Download English grammar recognizes eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun

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Transcript
Los Medanos College
Center for Academic Support
Spring 2012
English grammar recognizes eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun, verb,
adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. Many words
can function as more than one part of speech, depending on its use in a
sentence (The Bedford Handbook for Writers, 4th ed.).
NOUN
Names a person, place, thing, or idea.
PRONOUN
Substitutes for a noun.
VERB
A HELPING VERB comes before a
main verb.
Modals: can, could, may, might, must,
shall, should, will would, ought to
Forms of be: be, am, is, are, was, were,
being, been.
Forms of have: have, has, had
Forms of do: do, does, did
Note: The forms of be, have and do may
also function as main verbs.
ADVERB
Modifies a verb, adjective, or adverb,
usually answering one of these
questions:
When? Where? Why? How?
Under what conditions?
To What degree?
A MAIN VERB asserts action, being, or
state of being.
There are eight forms of the highly
irregular verb be: be, am, is, are, was,
were, being, been.
ADJECTIVE
Modifies a noun or pronoun, usually
answering one of these questions:
Which one?
What kind of?
How many?
The articles a, an and the are also
adjectives.
CONJUNCTION
Joins words, phrases, or clauses and
indicates the relationship between joined
elements.
PREPOSITION
Shows the relationship between the noun
or pronoun that follows it and another
word in the sentence. Prepositional
phrases usually function as adjectives or
adverbs.
Common prepositions: about, above,
across, after, against, along, among,
around, as, at, before, behind, below,
beside, besides, between, beyond, but,
by, concerning, considering, despite,
down, during, except, for, from, in,
inside, into, like, near, next, next to, of,
off, on, onto, opposite, out, outside,
over, past, plus, regarding, respecting,
round, since, than, through, throughout,
till, to, toward, under, underneath,
unlike, until, unto, up, upon, with,
without.
INTERJECTIONS Express surprise or
emotion. WOW! OH! HEY!
HOORAY!