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Transcript
Sentence
Review
What every sentence needs
Parts of a sentence
Types of sentences
Every sentence must…
 Begin
with a capital letter.
 Contain
 End
a verb.
with a . ! or ?
Parts of a Sentence
Sentences usually have two parts,
a subject and a predicate.



Subjects
Tells who or what the
sentence is about.
Contains the noun of
the sentence.
Usually comes first.



Predicates
Tells what the subject
of the sentence does or
is being.
Always contains a
verb.
Usually comes after the
subject.
Parts of a Sentence


A subject will
always consist of
a noun—a person,
place or thing.
(Mrs. Murphy,
desk, town)


A predicate will
always consist of
a verb—an action,
or a state of
being.
(ran, screamed,
is/are/was/were)
Identify the Simple Subject
1.
2.
3.
The new student struggled to open her
locker.
Fortunately, a boy named Paul volunteered
to help her.
In the front hallway, math and science
teachers celebrated the arrival of the
students.
Identify the Simple Predicate
1.
2.
3.
Caroline is nervous about performing
in the play.
The cast practiced their lines each
afternoon.
Opening night’s performance was the
best of the three shows.
Individual Practice


In the grammar workbook, look at the
exercise on pp. 25.
Complete exercises 1-15. Underline
the simple subject once, and the
simple predicate twice.
Simple and
Complete Subjects
Complete Subjects
Complete subjects include the noun and all of the words
describing the noun.
Ex. The tiny red bird built a nest in the tree.
The fourth grade students studied hard for their test.
Simple Subjects
Simple subjects are only the noun in the subject.
Ex. The tiny red bird built a nest in the tree.
The fourth grade students studied hard for their test.
Simple and
Complete Predicates
Complete Predicates
Complete predicates include the verb and all of the
words describing the verb.
Ex. The tiny red bird built a nest in the tree.
The fourth grade students studied hard for their test.
Simple Predicates
Simple predicates are only the verb in the predicate.
Ex. The tiny red bird built a nest in the tree.
The fourth grade students studied hard for their test.
Compound Subjects
Compound subjects are two or more subjects joined
together by a conjunction to create one subject.
Examples
•Braden played basketball at recess.
•Josie played basketball at recess.
•Braden and Josie played basketball at recess.
•Pancakes are good for breakfast.
•Waffles are good for breakfast.
•Pancakes or waffles are good for breakfast.
Compound Predicates
Compound predicates are two or more predicates joined
together by a conjunction to create one predicate.
Examples
•Braden played basketball at recess.
•Braden ran the track at recess.
•Braden played basketball and ran the track at recess.
•The dog chased the car.
•The dog barked at the car.
•The dog chased and barked at the car.
The Four Kinds of
Sentences

Declarative (telling)

Interrogative (question)

Exclamatory (exclamation)

Imperative (command)
Declarative
Sentences
A declarative sentence…
• is also called a statement.
• states or tells information.
• always ends with a period.
Examples of Declarative Sentences
1. We will have a great year.
2. Winding Creek is the best school there is.
Interrogative
Sentences
An interrogative sentence…
• is also called a question.
• asks a question.
• always ends with a question mark.
Examples of Interrogative Sentences
1. What did you do this summer?
2. Which type of book do you like the best?
Exclamatory
Sentences
An exclamatory sentence…
• is also called an exclamation.
• expresses strong emotion.
• always ends with an exclamation point.
Examples of Exclamatory Sentences
1. That movie was great!
2. What a beautiful flower!
Imperative
Sentences
An imperative sentence…
• is also called a command
• gives an order
• ends with a period or exclamation point.
Examples of Imperative Sentences
1. Please hand me the remote control.
2. Be careful!
Simple and
Compound Sentences

A simple sentence expresses one complete thought.

A compound sentence is two or more complete thoughts
joined together with a conjunction to create one sentence.
•Simple Sentence Examples
I would like to go to the store this afternoon.
I have a lot of homework to do.
•Compound Sentence Example
I would like to go to the store this afternoon, but I have a lot of
homework to do.
Compound sentences are always joined
by a comma then a conjunction.