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Transcript
Glossary
Reporting Category 1
Affixes: prefixes and suffixes, also known as the word parts
Connotations: the suggesting of a meaning by a word apart from the thing it explicitly names or
describes
Denotations: a direct specific meaning as distinct from an implied or associated idea
Prefix: to fix or appoint at the beginning of the word to change its meaning
Root: the basic meaning of the word
Suffix: an affix occurring at the end of a word, base, or phrase
Thesaurus: a book of words or of information about a particular field or set of concepts; a book
of words and their synonyms
Glossary
Reporting Category 2
Alliteration: the repetition of usually initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words
or syllables
Assonance: repetition of vowels without repetition of consonants
Character: people or animals depicted in a work of fiction
Character Foil: a character who contrasts with other characters
Connotation: the suggesting of a meaning by a word apart from the thing it explicitly names or
describes
Diction: an author’s verbal expression and order of the words
Direct Characterization: the author tells you directly what the character is like
Essay: type of writing that explores a specific topic
Figurative Language: figure of speech used to create specific impressions
First Person: pronouns and verbs used to refer to the speaker or writer of the language in which
they occur
Imagery: use of language to create vivid pictures; appeals to the senses
Indirect Characterization: the author provides details that help the reader infer what the character
is like
Irony: saying the opposite of what is meant
Metaphor: comparison between two dissimilar things, not using the words like, resembles or as
Narrator: person who tells the story
Paradox: contradiction that turns out to be true
Persona: a character assumed by an author
Personification: giving human qualities to non-human things
Point of View: the perspective that shapes what readers learn about characters and events
Purpose: a subject under discussion; connected to the point of view
Glossary
Rhyme: words with the same sound
Simile: comparison between two dissimilar things using the words like, resembles or as
Glossary
Reporting Category 3
Argument: logical defense of a position or claim
Audience: readers of the text
Bar Graph: data displayed using bars along a vertical or horizontal axis
Cause and Effect: explains what happens and why it happens
Chronological Order: information or events are in the order in which they happen
Compare and Contrast: similarities and differences
Conclusion: a reasoned judgment
Counterargument: argument against a position
Credible: information that is believable
Critique: an assessment of what was read that includes your opinion
Diagram: parts of something shown in an illustration
Expert Opinion: judgment by someone with knowledge in a specific field
Expository Text: writing that gives information or explains something
Fact: information that can be proven through testing, measurement and observation
Inference: decision reached by combining known information with information that is read
Infographics: graphics used to interpret information
Line Graph: data displayed using lines that go up and down along a vertical or horizontal axis
Map: geographic diagram
Nonfiction: real people, events, places and issues
Opinion: a personal belief, feeling or judgment
Order of Importance: information organized by the author that begins with the most important
point and ends with the least or vice versa
Pie Chart: quantitative information displayed in the form of a pie
Glossary
Problem and Solution: information organized by the author to present the problem and solution
Author’s Purpose: a subject under discussion; connected to the point of view

Describe: showing how something looks or what it is like

Entertain: amuse readers by sharing something humorous

Explain: provide reasons why something happened

Express: sharing strong feelings about something

Inform: provide information on the topic

Persuade: convincing readers of the truth or influence them
Reason: a thought, judgment or conclusion
Substantiated Opinions: an opinion that can be backed up by evidence to make it likely to be true
Summary: short, concise version of what you read; provides important ideas and information
Table: list of data displayed in columns and rows
Topic: the subject of the text; what the text is about
Unsubstantiated Opinions: opinions that are not supported with evidence
Valid Opinion: an opinion that is backed up with factual information
Glossary
Reporting Category 4
Cause and Effect: explains what happens and why it happens
Character: people or animals depicted in a work of fiction
Chronological Order: information or events are in the order in which they happen
Compare and Contrast: similarities and differences
Conflict: a struggle between two forces
Dialogue: written composition between two or more characters who are conversing
Expository Text: writing that gives information or explains something
Literary Narrative: an engaging story that includes characters, a plot, settings and themes
Narrative: a story that can be either true or false
Narrator: person who tells the story
Order of Importance: information organized by the author that begins with the most important
point and ends with the least or vice versa
Plot: pattern of events in a work of fiction
Setting: the time, place, and circumstances in which something occurs or develops
Spatial Order: ideas used to describe location or arrangement of objects
Theme: central idea that the writer wants to convey
Glossary
Reporting Category 5
Anecdote: short narrative of a humorous, biographical or interesting idea
Conclusion: a reasoned judgment
Counterargument: argument against a position
Fact: information that can be proven through testing, measurement and observation
Persuasive Texts: text used to persuade readers to do something or accept a position
Thesis: a statement or theory that is written (often in the introduction) and is proven in the body
of the text
Glossary
Reporting Category 6
Adverb: word that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb
Clause: group of words that has a subject and a verb
Dependent (Subordinate) Clause: a clause that does not express a complete idea
Gerund: a verb ending in –ing that is used as a noun
Independent Clause: a clause that expresses a complete thought
Infinitive: a verb preceded by to that is used as a noun, an adjective or an adverb
Participle: a verb form used as an adjective.
Phrase: group of words that does not contain both a subject and a verb