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Transcript
Let’s review the order of
words you should identify
when labeling a sentence…
Do you remember what we
said about verbs?
By now you should know
action and helping verbs well.
Linking Verbs (LV)
(see word bank)
Predicate Adjectives (PA)
(remember that predicate is
the verb part of the sentence)
Predicate Nominative (PN)
Nominative is just a fancy
name for noun
Here’s the thing…
How do I change passive to
active?
Let’s review the jobs of a
noun…
But wait, there’s more!
1. Prep. Phrase
2. Verb
3. Subject
4. Adj./Art.
5. Adv.
6. Conj.
1. Action- do
2. Helping- give permission
3. Linking- join
Let’s focus on linking verbs…
 Join or “link” the subject to the rest of the sentence.
 Passive
 It is like an equal sign in math Ex. 3+4=7 (3+4 is 7)
 It does one of two things…
 The Sub = an Adj. or Noun
 The Adj. that is found after the LV that describes the Sub.
 Ex. Jim is happy. Jim = happy.
 Ex. Sally was fast. Sally = fast.
 Ex. The happy dog is six. Dog = six.
 Ex. He appeared worried. He = worried.
 The noun that is found after the LV that renames the subject.
 Ex. Jim is my happy friend. Jim = friend.
 Ex. Sally is a fast runner. Sally = runner.
 Ex. The happy dog is a poodle. Dog = poodle.
 Ex. He is the worried boss. He = boss.
Sentences that use linking verbs are PASSIVE
 They show NO action
 They should be used sparingly.
 Do you remember when we said put your adjectives in front of your
nouns…
 Passive: Jim is happy.
 Active: Happy Jim jumped off the edge.
 Passive: Sally was fast.
 Active: Fast Sally sprinted to the finish line.
 Do you see the difference?
 Using a passive sentence is okay once in a while. (1-2 per paragraph)
1. Subject
2. Appositive
3. Object of Preposition
4. Predicate Nominative
5. Direct Object
6. Indirect Object
7. Objective Compliment
Now think back to Active
Verbs…
Direct Object (DO)
How do I find the DO?
Cross out prep phrases
Ask: S V what?
Indirect Object(IO)
How do I find the IO?
Cross out prep phrases
Ask: S V what?= DO
Ask: S V DO to whom/what?
How do I tell the DO and IO
apart?
Direct and Indirect Objects are used ONLY with Active verbs!
 Nouns that receive the action
1. Find all Prep. Phrases first!
 Remember that prep. phrases NEVER contain: S, V, DO, IO
Ex. The boy threw the ball to the dog.
 Now you’re left with: The boy threw the ball.
2. Find the Verb and the Subject.
 Boy threw
3. ASK: Subject verb what?
(I know this looks odd on paper, but if you say it aloud, it sounds correct.)
 Boy threw what?
4. The answer is the DO.
 The boy threw the BALL.
 Noun that tells whom or what the action was done for.
1. Find all Prep. Phrases first!
 Remember that prep. phrases NEVER contain: S, V, DO, IO
Ex. The boy in the park threw Henry the ball.
 Now you’re left with: The boy threw Henry the ball.
2. Find the Verb and the Subject.
 Boy threw
3. ASK: Subject verb what?
(I know this looks odd on paper, but if you say it aloud, it sounds correct.)
 Boy threw what?
4. The answer is the DO.
The boy threw the BALL.
5. Now ASK: to whom or what?
 The boy threw the ball to whom?
6. The answer is the IO
The boy threw HENRY the ball.
Now you try…
Ex. Tom gave the TEACHER his homework from his backpack.
 One big clue to telling the DO and IO apart is you will always find the
IO before the DO and just after the verb.
 Sentences don’t have to have both a DO and IO.
 Sometimes you will only find a DO.
 If you mix them it can sound ridiculous…
 The boy threw Henry the ball.
 This sentence means that the boy is throwing the ball not Henry.
 BUT if you switch it…
 It means that the boy is throwing Henry.
Objective Compliments (OC)
S V What? What?
Every verb is either Transitive
or Intransitive
Transitive Verbs
Intransitive Verbs
Verbals




renames direct object or tells what the direct object has become
It is found after the DO
Ex. The people declared Fred the WINNER.
Ex. The team finds its opponent WEAK.
What does this mean?
 Have a DO
 Must be an Action verb
 Cannot be a Linking Verb. WHY… LV do not have DO
 Ex. Tim ate a hot dog.
 Do NOT have a DO
 ALL LV are Intransitive. WHY… LV do not have DO
 Tim is a pig.
 Action verbs can be intrans. If they do not have a DO.
 Ex. Tim ate on Friday.
 A verb that is used as another part of speech
 3 types
1. Infinitives
2. Gerunds
3. Participles
Reminder before we begin…


Nouns have several “jobs” in a sentence
They can be a:
1. Subject
2. Appositive
3. Object of the Preposition
4. Direct Object
5. Indirect Object
6. Predicate Nominative
7. Object complement
When a verbal is acting as a
noun…

You must figure out its “job”