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Transcript
 Describe
an experience in your life where
you learned a valuable lesson. It can be a
small moment, or a very BIG life lesson.
What happened? Who was involved? Use vivid
description! Who! What! Where! When! WHY!
 At
least five sentences!
 Describe
an experience in your life where
you learned a lesson. It can be a small
moment, or a very BIG life lesson. What
happened? Who was involved? Use vivid
description.
 At
least five sentences!
 The
age of the Enlightenment is also known
as the age of reason.
 Two
principal beliefs of those who lived
during the Enlightenment:
*Many people came to
believe that they could
arrive at truth solely
through human reason.
*Through rational, logical
thinking, human beings
could probe the secrets of
the universe and
understand the true
relationship between
themselves and God.
King Louis the XIV
Where did he live?
Versailles
Upper
Lower
1. René Descartes (1596–1650):
believed that the deductive method used
in mathematics was the way to
discover universal truths.
2. Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727)
In Mathematical Principles of Natural
Philosophy (1687), he describes a
clockwork universe governed by absolute
laws that can be expressed
mathematically.
 It
supported the idea
that unchanging laws
govern politics and
morality.
He advanced the social theory that people choose
what is in their best interest. Hobbes argued
that people’s common interests lead them to
make a “social contract.” They accept their
sovereign’s power over them in exchange for
protection against their own greedy, evil nature.
Someone who believes that experience rather
than logic is the only reliable source of
knowledge.
His Philosphy: 3 Ideas…What Are They?
“Tabula rasa”
Blank slate
Natural rights
Benjamin Franklin
Thomas Paine
Thomas Jefferson
Humanity is naturally good but is corrupted by
the environment, by education, and by
government.
He believed that governments must be subject
to the will of the people.
Free Will!
Jean de La Fontaine (1621–1695) wrote
shrewdly satiric fables.
Molière (1622–1673) wrote satiric dramas
exposing the greed, hypocrisy, and faults of
French society.
Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)- Gulliver’s Travels
and “A Modest Proposal” reflect Swift’s bitter
outrage at the corruption he saw.
http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=96594&title=
Satire_TEASe&ref=Stralkow