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Transcript
Biology Curriculum Map
Jenkins/Marcum
Revised: June 2010
Biological Change
Length
of Unit
3 wks
Core Content/POS
SC-HS-3.5.1
Students will:
 predict the impact on
species of changes to
1) the potential for a
species to increase
its numbers, (2) the
genetic variability of
offspring due to
mutation and
recombination of
genes, (3) a finite
supply of the
resources required
for life, or (4) natural
selection;
 propose solutions to
real-world problems
of endangered and
extinct species.
Species change over time.
Biological change over time
is the consequence of the
interactions of (1) the
potential for a species to
increase its numbers, (2) the
genetic variability of
offspring due to mutation and
recombination of genes, (3) a
finite supply of the resources
required for life and (4)
natural selection. The
consequences of change
over time provide a scientific
explanation for the fossil
record of ancient life forms
and for the striking molecular
Rowan County Senior High School
Key Concepts/Skills/Guiding Questions
Terms:
Constant
Scientific method
Hypothesis
Theory
Conclusion
Experiment
Independent
Dependent variable
hominid
bipedal
radiometric dating
absolute dating
relative dating
half-life
mass extinction
geology
Pangea
Evolution
Natural selection
Activities/Assessments/
Resources
Radioactive Decay Lab: popcorn lab
Time Line Activity
Sequencing of major Geologic/Biologic events
Word Wall (eras, periods and epochs)
Mutation Activity
Students will:
SC-H-EU-S-8
Students will explain how technological solutions permit the
study of phenomena too faint, small, distant or slow to be
directly measured
SC-H-BC-S-3
Students will compare variations, tolerances and adaptations
(behavioral and physiological) of plants and animals in different
biomes
SC-H-BC-S-5
Students will predict the likelihood of survival for a variety of
existing species based upon predicted changes in
environmental conditions (e.g., global warming, continental drift)
and propose methods to prevent the extinction of species with
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Jenkins/Marcum
similarities observed among
the diverse species of living
organisms. Changes in DNA
(mutations) occur
spontaneously at low rates.
Some of these changes make
no difference to the
organism, whereas others
can change cells and
organisms. Only mutations in
germ cells have the potential
to create the variation that
changes an organism’s
future offspring.
DOK 3
SC-HS-2.3.6
Students will:
 compare the
limitations/benefits of
various techniques (
radioactive dating,
observing rock
sequences and
comparing fossils) for
estimating geological
time;
 justify deductions
about age of geologic
features.
Techniques used to estimate
geological time include using
radioactive dating, observing
rock sequences and
comparing fossils to
correlate the rock sequences
at various locations.
Rowan County Senior High School
Revised: June 2010
insufficient ability to adapt
SC-H-BC-S-6
Students will distinguish between a scientific law, theory,
hypothesis and unsupported supposition/claim
SC-H-BC-S-7
Students will investigate the historical development and revision
of a variety of accepted scientific laws, theories and claims
Essential Questions
 How is the fossil record used to chronicle the history of
life?
 How do scientists know that life has changed through
time? How do paleontologist date fossils?
 What major evolutionary developments occurred during
Precambrian time?
 What dominant organisms evolved during the Mesozoic
Era and Cenozoic Era?
 What evidence was used to make the geologic time
scale?
 Why is evolutionary theory associated with Darwin?
 What does Darwin’s theory predict?
 Why are Darwin’s theories now widely accepted?
 What evidence do scientists have to support the theory
that species change over time?
 How has Darwin’s theory been updated?
 At what scales can evolution be studied?
 What is the raw material for which evolution acts?
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Unit Four
Length
of Unit
3wks
Core Content/POS
SC-HS-3.4.7
Students will:
 classify organisms
into groups based on
similarities;
 infer relationships
based on internal and
external structures
and chemical
processes.
Biological classifications are
based on how organisms are
related. Organisms are
classified into a hierarchy of
groups and subgroups based
on similarities that reflect
their relationships. Species is
the most fundamental unit of
classification. Different
species are classified by the
comparison and analysis of
their internal and external
structures and the similarity
of their chemical processes.
DOK 2
Revised: June 2010
Unity and Diversity of Plants and Cellular Energy
Key Concepts/Skills/Guiding Questions
Terms:
Plant, chloroplasts, photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigment, chromatography,
stomata, angiosperm, gymnosperm, bryophyte, avascular, vascular, carbon
cycle, nitrogen cycle, athotrophic
Activities/Assessments/
Resources
Photosynthesis lab
Chromotography lab
Role play of photosynthesis
Animation of photosynthesis
KWL: class discussion
Students will:
Essential Questions
 What are the major distinctions between prokaryotic and eukaryotic
cells?
 How are plants classified?
 How does plant structure relate to their functions?
 What are the main characteristics of the Plant kingdom?
 What are 5 adaptations plants have evolved to allow them to adapt to
their environment?
 What type of energy is used in cells and what is the ultimate source of
this energy?
 How is an organism’s metabolism related to carbon cycle?
 What is the role of pigments in photosynthesis?
 How do plants make sugars and store extra unused energy?
 What are three environmental factors that affect photosynthesis?
 Why are plants economically important to humans?
SC-HS-3.4.2
Students will understand that
most cell functions involve
chemical reactions. Food
molecules taken into cells react
to provide the chemical
constituents needed to
synthesize other molecules.
Both breakdown and synthesis
are made possible by a large
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Jenkins/Marcum
Revised: June 2010
set of protein catalysts, called
enzymes. The breakdown of
some of the food molecules
enables the cell to store energy
in specific chemicals that are
used to carry out the many
functions of the cell
SC-HS-3.4.4
Students will understand that
plant cells contain chloroplasts,
the site of photosynthesis.
Plants and many
microorganisms (e.g., Euglena)
use solar energy to combine
molecules of carbon dioxide
and water into complex,
energy-rich organic compounds
and release oxygen to the
environment. This process of
photosynthesis provides a vital
link between the Sun and
energy needs of living systems.
SC-HS-4.6.10
Students will:
 identify the
components and
mechanisms of
energy stored and
released from food
molecules
(photosynthesis and
respiration);
 apply information to
real-world situations.
Energy is released when the
bonds of food molecules are
broken and new compounds
with lower energy bonds are
formed. Cells usually store
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this energy temporarily in the
phosphate bonds of
adenosine triphosphate
(ATP). During the process of
cellular respiration, some
energy is lost as heat.
DOK 3
SC-HS-4.6.5
Students will describe and
explain the role of carboncontaining molecules and
chemical reactions in energy
transfer in living systems.
Living systems require a
continuous input of energy to
maintain their chemical and
physical organization since
the universal tendency is
toward more disorganized
states. The energy for life
primarily derives from the
Sun. Plants capture energy
by absorbing light and using
it to break weaker bonds in
reactants (such as carbon
dioxide and water) in
chemical reactions that result
in the formation of carboncontaining molecules. These
molecules can be used to
assemble larger molecules
(e.g., DNA, proteins, sugars,
fats). In addition, the energy
released when these
molecules react with oxygen
to form very strong bonds
can be used as sources of
energy for life processes.
DOK 3
Rowan County Senior High School
2010-2011
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Biology Curriculum Map
Jenkins/Marcum
Revised: June 2010
Unity and Diversity Animals
Length
of Unit
3wks
Core Content/POS
SC-HS-3.4.7
Students will:
 classify organisms
into groups based on
similarities;
 infer relationships
based on internal and
external structures
and chemical
processes.
Biological classifications are
based on how organisms are
related. Organisms are
classified into a hierarchy of
groups and subgroups based
on similarities that reflect
their relationships. Species is
the most fundamental unit of
classification. Different
species are classified by the
comparison and analysis of
their internal and external
structures and the similarity
of their chemical processes.
DOK 2
Key Concepts/Skills/Guiding Questions
Terms:
Invertebrate, deuterstome, protostome, coelem, diploidy, hetertrophic,
chordate, multicellular, tissue, symmetry, vertebrate, amniote egg
Students will:
Understand how animals are classified and discuss major changes in
adaptations that have occurred over time.
Activities/Assessments/
Resources
Invertebrate lab
Frog dissection lab
Live frog observations
Bird feather observations
Reptile display observations
Mammal skull lab
Essential Questions
 What general features do animals share?
 What two groups are animals informally classified?
 Why is an animal’s skeleton important?
 What are the functions of the body system and relate them to their
structure?
 What evolutionary trends in body structure do animals’ exhibit?
 What types of internal body plans do animals have?
 What are the key characteristics of chordates?
 What were the key evolutionary innovations in fish?
 What characteristics helped amphibians adapt to land?
 What major evolutionary innovations first appeared in reptiles?
 When did birds evolve and what were the first birds like?
 How are birds and reptiles alike? Different?
 When and from what group did mammals evolve?
 What characteristics define a mammal?
SC-HS-3.4.8
Students will understand that
multicellular animals have
nervous systems that generate
behavior. Nerve cells
communicate with each other
by secreting specific molecules.
Specialized cells in sense
organs detect light, sound and
specific chemicals enabling
animals to monitor what is
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Revised: June 2010
going on in the world around
them.
SC-HS-3.5.1
Students will:
 predict the impact on
species of changes to
1) the potential for a
species to increase
its numbers, (2) the
genetic variability of
offspring due to
mutation and
recombination of
genes, (3) a finite
supply of the
resources required
for life, or (4) natural
selection;
 propose solutions to
real-world problems
of endangered and
extinct species.
Species change over time.
Biological change over time
is the consequence of the
interactions of (1) the
potential for a species to
increase its numbers, (2) the
genetic variability of
offspring due to mutation and
recombination of genes, (3) a
finite supply of the resources
required for life and (4)
natural selection. The
consequences of change
over time provide a scientific
explanation for the fossil
record of ancient life forms
and for the striking molecular
similarities observed among
the diverse species of living
Rowan County Senior High School
2010-2011
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Page 7
Biology Curriculum Map
Jenkins/Marcum
Revised: June 2010
organisms. Changes in DNA
(mutations) occur
spontaneously at low rates.
Some of these changes make
no difference to the
organism, whereas others
can change cells and
organisms. Only mutations in
germ cells have the potential
to create the variation that
changes an organism’s
future offspring.
DOK 3
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2010-2011
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Jenkins/Marcum
Revised: June 2010
Unit Seven
Length
of Unit
3wks
Core Content/POS
SC-HS-4.6.4
Students will:
 describe the
components and
reservoirs involved in
biogeochemical
cycles ( water,
nitrogen, carbon
dioxide and oxygen);
 explain the movement
of matter and energy
in biogeochemical
cycles and related
phenomena.
The total energy of the
universe is constant. Energy
can change forms and/or be
transferred in many ways, but
it can neither be created nor
destroyed. Movement of
matter between reservoirs is
driven by Earth’s internal and
external sources of energy.
These movements are often
accompanied by a change in
physical and chemical
properties of the matter.
Carbon, for example, occurs
in carbonate rocks such as
limestone, in the atmosphere
as carbon dioxide gas, in
water as dissolved carbon
dioxide and in all organisms
as complex molecules that
control the chemistry of life.
DOK 3
Rowan County Senior High School
Ecology
Key Concepts/Skills/Guiding Questions
Terms:
Community, Ecosystem, Habitat, Biodiversity, Succession, Climate, Biome
Producer, Consumer, Decomposer, Trophic level, Energy pyramid, Population
Carrying capacity, Predation, Coevolution, Parasitism, Symbiosis, Mutualism
commensalism
Students will:
Relate how humans impact the environment, and understand how to properly
assess an ecosystem and understand interactions between abiotic and biotic
factors.
Activities/Assessments/
Resources
Observation of Ecosystem
Pond studies
Water testing
Macroinvertebrate lab
Macroinvertebrate mayhem
Portfolio: How humans impacting
the environment
Biome presentations: via ppt
Essential Questions
 What are the parts of an ecosystem?
 How does an ecosystem respond to change?
 What two key factors of climate determine a biome?
 What are the three major groups of terrestrial biomes?
 What are the four kinds of aquatic ecosystems?
 How does energy flow through an ecosystem?
 What happens to energy as it is transferred between trophic levels in a
community?
 Why are plants and animals important for carbon and oxygen in an
ecosystem?
 Why must nitrogen cycle through an ecosystem?
 Why must phosphorus cycle through an ecosystem?
 Why is it important to study populations?
 What is the difference between exponential growth and logistic growth?
 How have science and technology affected human population growth?
 What affects predator-prey interactions?
 What are two types of interactions in a community?
 How are humans and the environment connected?
 What is the difference between renewable resources and
nonrenewable resources
 How can the state of the environment affect a person’s health and
quality of life?
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Revised: June 2010
SC-HS-4.6.9
Students will:

explain the cause and
effect relationship
between global climate
and weather patterns
and energy transfer
(cloud cover, location of
mountain ranges,
oceans);
 predict the
consequences of
changes to the global
climate and weather
patterns.
Global climate is determined
by energy transfer from the
Sun at and near Earth’s
surface. This energy transfer
is influenced by dynamic
processes such as cloud
cover and the Earth’s rotation
and static conditions such as
the position of mountain
ranges and oceans.
DOK 3
SC-HS-4.7.1
Students will:
 analyze relationships
and interactions
among organisms in
ecosystems;
 predict the effects on
other organisms of
changes to one or
more components of
the ecosystem.
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Revised: June 2010
Organisms both cooperate
and compete in ecosystems.
Often changes in one
component of an ecosystem
will have effects on the entire
system that are difficult to
predict. The interrelationships
and interdependencies of
these organisms may generate
ecosystems that are stable for
hundreds or thousands of
years.
DOK 3
SC-HS-4.7.2
Students will:
 evaluate proposed
solutions from
multiple perspectives
to environmental
problems caused by
human interaction;
 justify positions using
evidence/data.
Human beings live within the
world's ecosystems. Human
activities can deliberately or
inadvertently alter the
dynamics in ecosystems.
These activities can threaten
current and future global
stability and, if not
addressed, ecosystems can
be irreversibly affected.
DOK 3
SC-HS-4.7.3
Students will:
 predict the
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2010-2011
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Revised: June 2010
consequences of
changes to any
component
(atmosphere, solid
Earth, oceans, living
things) of the Earth
System;
 propose justifiable
solutions to global
problems.
Interactions among the solid
Earth, the oceans, the
atmosphere and living things
have resulted in the ongoing
development of a changing
Earth system.
DOK 3
SC-HS-4.7.5
Students will:
 predict the
consequences of
changes in resources
to a population;
 select or defend
solutions to realworld problems of
population control.
Living organisms have the
capacity to produce
populations of infinite size.
However, behaviors,
environments and resources
influence the size of
populations. Models (e.g.,
mathematical, physical,
conceptual) can be used to
make predictions about
changes in the size or rate of
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2010-2011
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growth of a population.
DOK 3
SC-HS-3.5.2
Students will:
 predict the success of
patterns of adaptive
behaviors based on
evidence/data;
 justify explanations of
organism survival
based on scientific
understandings of
behavior.
The broad patterns of
behavior exhibited by
organisms have changed
over time through natural
selection to ensure
reproductive success.
Organisms often live in
unpredictable environments,
so their behavioral responses
must be flexible enough to
deal with uncertainty and
change. Behaviors often have
an adaptive logic.
DOK 3
SC-HS-4.6.5
Students will describe and
explain the role of carboncontaining molecules and
chemical reactions in energy
transfer in living systems.
Living systems require a
continuous input of energy to
maintain their chemical and
physical organization since
the universal tendency is
toward more disorganized
states. The energy for life
Rowan County Senior High School
2010-2011
13
Page 13
Biology Curriculum Map
Jenkins/Marcum
Revised: June 2010
primarily derives from the
Sun. Plants capture energy
by absorbing light and using
it to break weaker bonds in
reactants (such as carbon
dioxide and water) in
chemical reactions that result
in the formation of carboncontaining molecules. These
molecules can be used to
assemble larger molecules
(e.g., DNA, proteins, sugars,
fats). In addition, the energy
released when these
molecules react with oxygen
to form very strong bonds
can be used as sources of
energy for life processes.
DOK 3
Rowan County Senior High School
2010-2011
14
Page 14