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Transcript
Unit 1: Mechanical Equilibrium
Mechanical Equilibrium
PACING
Big Idea / Key Concepts
Big Idea:
Suggested Pacing:
15 Days
An object in mechanical equilibrium is
stable, without changes in motion.
Key Concepts
Chapter: Two
2.1:
2.2:
2.3:
2.4:
2.5:
Force
Mechanical Equilibrium
Support Force
Equilibrium for Moving Objects
Vectors
Suggested Performance Assessment
Student Outcomes
At the conclusion of Unit 1 Student will be
able to do the following:
Explain the idea of equilibrium and define
the term force.
An object in mechanical equilibrium is
stable, without changes in motion.
Explain the idea of equilibrium and define
the term force.
You can express the equilibrium rule
mathematically as ∑F = 0.
Discover that when forces acting on an
object are balanced the object will be in
equilibrium.
For an object at rest on a horizontal
surface, the support force must equal the
object’s weight.
Objects at rest are said to be in static
equilibrium; objects moving at constant
speed in a straight-line path are said to
be in dynamic equilibrium.
The sum of two or more vectors is called
their resultant.
Overarching Questions:
1.
What is the difference between
force and net force?
2.
How are forces visually represented
and added?
3.
How can you express the
equilibrium rule mathematically?
4.
How are support force and weight
related?
5.
How are static and dynamic
equilibrium different?
Visually represent the idea of mechanical
equilibrium and balanced forces.
Discover that an upward force is provided
from the table.
Explain how vectors are used and how
they can be added.
Visually and mathematically combine
parallel and perpendicular vectors.
Unit 2: Newton’s First Law of Motion - Inertia
Chemistry of Life
PACING
Big Idea / Key Concepts
Big Idea:
Suggested Pacing:
15 Days
Chapter: Three
3.3: Galileo on Motion
3.4: Newton’s Law of Inertia
3.5: Mass a Measure of Inertia
Suggested Performance Assessment
Student Outcomes
At the conclusion of Unit 2 Student will be
able to do the following:
Every object continues in a state of rest,
or of uniform speed in a straight line,
unless acted on by a nonzero net force.
Explain how force is related to the motion
of an object.
Key Concepts
Define friction and inertia in their own
words.
Friction is the force that acts between
materials that touch as they move past
each other.
The property of a body to resist changes
to its state of motion is called inertia.
Newton’s first law states that every
object continues in a state of rest, or of
uniform speed in a straight line, unless
acted on by a nonzero net force.
The more mass an object has, the greater
its inertia and the more force it takes to
change its state of motion.
Weight is the force of gravity on an
object. Weight depends on an object’s
location. The mass of an object is the
same whether the object is located on
Earth, on the moon, or in outer space.
Overarching Questions:
1.
What is friction and how does it
affect motion?
2.
What is Newton’s First Law of
Motion?
3.
What relationship does mass have
with inertia?
4.
How are mass and weight related?
Explain Newton’s First Law of Motion in
their own words.
Explain the difference between mass and
weight and mathematically solve for each.
Unit 3: Linear Motion
Linear Motion
PACING
Big Idea / Key Concepts
Big Idea:
Suggested Pacing:
20-25 Days
Chapter: Four
4.1: Motion is Relative
4.2: Speed
4.3: Velocity
4.4: Acceleration
4.5: Free Fall: How Fast
4.6: Free Fall: How Far
4.7: Graphs of Motion
4.8: Air Resistance and Falling Objects
Suggested Performance Assessment
Student Outcomes
At the conclusion of Unit 3 Student will be
able to do the following:
You can describe the motion of an object
by its position, speed, direction, and
acceleration.
Explain how motion is relative and use a
frame of reference to describe motion.
Key Concepts:
Describe that speed is a rate of distance
traveled in an amount of time.
An object is moving if its position relative
to a fixed point is changing.
You can calculate the speed of an object
by dividing the distance covered by time.
Speed is a description of how fast an
object moves; velocity is how fast and in
what direction it moves.
You can calculate the acceleration of an
object by dividing the change in its
velocity by time.
The acceleration of an object in free fall is
about 10 meters per second squared (10
m/s2).
For each second of free fall, an object
falls a greater distance than it did in the
previous second.
On a distance-versus-time graph the
slope represents velocity.
Overarching Questions:
1.
How can you tell if an object is
moving?
2.
How can you calculate speed?)
3.
How is velocity different from
speed?
4.
How do you calculate acceleration?
5.
For a falling object, how does the
distance per second change?
6.
How is motion represented on a
graph?
Compare speed and velocity and be able
solve the velocity equation.
Describe that acceleration is a rate of the
change of velocity in an amount of time.
Solve problems using the acceleration
equation.
Describe how speed and distance change
for an object in free fall.
Explain the meaning of the slope of a
distance-versus-time graph.
Unit 4: Projectile Motion
Projectile Motion
PACING
Big Idea / Key Concepts
Big Idea:
Suggested Pacing:
15 Days
Chapter: Five
5.1 Vector and Scalar Quantities
5.2 Velocity Vectors
5.3 Components of Vectors
5.4 Projectile Motion
5.5 Projectiles Launched Horizontally
Suggested Performance Assessment
Projectile motion can be described by the
horizontal and vertical components of
motion.
Key Concepts:
A vector quantity includes both
magnitude and direction, but a scalar
quantity includes only magnitude.
The perpendicular components of a
vector are independent of each other.
The horizontal component of motion for
a projectile is just like the horizontal
motion of a ball rolling freely along a level
surface without friction.
The vertical component of a projectile’s
velocity is like the motion for a freely
falling object.
The downward motion of a horizontally
launched projectile is the same as that of
free fall.
Overarching Questions:
1.
How does a scalar quantity differ
from a vector quantity?
2.
What is the resultant of two
perpendicular vectors?
3.
How do components of a vector
affect each other?
4.
Describe the components of
projectile motion.
Describe the downward motion of a
horizontally launched projectile.
5.
Student Outcomes
At the conclusion of Unit 4 Student will be
able to do the following:
Unit 5: Newton’s Second and Third Law
Newton’s 2nd and 3rd Law
PACING
Big Idea / Key Concepts
Big Idea:
Suggested Pacing:
15 Days
Chapter: Six and Seven
6.1 Force Causes Acceleration
6.2 Mass Resists Acceleration
6.3 Newton’s Second Law
7.2 Newton’s Third Law
7.4 Action and Reaction on Different
Masses
Suggested Performance Assessment
An object accelerates when a net force
acts on it. For every force, there is an
equal and opposite force.
Key Concepts:
Unbalanced forces acting on an object
cause the object to accelerate.
For a constant force, an increase in the
mass will result in a decrease in the
acceleration.
Newton’s second law states that the
acceleration produced by a net force on
an object is directly proportional to the
magnitude of the net force, is in the same
direction as the net force, and is inversely
proportional to the mass of the object.
Newton’s third law states that whenever
one object exerts a force on a second
object, the second object exerts an equal
and opposite force on the first object.
A given force exerted on a small mass
produces a greater acceleration than the
same force exerted on a large mass.
Overarching Questions:
1.
What causes an object to
accelerate?
2.
How does an increase in mass affect
acceleration?
3.
What is the relationship among an
object’s mass, an object’s
acceleration, and the net force on
an object?
4.
What happens when an object
exerts a force on another object?
5.
Why do objects that experience the
same amount of force accelerate at
different rates?
Student Outcomes
At the conclusion of Unit 5 Student will be
able to do the following: