as
portfolio assessment and shared decision making, are less effective without
accompanying meaningful student assignments based on deep inquiry.
Researchers analyzed data from more than 1,500 elementary, middle, and high
schools and conducted field studies in 44 schools in 16 states between 1990 and
1995.
Research Supporting Project-Based Learning
Project-based learning is a versatile approach to instruction that can readily be
used in conjunction with other approaches. Teachers who make extensive use of
project-based learning are blending a number of educational ideas—each
supported by substantial research. This section contains very brief summaries of
some of the areas of educational research that underlie project-based learning.
Constructivism is a widely supported educational theory that rests on the idea that
students create their own knowledge in the context of their own experiences
(Fosnot, 1996). Constructivism focuses on students being actively engaged in
"doing," rather than passively engaged in "receiving" knowledge. Project-based
learning can be viewed as one approach to creating learning environments in
which students construct personal knowledge.
Howard Gardner and David Perkins are the co-directors of Project Zero at Harvard
University, a large and long-continuing project that conducts research on ways to
improve content, pedagogy, and assessment in education. Howard Gardner's
theory of multiple intelligences, first put forth in 1983, supports the need for
personalization of schooling (Gardner, 1995). He argues that each person has a
number of different types of intelligence. For example, people have musical
intelligence, linguistic intelligence, and logical-mathematical intelligence. Through
appropriate training and experience, these various intelligences can be
enhanced—a person can develop his or her own individual potentials. Gardner
strongly supports the use of project-based learning as one approach to creating a
learning environment that enhances each student's multiple intelligences.
In his 1992 book, Smart Schools, David Perkins analyzes a number of different
educational theories and approaches to education. His analysis is strongly
supportive of Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. Perkins' book contains
extensive research-based evidence that education can be considerably improved
by more explicit and appropriate teaching for transfer, focusing on higher-order
cognitive skills, and the use of project-based learning.
Inquiry-based learning, or discovery-based learning, often involves hypothesis
generation and testing. The emphasis may be on discovering specific facts or on
developing a higher-order understanding of the topic and ideas being explored.
Students are encouraged to develop curiosity as a habit, and to approach all
learning with a disposition toward questioning and systematic investigation.
Research indicates that hands-on, inquiry-based instruction is generally more
effective than traditional didactic presentation in improving problem solving ability
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Using Project-Based Learning
Page 6-6
in particular subject domains (Helgeson, 1992, p. 53). Project-based learning often
makes use of inquiry-based teaching methods.
Project-based learning frequently includes teams of students engaged in
cooperative learning and collaborative problem solving as they work to complete a
project. Cooperative learning has been shown to be effective in improving
academic and social skills; however, successful cooperative learning requires
careful organization, and sometimes explicit training in collaboration and
communication (Johnson, 1986; Johnson & Johnson, 1989). Project-based
learning provides an authentic environment in which teachers can facilitate
students increasing their skills in cooperative learning and collaborative problem
solving.
One can draw a parallel between project-based learning and process writing. Many
teachers are familiar with presenting writing as a process, and are aware that the
steps of process writing—brainstorming, organizing ideas, developing a draft,
obtaining feedback, revising, and publishing—are similar to those required in many
other creative projects. In many cases, reports or computer-aided presentations
created through process writing constitute a project's final product.
Additional support for project-based learning can be found in the various
"standards" reports that have been developed by organizations such as the
National Academy of Sciences and the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics. Such reports stress the need for students being engaged in
authentic and multidisciplinary tasks—which are hallmarks of many project-based
learning environments.
Managing Project Based Learning:
Principles from the Field
John R. Mergendoller, Ph.D. ([email protected])
Buck Institute for Education
18 Commercial Boulevard
Novato, California 94949
Abstract
This investigation describes classroom management techniques used by teachers
who were expert in the use of project-based learning instructional strategies. The
authors interviewed 12 teachers, and subjected their descriptions of classroom
practice to a qualitative analysis. Fifty-three classroom management principles
emerged, grouped under seven themes and 18 sub-themes. Themes included:
Time Management, Getting Started, Establishing a Culture that Stresses Student
Self-Management, Managing Student Groups, Working with Others Outside the
Classroom, Getting The Most Out of Technological Resources, and Assessing
Students and Evaluating Projects. Researchers are encouraged to include the
wisdom of experienced teachers in future research on effective classroom
practices.
For complete article, visit
http://www.bie.org/research/study/principles_from_the_field
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Introduction
to Projects
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-7
Instead of using traditional classroom instructional methods (i.e., lectures),
teachers can incorporate hands-on projects that become the instructional method
through which students acquire understanding of the content. To that end,
learning outcomes from various instructional areas are grouped together as the
curricular backbone of several projects that could be incorporated into the
Marketing Principles course. Students may address these learning outcomes
simultaneously, rather than in the sequential manner occurring in traditional
courses. The learning outcomes, therefore, are not specified for coverage during a
specific week of the semester, but are tied to projects and can be acquired at any
point during the project.
In addition to the performance indicators addressed in each project, additional
components are included to guide instruction. These components include:
♦ Project Title
Each project is identified with a project title that captures the intent of the
activity. The three project titles in the Marketing Principles course guide are:
Don’t Be Such an Oxymoron
Tick Tock, Tech Talk
Mascot Mystery
♦ Timeframe
A number of weeks for each project is specified to guide teachers in allocating
class time for students to master the performance indicators and complete all
project activities. The timeframes are flexible to allow teachers leeway with
scheduling.
♦ Briefings
For some topics, instructors should provide mini-lectures, referred to as
Briefings. A topical outline for each Briefing is provided following each project.
♦ Driving Questions
Each project addresses a “driving question” that encapsulates the purpose of
the activity, the problem to be solved, or the question to be answered.
♦ Entry Events
To catch students’ attention and get them interested in the projects, an entry
event has been recommended for each project. When appropriate, alternative
ideas are provided for instructors to select what would be of most interest to
their students and most feasible to implement at the local level.
♦ Checkpoints
These represent the various opportunities for student assessment: deliverables,
quizzes, tests, and exams. Rubrics to support assessment appear after each
project.
♦ Reflections
Research indicates that student learning is enhanced when students are given
time to reflect on what they have learned. To that end, topics for reflection have
been identified. Instructors should identify additional opportunities for reflection.
♦ Teacher Tips
Reminders and information needed for project implementation are provided in
Teacher Tips at the end of each project.
Instructors should make every effort to adhere to the timeframe specified so that
students have adequate time to master the performance indicators associated
with projects and briefings.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-8
Project 1
Don’t Be Such an Oxymoron
Overview
In this project, students will develop an understanding of the marketing functions—
channel management, marketing-information management, pricing,
product/service management, promotion, and selling. Each student will conduct
secondary research to develop a rough draft of a marketing “handbook” which
contains a description and pictures of each marketing function as well as a
discussion of legal and ethical issues for each function. After the individual rough
drafts are completed, team members will compare their rough drafts to develop a
final draft of the handbook for their team. Each team has the opportunity to choose
the form of their handbook (e.g., word document, presentation, video, etc.), as long
as the handbook can be delivered digitally. After completing their final draft, each
team will send its work electronically to a college marketing professor who will
select the best, most accurate marketing handbook. That handbook will then be
distributed to college students.
Timeframe
3-4 weeks
Performance
Indicators
Students should master the following performance indicators during the project
through their research efforts or through briefings, identified with asterisks. The
page numbers for the planning guide sheets are cited after each statement.
 Explain marketing and its importance in a global economy (MK:001,
MK LAP 4) (CS) (p. 5-3)*
 Describe marketing functions and related activities (MK:002, MK LAP 1) (CS)
(p. 5-5)*
 Explain the nature and scope of channel management (CM:001, CM LAP 2)
(CS) (p. 5-95)
 Explain legal considerations in channel management (CM:005) (SP) (p. 5-103)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)














Describe ethical considerations in channel management (CM:006) (SP)
(p. 5-105) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Explain the nature and scope of the marketing information management
function (IM:001, IM LAP 2) (SP) (p. 5-133)
Explain the role of ethics in marketing-information management (IM:025) (SP)
(p. 5-135) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Explain the nature and scope of the pricing function (PI:001, PI LAP 2) (SP)
(p. 5-85)
Describe the role of business ethics in pricing (PI:015) (SP) (p. 5-87)
Explain legal considerations for pricing (PI:017) (SP) (p. 5-91)
Explain the nature and scope of the product/service management function
(PM:001, PM LAP 17) (SP) (p. 5-66)
Explain business ethics in product/service management (PM:040) (SP)
(p. 5-72)
Identify consumer protection provisions of appropriate agencies (PM:017) (SP)
(p. 5-74) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Explain the role of promotion as a marketing function (PR:001, PR LAP 2) (CS)
(p. 5-109)
Describe the use of business ethics in promotion (PR:099) (SP) (p. 5-115)
Describe the regulation of promotion (PR:101) (SP) (p. 5-119)
Explain the nature and scope of the selling function (SE:017, SE LAP 117)
(CS) (p. 5-21)
Explain business ethics in selling (SE:106, SE LAP 129) (SP) (p. 5-160)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles

Describe the nature of selling regulations (SE:108) (SP) (p. 5-164)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-9
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-10
Project 1
Don’t Be Such an Oxymoron (cont’d)
Briefings
To augment the project, briefings should be provided. Content for the
briefings is provided on the page numbers identified after each topic.
Topic
Group Contracts
Project Plans
An Introduction to Marketing & Marketing Functions
Entry Event
Briefing
p. 6-11
p. 6-14
p. 6-19
Display examples of oxymorons, and ask students what they have in common.
Examples include:
Cold heat
Hell’s Angels
Jumbo shrimp
Original copy
Exact estimate
Explain that they are examples of oxymorons. Ask the driving question.
Driving
Question
Is ethics in marketing an oxymoron?
Checkpoints
Details
Assessment
Group Contract
Each team develops a contract for how the team will
operate, including how to handle conflict and
consequences for team members that don’t participate. A
sample group contract is provided on page 6-12.
Complete/
Incomplete
Project Plan
Team develops a written project plan to be used as a
guide for completing tasks within the project. A sample
project plan is provided on page 6-15, and a blank project
plan form is provided on page 6-17.
Developing a Project
Plan Rubric (p. 6-21)
Rough Draft of
Individual’s
Marketing
Handbook
Each team determines what medium it wants to use for its
marketing handbook. The handbook could be in the form
of a Word document, a Power Point presentation, a video,
etc., as long as the final draft can be delivered digitally.
Then, each student develops a rough draft of her/his
marketing handbook. Keep in mind that the intended
audience is entry-level college marketing students, and
the handbook serves as a teaching tool for them. The
handbook contains a description and pictures of each
marketing function, as well as a discussion of ethical and
legal issues associated with each marketing function. The
handbook should have a public service announcement
(PSA) “feel” to it. For examples of PSAs, visit
http://www.adcouncil.org/gallery.html
Complete/
Incomplete
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Project 1
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-11
Don’t Be Such an Oxymoron (cont’d)
Final Draft of
Group’s
Marketing
Handbook
After each team member has finished his/her rough draft
of the marketing handbook, team members will compare
their work to create a final version of the marketing
handbook for their team. The team should create the final
draft using the medium that they chose early in the
project. After completing their final product, each team will
e-mail their handbook to their teacher and to a college
marketing professor. The college professor will select the
best team handbook from the class, and that handbook
will be distributed to college students in introductory
marketing courses.
Teacher Tips
The following tips are offered to aid in project
implementation:
 Encourage students to be creative when determining
what form their team’s final product will be. Offer them
a variety of software programs to choose from (e.g.,
word processing, presentation, desktop publishing,
etc.) and make digital cameras and video cameras
available to the students.
 Invite the college marketing professor to class to
kickoff and to conclude this project. Knowing that their
final product will be seen and used by college
students will push students to excel.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Marketing Handbook
Rubric (p. 6-23)
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-12
Topic
Group Contracts
Key Points
Explain the purpose of group contracts.
To provide a foundation for how each group will function, addressing how
problems will be handled
Identify components of group contracts.
Members’ Names
Group Constitution
Absence Policy
Work Policy
Leadership Policy
Work Ethics
Member Dismissal
Signatures
Ask students to brainstorm ideas for other possible components of group
contracts.
Optional: Provide sample for review (pp. 6-12-6-13).
NOTE: Providing students with a sample group contract may hinder creativity
during the group contract development process, since some students will be
tempted to copy the sample rather than write their own original group
contract.
Discuss skills needed to set up group contracts.
Communication skills
Negotiation skills
Anticipation of potential problems
Problem-solving skills
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Page 6-13
GROUP CONTRACT
Members
Carlie, Otis, Neff, Rennie, Joe, Vince
Group Constitution
Forward: This contract is a binding legal document and governs the group until the assigned project
deadline. If the group separates, or a member is fired, the basic contract laws remain intact for both
parties. However, being fired may cause work responsibilities to shift.
Article I: Absence Policy
a. If a group member will be absent on a day in which work is due, they must tell another group member
a day in advance and have all work that they are responsible for turned in. All group members must
stick to the provided agenda to have the assignments completed on time. If there will be an
unexpected absence, the group member is to complete the work from home and email another group
member to let them know they are gone for the day.
b. Group members will contact one another if they are absent for any amount of period during the time
allotted for working on the projects.
Article II: Work Policy
a. Any member that is mentally or physically disabled and can prove that they cannot complete the work
assigned to them alone may acquire assistance from other group members to help complete it. This
will only apply for work that is group work and not individual work, and work will only be finished by that
group member, and the assisting group member will not write it.
b. Each group member will work to the best of their ability, making sure the completed work is up to
standards, and that they complete it with punctuality.
c.
If a group member commits plagiarism, they are solely responsible and incur the punishment on their
own.
Article III: Leadership
a. At the beginning of the project, a leader will be voted upon democratically. If a group member is absent
at the time of voting, they waive their right to participate in voting. The person who wins the most votes
becomes the leader. If there is an unclear outcome (same number of votes for different people), the
group will have no leader until one can be chosen by a revote.
b. By being elected leader, the person must perform the following duties:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Organize group meetings.
Create and enforce a group agenda to govern group progress.
Organize any out-of-school project efforts.
Provide communication between group members in order to help individuals work towards the
project goal.
If they fail to perform these duties, or another person is also carrying them out, a revote may be
taken to determine whether to obtain a new leader.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Page 6-14
Article IV: Work Ethics
a. If a group member does not complete work they were assigned, the punishment for the
infringement will be of detriment solely to the group member at fault. No negative grading shall
be given to any other group members.
Article V: Member Dismissal
a. The following conducts will result in a group member being able to be dismissed:
i. Incomplete or missing group work
ii. Plagiarism or any form of cheating
iii. If group member decides to leave under his or her own will
b. Any group member leaving under their own will may submit all their own work, while the other group
members may not. Any group member fired for breaking any of the conducts under Article V-a (i-iii) will
have their work taken from their possession to be used at the discretion of the original group, but not for
the individual being fired. In addition, any fired member may not use any work completed by other group
members, subject to punishment under Article 2-c.
c.
If a group member leaves under the stipulation of Article V-a, they retain all the work they have already
provided for the group. The original group cannot use this work or it is subject to punishment under
Article 2-c.
Article VI: Signature
By signing this contract, the following group members abide to the articles above. If any member fails to
abide by the articles of this contract, they may be fired from the group given at least a 50% vote in favor of
firing the individual.
Signatures:
Source: Novel Approach Consulting Group, www.novelapproachpbl.com
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Topic
Group Project Plan
Key Points
Explain the purpose of a project plan.
To ensure that all participants know and understand their roles and
responsibilities in projects and when their work is due
Page 6-15
Identify the components of a project plan.
Project objective
Tasks to be completed
Resources needed
Due dates for each task
Responsibility for each task
Status
Provide sample of project plan.
Suggest techniques for creating group project plan.
Ask each group to complete a project plan after the details of the project have
been explained by the instructor and discussed as a class.
Explain that each group should create its own project plan with all members
participating in the process.
Encourage group members to sign the project plan to encourage
accountability.
Let students know that the project plan can also be used to report project
status to the instructor on a weekly basis. (Determine whether you want
students to submit weekly status reports using the project plan).
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Page 6-16
PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN - Sample
This document serves two purposes in every project:
A) Project planning guide
B) Project status report
Instructions:
 Each team works together to determine
o Project objective
o Tasks to be completed for a successful fulfillment of the project objective
o Resources needed to complete each task (if any)
o Person(s) responsible for completing each task
o Due date for each task
 The first four columns of the table below (task, responsible, resources, and due date) serve as
the guiding document through the end of the project. Make one copy of the table per week the
project lasts (for a five-week project, make five copies)
 At the end of each week, use one copy to fill in the last three columns of the table. This
serves as a weekly status report for your teacher.
Members of my group
Project Name:
Hannah, Cole, Zoe, Bryce
Spanish Club Recruitment Brochure
Project Objective:
Design an informative brochure for 9-11 graders that will raise their
interest in joining the Spanish Club and direct them to get more
information from Mrs. Gonzalez. Design must be ready-to-print in four
weeks.
Task
Initial meeting with Mrs. Gonzalez:
gather information on club projects,
requirements, etc., as well as
brochure details (color? photos? etc.)
Who Is
Resources Due
Responsible Needed
Team
n/a
Wk 1
Attend Spanish Club meeting.
Interview current club members &
take digital pictures
Cole & Zoe
Digital
camera
Wk 1
Check printing costs at 3 print shops
Hannah
n/a
Wk 1
Team meeting: update on week’s
tasks
Team
n/a
Wk 1
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Status
Date
turned in
Section 6
Page 6-17
Task
Questionnaire developed,
distributed, and results compiled to
determine why students would join
Spanish Club
Create pencil sketch of brochure
Team comments on pencil sketch
and changes made as needed
Team meeting: update on week’s
tasks
Pencil sketch to Mrs. Gonzalez for
comments
Pencil sketch changes made and
resubmitted to Mrs. Gonzalez
Quotes obtained from Spanish Club
members as needed
First draft of brochure completed in
Microsoft Publisher
Team meeting: update on week’s
tasks
Comments from team and changes
made as needed
Submitted to Mrs. Gonzalez midweek to allow time for changes if
needed
Final to Mrs. Gonzalez
Who Is
Resources Due
Responsible Needed
Team
n/a
Wk 2
Bryce
n/a
Wk 2
Team
n/a
Wk 2
Team
n/a
Wk 2
Bryce
n/a
Wk 3
Bryce
n/a
Wk 3
Zoe
n/a
Wk 3
Hannah &
Cole
Team
Microsoft
Publisher
n/a
Wk 3
Team
n/a
Wk 4
Team
n/a
Wk 4
Team
n/a
Wk 4
Status
Date
turned in
Wk 3
Team Signatures:
Cole_______________________
__Hannah________________________
__
Bryce_______________________
__
__
ZOË____________________
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Page 6-18
PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN
This document serves two purposes in every project:
A) Project planning guide
B) Project status report
Instructions:
 Each team works together to determine
o Project objective
o Tasks to be completed for a successful fulfillment of the project objective
o Resources needed to complete each task (if any)
o Person(s) responsible for completing each task
o Due date for each task
 The first four columns of the table below (task, responsible, resources, and due date) serve as
the guiding document through the end of the project. Make one copy of the table per week the
project lasts (for a five-week project, make five copies)
 At the end of each week, use one copy to fill in the last three columns of the table. This
serves as a weekly status report for your teacher.
Members of my group
Project Name:
Project Objective:
Task
Who Is
Resources
Responsible Needed
Due
Status
Date
turned in
Check
off box








6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Task
Page 6-19
Who Is
Resources
Responsible Needed
Due
Status
Date
turned in
Check
off box



Team Signatures:
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
__________________________________
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Topic
Marketing and Its Importance and Marketing Functions
Key Points
Define marketing.
Page 6-20
Identify marketing activities.
1. Planning
2. Pricing
3. Promoting
4. Distributing
Explain that marketing can take place wherever customers are.
Categorize items that are marketed.
1. Goods
a. Durable
b. Nondurable
2. Services
3. Organizations
4. Places
5. Ideas
6. People
Define marketing concept.
Marketing concept defined: a philosophy of conducting business that is
based on the belief that all business activities should be aimed toward
satisfying consumer wants and needs while achieving company goals
Explain the elements of the marketing concept.
1. Customer orientation: Do it their way.
2. Company commitment: Do it better.
3. Company goals: Do it with success in mind.
Explain the role of marketing in a private enterprise system.
1. Marketing fits into every facet of our lives.
2. Marketing provides benefits that make our lives better, promote using
natural resources more wisely, and encourage international trade.
3. Without marketing, we would be forced to be self-sufficient.
Explain how marketing benefits our society.
1. Makes our lives better.
2. Promotes using the earth’s resources more wisely.
3. Encourages trade between nations.
Describe ways in which consumers and businesses would be affected if
marketing did not exist.
1. Without marketing, our nation would have difficulty linking producers
with customers.
2. Without marketing, our own routines would be different because
marketing shapes even the little things we do.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Topic
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-21
Marketing and Its Importance and Marketing Functions (cont’d)
Explain that marketing functions are interrelated activities that must work
together to get goods and services from producers to customers.
Key Points
Explain that the six marketing functions must work together to attract target
customers to the business.
Describe the six marketing functions.
1. Channel management involves identifying, selecting, monitoring, and evaluating
sales channels
2. Marketing-information management involves gathering, accessing,
synthesizing, evaluating, and disseminating information.
3. Pricing involves determining and adjusting prices to maximize return and
meet customers’ perceptions of value.
4. Product/Service management involves obtaining, developing,
maintaining, and improving a product or service mix in response to
market opportunities.
5. Promotion involves communicating information about goods, services,
images, and/or ideas to achieve a desired outcome.
6. Selling involves determining client needs and wants and responding through
planned, personalized communication that influences purchase decisions and
enhances future business opportunities.
Discuss the importance of each marketing function.
1. Channel management
a. Determines who will offer products and where they will be offered
b. Develops relationships with channel members
c. Assesses quality of vendor performance
2. Marketing-information management
a. Provides data that can be used for business decision-making
b. Provides data about effectiveness of marketing efforts
c. Provides data about customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, needs, and wants
3. Pricing
a. Establishes products’ prices
b. Determines whether prices need to be adjusted
c. Sets policies and objectives for prices
4. Product/service management
a. Helps to determine which products a business will offer and in what quantities
b. Aids in determining and developing a company’s/product’s image
c. Provides direction for other marketing activities based on changes in a
product’s life cycle
5. Promotion
a. Reminds customers about products/businesses
b. Informs customers about products/businesses
c. Persuades customers about products/businesses
6. Selling
a. Creates a following of loyal customers
b. Completes the exchange transaction
c. Provides services for customers
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Rubric: Developing a Project Plan
Criteria
Content
The information
communicated by
the project plan
40 points
Professional
Experienced
 All components of the
project plan were complete
and in writing.
 All components of the project
plan were addressed in
writing, but some aspects
needed further description.
 Most of the project plan’s
components were in writing;
the missing elements
diminished the plan’s
effectiveness.
 Many of the project plan’s
components lacked sufficient
detail to take action or were
missing altogether.
 The project plan’s objective
gave a clear, comprehensive description of the
project’s scope and
schedule.
 The project plan’s objective
gave a clear description for
the most part, but one of the
items needed some
clarification.
 The project plan’s objective
descriptions were difficult to
follow/understand.
 The project plan’s objectives
were neither attainable nor
measurable.
 Needed resources were
clearly identified.
 Most resources were clearly
identified.
 Some critically needed
resources were not identified.
 Needed resources were too
incomplete or were missing
altogether.
 The project plan contained
specific activities/tasks.
 For the most part, the project
plan contained specific
activities/tasks.
 The project plan did not
specifically contain all
activities/tasks.
 The project plan contained
very few activities/tasks.
 The project plan clearly
specified persons
responsible for each task.
 For the most part, the project
plan specified persons
responsible for each task.
 The project plan did not
clearly specify persons
responsible for each task.
 The project plan did not
specify persons responsible
for each task.
 The project plan contained
specific deadlines.
 For the most part, the project
plan contained specific
deadlines.
 The project plan did not
contain specific deadlines.
 The project plan did not
contain deadlines.
 The project plan included
easy-to-follow table or
sequence-of-events flow
chart.
 The project plan included
table or sequence-of-events
flow chart, but some sections
were not easy to follow.
 The project plan included
table or sequence-of-events
flow chart, but it was too
broad; important, smaller
steps were omitted.
 The project plan omitted
table or flow chart; did not list
sequence-of-events.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Developing
Novice
Page 6-22
Rubric: Developing a Project Plan
Criteria
Appropriateness
Suitability;
compatibility of one
part of the plan with
all other parts
35 points
Organization
How the information
is put together; the
flow of the project
plan
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 The project plan’s objective
was clear, attainable, and
measurable.
 The project plan’s objective
was clear and measurable,
but difficult to attain.
 The project plan’s objective
was stated in measurable
terms.
 The project plan’s objective
was unclear and not stated
in measurable terms.
 All activities were logically
sequenced and supported
the project plan’s objective.
 Most activities were logically
sequenced and supported the
project plan’s objective.
 Several activities had gaps in
sequence, were not in logical
order, and/or did not support
the project plan’s objective.
 The sequence of activities
made no sense and did not
support the project plan’s
objective.
 Individual activity deadlines
were realistic for achieving
goals.
 Most individual activity
deadlines were realistic for
achieving goals.
 Several individual activity
deadlines were not realistic
for achieving goals.
 Most individual activity
deadlines were totally
unreasonable.
 Main points were easy to
follow and logical with
points building on each
other.
 Main points were generally
easy to follow and logical.
 Main points were generally
logical but difficult to follow.
 Main points were so difficult
to follow that their logic could
not be determined, or they
were illogical.
 Ideas were expressed
clearly in language that was
easy to understand.
 Ideas were expressed clearly
with only a few words being
difficult to understand.
 Both ideas and words
required much effort to
understand.
 Ideas were vague and
elusive, and language was
difficult to understand.
 The project plan was neat,
grammatically correct, and
error-free.
 The project plan was neat but
contained minor errors that
did not detract from the total
plan.
 The project plan contained
some spelling and grammatical errors that were
distracting.
 The project plan was messy,
with many errors in spelling
and grammar.
10 points
Communication
Skills
Ability to express
oneself so as to be
understood by others
15 points
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-23
Rubric: Marketing Handbook
Criteria
Content
The ethical and legal
issues associated
with channel
management,
marketinginformation
management, market
planning, pricing,
product/ service
management,
promotion, and
selling
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 Legal issues were current,
fully supported by
research, and addressed
all marketing functions.
 Legal issues were current
and addressed all marketing
functions but lacked
supporting documentation in
a few cases.
 Legal issues were current and
addressed all marketing
functions, but not supporting
documentation was provided.
 Legal issues were not provided
for all marketing functions, and
they lacked supporting
documentation..
 Ethical issues were
current, fully supported by
research, and addressed
all marketing functions.
 Ethical issues were current
and addressed all marketing
functions but lacked
supporting documentation in
a few cases.
 Ethical issues were current
and addressed all marketing
functions, but no supporting
documentation was provided.
 Ethical issues were not provided
for all marketing functions, and
they lacked supporting
documentation.
 Ideas were expressed
clearly in the audience’s
own language and were
easy to understand.
 Ideas were expressed
clearly with only a few
words being difficult to
understand.
 Both ideas and words required
effort to understand.
 Ideas were vague and elusive,
and language was difficult to
understand.
 Visual aids and sound
effects supported,
focused, clarified, and
reinforced information
given.
 Visual aids and sound
effects added some support
to the information given.
 Visual aids and sound effects
were related to the
information given, but did not
clarify or reinforce it.
 Visual aids and sound effects
detracted from the presentation
raising many questions.
 Report was neat,
grammatically correct, and
error-free.
 Report was neat but
contained minor errors that
did not detract from total
report.
 Report contained slight
smudges, blurred letters, and
grammatical errors that were
distracting.
 Report was messy, with many
errors in spelling and grammar.
 Message was personal for
the intended audience,
delivered a core thought,
and grabbed their
attention with the first
sentence.
 Message was personal for
the intended audience,
delivered a core thought,
but failed to immediately
catch their attention.
 Message was personalized for
the intended audience and
attracted their attention, but
delivered several ideas rather
than a core idea.
 Message was untargeted,
rambling, and failed to attract
attention.
40 points
Communication
Ability to express
oneself so as to be
understood by others
30 points
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-24
Rubric: Marketing Handbook
Criteria
Organization
How the information
is put together; the
flow of the marketing
handbook as public
service
announcements
30 points
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 Main points were easy to
follow and logical with
points building on each
other.
 Main points were generally
easy to follow and logical.
 Main points were logical but
difficult to follow.
 Main points were so difficult to
follow that their logic could not
be determined, or they were
illogical.
 Sections were clearly
identified and titled, and
material was easily
located.
 Sections were clearly
identified and title; only a
few items were difficult to
locate.
 Some sections were not
identified or titled, and several
items were difficult to locate.
 Sections ran together or were
not identified or titled; and
material was difficult to locate.
 Supporting documentation
was complete and clearly
presented so that the
media would know when
and for how long to run
the public service
announcement.
 Supporting documentation
was clearly labeled, but
some items were missing.
 Some supporting
documentation was missing,
and some was inaccurately
labeled.
 Supporting documentation was
not provided.
 Number of words in the
public service
announcement was
appropriately targeted for
the designated timeframe
(i.e., 20-25 words for 10
seconds, 30-35 words for
15 seconds, 40-50 words
for 20 seconds, or 60-75
words for 30 seconds).
 Number of words in the
public service
announcement were slightly
above/below the number
designated for the
timeframe but could fit the
parameters without
damaging the message’s
clarity.
 Number of words in the public
service announcement was
slightly above/below the
number designated for the
timeframe, and the message’s
clarity was slightly hindered.
 Number of words in the public
service announcement was
greatly over/under the
designated timeframe, and the
message’s clarity was
damaged.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-25
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-26
Project 2
Tick Tock, Tech Talk
Overview
In Tick Tock, Tech Talk, students become acquainted with forms of technology
used by marketing personnel at different local businesses. Each team pulls a slip
of paper from a “hat.” That slip of paper will contain the name and/or type of
business that the team needs to research and visit. Each team should have a
different business to research and visit. Team members conduct secondary
research to become acquainted with their assigned business and marketing
technology, and after completing its research, each team visits its business and
interviews marketing personnel there. The team should inquire about the use of
technology in each of the marketing functions at its business. If possible, team
members should use their cell phones to take photos of the technology in action.
After visiting a business, each team creates an informal PowerPoint presentation
containing their photos and shares its presentation with the class. The class should
compare technology across the marketing functions and businesses and discuss
possible reasons for similarities and differences. After a class discussion, each
student reflects on what technology his/her local business could adopt to improve
the productivity and effectiveness of its marketing functions.
Timeframe
2 weeks
Performance
Indicators
Students should master the following performance indicators during the project
through their research efforts. The page numbers for the planning guide sheets are
cited after each statement.
 Describe the use of technology in the channel management function (CM:004)
(CS) (p. 5-101)
 Describe the use of technology in the marketing-information management
function (IM:183) (SP) (p. 5-137)
 Explain the use of technology in the pricing function (PI:016) (SP) (p. 5-89)
 Describe the use of technology in the promotion function (PR:100) (SP)
(p. 5-117)
 Describe the use of technology in the product/service management function
(PM:039) (SP) (p. 5-70)
 Describe the use of technology in the selling function (SE:107) (SP) (p. 5-162)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-27
Project 2
Tick Tock, Tech Talk (cont’d)
Briefings
There are no briefings provided to augment the project.
Entry Event
Show clips from shows that demonstrate the progression of technology. Access
the following websites for visuals depicting the progression of the telephone and
the cell phone: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/telephone/gallery/index.html
http://mobile.mmess.net/in-pictures-a-history-of-cell-phones/
Ask the driving question.
Driving
How do local marketers use technology?
Question
Checkpoints
Details
Assessment
Group Contract
Each team develops a contract for how the team will
operate, including how to handle conflict and
consequences for team members that don’t participate. A
sample of a group contract is provided on page 6-12.
Complete/
Incomplete
Project Plan
Team develops a written project plan to be used as a
guide for completing tasks within the project. A sample of
a project plan is provided on p. 6-15, and a blank project
plan form is provided on page 6-17.
Developing a Project
Plan Rubric (p. 6-21)
Individual
Summaries of
Local Business
and Marketing
Technology
Each student conducts secondary research to gather
information about his/her team’s local business, as well as
general use of technology in marketing functions. After
conducting research, each student writes a one-page
report containing two sections. Section 1 contains
information about the local business. Section 2 describes
how technology is used in marketing functions, based on
secondary research.
Complete/
Incomplete
Team
Technology
Presentation
Team develops an informal PowerPoint presentation
showcasing forms of technology used in the marketing
functions at a local business. Team members discuss the
business and technology informally with the class.
Complete/
Incomplete
Individual
Reflection
After all teams have given their presentations and the
class has discussed forms of technology used in the
marketing functions at local businesses, each student
writes a one-page reflection piece describing what
different technology could be used in the marketing
functions at his/her local business to improve the
productivity and effectiveness of the marketing functions.
Written Report Rubric
(p. 6-28)
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Project 2
Tick Tock, Tech Talk (cont’d)
Teacher Tips
The following tips are offered to aid in project
implementation:
 If local businesses do not allow students to
photograph their technology, students should search
the Internet to locate photos of that type of technology
for use in their presentation.
 Remind students to use their marketing handbooks to
determine the marketing functions.
 Teachers should determine what local businesses to
put into the “hat.” Take into consideration who does
the marketing at these local businesses and whether
the marketing functions actually use any technology
there. If necessary, locate businesses further away
that students could visit.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-28
Rubric: Written Report
Criteria
Content
Description of
different
technologies that
could be used in the
marketing functions
at a local business to
improve the
productivity and
effectiveness of the
marketing functions
40 points
Communication
Ability to express
oneself so as to be
understood by others
30 points
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 The information sufficiently
summarized the issue/topic.
 Overall, the information
adequately summarized the
topic/issue.
 The information left some
gaps in the issue/topic.
 The information failed to
summarize the issue/topic.
 Conclusions reached were
logical and fully supported
by research.
 Conclusions reached were
reasonable but lacked
supporting documentation in a
few cases.
 Conclusions reached were
inconsistent in their logic and
lacked supporting
documentation.
 Questionable conclusions
were reached that were not
supported by the research.
 The conclusions were
based on the most recent
documentation available.
 The conclusions were based,
overall, on current
information.
 The conclusions were based
on outdated information that
was still relevant.
 The conclusions were based
on outdated information that
was no longer relevant.
 Ideas were expressed
clearly in language that was
easy to understand.
 Ideas were expressed clearly
with only a few words being
difficult to understand.
 Both ideas and words
required much effort to
understand.
 Ideas were vague and
elusive, and language was
difficult to understand.
 Report was neat,
grammatically correct, and
error-free.
 Report was neat but
contained minor errors that
did not detract from total
report.
 Report contained slight
smudges, blurred letters, and
grammatical errors that were
distracting.
 Report was messy, with
many errors in spelling and
grammar.
Marketing Principles
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-29
Rubric: Written Report
Criteria
Organization
How the information
is put together; the
flow of the written
report
30 points
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 Main points were easy to
follow and logical with
points building on each
other
 Main points were generally
easy to follow and logical.
 Main points were logical but
difficult to follow.
 Main points were so difficult
to follow that their logic could
not be determined, or they
were illogical.
 Sections were clearly
identified, and material was
easily located.
 Sections were clearly
identified and only a few items
were difficult to locate.
 Some sections were not
identified, and several items
were difficult to locate.
 Sections ran together or were
not identified, and material
was difficult to locate.
 Supporting documentation
was complete and clearly
labeled.
 Supporting documentation
was clearly labeled, but some
items were missing.
 Some supporting
documentation was missing,
and some was inaccurately
labeled.
 Supporting documentation
was not provided.
Marketing Principles
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-30
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-31
Project 3
Mascot Mystery
Overview
In this project, students are introduced to the scope and nature of marketing
information and research. Students are told that the school is facing a dilemma—
that it must change the school mascot—and it is up to the students to develop a
marketing research plan to gather information to help solve the dilemma. Each
team conducts extensive research and develops a marketing research plan to
submit to the school principal and business members of the advisory committee.
The principal and business professionals study the marketing research plan, ask
the teams questions, and then select the best thought-out marketing research
plan.
Timeframe
3-4 weeks
Performance
Indicators
Students should master the following performance indicators during the project
through their research efforts or through briefings, identified with asterisks. The
page numbers for the planning guide sheets are cited after each statement.

Describe the need for marketing information (IM:012) (CS) (p. 5-15)

Identify information monitored for marketing decision making (IM:184) (SP)
(p. 5-17)

Explain the nature of marketing research (IM:010) (SP) (p. 5-141)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Describe methods used to design marketing-research studies (i.e.,
descriptive, exploratory, and causal) (IM:284) (SP) (p. 5-146)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)



Briefings
Describe options businesses use to obtain marketing-research data (i.e.,
primary and secondary research, quantitative and qualitative research)
(IM:281) (SP) (p. 5-148)* (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Discuss the nature of marketing research problems/issues (IM:282) (SP)
(p. 5-144) (SUPPLEMENTAL)
Describe data-collection methods (e.g., observations, mail, telephone,
Internet, discussion groups, interviews, scanners, etc.) (IM:289) (p. 5-152)
To augment the project, briefings should be provided during the week specified.
Content for the briefings is provided on the page numbers identified after each
topic.
Topic
Briefing
Sources of Primary and Secondary Data
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
p. 6-33
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-32
Project 3
Mascot Mystery (cont’d)
Entry Event
Show the video clip of the 2008 NBA mascot bloopers found at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS55Za2R4Ng
Afterwards, ask the driving question.
OR . . .
Arrange for the school’s mascot to visit the classroom to tell the students, “I’ve
been fired.” Since some mascots are not allowed to talk, the mascot could
pantomime being fired, and the students would need to determine the problem.
Ask the driving question.
Driving
Question
What is the best way to choose a new school mascot since ours can no longer be
used?
Checkpoints
Details
Assessment
Group Contract
Each team develops a contract for how the team will
operate, including how to handle conflict and
consequences for team members that don’t participate. A
sample group contract is provided on page 6-12.
Complete/
Incomplete
Project Plan
Team develops a written project plan to be used as a
guide for completing tasks within the project. A sample
project plan is provided on page 6-15, and a blank project
plan form is provided on page 6-17.
Developing a Project
Plan Rubric (p. 6-21)
Individual
Primary/
Secondary
Sources
Worksheet
Following the briefing on sources of primary and
secondary data, each student completes the
Primary/Secondary Sources worksheet found on page
6-35. Each student will need access to the Internet to
complete the handout.
Primary/
Secondary Sources
Answer Key (p. 6-38)
Team
Marketing
Research Plan
Each team does extensive research on methods used to
design marketing-research studies, options used to obtain
marketing-research data, research methods, and research
approaches. After completing its research, the team
determines a marketing-research problem/issue and
develops a written marketing research proposal to
address the issue. An outline of the proposal is provided
on page 6-41.
Marketing Research
Proposal Rubric
(p. 6-42)
Team Q & A
Session
After completing its written marketing research proposal,
each team will submit its plan to the school principal and
business members of the advisory committee. The
principal and business professionals review the marketing
research proposals at their convenience and then come to
class in order to ask each team any questions they might
have. After each team has had the chance to answer
these questions, the principal and business professionals
select the marketing research proposal that they deem is
the best.
Complete/
Incomplete
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Project 3
Mascot Mystery (cont’d)
Teacher Tips
The following tips are offered to aid in project
implementation:
 If there is a more pertinent local issue or dilemma that
the school or community is facing, use it as the basis
of the marketing research proposal instead of
changing the school mascot.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-33
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Topic
Sources of Primary and Secondary Data
Key Points
Distinguish between primary and secondary data.
Page 6-34
Primary data are collected for the problem/issue that needs to be resolved.
Secondary data are existing data that were collected for another purpose but can be
mined for data that address the problem/issue that needs to be resolved.
Identify sources of primary data.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Current customers
Vendors
Employees
Management
Former customers
Channel members
Prospective customers
Explain advantages of using primary data.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Addresses specific problem/issue at hand
Provides researcher a greater level of control over data collection
Improves likelihood that research money will be spent effectively
Eliminates others’ access to data
Provides current data
Discuss disadvantages of using primary data.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Costly to collect
Hard to recruit participants
Sporadic availability of data
Declining quality with lengthy data collection
Identify sources of secondary data.
Examples of internal sources (sources that are inside the company):
1. Company sales records/invoices
2. Financial statements (income statements and balance sheets)
3. Customer databases
4. Ad campaign results
5. Data from the use of loyalty cards
6. Sales activity reports
7. Product returns and exchanges
8. Customer complaints
9. Company blogs
10. Customer comment cards
Examples of external sources (sources that are outside the company):
1. Government sources
a. U.S. Census Data
b. U.S. Census Reports
c. U.S. Department of Commerce Data
d. Federal Reserve data
e. Economic indicators
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Section 6
Projects for Marketing Principles
Page 6-35
2.
Directories
Examples: Standard & Poor’s Registry of Corporations; Thomas’ Register of
American Manufacturers, Fortune Magazine Directory, Million Dollar Directory,
Sales and Marketing Management’s Survey of Buying Power, Source Book of
Demographics and Buying Power for Every Zip Code in the USA
3. Statistical sources
Examples: Standard and Poor’s Industrial Surveys, American Statistics Index,
Statistical Reference Index, Federal
4. Trade associations and publications
5. Newspapers
6. Competitors’ websites
7. Competitors’ annual reports
8. Media Panel Data Sources
Examples: Nielsen Media Research (TV); Arbitron, Inc. (radio); Roper Starch
(magazine ads); and Simmons Annual Report on Media & Markets
9. Syndicated data sources (companies that compile and then sell data to
others)
Examples:
Consumer panels about product purchase behavior and consumer attitudes
that are conducted by such organizations as J.D. Power, National Family
Opinion (NFO), and National Purchase Diary (NPD)
Store audits that assess product and brand movement at the retail level;
conducted by Nielsen Retail Index
10. Search engines such as Google and Yahoo!
A good online resource that contains information about secondary sources and
provides several exercises can be found at:
http://comm2.fsu.edu/faculty/comm/Sapolsky/netres/SecondaryDataSour
ces.pdf
Discuss advantages of secondary data:
1.
2.
3.
Less costly than primary data since they already exist
Quick to obtain—save time
Available on an ongoing basis
Describe disadvantages of secondary data:
1.
2.
3.
4.
May be out of date
May provide an incomplete picture
Will probably not contain sensitive information that could be used for
competitive advantage
May be presented in a wrong or unusable format
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-36
Primary and Secondary Data Sources: Seek and Find
For each of the following questions, determine whether primary or secondary data are needed. If primary
data are needed, determine the best method of collecting that data, and describe the method in the space
titled Process for locating the answer. If the data can be gathered using on-line secondary sources, write
an answer in the space provided. Also record the source of the information, its URL, and the process you
used to locate the answer in the URL. Finally, determine how you, as a marketer, could use this
information, regardless of whether it is primary or secondary data. Print and attach a copy of your findings
for each question.
1. What were the top five rated TV shows last week?
a. Show #1: _______________________________________________________________
b. Show #2: _______________________________________________________________
c. Show #3: _______________________________________________________________
d. Show #4: _______________________________________________________________
e. Show #5: _______________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
2. What were the top three best selling motor vehicles last year?
a. Vehicle #1: ______________________________________________________________
b. Vehicle #2: ______________________________________________________________
c. Vehicle #3: ______________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
3. Which five states in 2000 were home to the largest number of persons who are 65-years-old or older?
a. State #1: ________________________________________________________________
b. State #2: ________________________________________________________________
c. State #3: ________________________________________________________________
d. State #4: ________________________________________________________________
e. State #5: ________________________________________________________________
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-37
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
What five states in 2000 had the largest percentage increase in population ages 65 or more since 1990?
a. State #1: ________________________________________________________________
b. State #2: ________________________________________________________________
c. State #3: ________________________________________________________________
d. State #4: ________________________________________________________________
e. State #5: ________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
If you were trying to decide in what state to locate a seniors-only athletic facility, would you choose FL or
NV? Why?
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
4. What were the top three fitness magazines last year?
a. Magazine #1: _____________________________________________________________
b. Magazine #2: _____________________________________________________________
c. Magazine #3: _____________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
5. Compile a list of people in your county who purchased a new home in the last month.
_____________________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-38
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
6. What are the top three women’s fashion trends predicted for next fall?
a. Fashion trend #1: _________________________________________________________
b. Fashion trend #2: _________________________________________________________
c. Fashion trend #3: _________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
7. How satisfied with their stay last week were the guests of the Hyatt on Capital Square in Columbus,
Ohio?
_____________________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
8. Which area of your local grocery store receives the most traffic (number of shoppers passing by)?
_____________________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
How could a marketer use this information? __________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-39
Primary and Secondary Data Sources: Seek and Find Answer Guide
For each of the following questions, determine whether primary or secondary data is needed. If primary
data is needed, determine the best method of collecting that data and describe the method in the space
titled Process for locating the answer. If the data can be gathered using on-line secondary sources, write
an answer in the space provided. Also record the source of the information, its URL, and the process you
used to locate the answer in the URL. Finally, determine how you, as a marketer, could use this
information, regardless of whether it is primary or secondary data. Print and attach a copy of your findings
for each question.
1. What were the top five rated TV shows last week?
a. Show #1: _______________________________________________________________
b. Show #2: _______________________________________________________________
c. Show #3: _______________________________________________________________
d. Show #4: _______________________________________________________________
e. Show #5: _______________________________________________________________
URL accessed: http://television.aol.com/news/nielsen-ratings
Process for locating the answer: Entered “top rated TV shows” into the search engine. Nielsen Ratings
should be the first option that appears. Clicked on that option, and then clicked on “Main.” Scrolled down
the page to the Nielson Ratings on the right-hand side of the screen.
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers could use the information to select the most
viewed shows for determining time-slots for their TV advertising.
2. What were the top three best selling motor vehicles last year?
a. Vehicle #1: ______________________________________________________________
b. Vehicle #2: ______________________________________________________________
c. Vehicle #3: ______________________________________________________________
URL accessed: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22099975/
Process for locating the answer: Entered “top selling vehicles” 2007 into the search engine. (Year
entered will change.) Clicked on first option—msnbc.com, and scrolled down the page to see a chart of
the best and worst vehicles for that year.
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers who work for automobile manufacturers could
determine what features/attributes the best-selling autos have in common and then ensure that their own
products also contain these same attributes. Marketers who work for used-car dealerships could use the
information to determine what autos to seek out to put in their inventory.
3. Which five states in 2000 were home to the largest number of persons who are 65-years-old or older?
a. State #1: California
b. State #2: Florida
c. State #3: New York
d. State #4: Texas
e. State #5: Pennsylvania
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-40
URL accessed: http://www.census.gov/population/cen2000/phc-t13/tab01.pdf
Process for locating the answer: A great resource for demographic data in the United States is the U.S.
Census Bureau whose homepage is http://www.census.gov/. At the top of the homepage, clicked on
Subjects A-Z.
Accessed the Subjects Index at http://www.census.gov/main/www/subjects.html and selected Age Data.
Accessed Age Data of the United States at http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/age.html
and clicked on Census 2000 Gateway
Accessed Census 2000 Gateway at http://www.census.gov/main/www/cen2000.html and clicked on
Population and Ranking Tables of the Older Population for the United States, States, Puerto Rico, Places
of 100,000 or More Population, and Counties (PHC-T-13) at
http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/phc-t13.html
Accessed that table at http://www.census.gov/population/cen2000/phc-t13/tab01.pdf
What five states in 2000 had the largest percentage increase in population ages 65 or older since 1990?
a. State #1: Florida
b. State #2: Pennsylvania
c. State #3: West Virginia
d. State #4: Iowa
e. State #5: North Dakota
If you were trying to decide in what state to locate a seniors-only athletic facility, would you choose FL or
NV? Why?
Florida. Although Nevada had a 71.5% increase in the 65+ population between 1990 and 2000, the actual
number of people in that age category was less than in Florida since Florida has a much larger
population. (This is an important lesson since percentages can be deceiving.)
4. What were the top three fitness magazines last year?
a. Magazine #1: _____________________________________________________________
b. Magazine #2: _____________________________________________________________
c. Magazine #3: _____________________________________________________________
URL accessed: http://www.allyoucanread.com/Top20/index.asp?idCat=18
Process for locating the answer: Entered “most read fitness magazines” into the search engine.
Clicked on first option—allyoucanread.com, and found a listing of the top 20 health and fitness
magazines.
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers whose target audience is fitness- and healthoriented individuals could use the information to select the most popular fitness magazines for their
advertisements.
5. Compile a list of people in your county who purchased a new home in the last month.
_____________________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: http://209.51.193.89/Scripts/mw5conv.pl Will vary from based on location.
Process for locating the answer: Entered “Franklin County Auditor” into the search engine. (County will
vary.) Clicked on first option—Joseph W. Testa—Franklin County Auditor/Welcome. Chose departments
from top of page, then real estate, and finally transfer and conveyance. Then clicked on daily
conveyances about halfway down the page.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-41
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers could use this information to target prospective
buyers of new-home associated products and services, such as furniture, insurance, paint, home
improvement services, etc. The marketer can then send direct mail, use telemarketing, etc. to solicit
business.
6. What are the top three women’s fashion trends predicted for next fall?
a. Fashion trend #1: _________________________________________________________
b. Fashion trend #2: _________________________________________________________
c. Fashion trend #3: _________________________________________________________
URL accessed:
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/601329/top_womens_fashion_trends_for_fall.html?cat=46
Process for locating the answer: Entered “top women’s fashion trends fall 2008” into the search
engine. Clicked on the second option, Associated Content, and found a listing of the top women’s fashion
trends for fall 2008 on the right side of the page.
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers could use this information to dress a
spokesmodel appearing in an upcoming advertisement and/or to decide which items to feature on
department store’s website, print advertisement, commercial, catalog, etc.
7. How satisfied with their stay last week were the guests of the Hyatt on Capital Square in Columbus,
Ohio?
_____________________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: Create a questionnaire/survey to distribute to last week’s hotel guests
via postal mail, telephone, e-mail, or website.
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers could use the information to make
improvements to the hotel itself and its services; to reward past customers and encourage them to stay at
the hotel again; and/or to use guests’ favorable responses as testimonials in advertising, on websites, etc.
8. Which area of your local grocery store receives the most traffic (number of shoppers passing by)?
_____________________________________________________________________________
URL accessed: ________________________________________________________________
Process for locating the answer: Conduct observational research at the grocery store to determine the
high traffic areas and most common traffic patterns.
How could a marketer use this information? Marketers could use the information to decide where to
place a new product display and/or to determine where to position a booth for distributing product
samples.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-42
Marketing Research Proposal Outline
A.
What is the marketing research problem/issue?
B.
What are the objectives of the marketing research project?
C.
What design will the marketing research study use?
D.
What data-collection methods will be used in marketing research study?
E.
What methods will be used to analyze the marketing research data?
F.
Who will be involved in the marketing research study?
G.
How much time will be needed to conduct the marketing research study?
H.
What materials will be needed to conduct the marketing research study?
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Rubric: Marketing Research Proposal
Criteria
Content
The information
contained in and
communicated by
the marketing
research proposal
70 points
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 All components of the
marketing research
proposal were complete
and in writing.
 All components of the
marketing research proposal
were addressed in writing, but
some aspects needed further
description.
 Most of the marketing research
proposal’s components were in
writing; the missing elements
diminished the proposal’s
effectiveness.
 Many of the marketing
research proposal’s
components lacked
sufficient detail to take
action or were missing
altogether.
 The marketing research
proposal’s marketing
problem clearly and
concisely described the
focus of the research.
 The marketing research
proposal’s marketing problem
described the focus of the
research well, but some
clarification was required.
 The marketing research
proposal’s marketing problem
was difficult to
follow/understand.
 The marketing research
proposal’s marketing
problem was incomplete or
missing altogether.
 Research objectives were
clearly identified and
appropriately described the
research project goals.
 Research objectives were
identified and appropriately
described the research
project goals for the most
part, but some clarification
was necessary.
 The research objectives were
difficult to follow/understand.
 The research objectives
were not attainable or
missing.
 The selected research
design was clearly stated,
explained, and appropriate
for the research project.
 The selected research design
was clearly stated, somewhat
explained, and appropriate for
the research project, but
some further explanation was
needed.
 The selected research design
was stated and appropriate for
the research project, but no
explanation of the design was
provided.
 The selected research
design was inappropriate
for the project or missing
altogether.
 Data collection method(s)
were clearly identified,
explained in detail, and
appropriate for the research
project.
 Data collection method(s)
were clearly identified,
somewhat explained, and
appropriate for the research
project, but further detail was
required.
 Data collection method(s) were
identified and appropriate for the
research project, but no
explanation was provided.
 Data collection method(s)
were inappropriate or
missing.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-43
Rubric: Marketing Research Proposal
Criteria
Communication
Skills
The ability to
express oneself so
as to be understood
by others
15 points
Organization
The way in which the
information is put
together
15 points
Professional
Experienced
Developing
Novice
 The marketing research
proposal clearly specified
and explained proposed
data analysis method(s).
 For the most part, the
marketing research proposal
clearly specified and
explained proposed data
analysis method(s).
 The marketing research
proposal did not clearly specify
and explain proposed data
analysis method(s).
 The marketing research
proposal did not contain
proposed data analysis
method(s).
 The marketing research
proposal clearly specified
time, personnel, and
supplies needed to carry
out the marketing research.
 For the most part, the
marketing research proposal
clearly specified time,
personnel, and supplies
needed to carry out the
marketing research.
 The marketing research
proposal did not clearly specify
time, personnel, and supplies
needed to carry out the
marketing research.
 The marketing research
proposal did not contain a
listing of time, personnel,
and supplies needed to
carry out the marketing
research.
 Information was clear and
easy to understand.
 Information was clear with
only a few items being difficult
to understand.
 Information was not clear and
took much effort to understand.
 Information was too vague
to understand.
 Completed marketing
research proposal was
neat, grammatically correct,
and error-free.
 Completed marketing
research proposal was neat
but contained minor errors.
 Completed marketing research
proposal contained spelling and
grammatical errors that were
distracting.
 Completed marketing
research proposal was
messy, with many errors in
spelling and grammar.
 Marketing research
proposal components were
clearly identified.
 Marketing research proposal
components were identified,
but not always clearly.
 Marketing research proposal
components were identified, but
not clearly.
 Marketing research
proposal components
were not identified at all.
 Information presented was
logical and easy to follow.
 Information presented was
generally logical and easy to
follow.
 Information presented was
sometimes difficult to follow.
 Information was difficult to
follow and illogical.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Page 6-44
Appendix A
SCANS Competencies and Skills
Appendix A
Background
SCANS
Page A-2
The Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS)
was established in February 1990 to examine the demands of the
workplace and to determine whether the current and future work force is
capable of meeting those demands. Commission members included 31
representatives from the nation's schools, businesses, unions and
government. The Commission issued its first report, "What Work
Requires of Schools," in June 1991. This report told educators and
employers what students and workers need to know and be able to do in
order to succeed in the workplace. This kind of information is especially
vital today, when more than half of our young people leave school without
the basic skills required to find and hold a good job.
Specifically, the Commission was directed to advise the Secretary of
Labor on the type and level of skills required to enter employment. In
carrying out this charge, the Commission was asked to:
1.
Define the skills needed for employment;
2.
Propose acceptable levels in those skills;
3.
Suggest effective ways to assess proficiency; and
4.
Develop a strategy to disseminate the findings to
the nation's schools, businesses and homes.
The Commission identified two types of skills: competencies and
foundations. Competencies are the skills necessary for success in the
workplace and are organized into five areas. Foundations are skills and
qualities that underlie the competencies. The competencies and
foundations are generic—most of them are required for most jobs. The
SCANS competencies and foundations are identified and defined on the
following pages. The number referenced before each of them relates to
the SCANS identified in each unit guide sheet.
Competencies
Resources
1
Allocates Time—Selects relevant, goal-related activities; ranks
them in order of importance; allocates time to activities; and
understands, prepares and follows schedules. Competent
performance in allocating time includes properly identifying tasks to
be completed; ranking tasks in order of importance; developing and
following an effective, workable schedule based on accurate
estimates of such things as importance of tasks, time to complete
tasks, time available for completion and task deadlines; avoiding
wasting time; and accurately evaluating and adjusting a schedule.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix A
Information
SCANS
Page A-3
2
Allocates Money—Uses or prepares budgets, including making
cost and revenue forecasts, keeps detailed records to track budget
performance and makes appropriate adjustments. Competent
performance in allocating money includes accurately preparing and
using a budget according to a consistent and orderly accounting
method; accurately calculating future budgetary needs based on
projected costs and revenues; accurately tracking the extent to
which actual costs and revenues differ from the estimated budget;
and taking appropriate and effective actions.
3
Allocates Material and Facility Resources—Acquires, stores and
distributes materials, supplies, parts, equipment, space or final
products in order to make the best use of them. Competent
performance in allocating material and facility resources includes
carefully planning the steps involved in the acquisition, storage and
distribution of resources; safely and efficiently acquiring,
transporting or storing them; maintaining them in good condition;
and distributing them to the end user.
4
Allocates Human Resources—Assesses knowledge and skills and
distributes work accordingly, evaluates performance and provides
feedback. Competent performance in allocating human resources
includes accurately assessing peoples' knowledge, skills, abilities
and potential; identifying present and future workload; making
effective matches between individual talents and workload; and
actively monitoring performance and providing feedback.
5
Acquires and Evaluates Information—Identifies need for data,
obtains them from existing sources or creates them and evaluates
their relevance and accuracy. Competently performing the tasks of
acquiring data and evaluating information includes analytic
questions to determine specific information needs; selecting
possible information and evaluating its appropriateness; and
determining when new information must be created.
6
Organizes and Maintains Information—Organizes, processes and
maintains written or computerized records and other forms of
information in a systematic fashion. Competently performing the
tasks of organizing and maintaining information includes
understanding and organizing information from computer, visual,
oral and physical sources in readily accessible formats, such as
computerized data bases, spreadsheets, microfiche, video disks,
paper files, etc.; when necessary, transforming data into different
formats in order to organize them by the application of various
methods such as sorting, classifying or more formal methods.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix A
Interpersonal
SCANS
Page A-4
7
Interprets and Communicates Information—Selects and analyzes
information and communicates the results to others using oral,
written, graphic, pictorial or multi-media methods. Competently
performing the tasks of communicating and interpreting information
to others includes determining information to be communicated;
identifying the best methods to present information (e.g.,
overheads, handouts); if necessary, converting to desired format
and conveying information to others through a variety of means
including oral presentation, written communication, etc.
8
Uses Computers to Process Information—Employs computers to
acquire, organize, analyze and communicate information.
Competently using computers to process information includes
entering, modifying, retrieving, storing and verifying data and other
information; choosing format for display (e.g., line graphs, bar
graphs, tables, pie charts, narrative); and ensuring the accurate
conversion of information into the chosen format.
9
Participates as a Member of a Team—Works cooperatively with
others and contributes to group with ideas, suggestions and effort.
Demonstrating competence in participating as a member of a team
includes doing own share of tasks necessary to complete a project;
encouraging team members by listening and responding
appropriately to their contributions; building on individual team
members' strengths; resolving differences for the benefit of the
team; taking personal responsibility for accomplishing goals; and
responsibly challenging existing procedures, policies or authorities.
10
Teaches Others—Helps others learn. Demonstrating competence
in teaching others includes helping others to apply related concepts
and theories to tasks through coaching or other means; identifying
training needs; conveying job information to allow others to see its
applicability and relevance to tasks; and assessing performance
and providing constructive feedback/reinforcement.
11
Serves Clients/Customers—Works and communicates with clients
and customers to satisfy their expectations. Demonstrating
competence in serving clients and customers includes actively
listening to customers to avoid misunderstandings and identifying
needs; communicating in a positive manner especially when
handling complaints or conflict; and efficiently obtaining additional
resources to satisfy client needs.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix A
Systems
SCANS
Page A-5
12
Exercises Leadership—Communicates thoughts, feelings and
ideas to justify a position; encourages, persuades, convinces or
otherwise motivates an individual or groups, including responsibly
challenging existing procedures, policies or authority.
Demonstrating competence in exercising leadership includes
making positive use of the rules/values followed by others;
justifying a position logically and appropriately; establishing
credibility through competence and integrity; and taking minority
viewpoints into consideration.
13
Negotiates to Arrive at a Decision—Works toward an agreement
that may involve exchanging specific resources or resolving
divergent interests. Demonstrating competence in negotiating to
arrive at a decision involves researching opposition and the history
of the conflict; setting realistic and attainable goals; presenting facts
and arguments; listening to and reflecting on what has been said;
clarifying problems and resolving conflicts; adjusting quickly to new
facts/ideas; proposing and examining possible options; and making
reasonable compromises.
14
Works with Cultural Diversity—Works well with men and women
and with a variety of ethnic, social or educational backgrounds.
Demonstrating competence in working with cultural diversity
involves understanding one's own culture and those of others and
how they differ; respecting the rights of others while helping them
make cultural adjustments where necessary; basing impressions
on individual performance, not on stereotypes; and understanding
concerns of members of other ethnic and gender groups.
15
Understands Systems—Knows how social, organizational and
technological systems work and operates effectively within them.
Demonstrating competence in understanding systems involves
knowing how a system's structures relate to goals; responding to
the demands of the system/organization; knowing the right people
to ask for information and where to get resources; and functioning
within the formal and informal codes of the social/organizational
system.
16
Monitors and Corrects Performance—Distinguishes trends, predicts
impact of actions on system operations, diagnoses deviations in the
function of a system/organization and takes necessary action to
correct performance. Demonstrating competence in monitoring and
correcting performance includes identifying trends and gathering
needed information about how the system is intended to function;
detecting deviations from system's intended purpose;
troubleshooting the system; and making changes to the system to
rectify system functioning and to ensure quality of product.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix A
Technology
SCANS
Page A-6
17
Improves and Designs Systems—Makes suggestions to modify
existing systems to improve products or services and develops new
or alternative systems. Demonstrating competence in improving or
designing systems involves making suggestions for improving the
functioning of the system/organization; recommending alternative
system designs based on relevant feedback; and responsibly
challenging the status quo to benefit the larger system.
18
Selects Technology—Judges which set of procedures, tools or
machines, including computers and their programs, will produce the
desired results. Demonstrating competence in selecting technology
includes determining desired outcomes and applicable constraints;
visualizing the necessary methods and applicable technology;
evaluating specifications; and judging which machine or tool will
produce the desired results.
19
Applies Technology to Task—Understands the overall intent and
the proper procedures for setting up and operating machines,
including computers and their programming systems.
Demonstrating competence in how to apply technology to task
includes understanding how different parts of machines interact
and how machines interact with broader production systems; on
occasion installing machines including computers; setting up
machines or systems of machines efficiently to get desired results;
accurately interpreting machine output; and detecting errors from
program output.
20
Maintains and Troubleshoots Technology—Prevents, identifies or
solves problems in machines, computers and other technologies.
Demonstrating competence in maintaining and troubleshooting
technology includes identifying, understanding and performing
routine preventative maintenance and service on technology;
detecting more serious problems; generating workable solutions to
correct deviations; and recognizing when to get additional help.
1
Reading—Locates, understands and interprets written information
in prose and documents—including manuals, graphs and
schedules—to perform tasks; learns from text by determining the
main idea or essential message; identifies relevant details, facts
and specifications; infers or locates the meaning of unknown or
technical vocabulary; judges the accuracy, appropriateness, style
and plausibility of reports, proposals or theories of other writers.
Foundation
Skills
Basic Skills
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix A
Thinking Skills
SCANS
Page A-7
2
Writing—Communicates thoughts, ideas, information and
messages in writing; records information completely and
accurately; composes and creates documents such as letters,
directions, manuals, reports, proposals, graphs, flow-charts; uses
language, style, organization and format appropriate to the subject
matter, purpose and audience; includes supporting documentation
and attends to level of detail; and checks, edits and revises for
correct information, appropriate emphasis, form, grammar, spelling
and punctuation.
3
Arithmetic—Performs basic computations; uses basic numerical
concepts such as whole numbers and percentages in practical
situations; makes reasonable estimates of arithmetic results without
a calculator; and uses tables, graphs, diagrams and charts to
obtain or convey quantitative information.
4
Mathematics—Computational skills needed in maintaining records,
estimating results, using spreadsheets or applying statistical
process.
5
Listening—Receives, attends to, interprets and responds to verbal
messages and other cues such as body language in ways that are
appropriate to the purpose; for example, to comprehend, to learn,
to critically evaluate, to appreciate or to support the speaker.
6
Speaking—Organizes ideas and communicates oral messages
appropriate to listeners and situations; participates in conversation,
discussion and group presentations; selects an appropriate
medium for conveying a message; uses verbal language and other
cues such as body language appropriate in style, tone and level of
complexity to the audience and the occasion; speaks clearly and
communicates a message; understands and responds to listener
feedback; and asks questions when needed.
7
Creative Thinking—Uses imagination freely, combines ideas or
information in new ways, makes connections between seemingly
unrelated ideas and reshapes goals in ways that reveal new
possibilities.
8
Decision Making—Specifies goals and constraints, generates
alternatives, considers risks and evaluates and chooses best
alternative.
9
Problem Solving—Recognizes that a problem exists (i.e., there is a
discrepancy between what is and what should or could be);
identifies possible reasons for the discrepancy; devises and
implements a plan of action to resolve it; evaluates and monitors
progress; and revises plan as indicated by findings.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix A
Personal
Qualities
SCANS
Page A-8
10
Seeing Things in the Mind's Eye—Organizes and processes
symbols, pictures, graphs, objects or other information; for
example, sees a building from a blueprint; a system's operation
from schematics; the flow of work activities from narrative
descriptions; or the taste of food from reading a recipe.
11
Knowing How to Learn—Uses efficient learning techniques to
acquire and apply new knowledge and skills.
12
Reasoning—Discovers a rule or principle underlying the
relationship between two or more objects and applies it in solving a
problem.
13
Responsibility—Exerts a high level of effort and perseverance
toward goal attainment; works hard to become excellent at doing
tasks by setting high standards, paying attention to details, working
well and displaying a high level of concentration even when
assigned an unpleasant task; and displays high standards of
attendance, punctuality, enthusiasm, vitality and optimism in
approaching and completing tasks.
14
Self-Esteem—Believes in own self-worth and maintains a positive
view of self.
15
Social—Demonstrates understanding, friendliness, adaptability,
empathy and politeness in new and on-going group settings;
asserts self in familiar and unfamiliar social situations; relates well
to others; responds appropriately as the situation requires; and
takes an interest in what others say and do.
16
Self-Management—Assesses own knowledge, skills and abilities
accurately; sets well-defined and realistic personal goals; monitors
progress toward goal attainment and motivates self through goal
achievement; exhibits self-control and responds to feedback
unemotionally and non-defensively; and is a "self-starter."
17
Integrity/Honesty—Chooses ethical courses of action.
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix B
21st Century Skills
Appendix B
Overview
21st Century Skills
Page B-2
While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 identifies the core subjects as the
traditional academic areas, business and education leaders along with
policymakers have identified several other significant content areas that they
consider critical to educational success in the 21st century. This group known as
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills leads the way for including these skills in
education. To encourage school districts to address these skills, the group
provides the necessary tools and resources schools need to add the skills to the
curriculum.
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills conducted extensive initial research with
thousands of key stakeholders and citizens across the country. The Partnership
has identified six elements of 21st century learning:
 Core subjects
 21st century content
 Learning and thinking skills
 Information and communications technology literacy
 Life skills
 21st century assessments
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Appendix B
21st Century
Content
21st Century Skills
Page B-3
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills has created the graphic below to
summarize their work. The graphic represents both 21st century skills student
outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and 21st century skills
support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom). The text following
the graphic describes the Partnership’s perspective and then lists the student
outcomes identified. For the purposes of the Marketing Principles crosswalk,
numbers have been given to each skill.
Mastery of core subjects and 21st century themes is essential for students in the
21st century. Core subjects include:
 English, reading or language arts
 World languages
 Arts
 Mathematics
 Economics
 Science
 Geography
 History
 Government and Civics
In addition to these subjects, we (The Partnership) believe schools must move
beyond a focus on basic competency in core subjects to promoting understanding
of academic content at much higher levels by weaving 21st century
interdisciplinary themes into core subjects:
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Appendix B
21st Century Skills
Page B-4
Global Awareness
1. Using 21st century skills to understand and address global issues
2. Learning from and working collaboratively with individuals representing
diverse cultures, religions and lifestyles in a spirit of mutual respect and
open dialogue in personal, work and community contexts
3. Understanding other nations and cultures, including the use of non-English
languages
Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy
1. Knowing how to make appropriate personal economic choices
2. Understanding the role of the economy in society
3. Using entrepreneurial skills to enhance workplace productivity and career
options
Civic Literacy
1. Participating effectively in civic life through knowing how to stay informed
and understanding governmental processes
2. Exercising the rights and obligations of citizenship at local, state, national
and global levels
3. Understanding the local and global implications of civic decisions
Health Literacy
1. Obtaining, interpreting and understanding basic health information and
services and using such information and services in ways that are health
enhancing
2. Understanding preventive physical and mental health measures, including
proper diet, nutrition, exercise, risk avoidance and stress reduction
3. Using available information to make appropriate health-related decisions
4. Establishing and monitoring personal and family health goals
5. Understanding national and international public health and safety issues
Learning and Innovation Skills
Learning and innovation skills are increasingly being recognized as the skills that
separate students who are prepared for increasingly complex life and work
environments in the 21st century, and those who are not. A focus on creativity,
critical thinking, communication and collaboration is essential to prepare students
for the future.
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Appendix B
21st Century Skills
Page B-5
Creativity & Innovation
1. Demonstrating originality and inventiveness in work
2. Developing, implementing and communicating new ideas to others
3. Being open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives
4. Acting on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the
domain in which the innovation occurs
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
1. Exercising sound reasoning in understanding
2. Making complex choices and decisions
3. Understanding the interconnections among systems
4. Identifying and asking significant questions that clarify various points of
view and lead to better solutions
5. Framing, analyzing and synthesizing information in order to solve
problems and answer questions
Communication & Collaboration
1. Articulating thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking
and writing
2. Demonstrating ability to work effectively with diverse teams
3. Exercising flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary
compromises to accomplish a common goal
4. Assuming shared responsibility for collaborative work
Information, Media and Technology Skills
People in the 21st century live in a technology and media-suffused environment,
marked by access to an abundance of information, rapid changes in technology
tools, and the ability to collaborate and make individual contributions on an
unprecedented scale. To be effective in the 21st century, citizens and workers
must be able to exhibit a range of functional and critical thinking skills related to
information, media and technology.
Information Literacy
1. Accessing information efficiently and effectively, evaluating information
critically and competently and using information accurately and creatively
for the issue or problem at hand
2. Possessing a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues
surrounding the access and use of information
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Appendix B
21st Century Skills
Page B-6
Media Literacy
1. Understanding how media messages are constructed, for what purposes
and using which tools, characteristics and conventions.
2. Examining how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and
points of view are included or excluded and how media can influence
beliefs and behaviors.
3. Possessing a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues
surrounding the access and use of information
ICT (Information, Communications & Technology) Literacy
1. Using digital technology, communication tools and/or networks
appropriately to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, and create
information in order to function in a knowledge economy
2. Using technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and
communicate information, and the possession of a fundamental
understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use
of information
Life & Career Skills
Today’s life and work environments require far more than thinking skills and
content knowledge. The ability to navigate the complex life and work environments
in the globally competitive information age requires students to pay rigorous
attention to developing adequate life and career skills.
Flexibility & Adaptability
1. Adapting to varied roles and responsibilities
2. Working effectively in a climate of ambiguity and changing priorities
Initiative & Self-Direction
1. Monitoring one’s own understanding and learning needs
2. Going beyond basic mastery of skills and/or curriculum to explore and
expand one’s own learning and opportunities to gain expertise
3. Demonstrating initiative to advance skill levels towards a professional level
4. Defining, prioritizing and completing tasks without direct oversight
5. Utilizing time efficiently and managing workload
6. Demonstrating commitment to learning as a lifelong process
Social & Cross-Cultural Skills
1. Working appropriately and productively with others
2. Leveraging the collective intelligence of groups when appropriate
3. Bridging cultural differences and using differing perspectives to increase
innovation and the quality of work
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Appendix B
21st Century Skills
Page B-7
Productivity & Accountability
1. Setting and meeting high standards and goals for delivering quality work
on time
2. Demonstrating diligence and a positive work ethic (e.g., being punctual
and reliable)
Leadership & Responsibility
1. Using interpersonal and problem-solving skills to influence and guide
others toward a goal
2. Leveraging strengths of others to accomplish a common goal
3. Demonstrating integrity and ethical behavior
4. Acting responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind
Source: Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (2011). Framework for 21st century
learning. Retrieved May 16, 2011, from http://www.21stcenturyskills.org
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Appendix C
Sample Semester Exams
for Marketing Principles
Semester One Exam
1. What type of information concerning policies and procedures do employees often extract from an
internal business report?
A. Customer profiles
C. Industry research data
B. New personnel regulations
D. Former local competitors
CO:057/1.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
2. What type of information should employees be able to locate in their company's employee handbook?
A. The company's annual report
B. The company's list of current job openings
C. The use of company property
D. The number of vacation days that an employee has taken
CO:057/1.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
3. What should you do to demonstrate a customer-service mindset in the following situation: A
loyal customer states in a calm tone that she was charged incorrectly for several sales items?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Make sure the mistake is corrected
Blame the billing department
Get as upset as the customer
Call the person's supervisor to complain about the customer's attitude
CR:004/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
4. What should you do to demonstrate a customer-service mindset in the following situation: An irate
business customer yells at you because of a billing error?
A. Make sure the mistake is corrected
B. Blame the billing department
C. Get as upset as the customer
D. Call the person's supervisor to complain about the customer's attitude
CR:004/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
5. What should employees do to maintain a customer-service mindset?
A. Listen to the words of soothing songs
C. Maximize conversations with coworkers
B. Devote their full attention to customers
D. Decide how to spend their break time
CR:004/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6. How do service-oriented companies often improve their levels of service?
A. By evaluating internal product development procedures
B. By requesting input through employee and customer surveys
C. By providing customers with product testimonials
D. By conducting a feasibility analysis for company expansion
CR:005/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
7. What is one of the benefits to a business of reinforcing service orientation through communication?
A. Promotes the sale of new products
C. Rewards customers for their support
B. Builds positive relationships with customers D. Encourages employees to be aggressive
CR:005/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
8. What is a guideline for employees to follow in handling customer inquiries?
A. Spend as little time as possible answering customers' inquiries
B. Try to make a sale while you're answering each inquiry
C. Don't try to handle inquiries when you are busy with a sale
D. Make sure you clearly understand customers' inquiries
CR:006/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
9. A customer asked you several questions about the new expandable notebooks. So that you address
the customer’s questions correctly, what should you do?
A. Spend as little time as possible answering customers' inquiries
B. Try to make a sale while you're answering each inquiry
C. Don't try to handle inquiries when you are busy with a sale
D. Make sure you clearly understand customers' inquiries
CR:006/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
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Semester One Exam
10. What is a businesslike way for employees to handle a situation in which they must obtain information
requested by customers and call the customers back?
A. Tell the customers exactly when they will be called
B. Ask the customers when it would be convenient to call them
C. Explain how much effort will be required to get the requested information
D. Ask the customers to call back if they don't receive a call within 24 hours
CR:006/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
11. What are businesspeople who fail to adapt their communication styles to appeal to their international
clients likely to do?
A. Offend the clients
C. Impress the clients
B. Earn the clients' trust
D. Persuade the clients to buy
CR:019/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
12. Jami researched her international customers’ buying behavior. Jami wanted to be sure she did
not make the common mistake to do which of the following actions?
A. Offend the clients
B. Earn the clients' trust
C. Impress the clients
D. Persuade the clients to buy
CR:019/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
13. What should help businesspeople adapt their communication styles to appeal to clients from
other cultures?
A. Being respectful, indifferent, and honest
B. Being confident, biased, and manipulative
C. Being sensitive, transparent, and demanding
D. Being patient, flexible, and empathetic
CR:019/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
14. What is a factor that affects a business's selection of policies to guide its operations?
A. Communication skills of employees
C. Nature of the business
B. Personal preferences of management
D. Space available to display policies
CR:007/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
15. What is one of the purposes of having business policies?
A. To encourage customers to make frequent exchanges
B. To make sure the business's actions are consistent
C. To ensure that the business makes a profit
D. To allow employees to make decisions regarding customers
CR:007/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
16. What should salespeople do when they must cope with customers who are being disagreeable?
A. Speed up the sale to minimize opportunity for disagreement
B. Use product knowledge to prove they are wrong
C. Listen patiently and try to stay calm
D. Ask them to come back when they are ready to buy
CR:009/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
17. What kind of customer would make the following statement: “I must compare the different
shades of color and fabrics available for a new comforter set.”
A. Disagreeable
B. Suspicious
C. Slow/Methodical
D. Dishonest
CR:009/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
18. What kind of customer would make the following statement: "I just don't know which of these my
girlfriend would like best. I had better come back at another time."
A. Disagreeable
C. Slow/Methodical
B. Suspicious
D. Dishonest
CR:009/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
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Semester One Exam
19. What is a cost associated with customer complaints?
A. Markups on inventory
C. Higher commissions
B. Additional advertising
D. Loss of sales
CR:010/2.05
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
20. Which of the following would be the most likely cause of customer complaints:
A. Institutional ads
C. Extended hours
B. Product quality
D. Price reductions
CR:010/2.05
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
21. What should you do to eliminate any misunderstandings that you or your customer might have
concerning the customer's complaint?
A. Thank the customer
C. Restate the complaint
B. Explain company policy
D. Take immediate action
CR:010/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
22. Tammy listened carefully to a disgruntled customer, who is disappointed in the delayed
delivery of several packages. What should Tammy do next?
A. Thank the customer
B. Explain company policy
CR:010/2.05
C. Restate the complaint
D. Take immediate action
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
23. Are noncomplainers a more difficult problem for businesses than complainers?
A. Yes, because records of the complaints cannot be maintained.
B. Yes, because the salesperson does not have an opportunity to handle the complaint.
C. No, because noncomplainers do not express ill feelings.
D. No, because the salesperson can satisfy the noncomplainer within company guidelines.
CR:010/2.05
(SUPPLEMENTAL)
24. When a business publicly pledges to provide all of its customers with quick, courteous service, what is it
doing?
A. Making a brand promise
C. Stating industry policies
B. Developing a campaign platform
D. Establishing product position
CR:001/2.07
25. John communicates through all advertisements that his employees go through extensive training. What
is John doing?
A. Making a brand promise
C. Stating industry policies
B. Developing a campaign platform
D. Establishing product position
CR:001/2.07
26. What will probably happen to a business if it continuously fails to deliver on its brand promise?
A. Lose credibility
C. Increase market share
B. Improve sales volume
D. Decrease liability
CR:001/2.07
27. What is an example of an employee reinforcing a firm's image through his/her job performance?
A. A customer waits on the telephone for several minutes while Matt confirms shipping
information.
B. Susan advises her customer that the sofa is only available by special order.
C. Jack politely asks if his customer would like a beverage while s/he waits for car service.
D. Angela, a human resources manager, prepares the firm's employee newsletter every month.
CR:002/2.07
28. Which of the following is a policy that the WNJ Company might implement to reinforce its image as an
efficient and responsive business?
A. Requiring employees to respond to customer inquiries within 24 hours
B. Requesting that employees sign their timecards at the end of a pay period
C. Ensuring that employees wear clean uniforms during their shifts
D. Allowing employees to establish their own service standards
CR:002/2.07
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Semester One Exam
29. What is one way that businesses use marketing information?
A. To develop new products
C. To change economic trends
B. To determine credit scores
D. To prepare sales invoices
IM:012/1.05
30. What does continuously monitoring internal marketing information enable businesses to do?
A. Investigate competitors
C. Evaluate market share
B. Identify problems
D. Analyze economic changes
IM:012/1.05
31. What is one way that many businesses use the marketing information contained in sales reports?
A. To monitor expense accounts
C. To improve the effectiveness of salespeople
B. To qualify potential new customers
D. To develop negotiating techniques
IM:184/1.05
32. By monitoring its sales and its customers' buying habits, what is a business often able to identify?
A. Popular products
C. Economic resources
B. Research methods
D. Competitors' activities
IM:184/1.05
33. XYZ Company noticed that the sales of iPads in blue have increased in sales. What can the
business determine about the iPads.
A. Popular products
B. Research methods
C. Economic resources
D. Competitors' activities
IM:184/1.05
34. What type of internal report would indicate to a business that sales for a specific product have
dramatically dropped over the past three months?
A. Market demographics analysis
C. Annual income statement
B. Accounts-payable summary
D. Quarterly inventory status
IM:184/1.05
35. What type of marketing data can a business obtain by reviewing its inventory reports and customers'
invoices?
A. Product quality
C. Customers' product preferences
B. Customers' credit limits
D. Actual market share
IM:184/1.05
36.
What does applying the customer-orientation element of the marketing concept enable the
business to do?
A. Offer products that consumers want to buy
B. Persuade customers to buy its products
C. Provide more products than consumers need
D. Coordinate its marketing activities
MK:001/1.01
37.
By increasing awareness of the need for environmental controls, what has marketing done?
A. Made buying more convenient
C. Improved the quality of life
B. Regulated the standard of living
D. Added usefulness to products
MK:001/1.01
38. Grocery stores are allowing customers to bring in the own cloth bags to use in place of the plastic bags
that they usually provide. What has this action done?
A. Made buying more convenient
C. Improved the quality of life
B. Regulated the standard of living
D. Added usefulness to products
MK:001/1.01
39. According to the marketing concept, which option shows company commitment?
A. Leaving marketing to the marketing department
B. Teaching marketing to college marketing students
C. Setting aside funds to research what customers want
D. Pricing a product to maximize profitability per item
MK:001/1.01
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Semester One Exam
DELETED 40. Which marketing function helps businesspeople forecast how much will be sold in a given
period?
A. Market planning
C. Promotion
B. Risk management
D. Channel management
MK:002/1.01
DELETED 41. Company XYZ has predicted it will sell 3,000 new microwaves during the “Back to School”
sale. Which marketing function is this business using?
A. Market planning
C. Promotion
B. Risk management
D. Channel management
MK:002/1.01
42. After the popularity of a product dropped, the business needed a new product to promote that would
help to improve its image. Which marketing function would come up with the new product?
A. Channel management
C. Selling
B. Product/Service management
D. Promotion
MK:002/1.01
43. Paul’s plant food is losing its popularity among his customer base. What marketing function
would come up with the improved product?
A. Channel management
B. Product/Service management
C. Selling
D. Promotion
MK:002/1.01
44. What does the selling function involve that makes it so important?
A. Setting high prices
C. Contacting customers
B. Displaying products
D. Obtaining feedback from vendors
MK:002/1.01
45. What is the overall reason that marketing strategies are designed and implemented?
A. Improving management techniques
C. Changing the image of the business
B. Achieving planned goals
D. Increasing business profits immediately
MP:001/1.04
46. Dennis has a great idea for a new type of tennis ball that, if produced, would be better than any ball
currently on the market. He pitches his idea to a few investors. Which of the four Ps should these
investors consider first?
A. Product
C. Promotion
B. Price
D. Place
MP:001/1.04
47. Manny has a new idea for a new cleanser that would decrease the time in cleaning tiled floors. He
thinks this product would be better than any cleanser currently on the market. Which of the four Ps
should these investors consider first?
A. Product
C. Promotion
B. Price
D. Place
MP:001/1.04
48. To promote its summer menu, Danielle's Café plans to e-mail a $5.00-off coupon to its regular
customers next Tuesday. The coupon will be valid from June 1 through June 15. What does use of the
coupon represent?
A. Tactic
C. Goal
B. Strategy
D. Trend
MP:001/1.04
49. Highway 1 Restaurant allows customers the opportunity to enter drawings in order to win a birthday
cake. Customers register by providing their contact information on a card. What does entering the
drawings represent?
A. Tactic
C. Goal
B. Strategy
D. Trend
MP:001/1.04
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam
50. Sue is a 12th grade student who loves the new Ferrari convertible which retails for approximately
$300,000. She works part-time at the local movie theater and has approximately $150 in her savings
and checking account. Is Sue a part of the market for the Ferrari?
A. No, she is not financially willing to purchase the Ferrari.
B. Yes, she has an unfulfilled desire for the Ferrari.
C. No, she is not financially able to purchase the Ferrari.
D. Yes, she has an unfulfilled desire and is financially able and willing to satisfy that desire.
MP:003/1.04
51. Which market segment do customers in cold climates who need snow shovels and snow blowers
represent?
A. Geographic
C. Behavioral
B. Psychographic
D. Occupational
MP:003/1.04
52. Which market segment do customers that prefer reasonably-priced recreational activities that
include a variety represent?
A. Geographic
B. Psychographic
C. Behavioral
D. Occupational
MP:003/1.04
53. A business determines that it can increase its market share 12 percent by promoting its goods and
services to Hispanic females who are 18- to 34-years old. How is the business segmenting the market?
A. By geographics
C. By demographics
B. By psychographics
D. By behavior
MP:003/1.04
54. How does the use of grades and standards affect the buying and selling process?
A. It enables customers to buy without having to inspect each product.
B. It provides product information on unsafe products.
C. It enables businesses to set high prices.
D. It enables salespeople to suggest products without having to determine customer needs.
PM:019/2.06
55. Why do many professional organizations develop standards for their members to follow?
A. To promote group activities
C. To establish control
B. To create influence
D. To promote product safety
PM:019/2.06
56. Which is an example of an implied warranty?
A. A customer buys a toaster and assumes it will toast bread.
B. A jacket's hang tag states that the fabric is pure wool.
C. A television's label promises a full refund if the set doesn't work.
D. A salesperson tells a customer, "This is the best quality you can buy."
PM:020/2.06
57. Teri purchased a new car and expects for the entertainment system to work smoothly. Which
warranty is Teri expecting to be fulfilled?
A. express
C. limited
B. full
D. implied
PM:020/2.06
58. A customer buys a CD player and receives a printed warranty card stating the action the company will
take if the CD player does not work properly. This is an example of a(n) _________ warranty.
A. express
C. limited
B. full
D. implied
PM:020/2.06
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam
59. What is a purpose of warranties and guarantees?
A. To increase customer anxiety about purchases
B. To decrease feedback from customers
C. To protect the producer and the seller
D. To avoid a customer-oriented focus for the business
PM:020/2.06
60. Harrison Stroller Company manufactures baby strollers. The business launched a new stroller line in
hopes of increasing its market share. The new model featured neon, plastic, musical toys on the front
bar of the stroller. By the middle of the first year, there were 50 reports of infant injuries. What legal
action will Harrison Stroller Company have to face?
A. Consumer protection
C. Product liability
B. Product deletion
D. Consumer Product Safety Act
PM:017/3.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
61. Lakeview Manufacturing produces canned tuna fish for consumers and pets. After the company
decided to expand its market to three additional states, it discovered that the pet products were labeled
incorrectly. They had been packaged and distributed as consumer products. To correct this problem,
what action should the company take?
A. Product liability
C. Guarantee
B. Product recall
D. Warranty
PM:017/3.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
62. Why would a business use a broad product mix?
A. To assure that the product lines are related
B. To promote one-stop shopping
C. To decrease legal liabilities
D. To relate the products to the target market
PM:003/3.03
63. Which of the following is a reason that a business would make changes to its products?
A. To keep up with changing consumer preferences
B. To spread risk over a wider area
C. To predict the success of the changed product
D. To make room for other products
PM:003/3.03
64.
What does a salesperson need to do to be successful in selling?
A. Always attempt to sell related merchandise
B. Ask management to limit the number of brands
C. Describe the disadvantages of competing brands
D. Learn the features unique to the brands s/he sells
SE:017/2.01
65. Joe is a salesperson who will sometimes forgo a sale in order to satisfy a customer's needs. Carol
always attempts to close a sale at all costs. Who is likely to be the more successful salesperson?
A. Joe, because he is a nice person
B. Carol, because Joe is too timid to close a sale
C. Joe, because he will get more repeat business
D. Carol, because she will make more sales
SE:017/2.01
66. What can salespeople do to maintain good relationships with existing customers?
A. Ask for new referrals
C. Live up to their promises
B. Use customers in advertisements
D. Send customers expensive gifts
SE:076/2.01
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam
67. What is an effective follow-up activity that salespeople can use to provide good service and develop
strong relationships with customers?
A. Asking for referrals
B. Calling to make sure the products are satisfactory
C. Explaining the company's business plan
D. Sending articles about local competitors
SE:076/2.01
68. George sold Sandy a new living room set. What should George do an effective follow-up to
provide good service and develop a strong relationship with her?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Asking for referrals
Calling to make sure the products are satisfactory
Explaining the company's business plan
Sending articles about local competitors
SE:076/2.01
69. Which is a pre-sale opportunity for salespeople to provide customer service?
A. Providing ample product information
C. Maintenance and repair
B. Shipping and delivery
D. Technical assistance and support
SE:076/2.01
70. What should a salesperson do when dealing with a customer who wants to return an unsatisfactory
item?
A. Exchange the item
C. Consult the buyer
B. Refer the customer to the manufacturer
D. Follow the business's selling policies
SE:932/2.03
71. What is an internal factor that affects the selling policies of a business?
A. Customer requests
C. Financial resources
B. Actions of competitors
D. Government legislation
SE:932/2.03
72. What type of product information might a salesperson be able to obtain from a manufacturer's
representative?
A. How the product is made
C. How the product became popular
B. What credit terms are available
D. What inventory method to use
SE:062/2.08
73. A customer asks a specific product question that a new salesperson cannot answer. What should the
new salesperson do?
A. Tell the customer to contact the manufacturer
B. Explain that s/he is new and doesn't know
C. Try to serve the customer as best s/he can
D. Ask an available, experienced employee
SE:062/2.08
74. Geri asked a salesperson about some features of the new Samsung Android cellular telephone.
Since the salesperson was not aware of the features, what should he do?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Tell the customer to contact the manufacturer
Explain that s/he is new and doesn't know
Try to serve the customer as best s/he can
Ask an available, experienced employee
SE:062/2.08
75. How does a feature-benefit chart help a salesperson?
A. Evaluates customer reaction to the presentation
B. Explains the business's compensation rate to the salesperson
C. Determines which features and benefits appeal to each customer
D. Provides a quick reference to the salesperson about the product
SE:109/2.08
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam
76. What is a product benefit that a salesperson might point out to a customer who wants to buy a
computer?
A. Monitor has a nonglare screen.
C. Print capability is optional.
B. Pre-installed software saves money.
D. Models are available in many colors.
SE:109/2.08
77. When salespeople explain the benefits of a technical product, what questions are they answering for
customers?
A. What is the warranty?
C. What is the price?
B. What is it?
D. What's in it for me?
SE:109/2.08
78. Josh wants to know more about the benefits of his new iPad. What about the iPad he wants to know?
A. What is the warranty?
C. What is the price?
B. What is it?
D. What's in it for me?
SE:109/2.08
79. After learning that a customer is interested in a computer that can produce sophisticated graphics, what
should be the salesperson's next step?
A. Trying to reach closure with the customer
B. Suggesting a specific computer to the customer
C. Trying to make the customer feel more relaxed
D. Giving the customer a price list
SE:048/2.09
80. By what will the emphasis put on each phase of the selling process vary most significantly?
A. State and local laws
C. Product and the client
B. Economic climate
D. Geographic area
SE:048/2.09
81. Why should salespeople create favorable impressions during the initial contact with customers?
A. Customers want to ask for assistance.
C. First impressions seldom last very long.
B. First impressions are difficult to change.
D. Customer rapport is unimportant.
SE:110/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
82. What should the salesperson do when s/he is helping a customer and another customer enters the
selling area?
A. Apologize to the first customer for helping the second customer.
B. Leave the first customer to help the second customer.
C. Acknowledge the second customer as soon as possible.
D. Ignore the second customer until finished with the first customer.
SE:110/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
83. A customer has been looking at different brands of the same product for several minutes. What is the
most appropriate sales approach to use under these circumstances?
A. "May I help you?"
C. "Brand X is on sale today."
B. "Good morning. How are you?"
D. "What can I do for you today?"
SE:110/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
84. If you feel you are asking too many questions but have not determined the customer's need or want,
what can you do to vary your approach?
A. Use questioning statements.
C. Ask questions more slowly.
B. Wait for the customer to ask questions.
D. Speed up the pace of your questions.
SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
85. Tim could not think of any more questions to determine a customer’s need for a new stove. What should
Tim do?
A. Use questioning statements.
C. Ask questions more slowly.
B. Wait for the customer to ask questions.
D. Speed up the pace of your questions.
SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam
86. On what does the speed of asking customers questions depend?
A. Type of product that is being sold
B. Number of other customers waiting
C. Amount of time left before the business closes
D. Pace of the customer's responses to your questions
SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
87. What is good advice for a salesperson to follow when questioning customers?
A. Ask each customer the same questions
C. The more questions you ask, the better
B. Ask impersonal questions
D. Make sure customers answer your
questions
SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
88. What should a salesperson explain to a customer when recommending a substitute item?
A. Buying motives
C. Comparable features
B. Exchange policies
D. Fringe benefits
SE:114/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
89. Judy sold customers substitute computers for the iPad. What should she explain to the
customers about the substitute computers?
A. Buying motives
B. Exchange policies
C. Comparable features
D. Fringe benefits
SE:114/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
90. Analyze the following situation to determine how the sale was lost: Ms. Garcia asked a sales
representative for a handheld scanner she'd seen at a trade show. The sales representative said, "You
don't want that scanner. It's too slow and inaccurate. For a few more dollars, you can have this quality
scanner instead." Ms. Garcia didn't buy. What had the sales representative done?
A. Pointed out features of the scanner
C. Criticized the original request
B. Suggested trading-down
D. Referred to the new item as a substitute
SE:114/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
91. A small computer business does not stock the computer printer that a customer has requested. What
should the sales representative do?
A. Take the customer's telephone number and call if the business decides to stock the printer
B. Offer the customer free ink cartridges if a computer is purchased
C. Tell the customer to try another business or competitor
D. Offer to call the printer's manufacturer to check availability and delivery dates
SE:009/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
92. When a customer's special order arrives, another customer who is on hand at the time asks to buy the
item. What should the salesperson do?
A. Hold the item for the original customer, and offer to place an order for the new customer
B. Sell the item to the new customer, and refund the original customer's money
C. Hold the item for the original customer, and get the new customer's name and address
D. Sell the item to the new customer, and reorder for the original customer
SE:009/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
93. What is often one of the first steps in processing an incoming telephone order?
A. Checking for availability
C. Describing each item
B. Explaining pricing policy
D. Obtaining customer's name
SE:835/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
94. Shari wants to make sure that she knows which customers orders she is taking on the
telephone, which one of the first steps in processing incoming telephone orders would help?
A. Checking for availability
B. Explaining pricing policy
C. Describing each item
D. Obtaining customer's name
SE:835/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam
95. What is usually an important step in processing a customer's telephone order?
A. Asking personal questions
C. Checking product availability
B. Calculating gross profit
D. Ending the call quickly
SE:835/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
96. A 589-pound shipment is sent by motor freight at a rate of $11.56 per 100 pounds. What are the
shipping charges?
A. $68.09
C. $66.08
B. $67.08
D. $69.09
SE:116/2.11
97. A customer purchased dining room furniture that retails for $750.00 at 33% off. The sales tax rate is
5%, and delivery is $25. What is the total cost of the purchase?
A. $527.50
C. $527.63
B. $553.88
D. $552.63
SE:116/2.11
98.
How much should be charged to ship a 47-pound package to California from Utah based on the
delivery chart provided?
Weight
Not to
Exceed
Letter
1 lb
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
48
States
12
$ 5.75
6.00
7.00
7.75
8.25
9.00
10.25
11.50
12.75
14.00
15.25
ZONES
*Alaska
Puerto
& Hawaii
Rico
14
15
$ 9.00
$ 8.50
10.25
9.75
11.50
11.25
12.75
12.75
14.00
14.25
15.25
15.50
16.75
16.75
18.25
18.00
19.75
19.25
21.25
20.50
22.75
21.75
*Alaska
(Rural)
16
$ 12.50
20.25
22.25
24.00
24.75
25.50
26.25
27.25
28.50
29.75
31.00
Weight
Not to
Exceed
41 lbs
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
48
States
12
$ 48.75
50.00
51.00
52.00
53.00
54.25
55.25
56.50
57.50
58.50
ZONES
*Alaska
Puerto
& Hawaii
Rico
14
15
*Alaska
(Rural)
16
$ 60.25
61.25
62.25
63.25
64.00
64.75
65.50
66.25
67.00
68.00
$66.25
67.25
68.25
69.50
70.50
71.50
72.25
73.00
74.00
75.00
$57.25
58.25
59.25
60.25
61.25
62.25
63.25
64.25
65.25
66.25
A. $72.25
C. $65.50
B. $63.25
D. $55.25
SE:116/2.11
99. How much should be charged to ship a 42-pound package to Puerto Rico from North Carolina based on
the delivery chart provided?
A. $50.00
C. $61.25
B. $58.25
D. $67.25
SE:116/2.11
100. How much should be charged to ship a 10-pound package to Hawaii from New Jersey based on the
delivery chart provided?
A. $15.25
B. $21.75
SE:116/2.11
C. $22.75
D. $31.00
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
1. B
New personnel regulations. Most businesses prepare a variety of internal reports that are intended to
inform employees about changes in policies and procedures. These internal reports often explain new
personnel regulations. If employees analyze the reports, they will be able to understand and comply
with the new personnel policies and procedures. Businesses do not share customer profiles with all
employees. Internal business reports concerning policies and procedures usually do not explain
industry research data or list former local competitors.
SOURCE: CO:057/1.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Locker, K.O., & Kaczmarek, S.K. (2007). Business Communication: Building critical skills
(3rd ed.) [p. 307]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
2. C
The use of company property. Businesses often develop employee handbooks, which provide
information about their general policies and procedures. Employee handbooks are usually given to new
employees when they are hired. Employee handbooks usually provide information about overtime and
vacation policies, disciplinary and grievance procedures, pay schedules, dress codes, and behavioral
expectations in its employee handbook. Many employee handbooks include information about
employees and their personal use of company property. Company-property issues that the handbook
might address include making personal long-distance phone calls on the company phone and using the
office copy machine or laser printer for non-business purposes. Lists of the company's current job
openings and personal information about vacation days are usually available through the humanresources department, and are not included in the employee handbook. Additionally, the company's
annual report is not usually included in the employee handbook. Often, corporations post their annual
reports on the company's web site.
SOURCE: CO:057/1.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: SmallBusinessNotes.com. (n.d.). Employee handbook. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.smallbusinessnotes.com/managing-your-business/employee-handbook.html
3. A
State provided
2.02
4. A
Make sure the mistake is corrected. The customer wants you to resolve the problem. To do this, you
must find solutions and correct the mistake without getting as upset as the customer, being defensive,
or placing blame. You must find out what happened so that you know what to do next. Calling the
customer's supervisor is inappropriate. You should look at this problem as an opportunity to discover
how you can improve your customer-service skills.
SOURCE: CR:004/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (pp. 50-51). Mason, OH: South-Western.
5. B
Devote their full attention to customers. Maintaining a customer-service mindset requires employees to
set their minds on customers. They should not become distracted by other things around them, such as
songs on the radio, conversations with coworkers, the amount of work piling up on their desks, or what
they will be doing after work or during breaks. Distractions turn their focus away from customers and
prevent them from providing quality service.
SOURCE: CR:004/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (pp. 118-120). Mason, OH: SouthWestern.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
6. B
By requesting input through employee and customer surveys. Service-oriented companies are
generally committed to providing exceptional service levels. Service-oriented companies are always
looking for ways to improve their service levels. Requesting feedback from employees and customers
regarding service levels is one way businesses can evaluate and improve service. Testimonials are
statements by identified users of a product proclaiming the benefits received from the use of a product.
Distributing testimonials, evaluating product development procedures, and conducting a feasibility
analysis are not methods that businesses generally use to improve their service levels.
SOURCE: CR:005/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Rokes, B. (2002). Customer service: Business 2000 (p. 139). Mason, OH: South-Western.
7. B
Builds positive relationships with customers. A service orientation is the business philosophy of
providing quality service. One way to do this is to communicate effectively with customers so they trust
the business. The benefit of creating trust by providing accurate and credible information is that it tends
to build positive relationships with customers. Customers often remain loyal to a business if they have
confidence that the business will treat them well and provide quality service. The purpose of reinforcing
service orientation through communication is not to promote the sale of new products, reward
customers for their support, or encourage employees to be aggressive.
SOURCE: CR:005/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Weitz, B.A., Castleberry, S.B., & Tanner, J.F. (2007). Selling: Building partnerships (6th ed.)
[pp. 40-41]. New York: McGraw-Hill.
8. D
Make sure you clearly understand customers' inquiries. Customers' inquiries are not always phrased in
such a way that employees can easily determine what customers want to know. Employees should find
out exactly what the customers are asking in order to give them the most accurate answers. Inquiries
should be handled as courteously as sales, which means spending whatever time is needed to answer
them. In many cases, it would be inappropriate to try to sell something to a customer who asks a
question. Employees who are busy with a sale can often take a moment to answer a single question for
another customer without being rude to the first customer. If the second customer has additional
questions, s/he should be asked to wait until you can give those questions your full attention.
SOURCE: CR:006/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Bovée, C.L., & Thill, J.V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.) [pp. 225-226].
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
9. D
State provided
2.02
10. B
Ask the customers when it would be convenient to call them. When employees must gather information
requested by customers and call them later, the employees should ask the customers when the
customers would like to be called. The call should be scheduled to suit the customers' convenience, not
that of the business. The employees should explain that the information is not available at the moment
but will be obtained. Explaining how much effort will be required to obtain the information sounds like a
complaint about the customers' request. Employees should make sure that they follow through on their
promise of a return call, rather than asking customers to call back if they don't receive a call.
SOURCE: CR:006/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: United Concordia. (n.d.). Enhanced customer service experiences. Retrieved May 18,
2011, from http://www.tricaredentalprogram.com/tdptws/info/enhanced_tools.jsp
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
11. A
Offend the clients. Businesspeople should try to learn as much as they can about a client's culture,
customs, and social values. By understanding and being aware of cultural differences, businesspeople
can adapt their communication styles to make a positive impression on their clients, earn their clients'
trust, and persuade their clients to buy. Businesspeople who adapt their communication styles are
aware of actions that a particular client might view as hospitable, as well as behaviors that the client
might find offensive. Offensive behaviors can hinder the ability to build long-term relationships with
international clients.
SOURCE: CR:019/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Buckler, C., & Moore, K. (n.d.). Module 3: Cross-cultural communication. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.ookpik.org/pdf/cross_cultural_coms.pdf
12. A
State provided
2.02
13. D
Being patient, flexible and empathetic. So that businesspeople don't do something that will offend their
clients, they should adapt their communication styles with clients from different cultures. To develop
positive relationships with international clients, businesspeople should try to learn as much as they can
about their clients' cultures, customs, and social values. Adapting communication styles requires
businesspeople to be patient, flexible, empathetic, respectful, confident (but not overly so), honest
(transparent), and sensitive to their clients' cultures and customs. Projecting biased, demanding,
manipulative, or indifferent attitudes may offend the clients.
SOURCE: CR:019/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Buckler, C., & Moore, K. (n.d.). Module 3: Cross-cultural communication. Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://www.ookpik.org/pdf/cross_cultural_coms.pdf
14. C
Nature of the business. A business's policies must be appropriate for the type of business. For
example, a policy that might be appropriate for an investment business might be inappropriate for a
hardware store. Not all business policies are written, and it would not be necessary to display them.
The personal preferences of management should not be a consideration. Employees who lack good
communication skills can receive training that will improve their skills in communicating policies to
customers.
SOURCE: CR:007/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Rue, L.W., & Byars, L.L. (2006). Business management: Real-world applications and
connections (pp. 241-242). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
15. B
To make sure the business's actions are consistent. Business policies keep the day-to-day operations
running smoothly and consistently. Policies ensure that employees will handle the same situations in
the same manner, rather than making decisions regarding each customer, because the policies provide
guidelines for employees to follow. Business policies cannot ensure profits. Policies usually set rules for
exchanges of goods, but they do not encourage customers to make exchanges frequently.
SOURCE: CR:007/2.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Rue, L.W., & Byars, L.L. (2006). Business management: Real-world applications and
connections (pp. 241-242). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
16. C
Listen patiently and try to stay calm. In order to keep the channel of communication open, the employee
must remain calm and courteous. S/He should listen carefully to the individual and give him/her plenty
of time to say what s/he feels. Proving someone else is wrong seldom improves a situation and may
make it worse. Speeding up the sale is not an effective way to deal with disagreeable individuals and
may even make them more disagreeable.
SOURCE: CR:009/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: CR LAP 3—Making Mad Glad (Handling Difficult Customers)
17. C
State provided
2.05
18. C
Slow/Methodical. Slow/Methodical customers require a lot of time to make a purchase because of
shyness or difficulty in making a choice or buying decision. Disagreeable customers are unpleasant and
hard to help because they are argumentative, complaining, irritable/moody, insulting, impatient, and/or
have a leave-me-alone attitude. Dishonest customers intentionally attempt to avoid paying part or all of
the cost of a good or service. Suspicious customers question everything and may want facts and proof
before being convinced that something is true.
SOURCE: CR:009/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: CR LAP 3—Making Mad Glad (Handling Difficult Customers)
19. D
Loss of sales. When customer complaints are handled improperly, the salesperson stands to lose the
customer's current and future purchases. In addition, the unhappy customer often expresses the
dissatisfaction to friends, to relatives, and to coworkers. This can also result in loss of sales. Only in
rare cases would additional advertising be used to respond to customer complaints since most
businesses would prefer that complaints not be made public. Markup on inventory is a routine
procedure not connected to customer complaints. Higher commissions would be a cost associated with
increased sales.
SOURCE: CR:010/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (p. 51). Mason, OH: South-Western.
20. B
Product quality. Poor quality products that do not perform properly or break are a common cause for
complaint. Other causes include the business itself, its policies, and its personnel. Price reductions are
usually pleasing to customers. Extended hours give customers more time to shop. Institutional ads
promote the image of the business and are not likely to be the subject of complaints.
SOURCE: CR:010/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (p. 51). Mason, OH: South-Western.
21. C
Restate the complaint. Restating the complaint involves putting the customer's complaint into your own
words. Including all relevant facts when you restate the complaint helps to ensure that you fully
understand the customer's complaint. This also provides the customer an opportunity to correct any
errors in your understanding of the problem. Explaining company policy and taking action should be
done after you restate the complaint. Thanking the customer for bringing the problem to your attention
helps to calm the customer's anger.
SOURCE: CR:010/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (pp. 52-54). Mason, OH: South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
22.
C
State provided
2.05
23.
B
Yes, because the salesperson does not have an opportunity to handle the complaint. Salespeople are
not able to satisfy noncomplainers because they do not express their dissatisfaction to anyone
associated with the business. They do, however, express ill feelings to friends, to relatives, and to
coworkers. In this way, they create a poor image of the business. Because of this, they are a much
bigger problem than complainers. Once salespeople know the source of customer complaints, they can
seek ways to satisfy the complainers within company guidelines.
SOURCE: CR:010/2.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (pp. 22-25). Mason, OH: South-Western.
24. A
Making a brand promise. A brand promise is a business's agreement, spoken or unspoken, with
customers that it will consistently meet their expectations and deliver on its brand characteristics and
values. In the example, the brand promise is to provide all customers with quick, courteous service.
Developing a campaign platform, stating industry policies, and establishing product position are not
activities in which a business is making a pledge or promise to customers.
SOURCE: CR:001/2.07
SOURCE: Ubrander. (2006, August 31). How do I create a brand marketing plan? Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://ubrander.wordpress.com/2006/08/31/how-do-i-create-a-brand-marketingplan/
25. A
State provided
CR:001/2.07
26. A
Lose credibility. A brand promise is a business's agreement, spoken or unspoken, with customers that it
will consistently meet their expectations and deliver on its brand characteristics and values. An example
of a brand promise is a large company that pledges to deliver backorders within 24 hours. If the
company consistently fails to deliver backorders within 24 hours, customers are likely to become upset,
which may cause the company to lose its credibility. A business that loses credibility with its customers
tends to lose sales and market share because its customers will likely find new sources to fulfill their
needs. Liability refers to a debt, (e.g., money), that the company owes and does not always affect a
company's ability to fulfill its brand promise.
SOURCE: CR:001/2.07
SOURCE: Ubrander. (2006, August 31). How do I create a brand marketing plan? Retrieved May 17,
2011, from http://ubrander.wordpress.com/2006/08/31/how-do-i-create-a-brand-marketingplan/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
27. C
Jack politely asks if his customer would like a beverage while s/he waits for car service. The manner in
which employees perform their tasks is an important factor that affects how customers view a business.
When an employee is polite and asks a customer if s/he would like a beverage while waiting for service,
the employee is reinforcing a positive view or image of the business. On the other hand, placing a
customer on hold, especially if it happens often, might anger the customer and reinforce a negative
image of the business. There is not enough information to determine if preparing a newsletter or telling
a customer that an item is only available by special order is reinforcing or creating a certain image.
SOURCE: CR:002/2.07
SOURCE: Odgers, P. (2004). The world of customer service (pp. 6-7). Mason, OH: South-Western.
28. A
Requiring employees to respond to customer inquiries within 24 hours. A business's employees can
have a dramatic impact on the ways in which customers view the business. If one customer has a poor
experience with one employee, that customer often develops a poor attitude about the entire business.
And, that customer often shares those negative opinions with others. Therefore, a business should take
steps to ensure that its employees understand how their actions affect the business's image.
Businesses often develop policies to ensure that employees are engaging in behaviors that support the
company's image. Because WNJ wants to project an image of being responsive to its customers'
needs, it developed a policy that employees must respond to inquiries within 24 hours. This may
include a quick phone call just to tell the customer that the business is working on a problem or issue.
Requiring signed timecards is a personnel policy rather than a way to reinforce the business's public
image. Although clean uniforms can affect the business's image, the uniforms do not indicate how
responsive the business is in meeting its customers' needs. Because individuals often have different
perspectives about excellent service, it is not a good idea to allow employees to set their own service
standards.
SOURCE: CR:002/2.07
SOURCE: Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2008). Principles of marketing (12th ed.) [pp. 222, 244-245].
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
29. A
To develop new products. Businesses need to obtain and analyze a wide variety of marketing
information in order to make decisions for the future. One way that businesses use this information is to
develop new products and improve existing products in order to satisfy customers' needs. In order to
make marketing decisions that will keep them competitive, businesses are constantly gathering
information about customers' preferences and why customers buy certain products. Businesses do not
use marketing information to prepare sales invoices. Businesses obtain marketing information in order
to monitor economic trends, but they are not able to change those trends. Credit scoring is a function of
finance that helps a company determine a customer's credit worthiness.
SOURCE: IM:012/1.05
SOURCE: Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 170-171].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
30. B
Identify problems. Marketing information is data available inside (internal) and outside (external) the
business. Internal marketing information that businesses monitor include inventory reports, customers'
sales records, customers' feedback from surveys, etc. Comparing current and past marketing
information can often reveal problems, such as a sudden drop in sales of a particular product. A drop in
sales may indicate that the business needs to provide new or improved products or increase
promotional efforts. Businesses need to review various forms of external marketing information to
effectively investigate competitors, evaluate market share, and analyze economic changes.
SOURCE: IM:012/1.05
SOURCE: Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2008). Principles of marketing (12th ed.) [p. 98]. Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
31. C
To improve the effectiveness of salespeople. Sales reports contain a variety of marketing information
that businesses often use to improve the effectiveness of salespeople. This includes information about
number of new customers, number of lost customers, cost of selling, time spent with each customer,
etc. By reviewing the information, a business can determine if the salesperson is effective, or might
need assistance or more training to be better able to market the business's products to customers. For
example, a sales call report might reveal that customers want detailed product information that the
salesperson does not have. Then, the business can develop materials to provide the detailed
information. This will help the salesperson to more effectively work with customers. Businesses do not
use the marketing information contained in sales reports to qualify potential new customers or to
develop negotiating techniques. Expense accounts are types of sales reports that often contain
marketing information.
SOURCE: IM:184/1.05
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 594).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
32. A
Popular products. A business that monitors its sales and customers' buying habits over time can
determine which products are popular and which products are not selling. By knowing which products
are moving well and not so well, the business can make informed decisions about its product mix. For
example, a business may decide to offer popular products in other colors or sizes, or it may decide to
delete slow-moving items from its product mix. Research methods are the ways in which a business
obtains marketing information. Economic resources are the human and natural resources and capital
goods used to produce goods and services. Monitoring its sales and its customers' buying habits will
not help the business identify research methods, economic resources, or competitors' activities.
SOURCE: IM:184/1.05
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 640, 742).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
33. A
State provided
1.05
34. D
Quarterly inventory status. By monitoring inventory, a business can determine how well a product is
selling. If the status report indicates that the inventory for the item is turning slowly, then the business
knows that sales are down. By monitoring the inventory status report over time, the business might
decide to drop items from the product line that are not selling. Accounts-payable reports summarize
data related to monies that the business owes others. An income statement is a financial summary that
shows how much money the business has made or lost over a certain period of time. A demographics
analysis provides a business with information about a market segment's physical and social
characteristics (e.g., age, gender, education). An accounts-payable summary, an annual income
statement, and a market demographics analysis will not indicate changes in a product's sales.
SOURCE: IM:184/1.05
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 510-515).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
35. C
Customers' product preferences. Internal records provide businesses with information about their
customers' buying habits and product usage. By reviewing inventory reports, a business can determine
which products are selling well and which products are moving slowly. This information may prompt the
business to phase out the slow moving product and increase promotional efforts for the products that
are selling well. Customers' invoices provide information about an individual customer's buying
preferences and habits. For example, invoices might reveal that certain customers buy a certain
quantity of a particular product four times a month. By knowing this type of information, the business
can customize promotions for its customers and take steps to ensure that it has sufficient product on
hand when it is needed. Financial reports provide information about customers' credit status and limits.
Customer invoices do not provide information about a product's level of quality. Businesses need to
analyze industry and competitors' data and compare them with internal data to evaluate its market
share.
SOURCE: IM:184/1.05
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 594-595).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
36. A
Offer products that consumers want to buy. Businesses that implement the customer-orientation
element of the marketing concept base their decision making on customer wants and needs. They
determine what customers want and offer that, rather than deciding on their own what they want to sell.
Promotional activities help the business to persuade customers to buy. Providing more products than
consumers need would not benefit a business. Having a customer orientation does not coordinate a
business's marketing activities.
SOURCE: MK:001/1.01
SOURCE: MK LAP 4—Have It Your Way! (Nature of Marketing)
37. C
Improved the quality of life. Marketing has improved the quality of life by encouraging the development
of safer, better goods and services. In addition, marketing has increased awareness of the need for
environmental controls to protect our physical surroundings, which has led to an improvement in our
existence. Making people aware of the need for environmental controls does not add usefulness to
products or make buying more convenient, although those are other benefits of marketing. Marketing
does not regulate the standard of living but usually helps to raise it by improving the general conditions
in which people live.
SOURCE: MK:001/1.01
SOURCE: MK LAP 4—Have It Your Way! (Nature of Marketing)
38.
C
State provided
1.01
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
39.
C
Setting aside funds to research what customers want. Company commitment involves everyone in the
organization embracing the marketing concept and putting customers' interests first. One way to
demonstrate a commitment to the marketing concept is to set aside money to fund the research needed
to develop a product according to customers' wishes. Leaving marketing to the marketing department
prevents the rest of the company from being involved in marketing. Teaching marketing to college
marketing students is honorable, but it does not demonstrate the marketing concept's theme of
company commitment. Pricing a product to maximize profitability per item allows the company to earn
as much money as it can, but customers may not be willing to purchase the product at that high of a
price. Pricing a product to maximize profitability per item puts the company's interests before the
customers', which goes against the marketing concept.
SOURCE: MK:001/1.01
SOURCE: MK LAP 4—Have It Your Way! (Nature of Marketing)
DELETE 40.
A
Market planning. Market planning is a marketing function that addresses the principles and tools used
to determine and to target marketing strategies to a select audience. Risk management is not a
marketing function. Promotion involves communicating information about goods, services, images,
and/or ideas to achieve a desired outcome. Channel management is the processes by which marketers
ensure that products are distributed to customers efficiently and effectively.
SOURCE: MK:002/1.01
SOURCE: MK LAP 1—Work the Big Six (Marketing Functions)
DELET 41.
A
State provided
1.01
42. B
Product/Service management. This is a marketing function that involves obtaining, developing,
maintaining, and improving a product or service mix in response to market opportunities. This includes
selecting products that help to promote a certain image for the business. Selling is a marketing function
that involves determining client needs and wants and responding through planned, personalized
communication that influences purchase decisions and enhances future business opportunities.
Promotion is a marketing function that communicates information about goods, services, images,
and/or ideas to achieve a desired outcome. Channel management is the processes by which marketers
ensure that products are distributed to customers efficiently and effectively.
SOURCE: MK:002/1.01
SOURCE: MK LAP 1—Work the Big Six (Marketing Functions)
43. B
State provided
1.01
44. C
Contacting customers. The selling function is very important because it involves contact with
customers. If customers are not satisfied with the sales experience, they often will not buy even if they
need the product and the price is right. The selling function does not necessarily involve displaying
products, setting high prices, or feedback from vendors.
SOURCE: MK:002/1.01
SOURCE: MK LAP 1—Work the Big Six (Marketing Functions)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
45. B
Achieving planned goals. The business's goals and strategies for achieving those goals may change
frequently. Changing the business's image, increasing its profits, or improving management techniques
might be specific goals at any point in time.
SOURCE: MP:001/1.04
SOURCE: MP LAP 2—Pick the Mix (Nature of Marketing Strategies)
46. A
Product. Before a company introduces a new product, it should determine if there is a market for the
product. The investors should first determine if there is a market for a new type of tennis ball before
creating a company. After product is considered, the investors would have to think about how to price
the new ball, where and how it should be promoted, how to ship the product, and where it should be
sold.
SOURCE: MP:001/1.04
SOURCE: MP LAP 2—Pick the Mix (Nature of Marketing Strategies)
47. A
State provided
1.04
48. A
Tactic. Because e-mailing the coupon is a specific action to increase short-term sales, it is a marketing
tactic. Marketing tactics are used to carry out the business's marketing strategies, which are broader in
scope and serve as “road maps” to achieve the business's marketing goals. A trend is the general
direction in which people or events are moving. Businesses evaluate trends when setting marketing
objectives, determining marketing strategies, and executing marketing tactics.
SOURCE: MP:001/1.04
SOURCE: MP LAP 2—Pick the Mix (Nature of Marketing Strategies)
49. A
State provided
1.04
50. C
No, she is not financially able to purchase the Ferrari. To be part of a market, the customer must have
an unfulfilled desire and be financially able and willing to satisfy that desire. Sue lacks the financial
ability to purchase a Ferrari.
SOURCE: MP:003/1.04
SOURCE: IM LAP 9—Have We Met? (Market Identification)
51. A
Geographic. Geographic segmentation groups people by the areas in which they are located. This
includes customers in cold climates. Occupations are a basis for demographic segmentation.
Psychographic segmentation groups people by lifestyles and personalities. Behavioral segmentation
groups people by their response to a product.
SOURCE: MP:003/1.04
SOURCE: IM LAP 9—Have We Met? (Market Identification)
52. B
State provided
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
1.04
53. C
By demographics. Demographics are the physical and social characteristics of the population. A
business that segments the market on the basis of demographics considers factors such as the age,
gender, and ethnicity of the population. Psychographic segmentation is the division of a market on the
basis of consumers' lifestyles and personalities, which are influenced by their behavior. Geographic
segmentation involves dividing a market on the basis of location (e.g., zip code).
SOURCE: MP:003/1.04
SOURCE: IM LAP 9—Have We Met? (Market Identification)
54. A
It enables customers to buy without having to inspect each product. The use of grades and standards
speeds up the buying and selling process because customers can buy without having to inspect each
product. It also furnishes information that salespeople can use to justify price, to sell benefits, and to
meet customer needs. The use of grades and standards enables salespeople to recommend products
that best meet customer needs. Although grades and standards provide product information, they do
not address unsafe products. Unsafe products should not be offered since they are a business liability.
Product prices will vary based on the product's grade. Therefore, the prices will not necessarily be high.
SOURCE: PM:019/2.06
SOURCE: PM LAP 8—Raise the Bar (Grades and Standards)
55. D
To promote product safety. Many professional organizations develop standards for their members to
follow in order to promote safety. These specifications guarantee that the materials used to make
goods, or the goods themselves, meet certain standards for safety. The safety standards also benefit
customers who are ensured of purchasing safe goods. Professional organizations do not develop
standards in order to promote their activities, to create influence, or to establish control.
SOURCE: PM:019/2.06
SOURCE: PM LAP 8—Raise the Bar (Grades and Standards)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
56. A
A customer buys a toaster and assumes it will toast bread. An implied warranty is an unwritten warranty
understood by the consumer and the seller that the product will perform as expected. The television
carries a guarantee—a promise made by the seller to refund the consumer's purchase price if the
product does not perform as expected. The other alternatives are examples of express warranties that
are either written or expressed verbally.
SOURCE: PM:020/2.06
SOURCE: PM LAP 4—Promises, Promises (Warranties and Guarantees)
57.
D
State provided
2.06
58.
A
Express. An express warranty is a promise expressed in a specific statement concerning the quality of
the product. It may be in written or oral form. An implied warranty is an unwritten warranty that is
understood by the consumer and the seller that the product will perform as expected. Not enough
information is given to determine the extent of the promise; therefore, we do not know whether the
promise covered all repairs (a full warranty) or only specific parts of the product (limited warranty).
SOURCE: PM:020/2.06
SOURCE: PM LAP 4—Promises, Promises (Warranties and Guarantees)
59.
C
To protect the producer and the seller. A purpose of warranties and guarantees is to protect the
producer and the seller. Producers and sellers are protected by well-written warranties and guarantees
because the irresponsibilities to the consumer are clearly defined. The customer is informed at the
time of the purchase of the way in which any problems will be handled. This helps to prevent
purchasers from making unreasonable claims against producers or sellers. Reduced anxiety about
purchases is a customer benefit received from warranties and guarantees. Benefits to the business
from warranties and guarantees include attaining a customer-oriented focus for the business and
obtaining feedback from customers.
SOURCE: PM:020/2.06
SOURCE: PM LAP 4—Promises, Promises (Warranties and Guarantees)
60. C
Product liability. Harrison Stroller Company will be held responsible for any injuries the product caused
the children. Product liability refers to the producer's responsibility for any injury that the business's
product may cause. Product deletion involves removing a product from the product line. Instead of
removing the stroller from its product line, Harrison may decide to improve the stroller's safety by
making changes to the product, which may involve issuing a product recall to fix or replace the faulty
strollers. Consumer protection involves all the efforts to safeguard consumers from any kind of injury
they might suffer in the process of purchasing and/or using consumer products. The Consumer Product
Safety Act was passed in 1972. It gave the Consumer Product Safety Commission jurisdiction over the
safety of consumer products.
SOURCE: PM:017/3.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Meyer, E.C., & Allen, K.R. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management
(pp. 167-168). New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
61. B
Product recall. Lakeview Manufacturing should alert the public and recall all the consumer tuna-fish
products that were improperly labeled. Product recall is the removal from the marketplace of a product
that is defective or hazardous to consumers. Product liability refers to the producer's responsibility for
any injury that the business's product may cause. Guarantee is a promise to the consumer that a
product's purchase price will be refunded if the product is not satisfactory. It is often called a moneyback guarantee. Warranty is a promise to the purchaser that a product will be repaired or replaced if it
proves to be defective.
SOURCE: PM:017/3.02 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: BNET. (2009). Product recall. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://dictionary.bnet.com/definition/product+recall.html
62. B
To promote one-stop shopping. A business with a broad product mix offers many product lines. This
provides them many opportunities to make sales, allows them to appeal to consumers with a variety of
needs, promotes one-stop shopping, and often reduces the costs of the goods they buy for resale.
Assuring that product lines are related refers to consistency. The use of a narrow product mix helps a
business relate its products to the target market. The use of a broad product mix does not decrease
legal liabilities. In fact, its use may increase legal liabilities since the business is responsible for a larger
variety of product lines.
SOURCE: PM:003/3.03
SOURCE: PM LAP 3—Mix & Match (Nature of the Product Mix)
63. A
To keep up with changing consumer preferences. Customers' attitudes toward products change over
time, and their preference for a product may change. Altering the product in some way can renew
customers' interest. Making room for other products is a reason for using the contraction strategy. By
adding products to the product mix, businesses are able to spread risk over a wider area. A limitation to
the alteration strategy is that businesses cannot predict the success of altered products.
SOURCE: PM:003/3.03
SOURCE: PM LAP 3—Mix & Match (Nature of the Product Mix)
64. D
Learn the features unique to the brands s/he sells. Typically, all products have unique features with
which the salesperson should be familiar. Not all products have related items. Asking management to
limit the number of brands the business carries would indicate the salesperson is not willing to learn
about other brands. It is a better selling technique to point out the advantages of the brands you sell
than to describe the disadvantages of competing brands.
SOURCE: SE:017/2.01
SOURCE: SE LAP 117—Sell Away (The Nature and Scope of Selling)
65. C
Joe, because he will get more repeat business. In the long run, Joe will be more successful because he
makes a sincere effort to satisfy the customer's needs, which will establish repeat clients. He will not
establish repeat clients just because he is nice. Joe is not too timid to close a sale; he just has the
customer's best interests in mind. Because sales situations differ, attempts to close a sale do not
always result in a sale. Carol may get more sales initially, but will probably have very little repeat
business.
SOURCE: SE:017/2.01
SOURCE: SE LAP 117—Sell Away (The Nature and Scope of Selling)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
66. C
Live up to their promises. An important part of providing quality customer service involves salespeople
doing what they say they will do. By living up to their promises, salespeople will be able to maintain
good relationships with existing customers. Customers will know that they can rely on salespeople and
that they will receive the service and support that they need. Breaking promises is a sure way to lose
valuable customers. Businesses sometimes use customers in advertisements but that is not a way of
maintaining good relationships. Salespeople often ask for referrals from customers with whom they
have good relationships, but asking for referrals does not maintain the relationships. It is usually
considered inappropriate to send customers expensive gifts that may be misinterpreted as bribes.
SOURCE: SE:076/2.01
SOURCE: Futrell, C. M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through service (9th ed.)
[pp. 458-459]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
67. B
Calling to make sure the products are satisfactory. Following up with customers is one way to provide
good service and develop strong relationships. There are several effective follow-up activities and one
is to call customers to make sure the products are satisfactory. Customers appreciate knowing that their
business is important and that salespeople care enough to call to check on the products they sell.
Salespeople who follow up usually create goodwill, and develop strong relationships with customers
who often continue to buy from the salespeople. Asking for referrals is a way of identifying potential new
customers. Salespeople usually do not explain the company's business plan. Salespeople might follow
up by sending information about the company and new products, but they would not send articles about
local competitors.
SOURCE: SE:076/2.01
SOURCE: Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics: Teacher's edition (2nd ed.)
[p. 612]. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.
68.
B
State provided
2.01
69.
A
Providing ample product information. Providing ample product information is a pre-sale opportunity for
salespeople to provide customer service. Successful salespeople make sure that customers have all
the information they need to make sound, well-informed decisions. This occurs during the sales
presentation. Shipping and delivery, maintenance and repair, and technical assistance and support are
all post-sale aspects of customer service.
SOURCE: SE:076/2.01
SOURCE: SE LAP 130—Go Beyond the Sale (Customer Service in Selling)
70.
D
Follow the business's selling policies. Selling policies are the general rules set down by management to
guide the personal-selling effort, and they include service policies that are designed to govern the
support a company provides to customers after the sale. Policies governing the return of goods are
covered under a business's selling policies. A salesperson should know the accepted procedure for
handling returns and not refer the customer to the manufacturer or consult the buyer. The customer
may not want to exchange the item but obtain a credit or refund.
SOURCE: SE:932/2.03
SOURCE: Greene, C. (2003). Selling: Business 2000 (pp. 350-351). Mason, OH: South-Western.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
71. C
Financial resources. Financial resources are categorized as an internal factor over which a business
has some control. If a firm has limited financial resources, its selling policies may contain strict
requirements for credit approval. Actions of competitors, government legislation, and customer requests
are examples of external factors operating in the business environment over which the business has
little or no control.
SOURCE: SE:932/2.03
SOURCE: Rue, L.W., & Byars, L.L. (2006). Business management: Real-world applications and
connections (pp. 241-242). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
72. A
How the product is made. Manufacturers' representatives can provide salespeople with detailed
information about the manufacturing process. They can explain why certain materials and procedures
are used. Salespeople who understand how products are made are better able to pass on this
information to customers and encourage them to buy. The salesperson's company would decide what
type of credit terms to make available and what inventory method to use. A manufacturer's
representative might not know how a product became popular.
SOURCE: SE:062/2.08
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 266, 268).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
73. D
Ask an available, experienced employee. Experienced employees such as coworkers, supervisors, or
buyers are generally willing to help new employees by sharing product information. This enables the
new salesperson to serve customers more effectively and to give accurate answers to their questions.
Salespeople who tell their customers to contact the manufacturer are not providing good customer
service. New salespeople should not make excuses for their lack of knowledge or try to help customers
without having the right information.
SOURCE: SE:062/2.08
SOURCE: Anderson, R.E., & Dubinsky, A.J. (2004). Personal selling: Achieving customer satisfaction
and loyalty (p. 311). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
74.
D
State provided
2.08
75.
D
Provides a quick reference to the salesperson about the product. In creating the feature-benefit chart, a
salesperson can be better prepared in the selling process. Preparing a chart will help salespeople
remember the features and benefits and should aid in developing meaningful selling sentences. A
feature-benefit chart does not help a salesperson to determine which features and benefits appeal to
each customer, evaluate customer reaction to the sales presentation, or explain the business's
compensation rate.
SOURCE: SE:109/2.08
SOURCE: SE LAP 113—Find Features, Boost Benefits (Feature-Benefit Selling)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
76. B
Pre-installed software saves money. Customers buy benefits; they do not buy features. Therefore,
salespeople must be able to translate the features of their products into benefits. Explaining to a
customer that the pre-installed software on a computer will save money is an example of pointing out
benefits. The feature is the pre-installed software, but the benefit is the savings. Features of a computer
might include a nonglare monitor screen, print capability, and models available in many colors.
SOURCE: SE:109/2.08
SOURCE: SE LAP 113—Find Features, Boost Benefits (Feature-Benefit Selling)
77. D
What's in it for me? A benefit is the personal satisfaction or advantage that a customer wants from a
technical product. It is how a feature helps a particular buyer. For customers, it answers the question of
"What's in it for me?" An example is explaining that the benefit of GPS tracking systems is that they
provide directions so drivers reach their destinations without getting lost. Explaining features answers
the question of "What is it?" Explaining the benefits of a technical product does not answer the
questions of "What is the price?" and "What is the warranty?"
SOURCE: SE:109/2.08
SOURCE: SE LAP 113—Find Features, Boost Benefits (Feature-Benefit Selling)
78.
D
State provided
2.08
79.
B
Suggesting a specific computer to the customer. After learning about the customer's needs, the next
step is to prescribe a solution (specific computer). The salesperson should be well informed about the
products s/he sells in order to suggest the most appropriate product. Price should be discussed as part
of prescribing a solution to the customer's need, but giving the customer a price list at this point would
disrupt the selling process. Making the customer feel relaxed and at ease is part of establishing a
relationship with the customer. The salesperson should not try to reach closure before a suitable
product has been recommended and demonstrated.
SOURCE: SE:048/2.09
SOURCE: Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics (2nd ed.) [pp. 590-591].
Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
80. C
Product and the client. The different phases of the selling process can be made more or less important
according to what kind of product is being sold and according to the client to whom it is being sold. The
part of the country in which the sale occurs, the economic situation at the time, and the state/local laws
would not affect the situation.
SOURCE: SE:048/2.09
SOURCE: SE LAP 126—Set Your Sales (The Selling Process)
81. B
First impressions are difficult to change. When customers receive a negative first impression from the
salesperson, it may become permanent. This often results in lost sales. Therefore, the salesperson
must attempt to make a positive first impression with customers and establish good rapport, or
understanding. This should include offering the customer whatever assistance might be needed since
customers do not usually like to ask for help.
SOURCE: SE:110/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 279).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
82. C
Acknowledge the second customer as soon as possible. All customers should be acknowledged as
soon as possible after entering the selling area. Even if the salesperson is busy with another customer,
some form of acknowledgement should be given. It may be a smile, a nod, or some other gesture to let
the waiting customer know that the salesperson is aware of his/her presence. It is not appropriate,
though, to leave the first customer until proper service has been provided and apologizing to the first
customer would not make it correct.
SOURCE: SE:110/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Ogden, J.R., & Ogden, D.T. (2005). Retailing: Integrated retail management (pp. 388-389).
Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
83. C
"Brand X is on sale today." This is an example of a merchandise approach—a comment or question
that helps direct the customer's attention to the merchandise. It usually refers to goods on display in
which the customer seems to be showing an interest. The other alternatives are different versions of the
greeting, or welcome, approach—a warm, friendly greeting that makes the customer feel welcome and
important.
SOURCE: SE:110/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 282).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
84. A
Use questioning statements. These are statements used to gain a response from the customer, but
they are not stated in question form. Asking questions at a slower or faster pace would not reduce the
number of questions. It is the salesperson's responsibility, not the customer's, to ask questions that will
help to determine the customer's needs.
SOURCE: SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Futrell, C.M. (2006). Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through service (9th ed.)
[p. 325]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
85. A
State provided
2.10
86.
D
Pace of the customer's responses to your questions. A customer who is quick to answer may be asked
more direct questions at a faster pace. A customer who is slow in answering questions may be
frustrated or become confused by your asking him/her questions too quickly. The number of other
customers waiting, the type of product being sold, or the amount of time left before the business closes
should have no bearing on treating the customer with courtesy and respect and making every attempt
to satisfy a need or want.
SOURCE: SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Four techniques when asking questions. (2010, December 29). Retrieved May 17, 2011,
from http://callcentertoday.com/callcentermagazine/2010/12/29/four-techniques-whenasking-questions/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
87. B
Ask impersonal questions. Salespeople should ask general questions because personal questions are
inappropriate. The number of questions should be limited. If asked too many questions, customers may
feel that the salesperson is trying to control or quiz them. The questions should be tailored to the type of
customer: decided, undecided, or just-looking. Customers should not feel compelled to answer
questions.
SOURCE: SE:111/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 285, 287).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
88. C
Comparable features. When recommending a substitute item, salespeople should point out the features
and benefits so that the customer can make a buying decision. Salespeople will need to tell the
customer how the features of the item are like those of the item requested. Customers usually will not
purchase substitute items unless they are comparable to the items originally requested. Exchange
policies are a business's guidelines for replacing goods with goods of an equal price. Fringe benefits
are nonmonetary payments that workers receive in addition to wages. Buying motives are customers'
reasons for buying goods or services.
SOURCE: SE:114/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 295).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
89. C
State provided
2.10
90. C
Criticized the original request. Customers may be insulted when sales representatives criticize the
requested item. Instead, the sales representative should have discussed the similarities between Ms.
Garcia's request and the suggested item. The sales representative suggested trading-up, rather than
down, to a more expensive scanner than requested. The sales representative should point out features
and benefits of products; however, the sales representative should not refer to an item as being a
substitute.
SOURCE: SE:114/2.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 295).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
91. D
Offer to call the printer's manufacturer to check availability and delivery dates. If the printer is in stock at
the manufacturer's location and can arrive when the customer needs it, the sales representative
provides extra service and possibly makes a sale. The customer wants to purchase a printer, not a
computer; offering free merchandise for purchasing an item that is not requested will not meet the
customer's needs. Taking the customer's telephone number and calling if the business decides to stock
the printer does not satisfy the customer's immediate need. Quite likely, the customer will purchase the
printer from another computer business that stocks the item. Recommending another computer
business is a final option. If the sales representative has tried and cannot meet the customer's needs, it
builds goodwill to let the customer know where the printer can be purchased. Chances are the
customer would be very appreciative for the information and may come back to the business when
making a purchase at another time.
SOURCE: SE:009/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: McCalla, P. (2005). Retailing (p. 242). Woodland Hills CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
92. A
Hold the item for the original customer, and offer to place an order for the new customer. It would not be
fair to the original customer to make him/her wait an additional amount of time to receive the special
order. Both current and prospective customers should be treated in a fair and honest manner. Offering
to order the item for the new customer is treating both customers in the same way. Customers do not
return to a business that, in their view, does not fulfill promises or tries to deceive them.
SOURCE: SE:009/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Berman, B., & Evans, J.R. (2004). Retail management: A strategic approach (9th ed.)
[p. 357]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
93. D
Obtaining customer's name. One of the first steps in processing an incoming telephone order usually
involves obtaining the customer's name. Many businesses that accept telephone orders maintain
computerized customer files. When a customer calls, an order processor obtains the name, types the
name into the computer, and accesses additional information, such as the mailing address. If a
business does not have a computerized file or the customer is new, the processor needs to obtain the
customer's name in order to begin the paperwork that will be needed to process the customer's order.
After order processors obtain a customer's name, they may describe each item being ordered, explain
the pricing policy, and check for availability.
SOURCE: SE:835/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics (2nd ed.) [pp. 567-568].
Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
94.
D
State provided
2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
95.
C
Checking product availability. When customers place telephone orders, the order processors should
make sure that the items are in stock and available. In most cases, order processors have access to
the business's computerized inventory and can quickly check on product availability. They can
immediately inform customers if their orders can be shipped or if the items they want are on back order
and will be shipped as soon as possible. Telephone order processors are concerned with correctly
handling a customer's order rather than ending the call quickly. Order processors calculate the total
amount of the order, not the gross profit. Telephone order processors should not ask customers
personal questions.
SOURCE: SE:835/2.12 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Clark, B., Sobel, J., & Basteri, C.G. (2010). Marketing dynamics (2nd ed.) [pp. 567-568].
Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
96. A
$68.09. To determine freight charges, divide the total weight by 100 to obtain the number of 100
pounds units present in the shipment (589 ÷ 100 = 5.89). Then, multiply this number by the rate per 100
pounds to obtain the shipping charges (5.89 x $11.56 = $68.088 rounded up to $68.09).
SOURCE: SE:116/2.11
SOURCE: Burton, S., & Shelton, N. (2005). Practical math applications (2nd ed.) [pp. 265-266]. Mason,
OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester One Exam Key
97. D
$552.63. To calculate the cost of the total purchase, first multiply the retail price by the discount to
determine the amount of discount ($750 x .33 = $247.50). Subtract the discount amount from the retail
price to determine the cost before tax ($750 - $247.50 = $502.50). Multiply the cost by the sales tax
rate to determine the amount of tax ($502.50 x 5% or .05 = $25.13). Add the cost, the sales tax, and the
delivery charge to determine the amount of the total purchase ($502.50 + $25.13 + $25.00 = $552.63).
SOURCE: SE:116/2.11
SOURCE: Burton, S., & Shelton, N. (2005). Practical math applications (2nd ed.) [pp. 279-280]. Mason,
OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
98.
99.
D
$55.25. Based on the shipping chart provided, it would cost $55.25 to ship a 47-pound package to
California from Utah. To determine this amount, locate the weight of the package and find the
appropriate shipping zone. In this case, the package is being shipped within the 48 states; therefore,
the cost is located in column 1. It would cost $65.50 to ship the package to Alaska and Hawaii, $63.25
to ship the package to Puerto Rico, and $72.25 to ship the package to a rural area in Alaska.
SOURCE: SE:116/2.11
SOURCE: Burton, S., & Shelton, N. (2005). Practical math applications (2nd ed.) [pp. 265-266]. Mason,
OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
B
State provided
2.11
100.
C
State provided
2.11
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
1. Five years after a new product has been introduced, sales begin to level off because customers are
purchasing the competitor's brand. What strategy would be most appropriate to use in this situation?
A. Take the product off the market
B. Do nothing; fluctuations in sales are common
C. Modify the product to renew customer interest
D. Triple the advertising budget for the product
PM:001/3.01
2. Why is the quality level of a product an important product/service management decision?
A. It identifies a product's brand.
C. It protects consumers.
B. It reflects the image of the business.
D. It refers to the way the product works.
PM:001/3.01
3. Which activity is addressed in the product/service management function?
A. Setting discounts to clear products from inventory
B. Determining where products will be offered for sale
C. Focusing promotional activities on a new-product release
D. Eliminating products that are slow sellers
PM:001/3.01
4. Which of the following is a way that a business can extend the life cycle of an established product?
A. By promoting the product to current users
C. By restricting distribution
B. By finding new uses for the product
D. By attracting consumers who are innovators
PM:024/3.01
5. Why does a company need to know what stage of the product life cycle its products are in?
A. To prevent imitators from entering the market C. To predict the length of the life cycle
B. To find new uses for the product
D. To adapt its marketing strategies
PM:024/3.01
6. Why might profits sometimes decline for the company that first introduced the product during the growth
stage of a product's life cycle?
A. Because sales decline in the growth stage
B. Because marketing strategies are adjusted
C. Because competitors have entered the market
D. Because production is more efficient
PM:024/3.01
7. What is a technologically advanced method that allows businesses to produce products that are
specialized for a very few customers?
A. Intermittent conversion
C. Computerized robotics
B. Automatic production
D. Mass customization
PM:039/3.01
8. What is one way businesses use computer technology to obtain information to improve their
product/service mix?
A. Mailing questionnaires to customers
C. Compiling detailed databases
B. Tracking visitors to their web sites
D. Preparing interactive software programs
PM:039/3.01
9. Which of the following technological tools helps a business's employees simultaneously access the
same information about the business's products?
A. Memory card
C. Intranet
B. Micro-portal
D. Generator
PM:039/3.01
10. What is an example of an ethical issue that a product/service manager might face?
A. Use of color on the label
C. Use of packaging as a means of promotion
B. Use of environmentally friendly packaging
D. Use of nutrition information on a food label
PM:040/3.01
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
11. Which of the following is an unethical situation in product/service management?
A. Vincent Electronics discontinues production of a slow-moving solar calculator.
B. Travis Manufacturing uses recycled materials for its product packaging.
C. Donna's Dress Boutique obtains deep discounts from a new clothing designer.
D. The Simpson Company embellishes the information that it places on its product labels.
PM:040/3.01
12. Company XYZ sells condensed soups and promotes them by saying, "Great taste, great price."
Company XYZ is positioning its product according to what strategy?
A. Relationship to other products
C. Unique characteristics
B. Features and benefits
D. Price and quality
PM:042/3.04
13. A company advertises that its products are durable, lightweight, and come in a variety of colors. What
strategy is the company using to position its product?
A. Price and quality
C. Unique characteristics
B. Features and benefits
D. Relationship to other products
PM:042/3.04
14. A company that makes ink pens claims that no other pen on the market uses a type of ink that changes
color when exposed to light. The company is positioning its product according to what strategy?
A. Price and quality
C. Unique characteristics
B. Features and benefits
D. Relation to other products in a line
PM:042/3.04
15. Why do companies use brands for their products?
A. To differentiate their products
B. To charge higher prices
C. To encourage materialism
D. To demonstrate creativity
PM:021/3.04
16. In what stage of brand loyalty do people become aware of the brand?
A. Recognition
C. Insistence
B. Satisfaction
D. Preference
PM:021/3.04
17. How do channel members add value to a product?
A. By performing certain channel activities expertly
B. By making the product more costly
C. By making the product available in all locations
D. By pursuing individual goals
CM:001/3.07
18. What do marketers want to achieve by determining distribution intensity?
A. Ideal market exposure
C. Perfect market balance
B. Complete market coverage
D. Total market saturation
CM:001/3.07
19. When is it best for a business to use an exclusive distribution pattern?
A. It prefers to have its intermediaries promote the product.
B. It needs to maintain tight control over a product.
C. It chooses to eliminate intermediaries.
D. It wants the product to be available in all possible locations.
CM:001/3.07
20. Which of the following is an aspect of channel management that impacts customer service?
A. Advertising
C. Protectionism
B. Taxes
D. Timeliness
CM:002/3.07
21. What is one action that customer service can take to facilitate order processing?
A. Negotiate aggressively
C. Communicate effectively
B. Oversee assembly
D. Monitor inventory
CM:002/3.07
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
22. Which situation hinders a business's ability to provide quality customer service?
A. Supply channel has high flexibility levels.
C. Post-sale support is responsive.
B. Vendor consistently has back orders.
D. Distribution patterns are operational.
CM:002/3.07
23. What is an advantage for producers in using the producer to wholesaler to retailer to consumer
distribution channel?
A. It enables them to control channel activities.
B. Wholesalers do not take title to the goods.
C. Wholesalers usually buy in large quantities.
D. It enables them to reach large retailers directly.
CM:003/3.07
24. What indirect channel of distribution is used to reach large retailers when the producer does not want
responsibility for the selling activities?
A. Producer to wholesaler to retailer to consumer
B. Producer to agent to retailer to consumer
C. Producer to consumer
D. Producer to retailer to consumer
CM:003/3.07
25. What example demonstrates the use of satellite tracking within a distribution channel?
A. An inventory specialist enters product status information into a handheld electronic device.
B. A computer system performs warehouse functions that are usually executed by humans.
C. A technological system creates an efficient routing plan for transportation companies.
D. A dispatcher has current knowledge of a delivery truck's location and destination.
CM:004/3.07
26. What statement is true about technology in relation to channel management?
A. Some businesses have the capacity to distribute most or all of their products through the
Internet.
B. Because technology continues to evolve, vertical conflict among channel members is occurring
less often.
C. Technological advancements generally require businesses to increase the number of
intermediaries they use.
D. For most businesses, technology makes it more difficult to monitor the channel members'
activities.
CM:004/3.07
27. What factor could determine legal ownership of goods in the distribution process?
A. Country in which the product is produced
C. Involvement of agents
B. Availability of the product
D. Physical characteristics of the product
CM:005/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
28. What legal example is represented by a manufacturer selling its products through a toll-free phone
system, a company web site, and several retailers?
A. Restricted sales territories
C. Tying agreements
B. Exclusive dealing
D. Dual distribution
CM:005/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
29. In which situation might exclusive distribution be considered a legal arrangement?
A. A business prevents a competitor's product from entering the market.
B. A franchisor requires a franchisee to sell only the franchisor's products.
C. A distributor requires a customer to buy all of its products to obtain one product.
D. A manufacturer assigns an exclusive territory to restrict competition.
CM:005/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
30. Which of the following is an example of distributing goods through a gray-market strategy?
A. An Asian-based company establishes an Internet web site to sell its cleaning products directly
to European consumers.
B. A franchisee obtains a license to sell a well-recognized brand of tires through her/his
dealership.
C. A pharmacy sells brand medications to customers in foreign countries for a lower price than
they can get domestically.
D. A local jewelry store has exclusive distribution rights to sell expensive wristwatches for a Swiss
manufacturer.
CM:006/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
31. What is an example of a large business using coercion in the distribution channel?
A. Buying products from unauthorized intermediaries
B. Requiring a specific type of packaging material
C. Threatening to stop using a supplier unless given major concessions
D. Returning shipments without proper authorization
CM:006/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
32. What is an example of a topic that would be addressed in an informational message?
A. Request for payment on a past-due account C. Charitable appeal for a corporate donation
B. Date and time of appointment with customer D. Invitation to speak at a national conference
CO:039/3.09 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
33. How should the information be presented when writing informational messages?
A. In the order of importance
C. In a conversational way
B. In the shortest way possible
D. In a nonspecific manner
CO:039/3.09 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
34. What is a reason why a businessperson might write a letter of inquiry?
A. To forward a document
C. To request an appointment
B. To acknowledge an order
D. To complain about a product
CO:040/4.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
35. When writing a letter of inquiry, when should you identify the purpose of your letter?
A. Once the recipient has agreed to meet with you
B. After describing your company
C. At the beginning of the letter
D. After identifying what prompted your inquiry (such as an advertisement)
CO:040/4.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
36. What is an example of marketing information that a business could gather by surveying its customers?
A. Planned product improvements
C. Location of the company's market
B. The company's current market share
D. Financial status of competitors
IM:001/4.06
37. Which characteristic of useful marketing information is represented by the statement "The benefits of
using the information should be greater than the expense of gathering the data used to generate this
information"?
A. Timeliness
C. Relevancy
B. Accessibility
D. Cost-effectiveness
IM:001/4.06
38. Why do marketers continue to gather information?
A. Today's consumers are easy to please.
B. The marketing environment is constantly changing.
C. Marketers are decreasing their geographic scope.
D. Competition in general has decreased.
IM:025/4.07
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
39. How can researchers protect the integrity of the marketing information they collect?
A. By organizing it logically
C. By publishing it openly
B. By reviewing it frequently
D. By interpreting it correctly
IM:025/4.07
40. What is an important ethical issue involved with the collection and use of marketing information?
A. Adaptability
C. Confidentiality
B. Standardization
D. Commercialization
IM:025/4.07
41. A major credit-card company has hired a marketing-research firm to conduct a survey regarding the use
of consumer credit. Would it be considered ethical to use the database information collected in a direct
marketing campaign?
A. No, businesses should not undertake any non-research activities involving data collected.
B. Yes, the consumers know surveys are just a way to get information for advertising.
C. No, the database is probably not a reliable source of marketing information.
D. Yes, the credit-card company paid for the research and should be able to use it any way it
wants.
IM:025/4.07
42. Why do many businesses place a cookie on a user's hard drive when the user visits the business's web
site?
A. To regulate the user's access to information
B. To make it easy for the user to find the web site
C. To track the number of times the user buys a product
D. To guarantee that the web site is secure
IM:183/4.08
43. How can businesses use computerized databases to sort and organize information about customers'
purchases, brand preferences, and dollar amounts spent?
A. To maintain sales strategies
C. To develop inventory control plans
B. To prepare financial reports
D. To customize its marketing efforts
IM:183/4.08
44. How can using a database to track its customers' preferences and buying habits help a business?
A. Decreases the need to analyze marketing activities
B. Obtains additional deductions for its semi-annual tax return
C. Reduces unnecessary operational expenses
D. Builds strong, loyal customer relationships
IM:183/4.08
45. Which situation is an example of SUGGING?
A. A salesperson offers a customer the opportunity to try an expensive product free of charge.
B. A telemarketer asks a customer if s/he knows anyone who would want to buy a certain product.
C. A marketer tells a customer that s/he is conducting research, and then begins a sales pitch.
D. A business promotes a product by sending samples to its customers without authorization.
IM:419/4.09 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
46. What is the most significant reason why marketing research is important to businesses?
A. It makes competitors take notice of the business.
B. It improves financial management.
C. It contributes to business success.
D. It helps the business to base decisions on opinions.
IM:010/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
47. How could a business use marketing-research data it has gathered about the average age, income,
educational levels, and spending patterns of area consumers?
A. To identify problems within the business
B. To create a mailing list for the business
C. To develop a profile of the typical customer
D. To establish an appropriate operating budget
IM:010/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
48. What is an advantage of using secondary data in a marketing-research project?
A. Less expensive to collect than primary data
C. Less likely to be available to competitors
B. More up-to-date than primary data
D. More relevant than primary data
IM:010/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
49. What research option usually answers questions related to "how many"?
A. Intelligence
C. Syndicated
B. Quantitative
D. Economic
IM:281/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
50. What is an example of a secondary source of data that a business can obtain internally?
A. Trade journal
C. Government web site
B. Sales report
D. Magazine article
IM:281/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
51. What type of research is intended to obtain detailed data about customers' opinions and experiences?
A. Sampling
C. Observation
B. Qualitative
D. Forecasting
IM:281/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
52. Which statement about marketing research problems is true?
A. Problems that company decision-makers identify are often just symptoms of larger problems
that need to be researched.
B. Company decision-makers typically finalize marketing research problems prior to involving
marketing researchers.
C. Marketing research problems are commonly based on specific research objectives and
research instruments.
D. Marketing research problems are usually only needed when marketing researchers plan to
gather external information.
IM:282/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
53. What is a benefit of having managers and researchers "on the same page" about the marketingresearch problem?
A. It allows the two parties to avoid establishing research objectives.
B. It keeps the business from wasting resources.
C. It ensures favorable results from the study.
D. It improves the business's market share.
IM:282/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
54. What research approach do businesses often use to test new product ideas?
A. Questioning
C. Recording
B. Technological
D. Experimental
IM:284/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
55. What type of research would a business conduct if it wanted to identify potential issues or
opportunities?
A. Descriptive
C.
B. Experimental
D. Causal
IM:284/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
56. A business has identified a sample of the population that it plans to survey to determine who is using
their product in a foreign country. What research design should it use?
A. Exploratory
C. Descriptive
B. Causal
D. Experimental
IM:284/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
57. What question does establishing a sampling plan for a research project answer?
A. What type of product to study
C. When to conduct an interview
B. How many people to survey
D. Why the issue is important
IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
58. The TUV Company wants to conduct marketing research by surveying a sample of its vast customer
base. What should companies use to reduce the possibility of bias?
A. Personal interviews
C. Referral sampling
B. Telephone interviews
D. Random sampling
IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
59. When marketers sampled 100 15-year-old girls, they found that they all were 5 feet 2 inches tall. What
type of sampling error contributed to this finding?
A. Non-response
C. Chance
B. Interviewer bias
D. The way the question was asked
IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
60. A university is considering changes to its business administration degree. To obtain feedback on the
idea from students, the university selects a sample of business majors who are seniors. What type of
sampling did the university use?
A. Cluster
C. Stratified random
B. Proportionate
D. Simple
IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
61. The SBU Company developed a survey in which respondents are provided the same number of
favorable and unfavorable rating options. What type of scale has this survey used?
A. Sequential
C. Spliced
B. Continuous
D. Balanced
IM:286/4.13
62. What type of scale is a firm using when a survey format has a seven-point rating system consisting of
opposite adjectives on each end of the scale?
A. Semantic differential
C. Stapel
B. Likert
D. Random rating
IM:286/4.13
63. What is a common method of collecting research data that often involves the use of questionnaires?
A. Case study
C. Message board
B. Mail survey
D. Behavior chart
IM:289/4.12
64. What data-collection method can be used to obtain product information during the point-of-purchase
process?
A. Volume-tracking scanner
C. E-mail survey
B. Photographic scanner
D. Statistical survey
IM:289/4.12
65. What is the most appropriate data-collection method to use when a business wants to determine how
its employees interact with customers?
A. Experiment
C. Employee survey
B. Observation
D. Telephone interview
IM:289/4.12
66. What is an example of a marketing-research method that is used to collect primary data?
A. Customer survey
C. Trade-journal article
B. Census data
D. External reports
IM:289/4.12
67. How can ill-designed questionnaires affect survey participants?
A. Can make them question the survey's purpose
B. Can decrease their response rate
C. Can decrease their desire to answer personal questions
D. Can make them take their time to complete the survey
IM:418/4.13
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
68. When should researchers ask potentially sensitive questions during an interview?
A. Toward the end of the interview
B. At the beginning of the interview to get them out of the way
C. Throughout the interview
D. At the mid-point of the interview to allow time for the researcher to build rapport
IM:418/4.13
69. What costs do businesses usually include in the price of their products?
A. Regulations
C. Transportation
B. Inflation
D. Orientation
PI:001/3.06
70. What would be the most appropriate pricing strategy for a business in a small town where
unemployment has skyrocketed and the economy is in a downturn?
A. Below-cost pricing
C. Odd-cents pricing
B. High-level pricing
D. Flexible pricing
PI:001/3.06
71. What pricing tactic might be considered questionable by some businesses?
A. Matching the prices of a competitor
C. Marking up prices to earn a profit
B. Developing a complex pricing structure
D. Providing a reference price
PI:015/3.06
72. What is an example of an unethical pricing practice?
A. A company prices its products low in an attempt to drive its competitors out of business.
B. A business increases its prices when the cost of the materials to make the products increases.
C. A firm sets a business objective to increase its profit margins over the next five years.
D. A business prices a new product line to reflect high quality and status.
PI:015/3.06
73. What is the advantage to a business of using bar-code pricing?
A. Easier for customers to read
B. Reduces required business security
C. Easier to change prices
D. Reduces number of employees needed for sales
PI:016/3.06
74. How does technology help businesses when it enables them to obtain and analyze vast amounts of
information that impacts the pricing function?
A. By generating profit-and-loss statements
B. By deciding how much to spend on advertising
C. By calculating the cost of hiring more employees
D. By determining the best time to adjust prices
PI:016/3.06
75. A business charges a small company a higher price for a product than it charges a large company for
the same product. What does this represent?
A. Price discrimination
C. Price competition
B. Controlled pricing
D. Regulated pricing
PI:017/3.06
76. Companies A, B, and C sell similar products. Together, they recently decided to sell their products for
the same price. In what unethical activity are the businesses engaging?
A. Bait-and-switch
C. Loss-leader pricing
B. Price fixing
D. Gray markets
PI:017/3.06
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
77. What is an external factor that affects the price that a business charges for its products?
A. Operating costs
C. Economic conditions
B. Variable expenses
D. Employee benefits
PI:002/3.06
78. Why do some new companies set their selling prices as low as they can?
A. To eliminate all possible competition
C. To earn a high return on investment
B. To get market share as fast as possible
D. To quickly make a large profit
PI:002/3.06
79. How do companies make brand promises to their customers?
A. They provide customers with a sworn statement.
B. They meet or exceed customer expectations on a consistent basis.
C. Salespeople verbally make brand promises to each customer.
D. They fulfill special requests for customers.
PM:206/3.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
80. Why must all businesses incorporate their values into every aspect of their operations?
A. This will reinforce their promises to customers and build the brands.
B. It is less expensive to operate if everyone buys into the same thing.
C. It gives businesses something interesting to advertise.
D. There will be less employee resistance if there is a standard philosophy.
PM:206/3.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
81. What is an example of an external factor that affects promotion?
A. Reorganization of the business
C. Government regulation of ads
B. Increase in a product's price
D. A change in distribution methods
PR:001/4.01
82. How does promotion benefit customers?
A. Causes them to postpone making buying decisions
B. Enables them to identify their buying motives
C. Helps them to select appropriate products
D. Requires them to spend more on products
PR:001/4.01
83. What type of promotion is depicted by a business's one-time announcement of its half-price sale in the
local newspaper?
A. Product promotion
C. Free publicity
B. Institutional advertising
D. Sales promotion
PR:002/4.01
84. What is an objective of institutional advertising?
A. To support personal selling activities
B. To demonstrate the organization's role in community affairs
C. To introduce new goods or services
D. To create consumer interest in the company's goods or services
PR:002/4.01
85. In which stage of a product's life cycle do promotional activities focus on differences between
competing products?
A. Introductory
C. Declining
B. Growth
D. Introduction
PR:003/4.01
86. What form of promotion is generally emphasized for complex, technical products sold to industrial
users?
A. Personal selling
C. Publicity
B. Sales promotion
D. Advertising
PR:003/4.01
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
87. How do competing businesses within the same industry usually react to each other's promotional
mixes?
A. By playing follow the leader
C. By trying not to outdo each other
B. By reducing their promotional budgets
D. By changing distribution channels
PR:003/4.01
88. What is an example of publicity?
A. Company news release
B. Direct mail
C. Billboard
D. Company television commercial
PR:003/4.01
89. What is an example of advertisement stereotyping?
A. A television commercial depicts a woman mopping the kitchen with a new floor cleaner.
B. A print ad shows a middle-aged male pouring orange juice in glasses for his children.
C. A magazine ad campaign presents a variety of people who encourage others to drink milk.
D. A well-known athlete records a PSA that emphasizes the importance of continuing education.
PR:099/4.01
90. Which advertising message reinforces the concept of materialism?
A. We make this product by hand and use organic materials.
B. The government rates our product higher than our competitor's product.
C. You can increase your social status by purchasing this product.
D. For more information about our line of products, visit our web site.
PR:099/4.01
91. What is new technology enabling businesses to create that is impacting the promotion function?
A. Personalized premiums
C. Publicity campaigns
B. Attractive commercials
D. Individualized messages
PR:100/4.01
92. How have technological advancements enhanced a small business's ability to promote its products?
A. Most companies need fewer channels to coordinate and carry out promotional activities.
B. Small companies now have more money to spend on promotional activities.
C. Less time and creativity are required to develop effective promotional campaigns.
D. Information can be communicated by more venues, and messages can be customized.
PR:100/4.01
93. Why are there specific guidelines for advertising to children?
A. Research indicated that juvenile offenders watched more advertising on television than the
average child.
B. Children are impressionable, and the wrong kinds of advertising can affect their development.
C. Parents mounted a campaign against advertisers because their children demanded products
they saw advertised.
D. Children revealed, in focus groups, that while they like watching ads, it doesn't make them
behave differently.
PR:101/4.01
94. Which statement is true about regulating international promotional activities?
A. Most countries have a system of checks and balances to verify that promotion regulations are
fair.
B. Businesses must submit all promotional materials to the International Ad Coalition for approval.
C. Governments bear the sole responsibility of monitoring promotional materials and regulations.
D. A business must understand that the laws governing promotional activities vary by country.
PR:101/4.01
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
95.
Why are promotional media such as newspapers and television referred to as mass media?
A. They can present large amounts of promotion.
B. They direct promotions to a specific audience.
C. They reach a lot of people at the same time.
D. They try to meet the needs of many businesses.
PR:007/4.02
96. What is an example of out-of-home media?
A. An infomercial broadcast on a national television network
B. An eye-appealing card placed in a mailbox
C. A calendar imprinted with a company's name
D. An electrical sign located in a high-traffic area
PR:007/4.02
97. What is a benefit to businesses of positive word-of-mouth communication?
A. Increased product mix
C. Increased sales
B. Decreased advertising costs
D. Decreased operating expense
PR:247/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
98. What best describes the goal of amplified word-of-mouth?
A. Improving the quality of goods and services the business offers
B. Encouraging customers to provide both positive and negative feedback
C. Building loyal relationships with the customers
D. Providing information to activists to share with others
PR:247/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
99. Alexandria has been using Look-So-Good cosmetics for several years and would not consider changing
brands. In fact, Alexandria likes the cosmetics so much that she has become an advocate for the
cosmetic company. She tells everyone about the features and benefits of Look-So-Good products, and
encourages them to try the cosmetics. What type of word-of-mouth marketing is Alexandria using?
A. Mobile marketing
C. Shill marketing
B. Organic marketing
D. Virtual marketing
PR:247/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
100. A small retail chain that sells specialized products for sports enthusiasts is located in a resort area that
receives most of its business during the summer. To increase year-round sales, management wants to
use direct-mail advertising. What format should you recommend that the retail chain use?
A. Computer kiosks
C. Box-holder flyers
B. Cable television shopping channels
D. Niche catalogs
PR:089/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
101. What is a common thread among all direct advertising strategies?
A. They try to get consumers' attention by communicating in the most unusual ways possible.
B. They use a proven creative technique, with a strong headline and little copy.
C. They communicate with all consumers as one group with common likes and dislikes.
D. They intend to motivate the consumer to take action.
PR:089/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
102. What is an example of a successful direct-response advertisement?
A. A person orders an exercise machine by telephone after viewing an infomercial.
B. A movie theater shows several previews of new films and video releases.
C. A popular tourist attraction places a billboard in a remote location.
D. A local grocer distributes discount coupons to local businesses.
PR:089/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
103. Ben recently purchased a cellular telephone. The manufacturer provided a form and a special code with
the telephone's packaging. Ben completed the form, copied his sales receipt, and mailed these items
back to the manufacturer along with the part of the packaging that contained the special code. Within
six weeks, Ben received a $50 check from the telephone manufacturer. What type of sales-promotion
technique was used?
A. Warranty
C. Sweepstakes
B. Coupon
D. Rebate
PR:249/4.04
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
104. During one scene of a popular television show, an actor pours a box of brand-name cereal into a bowl
and begins to eat it. What does this exemplify?
A. Brand awareness
C. Brand identification
B. Product placement
D. Product programming
PR:249/4.04
105. What is a common communications channel used in public relations?
A. Billboards
C. Product displays
B. Trade shows
D. Press releases
PR:250/4.04
106. What communication channels is a corporation's public-relations department most likely to use to
maintain positive relationships with shareholders?
A. Press releases, online social networks, and print advertisements
B. Newsletters, annual reports, and the company's web site
C. News conferences, consumer blogs, and employee manuals
D. Policy manuals, commercials, and sponsorships
PR:250/4.04
107. What does a business need to do to build a clientele?
A. Know customers personally
C. Provide friendly, courteous service
B. Change the product mix frequently
D. Provide a wide variety of services
SE:828/4.14 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
108. "Toni is always patient and courteous. She seems to have a sincere interest in our satisfaction." What
key factor in building a clientele is Toni exhibiting?
A. Customer confidentiality
C. Persistence
B. Service attitude
D. Credibility
SE:828/4.14 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
109. What effect does building a clientele have on selling costs?
A. Increases them because salespeople earn less in bonuses and commissions
B. Reduces them because making a repeat sale costs less than making an initial sale
C. Reduces them because salespeople earn more in bonuses and commissions
D. Increases them because making an initial sale costs more than making a repeat sale
SE:828/4.14 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
110. Which situation demonstrates ethical behavior in selling?
A. Tom tells Mrs. Smith she can save $100 by purchasing a vacuum cleaner without the carpet
attachment, because she has hardwood floors.
B. Mrs. Thompson tells John she cannot give him a raise, so he should claim additional expenses
on his monthly expense account to make up for it.
C. Ron tells the customer she can save an additional $25 if she makes her check out to him
instead of the company.
D. Mayhew's raises prices on its clothing prior to a 25%-off sale so customers can feel good about
the amount of money they are saving.
SE:106/4.15
111. How can a reciprocal sales arrangement between a buyer and seller create an unethical situation?
A. Ethical issues can occur when the reciprocity hurts or eliminates competition.
B. Reciprocal sales arrangements usually result when a breach of warranty occurs.
C. Ethical issues usually occur when the reciprocity is technological in nature.
D. Reciprocal sales arrangements almost always create price discrimination.
SE:106/4.15
112. Caroline is unable to travel to a client's office but needs to demonstrate product features and be able to
answer questions as they arise. What technology tool would be helpful to her in making a sale?
A. High-tech sales-support office
B. Web presentation combined with a teleconference
C. Cell phone with wireless faxing
D. PowerPoint presentation on CD
SE:107/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam
113. What technology allows the Gateway Insurance Group to match its agents with policyholders by
aligning its agents with market potential?
A. Database software
C. Mapping software
B. Outbound telemarketing
D. Inbound telemarketing
SE:107/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
114. What is a sales practice that may be considered illegal?
A. Noncompete clauses
C. Competitive bids
B. Executive contracts
D. Tying arrangements
SE:108/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
115. What type of laws protects consumers from unethical selling practices, such as high-pressure sales
techniques?
A. Limited-probationary
C. Conditional-sales
B. Cooling-off
D. Buyer-withdrawal
SE:108/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
116. What is an illegal selling practice that is regulated because it reduces competition?
A. Incentive contracts
C. Exclusive dealing
B. Product labeling
D. Discount pricing
SE:108/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
117. What is the most important component of an effective business letter?
A. Opening
C. Address
B. Message
D. Heading
CO:133/1.06 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
118. What is one reason why an employee might write a business letter?
A. To apply for personal credit
C. To communicate with friends
B. To accept a social invitation
D. To sell goods and services
CO:133/1.06 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
119. What marketing career involves determining why customers do what they do?
A. Advertising
C. Sales
B. Distribution/Warehousing
D. Marketing research
PD:024/1.02
120. What marketing career involves catching customers' attention, informing them of products, and
persuading them to buy?
A. Marketing research
C. Public relations
B. Advertising
D. Product management
PD:024/1.02
121. Kwacky Kwackers needs a new package design for its crackers. What marketing professional would be
responsible for creating the new package?
A. Marketing research
C. Advertising
B. Product management
D. Channel management
PD:024/1.02
122. What is at the center of all marketing activities?
A. Math
B. Technological know-how
C. Purchasing
D. Communication
PD:024/1.02
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
1. C
Modify the product to renew customer interest. Modifying the product allows a company an opportunity
to increase sales without the risk of introducing an entirely new product. Also, such modifications could
include any technological advances that have taken place since the product's introduction. The product
should remain on the market; its sales have leveled off—not stopped. If the company does nothing,
sales may continue to decline. Tripling the advertising budget does not guarantee increased sales,
especially if there is something unsatisfactory about the existing product.
SOURCE: PM:001/3.01
SOURCE: PM LAP 17—Rapping Up Products (Product/Service Management)
2. B
It reflects the image of the business. The quality level of a product is an important part of
product/service management because it reflects the image of the business. Product managers must
choose not only the image they wish to portray but the level of quality that is appropriate to the products
themselves. The way that a product works refers to its design. By offering warranties, product
managers are protecting consumers. Labels identify a product's brand.
SOURCE: PM:001/3.01
SOURCE: PM LAP 17—Rapping Up Products (Nature of Product/Service Management)
3. D
Eliminating products that are slow sellers. The product/service management function follows a product
throughout its life cycle, determining when to eliminate slow-selling items. Determining where products
will be offered for sale is a channel management activity. Focusing promotional activities on newproduct releases would be carried out in promotion. Setting discounts to clear
products from inventory is an aspect of pricing.
SOURCE: PM:001/3.01
SOURCE: PM LAP 17—Rapping Up Products (Product/Service Management)
4. B
By finding new uses for the product. Established products are in the maturity stage, and one way
marketers can extend their life cycles is by finding new ways that the products can be used by current
consumers. Continuing to promote the same product to current users will not extend its life cycle.
Consumers who are innovators are attracted to products in the introductory stage, not the maturity
stage. Restricting distribution would shorten rather than lengthen the product's life cycle.
SOURCE: PM:024/3.01
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 368). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
5. D
To adapt its marketing strategies. Businesses change their marketing strategies as their products go
through the stages of the life cycle. This means that companies need to know where products are in
their life cycles in order to use marketing strategies appropriate for each stage. It is not usually possible
to prevent imitators from entering the market or to predict the length of a product's life cycle. Finding
new uses for the product is a marketing strategy that is used to boost sales for a mature product.
SOURCE: PM:024/3.01
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 642-645).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
6. C
Because competitors have entered the market. By the time a product reaches the growth stage, there
are usually many competitors in the market. This forces producers to lower prices in order to compete
for market share. The lower prices can cause profits to decline. Sales are on the increase in the growth
stage. More efficient production helps to support profits. Adjusting marketing strategies should stabilize
profits, not cause them to decline.
SOURCE: PM:024/3.01
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [pp. 282-284]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
7. D
Mass customization. Computerization and the technology of mass production have created the method
of mass customization which allows businesses to produce customized products for one customer or
only a very few customers. Businesses that use a mass-customization method can produce large
quantities of one product in many different varieties. This method allows businesses to meet the
individual needs of many customers by making variations of one product. Automatic production,
computerized robotics, and intermittent conversion are not methods that allow businesses to produce
products that are specialized for a very few customers.
SOURCE: PM:039/3.01
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [p. 220]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
8. B
Tracking visitors to their web sites. As a result of computer technology, many businesses have
developed web sites that are accessible to customers. The technology that allows businesses to have
web sites also makes it possible for those businesses to track the visitors to their web sites and obtain
information about them such as name, address, type of purchase, amount of sale, etc. Businesses
often use this information to improve their product/service mix. For example, if a business determines
that customers are not buying a certain product, they might improve the product or replace it.
Businesses do not use computer technology to mail questionnaires to customers. Businesses often
compile the information they obtain through their web sites in databases. However, the information is
not useful until the businesses analyze it. Simply preparing interactive software programs will not help
businesses to obtain information.
SOURCE: PM:039/3.01
SOURCE: Roberts, M. (2008). Internet marketing: Integrating online and offline strategies (2nd ed.)
[pp. 12-13]. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.
9. C
Intranet. Intranet refers to a business's network of computers that are linked so that the employees can
retrieve the same business information. For example, a software program that tracks inventory may be
available for the sales department, the shipping department, and the purchasing department to review.
A business that uses an Intranet system to manage products maximizes its communications and
response time. Generators and memory cards do not allow a business's employees to simultaneously
access the product information. Micro-portal is a fictitious term.
SOURCE: PM:039/3.01
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [p. 191]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
10. B
Use of environmentally friendly packaging. One of the ethical issues that product/service managers
face is that of being environmentally friendly. Many businesses have altered their packaging after being
pressured to do so by consumers. Ethics are principles that govern behavior and do not involve the use
of color on the label or using the packaging for promotion. Including nutrition information is not an
ethical decision because it is required by law.
SOURCE: PM:040/3.01
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 663).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
11. D
The Simpson Company embellishes the information that it places on its product labels. When a
company embellishes information on product labels, it is exaggerating the attributes or performance of
the product. This is unethical behavior because the company is misleading customers. If the company
misleads its customers, the customers may use the product inappropriately, which may harm them or
others. Using recyclable materials for product packaging and discontinuing the production of a slowmoving item are ethical actions. There is not enough information provided to determine if the dress
boutique is obtaining vendor discounts.
SOURCE: PM:040/3.01
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 662-666).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
12. D
Price and quality. The promotional slogan is positioning the product as having great taste at a great
price. The taste is a quality. The promotion does not address specific features and benefits of the
product such as "30% more chicken than the competition" or "Helps lower cholesterol." The company is
not claiming that its soups have a characteristic that is different than that of competitors. The soups are
not positioned according to other products because the slogan does not include information about other
products that the company produces.
SOURCE: PM:042/3.04
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 645).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
13. B
Features and benefits. The company is positioning its products according to their specific features and
benefits. Color is one of a product's attributes or features. Being durable and lightweight are benefits.
The company is not advertising quality or price, or unique characteristics not available from the
competition. The company does not mention its other products.
SOURCE: PM:042/3.04
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 645).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
14. C
Unique characteristics. The company is positioning its product according to unique characteristics
because it is claiming that its product does something that no other product can do. The ink changing
color in light is a feature, but it is a unique characteristic that is not available on other pens. The
company is not positioning according to the quality or price of the pens or their relationship to other
products.
SOURCE: PM:042/3.04
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 645-646).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
15. A
To differentiate their products. Companies want their products to be perceived as different from those of
other companies. They can do this through the use of brands. Charging higher prices and encouraging
materialism are seen by consumers as negative aspects of brands. Creating an appealing brand often
requires creativity, but demonstrating creativity is not a purpose of using brands.
SOURCE: PM:021/3.04
SOURCE: PM LAP 6—It's a Brand, Brand, Brand World! (Nature of Product Branding)
16. A
Recognition. Brand recognition is the stage of brand loyalty in which consumers become aware of a
brand's existence. Brand preference is when customers prefer to purchase a brand based on their
positive experiences with that brand. Brand insistence occurs when a customer will only purchase that
brand because of his/her satisfaction with it.
SOURCE: PM:021/3.04
SOURCE: PM LAP 6—It's a Brand, Brand, Brand World! (Nature of Product Branding)
17. A
By performing certain channel activities expertly. Channel members add value to a product by
performing certain channel activities expertly. Moving the product smoothly through the channel
benefits all channel members. Channels are not meant to make products more costly or more difficult
for consumers to find. Channels work best and deliver value-added products when channel members
work together toward common goals.
SOURCE: CM:001/3.07
SOURCE: CM LAP 2—Chart Your Channels (Channel Management)
18. A
Ideal market exposure. Marketers determine distribution intensity so they can achieve ideal market
exposure—that is, they want to make their product available to each and every customer who might buy
it, but they don't want to over-distribute the product and waste money. This condition is not known as
complete market coverage or total market saturation—ideal market exposure often does not cover an
entire market. It is also not referred to as perfect market balance.
SOURCE: CM:001/3.07
SOURCE: CM LAP 2—Chart Your Channels (Channel Management)
19. B
It needs to maintain tight control over a product. Exclusive distribution involves selling a product through
one intermediary or middlemen, in a geographic area. Exclusive distribution is often preferred for
specialty, highly complex, and technical products, or products that require special handling or training,
such as airplanes or large machinery. When a business wants to deal with intermediaries that will do
the best job to promote and sell their products, it would use selective distribution. Selective distribution
means selling a product through a limited number of wholesalers and retailers in a geographic location.
A business that wants to bypass middlemen (intermediaries) would choose a direct-distribution
strategy. Intensive distribution involves selling a product (e.g., candy bars) through every available
wholesaler and retailer in a geographic area where consumers might look for the product.
SOURCE: CM:001/3.07
SOURCE: CM LAP 2—Chart Your Channels (Channel Management)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
20. D
Timeliness. Channel management is the process of coordinating channel members to move goods and
services to the end user. The way that a business manages its channel members impacts customerservice levels. An important aspect of channel management in relation to customer service is making
sure that the customers receive their products in a timely manner. In many cases, customers order
items for a specific purpose and need them on a certain date. Therefore, it is important for the business
to monitor channel members' activities to ensure that the products are moving through the channel in
the most efficient manner. Taxes are monies that individuals or businesses must pay to the
government. Protectionism is a government's policy to protect domestic industries and businesses
against foreign competition. Advertising is any paid form of nonpersonal presentation of ideas, images,
goods, or services.
SOURCE: CM:002/3.07
SOURCE: Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2008). Principles of marketing (12th ed.) [p. 347]. Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
21. C
Communicate effectively. Effective communication is extremely important to make sure that a
customer's order is processed correctly and on time. However, communication is a two-way street.
Customer service needs to communicate with customers, and customers need to communicate their
needs to customer service. By maintaining an open line of communication, customer service will be
able to facilitate order processing. Customer service is not responsible for overseeing assembly or
monitoring inventory. It is not appropriate to negotiate aggressively because this might have a negative
impact on relationships with customers.
SOURCE: CM:002/3.07
SOURCE: Coyle, J.J., Bardi, E.J., & Langley, C.J. (2003). The management of business logistics: A
supply chain perspective (7th ed.) [pp. 99-100]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
22. B
Vendor consistently has back orders. Back orders are requests (orders) for goods that are out of stock
and will be shipped when the items are available. A business that runs out of stock on a regular basis is
not providing adequate customer service. When customers cannot get the products they want, when
they want them, they often go to other businesses to obtain the items. Therefore, it is important for a
business to evaluate its distribution patterns and monitor its channel members to make sure that
everything is operating efficiently. Being flexible and responsive are ways in which a business can
provide good customer service.
SOURCE: CM:002/3.07
SOURCE: Coyle, J.J., Bardi, E.J., & Langley, C.J. (2003). The management of business logistics: A
supply chain perspective (7th ed.) [pp. 99-101]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
23. C
Wholesalers usually buy in large quantities. Many producers cannot afford to fill requests for small
orders; however, small retailers are usually unable to place large orders. Therefore, wholesalers help to
fill the gap between producers and small retailers by buying large quantities and selling smaller
quantities to individual retailers. By using intermediaries, producers are giving up some of their channel
control. Wholesalers do take title to goods, but agents do not. Producers use the producer to retailer to
ultimate consumer channel to reach large retailers indirectly.
SOURCE: CM:003/3.07
SOURCE: CM LAP 1—Channel It (Channels of Distribution)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
24. B
Producer to agent to retailer to consumer. Some producers don't want to take the responsibility or
spend the time or money to sell their own goods but are prepared to handle other marketing functions.
These producers contract with an agent to sell the goods to retailers. When the producer to retailer to
consumer channel is used, the producer retains control of selling activities. The producer to wholesaler
to retailer to consumer channel is frequently used to reach small retailers. Producer to consumer is a
direct channel of distribution.
SOURCE: CM:003/3.07
SOURCE: CM LAP 1—Channel It (Channels of Distribution)
25. D
A dispatcher has current knowledge of a delivery truck's location and destination. Satellite tracking is
the use of satellites and technological systems that allow for the transmission of information between
two parties. Satellite tracking would help a business locate a package while it is en route in order to
provide an estimated arrival time to the package recipient. Computer systems that perform warehouse
functions that are usually executed by humans are called artificial intelligence systems. A computer
software program would be used to create routing plans for transportation companies, not a satellite
tracking system. Satellites are not generally needed to enter information into an electronic device.
SOURCE: CM:004/3.07
SOURCE: Coyle, J.J., Bardi, E.J., & Langley, C.J. (2003). The management of business logistics: A
supply chain perspective (7th ed.) [p. 465]. Mason, OH: South-Western.
26. A
Some businesses have the capacity to distribute most or all of their products through the Internet.
Some businesses provide pure services that do not require the use of intermediaries. For example, it is
possible for business consultants or freelance copyrighters to deliver their services directly to the end
users through their web sites. Many financial-services, such as bank loans and stock trades, can be
completed online without the use of intermediaries. Because some businesses are bypassing
intermediaries and selling products directly to the end users through their web sites, vertical conflict
among channel members continues to be a problem. When businesses decide to sell directly to
consumers, the number of intermediaries they use is reduced. In many ways, technological
advancements make the distribution process more efficient. For example, Extranets make it easier for
channel leaders to monitor channel activities and for channel members to communicate with one
another.
SOURCE: CM:004/3.07
SOURCE: Mize, S.R. (2007, July 24). Online business consulting-secrets and tactics: Part 1.
Retrieved May 24, 2011, from http://ezinearticles.com/?Online-Business-Consulting—Secrets-and-Tactics-Part-I&id=658801
27. C
Involvement of agents. Agents typically do not take ownership of a product. They are representatives of
the buyer or seller and do not take title to the goods. During the distribution process, either the buyer or
the seller owns the goods rather than the agent. Availability of the product, country in which the product
is produced, and the physical characteristics of the product are factors when determining the best
physical distribution path to follow. They do not determine legal ownership.
SOURCE: CM:005/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 419). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
28. D
Dual distribution. When a manufacturer uses more than one channel to reach consumers, it is known as
dual distribution. Dual distribution is legal as long as it promotes competition. When a supplier requires
an intermediary to purchase other products in its line, as well as the initial purchase, it is known as a
tying agreement. Exclusive dealing occurs when a manufacturer forbids an intermediary from carrying a
competitor's product. Restricted sales territories prohibit intermediaries from selling products outside a
designated area.
SOURCE: CM:005/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 419). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
29. B
A franchisor requires a franchisee to sell only the franchisor's products. Exclusive distribution is a
strategy that forbids dealers from carrying the competitors' products. This strategy is usually considered
illegal because it restricts competition. However, it is legal in certain situations, such as a franchisor
requiring a franchisee to sell only the franchisor's products. One of the characteristics of a franchise
agreement is that the franchisee buys the right to sell the products of the franchisor. In exchange for
that right, the franchisor may require the franchisee to sell only the franchisor's products. The franchisor
is protecting the image of its product by preventing the franchisee from carrying competing brands. It is
usually considered illegal for a business to prevent a competitor's product from entering the market. A
distributor requiring a customer to buy all of its products to obtain one product is an example of a tying
contract. A manufacturer assigning an exclusive territory to restrict competition is usually considered
illegal.
SOURCE: CM:005/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Perreault, W.D., Cannon, J.P., & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing: A marketing
strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [pp. 306-307]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
30. C
A pharmacy sells brand medications to customers in foreign countries for a lower price than they can
get domestically. Gray markets occur when imported goods are sold by businesses other than the
authorized intermediaries. In most cases, the goods are sold to customers for a great deal less than if
purchased through authorized distribution channels. Many types of products, from electronics to
clothing, are sold through gray markets. In some cases, the authorized dealers choose to abandon a
brand because they cannot compete with the gray market. A franchisee who obtains a license from the
franchisor is conducting a legal means to distribute through a product trade-name franchise agreement.
A company that sells its own products on an Internet web site to foreign customers is not conducting
activities through a gray market. A business that has obtained exclusive distribution rights from a
manufacturer is not participating in gray-market activities.
SOURCE: CM:006/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Wikipedia. (2006, April 26). Grey market. Retrieved May 27, 2011, from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_market
31. C
Threatening to stop using a supplier unless given major concessions. Coercion usually involves the use
of force and is generally considered to be unethical. If a large business threatens a supplier, that is an
example of coercion. The business may demand that the supplier sell at extremely low prices or pick up
other types of expenses in order to be a supplier to the business. The message is that the supplier will
no longer be used if the business does not receive the requested concessions. Requiring a specific
type of packaging material and returning shipments without proper authorization are not examples of
coercion. Buying products from unauthorized intermediaries is an example of the gray market.
SOURCE: CM:006/3.08 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 424-425). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
32. B
Date and time of appointment with customer. Informational messages are written every day in business
in order to send routine information to others. Sending a customer a message confirming the date and
time of the next appointment is an example of a topic that would be addressed in an informational
message. The topic concerns routine information and deals with common business situations.
Requesting payment on a past-due account, a charity appealing for a donation, or inviting someone to
speak at a conference are examples of topics that would be addressed in persuasive messages.
SOURCE: CO:039/3.09 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Young, D.J. (2006). Foundations of business communication: An integrative approach
(pp. 20, 122). New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
33. A
In the order of importance. Informational messages often contain a variety of information that has
different levels of importance. When writing the message, it is important to present the information in
the order of importance. Depending on the message, the information might be arranged in order of its
importance to the reader. For example, it is more important to readers to learn that they will receive
discounts on certain purchases than to learn that the bill will be mailed on a different date. Information
should be presented in a specific manner so readers will clearly understand. Information should be
explained thoroughly, which may not be the shortest way possible. Presenting information in a
conversational way is not always the most effective because a conversational tone is casual and may
not present all the important information.
SOURCE: CO:039/3.09 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Locker, K.O. (2006). Business and administrative communication (7th ed.) [pp. 152-153].
New York: McGraw-Hill.
34. C
To request an appointment. The function of a letter of inquiry usually is to make a request.
Businesspeople often write letters of inquiry to request an appointment with a current customer or a
potential customer, particularly if that customer is located out of town. For example, a businessperson
might write several letters requesting appointments with various customers before arranging a sales
trip. An acknowledgement letter would be written to acknowledge the receipt of an order. A claim letter
would be written to complain about a problem with a product. A transmittal letter would be written to
accompany a document being sent by mail.
SOURCE: CO:040/4.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Bovée, C.L., & Thill, J.V. (2008). Business communication today (9th ed.) [p. 219]. Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
35. C
At the beginning of the letter. Inquiries should be direct so that the recipient immediately knows what
the inquiry is about. Start with the purpose of the inquiry before describing your company, project, or
what prompted the inquiry. Delayed statement of your purpose (whether later in the letter or requesting
a separate meeting) makes it more difficult for the recipient to understand the inquiry.
SOURCE: CO:040/4.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Lesikar, R.V. & Flatley, M.E. (2005). Basic business communication: Skills for empowering
the Internet generation (10th ed.) [pp. 112-119]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
36. C
Location of the company's market. By surveying customers, the business can determine where the
people who are interested in buying its products are located. Information about the company's market
share and plans to improve current products can be obtained from the company's own records. The
financial status of competitors is only available if they operate as a corporation and must report their
finances to shareholders, or they are in a situation that requires them to disclose their financial
resources.
SOURCE: IM001/4.06
SOURCE: IM LAP 2—Get the Facts Straight (Marketing-Information Management)
37. D
Cost-effectiveness. Marketing information must provide greater benefits to the user than the expense of
gathering the data used to generate this information. If the marketing information cannot provide greater
benefits to the user, then the corresponding data are not worth gathering or processing. Timely data
and information are up-to-date, so the data must be gathered at a time when they will be of the most
value to the business. Accessible information is readily available so that it can be used without major
effort or excessive cost. Marketing information should be relevant—closely related to the situation at
hand.
SOURCE: IM001/4.06
SOURCE: IM LAP 2—Get the Facts Straight (Marketing-Information Management)
38. B
The marketing environment is constantly changing. Marketers need information in order to keep up with
these rapid changes. Other reasons that marketers must gather information include an increasing
geographic scope for businesses, hard-to-please consumers, and increasing competition.
SOURCE: IM001/4.07
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [p. 107]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
39. D
By interpreting it correctly. Marketing-information managers can protect the integrity of the information
they collect by interpreting it correctly and not manipulating it in such a way that it agrees with a
predetermined conclusion. Protecting the integrity of marketing information is sometimes difficult
because researchers often can make the information support either side of an issue depending on how
they interpret it. Most researchers try to interpret the information correctly because consumers are
sometimes suspicious of research findings that seem to support the opinions of the business that
sponsors the research. Researchers do not protect the integrity of marketing information by reviewing it
frequently, publishing it openly, or organizing it logically.
SOURCE: IM025/4.07
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [pp. 369,
493]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
40. C
Confidentiality. Confidentiality involves preventing the unauthorized disclosure of information. In the
process of collecting marketing information, researchers often obtain private and personal information
that is unethical to use or share with others without permission. Researchers need to respect client and
respondent confidentiality by making sure that the information they collect and use remains confidential
unless they receive explicit approval to reveal it to others. Standardization involves always performing a
task in the same way. Adaptability is the ability to adjust to changing conditions. Commercialization is
the point at which a product goes into full-scale production, the marketing plan is put into place, service
and sales training are done, and the product's life cycle begins.
SOURCE: IM025/4.07
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [pp. 88-91].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
41. A
No, businesses should not undertake any non-research activities involving data collected. Researchers
must not undertake any non-research activities such as database marketing involving data about
individuals that will be used for direct marketing or promotional activities. Such activities must be
organized and carried out in a manner clearly differentiated from research activities. Databases contain
reliable information. Consumers expect such information to be used for research rather than
advertising. The company should use the information only as intended.
SOURCE: IM025/4.07
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [pp. 99-100].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
42. C
To track the number of times the user buys a product. Many businesses that have web sites place a
cookie, which is a type of information, on a user's hard drive when the user visits that site. Then, the
next time a user visits that site, the site's computer recognizes the user because of the cookie. A
business's marketing-information managers use cookies to maintain user information and track how
many times a user visits a specific web site or buys a product online. This type of data allows
marketing-information managers to customize web sites in order to appeal to the preferences and
habits of the customers who are visiting their sites. Cookies make it possible for businesses to obtain
marketing information. They do not make it easy for the user to find the web site, regulate the user's
access to information, or guarantee that the web site is secure.
SOURCE: IM:183/4.08
SOURCE: Miles, J.E., & Dolce, C. (2006). E-Commerce (pp. 289-290). New York: Glencoe/McGrawHill.
43. D
To customize its marketing efforts. Many businesses use computerized databases to sort and organize
information about customers' purchases, brand preferences, dollar amounts spent, etc. The benefit to
the business is that it can use this information to customize its marketing efforts and appeal to specific
customers. For example, a business might use a database to organize customers according to
geographic location, and send different promotional pieces to each area. The database allows a
business to target specific customers based on certain criteria. Businesses do not use this type of
customer information to prepare financial reports, develop inventory control plans, or maintain sales
strategies.
SOURCE: IM:183/4.08
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 594-595).
New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Semester Two Exam Key
44. D
Builds strong, loyal customer relationships. When a business understands what its customers like and
dislike about its goods and services, it can incorporate activities to maintain, improve, or expand its
products. When customers see that the business is showing interest in meeting their needs and wants,
they are more likely to continue the relationship with the business. A business's tax deductions are not
generally based on its ability to track its customers' buying behavior. Operational expenses refer to all
of the expenses (costs) of running the business. A database can facilitate efficient use of a business's
resources, but does not necessarily reduce operating expenses, nor does it necessarily decrease the
need to analyze marketing activities.
SOURCE: IM:183/4.08
SOURCE: Semenik, R.J. (2002). Promotion and integrated marketing communications (p. 355).
Mason, OH: South-Western.
45. C
A marketer tells a customer that s/he is conducting research, and then begins a sales pitch. SUGGING
is an acronym for “selling under the guise of research.” SUGGING is an unethical practice in which a
marketer pretends to conduct research, but, in fact, is really attempting to sell a good or service to a
consumer. SUGGING is deceptive and rarely facilitates a long-term selling relationship. It also harms
the integrity of the general marketing-research field because potential respondents who have been
subjected to SUGGING are less likely to trust researchers and are likely to question their true motives.
A telemarketer who asks a person if s/he knows anyone who might buy a certain product is trying to
obtain a referral. Sending samples to consumers is a promotional technique. A salesperson providing a
customer the opportunity to try a product for a certain period of time is implementing a strategy to make
a sale.
SOURCE: IM:419/4.09 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Marketing Research Association. (n.d.). Challenges to the marketing research industry.
Retrieved May 24, 2011, from http://www.mra-net.org/media/index.cfm?ID=challenge
46. C
It contributes to business success. Marketing research has a significant impact on business success.
Businesses that obtain reliable marketing-research data are better able to make good decisions
because their decisions are based on fact, not opinion. Whether marketing research improves a
business's financial management would depend upon the kind of problem the business is trying to solve
and the data gathered. Competitors are often unaware of a business's marketing-research efforts.
SOURCE: IM:010/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: IM LAP 5—Seek and Find (Nature of Marketing Research)
47. C
To develop a profile of the typical customer. Demographic data are often gathered through marketing
research. The business can use such data to develop a profile of the typical customer. The business
cannot create a mailing list from these data since names and addresses are not included in the data.
The data also would not help the business to identify internal problems or set up an operating budget.
SOURCE: IM:010/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: IM LAP 5—Seek and Find (Nature of Marketing Research)
48. A
Less expensive to collect than primary data. Secondary data are facts that have been collected for
purposes other than the purpose at hand. They are quicker, easier, and less expensive to collect than
primary data. Examples of secondary data include industry reports, government census figures, and
trade association surveys. These data are readily available to competitors. A drawback of secondary
data is that they are less likely to be up-to-date and relevant than primary data.
SOURCE: IM:010/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: IM LAP 5—Seek and Find (Nature of Marketing Research)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
49. B
Quantitative. Quantitative research often answers questions related to "how many" and "how much."
The information is usually obtained from large numbers of people, and the results often are explained in
a numerical form. For example, a business would use quantitative research to find out how many
customers in a certain area buy a specific product and how many products they buy. Intelligence,
syndicated, and economic are not types of research techniques.
SOURCE: IM:281/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research (7th ed.)
[pp. 257-260, 494]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
50. B
Sales report. Marketing-research data are available from many sources, including those that are
collected for other purposes. This type of information is secondary data. Secondary data are available
outside the company from sources such as trade journals, government web sites, and magazine
articles. A business can also obtain useful secondary data that are generated within the organization.
Examples of this type of information include sales reports, budgets, customer profiles, and annual
reports.
SOURCE: IM:281/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 180-181].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
51. B
Qualitative. Qualitative research is based on obtaining data about opinions and experiences. The goal
of qualitative research often is to find out "why" people buy certain products and "how" they feel about
certain products and businesses. This research is often conducted through the use of in-depth
interviews to obtain the detailed data. Sampling involves selecting a group to interview. Observation
involves watching what people do. Forecasting involves making a prediction.
SOURCE: IM:281/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 597). New
York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
52. A
Problems that company decision-makers identify are often just symptoms of larger problems that need
to be researched. Frequently, the problem or issue that decision-makers identify is actually the result or
outcome of a much larger, “real” problem. Marketing researchers are responsible for helping these
decision-makers to dig deep enough into the situation that the true issue becomes obvious. Then, the
researchers and decision-makers can work together to finalize the marketing research problem.
Specific research objectives are based on the marketing research problem, not the other way around.
The research instruments, or methods to collect the data, are identified after the marketing research
problem has been finalized. Every marketing research project requires a research problem, regardless
of whether researchers plan to gather internal and/or external information.
SOURCE: IM:282/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Hair, J.F., Wolfinbarger, M, Ortinau, D.J., & Bush, R.P. (2008). Essentials of marketing
research (p. 28). New York, McGraw-Hill Irwin.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Semester Two Exam Key
53. B
It keeps the business from wasting resources. When managers and researchers are "on the same
page" about what the marketing-research problem is, it keeps the business from wasting the valuable
resources of time, money, and effort on researching the wrong problem. Managers and researchers will
still need to establish formal research objectives. Defining the problem clearly doesn't ensure that the
results of the study will be favorable for the business. The results of the study may help managers plan
strategies for improving the business's market share, but simply defining the problem won't accomplish
that.
SOURCE: IM:282/4.10 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: IM LAP 13—What's the Problem? (Marketing-Research Problems)
54. D
Experimental. This technique is expensive because it involves setting up the research situation, such as
developing a new product and then testing it on groups of consumers to determine their response. An
example of the experimental research approach is quick-serve restaurants testing a new sandwich in
certain markets. Technological is not a research approach. Recording means to keep track or to keep a
record of something. Questioning is a variation of the survey research approach.
SOURCE: IM:284/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2006). Marketing essentials (p. 616). New
York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
55. C
Exploratory. Businesses conduct exploratory research for discovery purposes. This type of research
helps the business define a marketing issue, situation, opportunity, or concern. Causal research is a
type of marketing research that focuses on cause and effect and tests "what if" theories. Causal
research involves conducting experiments, which involve manipulating one or more independent
variables and examining the outcome. Descriptive research involves gathering specific information
related to a specific issue, situation, or concern.
SOURCE: IM:284/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [pp. 50-51].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
56. C
Descriptive. Businesses use descriptive research to answer questions such as what, who, when, and
where. Unlike causal research design, it cannot answer "why" questions that examine cause and effect.
Experimental is a type of causal research. Exploratory research helps businesses gain insight, clarify
concepts, and gather explanations. It is less formal than descriptive and causal research.
SOURCE: IM:284/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: QuickMBA.com. (1999-2010). Marketing research. Retrieved May 24, 2011, from
http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/research/
57. B
How many people to survey. Sampling plans are intended to identify the number of people who will be
surveyed for a research project. The goal is to survey enough people to obtain an accurate
representation, but not more than necessary. In many cases, the population affected by the research is
very large and researchers are unable to survey all of them. Therefore, they establish a sampling plan
that determines the number of people to survey. A sampling plan does not answer the question of what
type of product to study, when to conduct an interview, or why the issue is important.
SOURCE: IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 614-615).
New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
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Semester Two Exam Key
58. D
Random sampling. Because it isn't feasible to survey a large target market, researchers often survey a
representative group or sample of the target market. Random sampling exists when each member of
the sample group has an equal chance or the same opportunity to be selected to participate in the
survey. An advantage to random sampling is that the data are less likely to be biased or skewed.
Researchers might use interviews (e.g., personal, telephone) when they want to obtain more in-depth
information. The disadvantage to using the interview method is there is a higher risk of interviewer bias.
Referral sampling is commonly called snowball sampling. This method involves obtaining
recommendations of other potential sample-group members from the selected sample respondents.
SOURCE: IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Shao, A. (2002). Marketing research: An aid to decision making (2nd ed.) [p. 363]. Mason,
OH: South-Western.
59. C
Chance. It is highly unlikely that all 100 girls in a sample would be exactly the same height. However, it
could happen by chance—even with little chance of occurrence. Interviewer bias occurs when the
presence, actions, or attitudes of the interviewer influence a respondent's answers. The scenario
provides insufficient information to determine whether non-response error occurred. This problem
happens when researchers fail to sample the people who didn't respond to determine whether there
were statistical differences between respondents and non-respondents. Inadequate information is
provided to know whether the question was asked in such a way that it influenced responses.
SOURCE: IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Mugo, F.W. (n.d.). Sampling in research. Retrieved May 24, 2011, from
http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/tutorial/Mugo/tutorial.htm
60. D
Simple. A simple sampling strategy is used when the researchers believe that the population is
relatively homogeneous for the characteristic of interest. In this case, the researchers would feel that
people sharing the same major, business, would have similar interests. Proportionate sampling is used
when subgroups vary dramatically in size in our population. Researchers can select more participants
from larger groups to ensure that they are adequately represented. Stratified random sampling is used
when subgroups in the population differ a great deal in their responses or behavior. To overcome this
issue, researchers treat the population as though it were multiple, separate populations and then
randomly sample within each subgroup. Marketers would choose cluster sampling when it would be
impossible or impractical to identify every person in the sample. As an example, imagine that a large
international business wants to survey its employees but does not have a staff directory from which
names could be sampled. It would be easier to sample by department. The researchers could randomly
sample a percentage of employees within each randomly selected department rather than trying to
sample that percentage of employees companywide.
SOURCE: IM:285/4.11 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Wadsworth Cengage Learning. (2005). Sampling methods: Research methods workshops.
Retrieved May 24, 2011, from
http://www.wadsworth.com/psychology_d/templates/student_resources/workshops/res_met
hd/sampling/sampling_01.html
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Semester Two Exam Key
61. D
Balanced. Marketing researchers can use many types of itemized rating scales on a survey. An
Itemized scale provides respondents with a set of options from which they must choose an answer. A
balanced itemized scale provides an equal number of favorable responses (e.g., extremely satisfied,
satisfied) as it does unfavorable responses (e.g., dissatisfied, extremely dissatisfied). A continuous
scale is a type of non-comparative scale that allows respondents to place a slash mark on a line that is
bounded by two opposite variables (e.g., the worst; the best). Spliced and sequential are not types of
survey rating scales.
SOURCE: IM:286/4.13
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [p. 358].
Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
62. A
Semantic differential. Itemized scales provide respondents with a set of options from which they must
choose an answer. A semantic differential scale is a type of itemized scale that marketing researchers
use to measure attitudes. The scale provides seven spaces, which are bounded by descriptive
antonyms at each end, such as reliable and unreliable. The respondent places an “X” at the point or
space on the continuum that best describes his/her feelings about the object or idea that s/he is rating.
The Likert scale measures the respondents' level of agreement with a statement. The Stapel scale is a
10-point scale that places the phrase in the middle and requires the respondent to mark which series of
positive or negative numbers best describes his/her feelings about the phrase in relation to the object or
idea. Random-rating scale is a fictitious term.
SOURCE: IM:286/4.13
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [pp. 348349]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
63. B
Mail survey. A survey is a marketing-research method that involves asking consumers questions in
order to learn their opinions and the reasons behind those opinions. Researchers often use mail
surveys that are sent to individuals' homes as a way of collecting data. A message board is a gathering
place for transmitting ideas or information through electronic communication. A case study is an
instructional method that involves giving trainees a written description of an organizational problem, and
the trainees are asked to determine the problem and potential solutions. Behavior chart is not a
common method of collecting research data.
SOURCE: IM:289/4.12
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2006). Marketing essentials (pp. 614-616).
New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
64. A
Volume-tracking scanner. A scanner is an electronic device that reads or translates codes that are
placed on products and enters the product information into a computer. Scanners are commonly used
during a sales transaction, which is the point of purchase. This is a popular method of collecting
information about customers' buying habits and inventory status because the scanning system can
track large volumes of goods. Once enough data are collected, researchers evaluate the data to
determine how fast or slow certain products are moving, which is information they can use to make
business decisions. Photographic scanners, e-mail surveys, and statistical surveys are not datacollection methods that researchers use during the point-of-purchase process.
SOURCE: IM:289/4.12
SOURCE: Zikmund, W.G., & Babin, B.J. (2010). Exploring marketing research (10th ed.) [pp. 256257]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
65. B
Observation. Observing the way in which employees and customers interact is one way to obtain
information about customer service and customer satisfaction. This technique involves watching how
the employees and customers communicate with one another without them knowing that they are being
observed. The observation approach often provides the researcher with insight (verbal and nonverbal
cues) that s/he cannot obtain by holding a telephone interview or by distributing a survey. For example,
if observation research indicates that several employees have problems helping customers select the
appropriate product, the business can take steps to train employees so they can better help customers.
An experiment involves manipulating certain factors in a controlled environment to determine the cause
and effect of variable combinations. An experiment would not be the appropriate approach to determine
how employees interact with customers.
SOURCE: IM:289/4.12
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 615-616).
New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
66. A
Customer survey. Primary marketing research is information that a business obtains for a specific
purpose. Businesses use many techniques to obtain primary data, such as observation, interviews, and
surveys. Surveys contain questions about the information the business wants to obtain. For example, a
business might distribute a survey to its customers when it wants to find out what the customers think of
the business's goods and services. Census data, trade-journal articles, and external reports are forms
of secondary research.
SOURCE: IM:289/4.12
SOURCE: Shao, A. (2002). Marketing research: An aid to decision making (2nd ed.) [pp. 184-185].
Mason, OH: South-Western.
67. B
Can decrease their response rate. Ill-designed questionnaires negatively affect the quality and quantity
of data obtained from survey participants. This lowers their response rate because they may think the
survey is too complex, too time-consuming, or too confusing. Survey design is unlikely to make
participants question the survey's purpose, decrease their desire to answer personal questions, or
make them take their time to complete the survey.
SOURCE: IM:418/4.13
SOURCE: Agriculture and Consumer Protection. (n.d.). Chapter 4: Questionnaire design. Retrieved
May 4, 2011, from http://www.fao.org/docrep/W3241E/w3241e05.htm
68. A
Toward the end of the interview. By asking potentially sensitive questions toward the end of an
interview, the researcher can avoid having the participant cut off the interview before important
information can be collected. By asking the questions at the beginning, in the middle, or throughout the
interview, the researcher risks prematurely ended interviews.
SOURCE: IM:418/4.13
SOURCE: Agriculture and Consumer Protection. (n.d.). Chapter 4: Questionnaire design. Retrieved
May 4, 2011, from http://www.fao.org/docrep/W3241E/w3241e05.htm
69. C
Transportation. There are a variety of ways that businesses can ship or transport their products to their
final destination. The cost of each type of transportation varies; therefore, businesses choose the
method that fits within their price range. Businesses build the transportation costs into the price of their
products. Inflation is a rapid rise in prices usually occurring when demand exceeds supply. Regulations
are an established set of rules. Orientation is job preparation or induction training for new employees.
SOURCE: PI:001/3.06
SOURCE: PI LAP 2—The Price is Right (Nature of Pricing)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
70. D
Flexible pricing. Flexible pricing means that a business adjusts prices up or down according to changes
in economic or other factors that affect consumer spending. High-level pricing in economic hard times
would reduce sales. Odd-cents pricing is used to give the illusion that a price is slightly lower than it is.
For example, many consumers perceive $4.99 as closer to $4.00 than to $5.00. Below-cost pricing
would mean selling products for less than what the business paid for them, which would lose money for
the business.
SOURCE: PI:001/3.06
SOURCE: PI LAP 2—The Price is Right (Nature of Pricing)
71. B
Developing a complex pricing structure. Some businesses develop complex pricing structures that are
very difficult for customers to understand. Customers buying from such businesses are seldom able to
figure out how to get a lower price and end up spending more than they should. Although this practice
is not illegal, it is considered unethical because customers don't have a fair chance to obtain the best
price. Providing a reference price is ethical because it gives customers a comparison price. It is ethical
for businesses to match the prices of competitors as long as they don't meet in advance and agree to
set the prices. The purpose of business is to earn a profit, which involves marking up prices.
SOURCE: PI:015/3.06
SOURCE: Perreault, W.D., Cannon, J.P., & McCarthy, E.J. (2008). Basic marketing: A marketing
strategy planning approach (16th ed.) [p. 480]. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
72. A
A company prices its products low in an attempt to drive its competitors out of business. Ethics are the
principles that guide personal behavior. When a business prices its products very low with the goal to
drive its competitors out of business, it may be acting unethically, and possibly illegally. This is because
the business is deliberately pricing products so low that smaller businesses cannot afford to compete,
which eventually drives them out of business. Increasing prices when production costs increase, setting
profit-margin objectives, and using a prestige pricing strategy are legal and ethical business practices.
SOURCE: PI:015/3.06
SOURCE: InvestorWords.com. (n.d.). Predatory pricing: Definition. Retrieved May 17, 2011, from
http://www.investorwords.com/3770/predatory_pricing.html
73. C
Easier to change prices. Bar codes that include price information can be scanned into a register
terminal where the price is read and recorded. When a business needs to change a price, such as to
offer a sale price, an employee can enter the change into the scanning system computer, and the
change is made for every item. This is a faster and more economical method than manually changing
prices on every item. Customers will need a scanning device to read the price. There are seldom
changes in the number of security personnel or employees based on the use of bar-code pricing
techniques.
SOURCE: PI:016/3.06
SOURCE: Farese, L. S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C. A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 504, 511).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Semester Two Exam Key
74. D
By determining the best time to adjust prices. Technology makes it possible for online businesses to
store previous sales information in databases and to use a point-of-sale system to obtain current sales
information. Then, online businesses can use certain software programs to analyze the information to
determine the best time to adjust prices. For example, an analysis of historical and current sales data
might indicate that the time is right to reduce prices on certain products that are beginning to lose
popularity. Deciding how much to spend on advertising, calculating the cost of hiring more employees,
or generating profit-and-loss statements are not factors that impact the pricing function.
SOURCE: PI:016/3.06
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2006). Marketing essentials (pp. 558-559).
New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
75. A
Price discrimination. Price discrimination is an illegal activity in which a business charges different
customers different prices for similar amounts and types of products. A business that charges a small
company a higher price for a product than it charges a large company for the same product is involved
in price discrimination. Businesses are expected to offer comparable prices to all customers for the
same product. However, there are some exceptions if the price differences do not restrict competition.
Charging different customers different prices is not an example of controlled pricing or regulated pricing.
Price competition is a type of rivalry between or among businesses that focuses on the use of price to
attract scarce customer dollars.
SOURCE: PI:017/3.06
SOURCE: Etzel, M.J., Walker, B.J., & Stanton, W.J. (2007). Marketing (14th ed.) [pp. 355-356].
Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin
76. B
Price fixing. Price fixing is an unethical activity in which businesses agree on the prices of their goods
and services resulting in little choice for the consumer. In some countries, price fixing is illegal because
it restricts competition. Bait and switch refers to an advertising scheme in which a business promotes a
low-priced item to attract customers to whom the business then tries to sell a higher priced item. Loss
leader pricing involves pricing a product below cost to attract customers to the business. Gray markets
involve selling goods to unauthorized dealers for very low prices.
SOURCE: PI:017/3.06
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [pp. 363-364]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
77. C
Economic conditions. External factors are those factors outside of the business over which the business
has no control, such as the overall condition of the economy. If the economy slows down and
consumers cut back on spending, businesses often reduce prices in order to encourage customers to
spend. On the other hand, if the economy is prospering and customers have money to spend,
businesses might increases prices. Variable expenses, operating costs, and employee benefits are
internal factors that affect price. However, the business has control over these factors.
SOURCE: PI:002/3.06
SOURCE: PI LAP 3—Make Cents (Factors Affecting Selling Price)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Semester Two Exam Key
78. B
To get market share as fast as possible. Businesses may use selling price to obtain a share of the
market, to enlarge the share they already have, or to maintain that share. For example, some new
companies set low prices in order to get as much of the market as possible right from the start. They
feel that they will benefit over time because the customers who are attracted by the low prices will
become regular customers. Because the selling prices are low, the business will not make a large profit
or earn a high return on investment. It is illegal for businesses to deliberately set prices so low that they
eliminate all competition.
SOURCE: PI:002/3.06
SOURCE: PI LAP 3—Make Cents (Factors Affecting Selling Price)
79. B
They meet or exceed customer expectations on a consistent basis. A brand promise is an agreement,
of sorts, with customers that a business or product will behave in certain ways that are in accordance
with their brand values and characteristics. Consistently delivering on a brand promise reinforces the
brand with customers, building brand equity and brand loyalty. Most businesses do not provide
customers with a sworn statement. Besides, "actions speak louder than words." Customers are more
interested in the quality of their experiences with a business than words. Salespeople generally do not
verbally make brand promises to customers; rather, they deliver on the business's brand promise
through the nature of their interaction with customers and their appearance. Fulfilling special requests
might be just one way in which a particular business delivers on its brand promise, if its values include
"individualized service" or "going the extra mile" for the customer. However, making and fulfilling a
brand promise to customers means the business must be customer centered in all of its operations and
interactions with customers.
SOURCE: PM:206/3.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: PM LAP 6—It's a Brand, Brand, Brand World! (The Nature of Branding)
80. A
This will reinforce their promises to customers and build the brands. Articulating brand values is not
enough; they must be acted upon. Customers must experience these values and brand qualities in
every encounter with a business or product in order to feel loyalty and to contribute to building the
brand's equity. There is no evidence that it is less expensive for a business to operate if everyone buys
into the same thing. Incorporating brand values into operations may provide the nugget of an
advertising idea, but this is not the reason for doing it; creating a satisfying "brand experience" for the
customer is. There is no evidence that says that there will be less employee "resistance" with a
standard brand philosophy; in fact, brand consistency throughout an organization's operations does
provide clarity for employees in terms of what is expected of them in how they do their jobs. It can
provide a rallying point for employees, as well.
SOURCE: PM:206/3.05 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Kotler, P., & Lane, K. (2006). Marketing management (12th ed.) [pp. 280-281, 285-287].
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
81. C
Government regulation of ads. Government regulations, such as the one prohibiting radio and television
cigarette advertising, are part of the external factors that affect promotion. Changes in the product's
price or distribution methods, or a reorganization of the business are examples of internal factors that
affect promotion.
SOURCE: PR:001/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 2—Razzle Dazzle (Nature of Promotion)
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
82. C
Helps them to select appropriate products. Promotion helps the customer determine which product is
the right one for him/her, or the most appropriate. Promotion introduces new products to consumers
and assists with decision making. It does not help consumers to spend more on products or delay
decisions. It is the salesperson's job to identify the customer's buying motives, or reasons for buying.
SOURCE: PR:001/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 2—Razzle Dazzle (Nature of Promotion)
83. A
Product promotion. Product promotion attempts to persuade consumers to buy a good or service. A
half-price sale is attempting to do just that. Since the business is paying for its own announcement, this
is not publicity. Institutional promotion aims to create a certain image in the eyes of consumers. Sales
promotion understands the concepts and strategies needed to communicate information about goods,
services, images, and/or ideas to achieve a desired outcome.
SOURCE: PR:002/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 4—Know Your Options (Types of Promotion)
84. B
To demonstrate the organization's role in community affairs. Institutional promotions aim to create a
certain image in the eyes of consumers. Supporting personal selling activities, introducing new goods or
services, and creating consumer interest in goods or services are all objectives of promotional
advertising.
SOURCE: PR:002/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 4—Know Your Options (Types of Promotion)
85. B
Growth. In the growth stage, competing products appear on the market, and promotional activities focus
on pointing out differences between competing products. When a product is first placed on the market,
it is in the introductory stage, and it is promoted to gain customer awareness. Little product promotion
occurs during the declining stage; rather, money is invested in promotional activities to maintain a
positive company image.
SOURCE: PR:003/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 1—Spread the Word (Nature of Promotional Mix)
86. A
Personal selling. Products sold to industrial users are usually complex, technical, expensive, and
require demonstration. Because of these characteristics, personal selling should be emphasized. Sales
promotion, publicity, and advertising could be used to support personal selling.
SOURCE: PR:003/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 1—Spread the Word (Nature of Promotional Mix)
87. A
By playing follow the leader. Competing businesses within the same industry usually use quite similar
promotional mixes because many of the factors affecting the promotional mix are the same for those
businesses. Businesses also use the same promotional activities to prevent losing customers to
competitors. Changing the distribution channel would not necessarily make the business more
competitive. Reducing the promotional budget or trying not to outdo the competition would make the
business less competitive.
SOURCE: PR:003/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 1—Spread the Word (Nature of Promotional Mix)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
88. A
Company news release. Publicity is a nonpersonal form of promotion that is not paid for by the
company or individual that receives it. A news release would be prepared by the company but
presented at the publisher's expense. Direct mail, a billboard, and a company television commercial are
examples of advertising.
SOURCE: PR:003/4.01
SOURCE: PR LAP 1—Spread the Word (Nature of Promotional Mix)
89. A
A television commercial depicts a woman mopping the kitchen with a new floor cleaner. A stereotype is
a set image or an assumption about a person or thing. Until recent decades, many people associated
homemaking or house cleaning as a female's primary responsibility. However, it is not generally true
today. With more women in the workforce, household and child care (e.g., a man pouring orange juice
for children), responsibilities are often shared with males. An ad campaign that presents a variety of
people suggests that all types of people drink milk. Therefore, the print ads aren't engaging in
stereotyping. Using a well-known athlete to promote continuing education does not necessarily promote
stereotypes.
SOURCE: PR:099/4.01
SOURCE: O'Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated brand
promotion (5th ed.) [p. 118]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
90. C
You can increase your social status by purchasing this product. Materialism is an emphasis on, or
preoccupation with, attaining things or certain positions—the right clothes, car, job, or social status.
Some critics believe that advertisements reinforce a materialistic attitude in today's society—defining a
person's value in society by his/her possessions. For example, an ad for a designer product might imply
that you will achieve a certain social status or acceptance if you buy the product. An advertisement
claiming that a product has a higher government rating than a competitor's product is an example of a
comparison ad. An advertisement stating that a handmade product is constructed of organic materials
is an example of an ad that reinforces the concept of social responsibility. A business usually would not
place an advertisement for the sole purpose of directing consumers to its web site.
SOURCE: PR:099/4.01
SOURCE: Arens, W.F. (2004). Contemporary advertising (9th ed.) [pp. 64-65]. Boston: Irwin/McGraw
Hill.
91. D
Individualized messages. The new information technology that includes computerized databases allows
businesses to create individualized promotional messages. Businesses can collect a variety of
information about customers, enter that information into a database, and use the computer to sort the
data. For example, a business might track customers according to their preferences for products and
then generate mailing lists and individualized messages that promote specific products to specific
customers. Businesses created commercials, premiums, and publicity campaigns before the new
technology was developed; however, new technology makes some of these activities easier to perform.
SOURCE: PR:100/4.01
SOURCE: O'Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated brand
promotion (5th ed.) [p. 530]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
92. D
Information can be communicated by more venues, and messages can be customized. Because there
are more people who are using personal computers, new computer software programs are being
developed to help businesses of all sizes to personalize promotional messages. Personalized
messages can be developed for specific target market members and can be communicated through
traditional direct mail or Internet (e.g., electronic mail, web sites) channels. Although technological
advancements often help companies become more productive and cost-efficient, it does necessarily
mean that the businesses have additional funds to spend on promotional activities. Although computer
advancements have helped accelerate the time to develop promotional campaigns, it does not
necessarily affect creativity. The number of channels needed to carry out promotional plans is highly
dependent on the type of promotional activity.
SOURCE: PR:100/4.01
SOURCE: O'Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated brand
promotion (5th ed.) [p. 530]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
93. B
Children are impressionable, and the wrong kinds of advertising can affect their development. This was
one of the most controversial issues of the 1970s. Children were watching hours and hours of television
each day, and some people believed that advertisers were taking advantage of the fact that children are
impressionable and often unable to evaluate advertising messages and make responsible purchase
decisions. So, legislation was passed and the Better Business Bureau, among others, published
guidelines geared specifically to advertisers who target children in their communication. Parents were
among those who raised issues about advertising to children but not primarily because their children
were asking for the products they saw on television. Research has shown that children exposed to a lot
of advertising do behave differently, but there is no known research linking juvenile offenders with
watching television advertising.
SOURCE: PR:101/4.01
SOURCE: Wells, W., Burnett, J., & Moriarty, S. (2003). Advertising principles and practice (6th ed.)
[p. 39]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
94. D
A business must understand that the laws governing promotional activities vary by country. Some
countries have strict promotional laws that marketers must follow, while other countries' laws are
lenient. A business that breaks a promotional law may have to pay government fines, which is costly to
the business. Therefore, it is important for marketers to understand which promotional activities are,
and are not, permissible in the countries where they sell and promote products. The International Ad
Coalition is a fictitious organization. In some countries, industry and consumer groups influence how the
governments regulate promotion. Some, rather than most, countries have a system of checks and
balances to verify that promotion regulations are fair.
SOURCE: PR:101/4.01
SOURCE: Arens, W.F. (2004). Contemporary advertising (9th ed.) [pp. 74-76]. Boston: Irwin/McGraw
Hill.
95. C
They reach a lot of people at the same time. The mass media include print, broadcast, direct mail, outof-home, and other media. They can literally reach people around the world at one time. The mass
media are also capable of reaching a specific audience, meeting the needs of many businesses, and
presenting large amounts of promotion, but it is their ability to reach masses of people that is
responsible for their name.
SOURCE: PR:007/4.02
SOURCE: PR LAP 3—Ad-quipping Your Business (Types of Advertising Media)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
96. D
An electrical sign located in a high-traffic area. Out-of-home media also include billboards, painted
bulletins, blimps, and hot-air balloons. An eye-appealing card placed in a mailbox is an example of
direct mail. A calendar imprinted with a company's name is an example of specialty advertising.
SOURCE: PR:007/4.02
SOURCE: PR LAP 3—Ad-quipping Your Business (Types of Advertising Media)
97. C
Increased sales. Word-of-mouth communication is promotion and publicity for a business provided by
customers who tell others of their satisfaction with the business. This type of positive communication
often leads to increased sales for the business because it attracts new customers. When satisfied
customers tell others about their positive experiences, they are encouraging others to buy from the
business. This will not decrease advertising costs because the business still needs to advertise.
Advertising is an operating expense. Word-of-mouth communication does not increase the product mix
which is the particular assortment of goods and services that a business offers in order to meet the
needs of its market and its company goals.
SOURCE: PR:247/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Semenik, R.J. (2002). Promotion and integrated marketing communications (pp. 441-443).
Mason, OH: South-Western.
98. D
Providing information to activists to share with others. Word-of-mouth promotion involves customers
who tell others about their satisfaction with the business. Amplified word-of-mouth promotion involves
the use of proactive efforts (campaigns) in which the business provides specific information to
customers (activists) to pass along to their friends, family, and business contacts. On the other hand,
organic word-of-mouth promotion occurs naturally. Because customers are satisfied with the business
and its products, they tell others about this satisfaction in the course of normal conversation. For
example, if a business shows a sincere interest in the customer by asking for feedback, taking actions
to ensure customer loyalty, or improving products, the customer is likely to share those positive
experiences with others.
SOURCE: PR:247/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Digital Vibes. (2008, June 1). Word of mouth: Organic or amplified. Retrieved May 24,
2011, from http://digitalvibes.wordpress.com/2008/06/01/word-of-mouth-101-organic-vsamplified/
99. B
Organic marketing. Word-of-mouth promotion occurs when customers tell others about their satisfaction
with the business. Organic word-of-mouth promotion occurs naturally. Because customers are satisfied
with the business and its products, they enthusiastically tell others about their satisfaction in the course
of normal conversation. In some situations, customers trust and like the product so much that they
become product advocates—putting in a good word whenever and wherever they can. Virtual
marketing involves communicating product information via the Internet. Mobile marketing involves
communicating information via mobile devices and networks (e.g., smartphones). Shill marketing
involves employing people to pose as customers who are satisfied with a business's product using
word-of-mouth techniques. Shill marketing is unethical behavior, and in some jurisdictions, it is an illegal
practice.
SOURCE: PR:247/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: WOMMA. (2010). Organic vs. amplified word of mouth. Retrieved May 24, 2011, from
http://womma.org/wom101/4/
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Semester Two Exam Key
100. D
Niche catalogs. These specialized catalogs focus on lifestyles and hobbies and can target specific
customers by using a database. Box-holder flyers are generally used to promote a business in a local
area, thus not reaching the audience sought by this retailer. Cable television shopping channels usually
carry well-known brands and usually require a large amount of inventory in stock to meet demands of
the customers. Computer kiosks are free-standing units that are located in stores or malls for
consumers to request information and order merchandise.
SOURCE: PR:089/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: O'Guinn, T.C., Allen, C.T., & Semenik, R.J. (2009). Advertising & integrated brand
promotion (5th ed.) [p. 211]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
101. D
They intend to motivate the consumer to take action. This is a key difference between direct strategies
and other types of advertising or promotion. Direct advertising strategies try to make the consumer do
something immediately: pick up the phone, go online, drive to the mall, etc. Its immediacy and strong
persuasiveness distinguish effective direct advertising strategies from other types of communication.
Creative techniques vary widely among different direct advertising strategies and are determined by
such factors as the objectives, the product being advertised, and the budget. Direct advertising
strategies are effective because they communicate with consumers on a more individual basis, not as
one large group. Some direct strategies get consumers' attention through the use of unusual copy and
graphics. However, some of the most effective direct strategies are also more straightforward—for
example, letters with long copy and few, if any, graphics. What works varies from situation to situation,
product to product.
SOURCE: PR:089/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Wells, W., Burnett, J., & Moriarty, S. (2003). Advertising principles and practice (6th ed.)
[pp. 415-418]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
102. A
A person orders an exercise machine by telephone after viewing an infomercial. Direct-response
advertising is a promotional method in which marketers provide the means for people to take action and
immediately respond to a message. An infomercial is defined as a lengthy commercial that looks like a
television program. A television channel airing an infomercial that includes a telephone number so
viewers are able to order the product is an example of direct-response advertising. When a person
orders the item advertised via the infomercial, the advertisement is successful because a sale has been
made. Billboards and movie theater previews are examples of out-of-home advertising. Coupon
distribution is an example of a sales promotion activity.
SOURCE: PR:089/4.03 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Lane, W.R., King, K.W., & Russell, J.T. (2005). Kleppner's advertising procedure (16th ed.)
[pp. 396-397]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.
103. D
Rebate. Sales-promotion techniques are activities other than advertising, selling, and personal selling
that stimulate customer purchases. A rebate is a sales-promotion technique in which a business
(manufacturer) returns part of the price that a customer (Ben) pays for a good (cellular telephone) or
service. Rebates stimulate sales because customers want to receive money back for their purchases.
Couponing involves the use of printed certificates that entitle the holder to a reduced purchase price.
Coupons are generally processed at the point of sale. Sweepstakes involve a game of chance in which
a customer wins a prize. A warranty is a promise made by the seller to the customer that the seller will
repair or replace a product that does not perform as expected. A warranty is a benefit of purchase
rather than a sales-promotion technique.
SOURCE: PR:249/4.04
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (pp. 372, 555).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Semester Two Exam Key
104. B
Product placement. Product placement is a sales-promotion strategy in which a product or brand is
mentioned or used as a prop by types of media such as television, film, or the theater. For example,
fans of the television series Friday Night Lights will often see the television characters eat in an
Applebee's restaurant. The intent of product placement is to generate and reinforce brand awareness
with a target market. Brand identification is the process by which all of the branding elements work
together to generate instant consumer recognition of a company or product. The use of props in
television shows and movies is not called product programming.
SOURCE: PR:249/4.04
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [p. 428]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
105. D
Press releases. Press releases are written information provided to the media in order to obtain publicity.
They are a common communications channel, or method or providing information to others, used in
public relations. Businesses often send press releases to the media to announce good news, such as
plans for expansion that will generate positive publicity for the business. Trade shows, product displays,
and billboards are not common communications channels used in public relations.
SOURCE: PR:250/4.04
SOURCE: Semenik, R.J. (2002). Promotion and integrated marketing communications (p. 456).
Mason, OH: South-Western.
106. B
Newsletters, annual reports, and the company's web site. Public relations involves establishing good
relationships between the business and the public. A business tries to maintain positive relationships
with different groups that make up the public, such as employees, local businesses, government
officials, the media, and the business's shareholders. Because the shareholders are the owners of the
company, it is important to develop and maintain positive relationships with them. The public-relations
department does this by communicating with them through newsletters, annual reports, the company's
web site, and online social networks. Print advertisements and commercials are forms of nonpersonal
advertising. Businesses use press releases and news conferences to convey information to the media.
Policy manuals help guide employees' actions on the job. Consumer blogs can be developed by
anyone to communicate positive and negative information about various goods and services. A
sponsorship is a partnership in which a company pays a fee to affiliate itself with a team, league, or
event.
SOURCE: PR:250/4.04
SOURCE: Soloman, M.R., Marshall, G.W., & Stuart, E.W. (2008). Marketing: Real people, real
choices (5th ed.) [pp. 432-435]. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
107. C
Provide friendly, courteous service. A company's sales personnel must have the appropriate personality
characteristics and attitudes in order to foster customer goodwill and encourage repeat business. These
characteristics include being patient, courteous, friendly, sincere, and trustworthy. Some businesses
change their product mix from time to time, but it is not necessary to make frequent changes or to
provide a wide variety of services. This approach might have the opposite effect from building a
clientele as customers would not know what to expect or would have too much from which to choose,
and is dependent on the type of business. It is not always possible to know customers personally.
SOURCE: SE:828/4.14 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: SE LAP 115—Keep Them Loyal (Building Clientele)
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
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Semester Two Exam Key
108. B
Service attitude. Toni's service attitude reflects a strong commitment to the client and his/her needs.
Credibility means that people can believe what you say. Confidentiality refers to keeping important
information secret. Persistence means having the staying power or endurance to follow through or to
reach a goal.
SOURCE: SE:828/4.14 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: SE LAP 115—Keep Them Loyal (Building Clientele)
109. B
Reduces them because making a repeat sale costs less than making an initial sale. Because of
reduced selling costs, it is to the organization's advantage to develop a loyal clientele. Repeat sales to
a client are more profitable for the business. With repeat sales, salespeople are usually able to increase
their commissions and bonuses.
SOURCE: SE:828/4.14 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: SE LAP 115—Keep Them Loyal (Building Clientele)
110. A
Tom tells Mrs. Smith she can save $100 by purchasing a vacuum cleaner without the carpet
attachment, because she has hardwood floors. Tom is doing the customer a favor and demonstrating
ethical behavior by not selling her something for which she has no use. Mrs. Thompson is encouraging
John to pad his expense account, thus costing the company additional money. This practice
demonstrates unethical behavior towards the company. Even though Ron is saving the customer
money, he is undercutting his company. Mayhew's is engaging in a practice that is both illegal and
unethical.
SOURCE: SE:106/4.15
SOURCE: SE LAP 129—Keep It Real—In Sales (Selling Ethics)
111. A
Ethical issues can occur when the reciprocity hurts or eliminates competition. Reciprocal sales
arrangements are agreements between two parties that they will buy products from each other.
Reciprocal sales agreements do not always create ethical dilemmas; however, problems can occur
when the two parties deliberately try to eliminate competition. Price discrimination occurs when a seller
has different pricing structures for similar customers. Reciprocal sales agreements do not necessarily
create price discrimination. A breach of warranty occurs when the quality or performance of a product is
misrepresented by the seller. Reciprocal sales arrangements can occur with any type of business.
Therefore, technological businesses are not any more likely to experience ethical dilemmas when
engaging in reciprocal selling arrangements than other types of businesses.
SOURCE: SE:106/4.15
SOURCE: SE LAP 129—Keep It Real—In Sales (Selling Ethics)
112. B
Web presentation combined with a teleconference. Utilizing this combination, Caroline's client could
view the demonstration online as she walks the customer through the presentation. Teleconferencing
allows her to answer questions as they arise during the presentation. A PowerPoint presentation on CD
could be sent to the client to view, but this would not provide a live demonstration. Also, questions
would have to be addressed via another method. The high-tech sales-support office is maintained for
the use of salespeople who may be dispersed geographically or travel a great deal. A cell phone with
wireless faxing would provide a static picture while allowing questions to be answered. This could also
be time consuming for the salesperson and the client.
SOURCE: SE:107/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Ingram, T.N, LaForge, R.W., Avila, R.A., Schwepker, C.H., & Williams, M.R. (2008).
Professional selling: A trust-based approach (4th ed.) [pp. 197-199]. Mason, OH: SouthWestern Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
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Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
113. C
Mapping software. This software is used in territory management and enables managers to align
territories and get an instant visual display of the effects. Outbound telemarketing allows companies to
build extensive databases of current as well as potential customers. Database software is used to
create records of customers and related information for future use by the business. Inbound
telemarketing occurs when customers call a toll-free number to place an order, file a complaint, or ask a
question.
SOURCE: SE:107/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Dlabay, L.R., Burrow, J.L., & Kleindl, B. (2009). Intro to business (7th ed.) [p. 205]. Mason,
OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
114. D
Tying arrangements. A tying arrangement is an illegal agreement requiring a customer to buy other
products in order to obtain desired goods and services. An example of a tying arrangement is a
salesperson's requiring a customer to buy the company's copy paper and toner in order to obtain the
desired copier machine. The copy paper and toner are the products tied to the main product.
Noncompete clauses in a salesperson's contract are legal in certain situations. Executive contracts and
competitive bids are legal.
SOURCE: SE:108/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. 425). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
115. B
Cooling-off. Many levels of government (e.g., local, state, provincial, national) have cooling-off laws.
Cooling-off regulations allow consumers the option to back out of a sales contract or transaction within
a limited period of time. These laws provide consumers with an opportunity to reevaluate sales
transactions, which often occurs when a salesperson uses high-pressure, unethical sales techniques.
Limited-probationary, conditional-sales, and buyer-withdrawal are not terms commonly used to describe
selling regulations.
SOURCE: SE:108/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Futrell, C.M. (2006) Fundamentals of selling: Customers for life through service (9th ed.)
[p. 93]. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
116. C
Exclusive dealing. Exclusive dealing agreements forbid customers from buying products from
competitors. This selling practice is regulated because it reduces competition. Consumer protection
legislation addresses product labeling issues. Incentives and discounts are not selling activities that
always reduce competition.
SOURCE: SE:108/4.16 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (pp. 424-425). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
117. B
Message. The message, or body, is the most important component of an effective business letter. The
message explains the purpose of the letter and expresses the writer's thoughts to the reader. A
business letter is ineffective if the message is not well written and clearly understandable. The opening,
address, and heading direct the business letter to the appropriate person.
SOURCE: CO:133/1.06 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Hyden, J.S., Jordan, A.K., & Steinauer, M.H. (2006). Communicating for success (3rd ed.)
[p. 308]. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.
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Semester Two Exam Key
118. D
To sell goods and services. One reason for writing business letters is to sell goods and services to
customers. Employees often write letters that explain new goods and services in order to encourage
customers to buy. Well-written business letters are used to create interest in goods and services and to
increase sales. Communicating with friends, accepting social invitations, and applying for personal
credit are reasons why individuals write personal letters.
SOURCE: CO:133/1.06 (SUPPLEMENTAL)
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2006). Marketing essentials (pp. 187-190).
New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
119. D
Marketing research. A marketing researcher could be classified as the "Sherlock Holmes" of marketing.
These investigators look for clues as to what customers want and need, as well as why customers do
what they do. Careers in distribution/warehousing physically link products with consumers by delivering
them to customers when they are needed. Careers in advertising involve catching customer attention
and informing customers about products, companies, and/or ideas. Sales careers involve satisfying
customer needs with products.
SOURCE: PD:024/1.02
SOURCE: Churchill, G.A., Brown, T.J., & Suter, T.A. (2010). Basic marketing research (7th ed.)
[pp. 13-15]. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.
120. B
Advertising. Advertisers use a variety of media to catch customers' attention, inform them of products,
and persuade them to buy. Some of these media are the Internet, radio, television, newspapers,
magazines, billboards, and catalogs. Marketing researchers are responsible for determining what
customers need and want and why customers do what they do. Product managers create, test, and
decide how a product will be packaged. They direct and coordinate all aspects of the product. Public
relations professionals strive to build and maintain positive relationships with the public by anticipating
problems, handling complaints, communicating with the media, and building a positive public image for
the company.
SOURCE: PD:024/1.02
SOURCE: Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk, C.A. (2009). Marketing essentials (p. 434).
Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
121. B
Product management. Product managers create, test, and decide how a product will be packaged.
They direct and coordinate all aspects of the product. Advertisers develop messages and images to
catch customers' attention, inform them of products, and persuade them to buy. They use a variety of
media to communicate with customers. Some of these media are the Internet, radio, television,
newspapers, magazines, billboards, and catalogs. Marketing researchers are responsible for
determining what customers need and want and why customers do what they do. Channel
management is the processes by which marketers ensure that products are distributed to customers
efficiently and effectively.
SOURCE: PD:024/1.02
SOURCE: Kimbrell, G., & Vineyard, B.S. (2006). Succeeding in the world of work (pp. 660-664). New
York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®
Semester Two Exam Key
122. D
Communication. Communication, the exchange of information in which the words and gestures are
understood in the same way by both the speaker and the listener, is at the center of all marketing
activities. Whether employees are working with customers or working with a team member, they need
to effectively exchange ideas and information. Communicating with people is crucial in marketing
because marketing involves continuous interaction with customers and coworkers. Purchasing is a
marketing function. Although math skills and technological know-how are often needed to carry out
marketing activities, their successful completion and use are based on communication.
SOURCE: PD:024/1.02
SOURCE: Boone, G., & Kurtz, D.L. (2009). Contemporary marketing 2009 (p. xxxxix). Mason, OH:
South-Western Cengage Learning.
6621 Marketing, Summer 2011 Version 2
Marketing Principles Course Guide
Copyright 2012, MBA Research and Curriculum Center®