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Transcript
PSYCHOLOGY 160: Social Psychology
SYLLABUS
***
INSTRUCTOR:
Professor ***
Office: *** Tolman
Phone: ***
Office hours: Wednesdays, ***
E-mail: *** (please try to visit office hours first)
GRADUATE STUDENT INSTRUCTORS:
Office:
E-mail:
Sections:
***
***
***
***
101, Monday, 12-1
102, Monday, 1-2
103, Monday, 2-3
***
***
***
***
***
104, Tuesday, 12-1
105, Tuesday, 1-2
106, Tuesday, 2-3
107, Thursday, 9-10
108, Thursday, 10-11
109, Thursday, 11-12
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Social psychology is the scientific study of the way people think about, feel, and behave in social situations. It
involves understanding how people influence, and are influenced by, the others around them. A primary goal of this
course is to introduce you to the perspectives, research methods, and empirical findings of social psychology.
Topics to be covered include: impression formation, conformity, prosocial behavior, interpersonal attraction,
persuasion, stereotyping and prejudice. Equally important is the goal of cultivating your skills for analyzing the
social situations and events that you encounter in your everyday lives. Finally, throughout the course, emphasis will
be placed on developing critical and integrative ways of thinking about theory and research in social psychology.
COURSE FORMAT AND REQUIREMENTS:
Course lectures are designed to reinforce and supplement the course readings, so they may include material that is
not covered in the readings. The sections led by your GSI are intended to hone and discuss in depth the ideas
covered in each week's lectures and readings. You are expected to attend and actively participate in these sections.
Sections begin meeting on January 19th (the day after the first lecture).
There will be 3 non-comprehensive exams (multiple choice & short answer). The dates are:
***
MARK THESE IN YOUR CALENDARS NOW. All exams are non-cumulative. Each covers the material
presented in the lectures, readings, AND sections within the specified dates. Make-up exams require advance notice
and a legitimate and documented excuse (e.g., a legible doctor’s note for illness).
Finally, there is a 3-credit Research Participation Program (RPP) requirement for this course. RPP coordinators
from the Psychology Department will visit our first lecture to provide information regarding the prescreening
survey (which counts for 1 credit) and enrolling in the on-line RPP system called Experimetrix.
In order to learn how to create an RPP account and start participating in experiments, please go to the following
link: http://psychology.berkeley.edu/rpp/ and click on "Important Information for Students." If you have any
questions, you can contact RPP at [email protected]
Note that significant CHANGES were made to RPP last year, so read the above links carefully.
GRADING:
Your final grade in this course will be based on your achievement on the course requirements weighted in the
following manner:
Exam #1
Exam #2
Exam #3
Section Participation
RPP Participation
29%
29%
29%
8%
5% (note that you must complete at least 1 RPP credit
during Phase I of RPP–in other words, by March 14th—
otherwise the maximum percentage grade you can
receive for your RPP participation is 4.5%)
Final letter grades are based on standard percentages, not curves, as follows:
97-100%
93-96%
90-92%
87-89%
83-86%
80-82%
…
…
…
…
…
…
A+
A
AB+
B
B-
77-79%
73-76%
70-72%
67-69%
63-66%
…
…
…
…
…
C+
C
CD+
D
REQUIRED READINGS:
Textbook
Social Psychology (2nd Edition—get this edition, not an earlier one)
Authors: Gilovich, Keltner, & Nisbett
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company, Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393932584
[A copy of the textbook will be available on reserve in the Ed-Psych library in Tolman]
Supplementary Articles
These articles can be downloaded from the website for our course on bspace: https://bspace.berkeley.edu/. The
articles are in a folder called “Supplementary Articles” under the Resources tab for our course. The articles are PDF
files and are arranged in alphabetical order (not the order in which they are assigned—so consult the reading
schedule on your syllabus to know what to read when).
Lecture Power Point Slides
Power Point slides will also be available on bspace (in a folder called “Lecture Power Point Files” under the
Resources tab) no later than 48 hours after each lecture.
Lecture Notes
Lecture notes will be available through ASUC.
(Unfortunately, neither webcast nor podcast is available in GPB100—I asked).
COURSE SCHEDULE & READINGS:
DATE
Mtg 1
TOPIC
Introduction & Themes
READINGS
Mtg 2
Mtg 3
Research Methods
Intro to Social Cognition
Chapters 1 & 2
Chapter 5
Mtg 4
Mtg 5
Effects of Schemas
Confirmation Biases & Schema Change
Hastorf & Cantril (1954)
Mtg 6
Mtg 7
Automatic vs. Controlled Processing
Attribution, Part I
Bargh, Chen, & Burrows (1996)
Chapter 4
Mtg 8
Mtg 9
Attribution, Part II
EXAM #1
Choi & Nisbett (1998)
Exam covers 1/18-2/13 material
Mtg 10
Mtg 11
No class—President’s Day
The Self, Part I
Chapter 3
Mtg 12
Mtg 13
The Self, Part II
The Multiply Motivated Self
Linville (1985)
Mtg 14
Mtg 15
Attitudes & Behavior (cognitive dissonance)
Attitudes & Behavior/Persuasion
Chapter 6
Chapter 9
Mtg 16
Mtg 17
Persuasion
Conformity & Compliance
Petty, Cacioppo, & Goldman (1981)
Chapter 8
Mtg 18
Mtg 19
Obedience
EXAM #2
Santos, Leve, & Pratkanis (1994)
Exam covers 2/22-3/19 material
Mtg 20
Mtg 21
No class-Spring recess
No class-Spring recess
Mtg 22
Mtg 23
Interpersonal Attraction
Close Relationships
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Mtg 24
Mtg 25
Aggression
Prosocial Behavior
Chapter 13
Mtg 26
Mtg 27
Group Processes
Stereotyping & Prejudice, Part I
Chapter 14
Chapter 12
Mtg 28
Mtg 29
Stereotyping & Prejudice, Part II
Intergroup Relations (& Wrapping Up)
Johns, Schmader, & Martens (2005)
Mtg 30
EXAM #3
Exam covers 4/2-4/25 material
Supplementary Empirical Articles
Hastorf, A. H., & Cantril, H. (1954). They saw a game – A case study. Journal of Abnormal and Social
Psychology, 49, 129-134.
Bargh, J. A., Chen, M., & Burrows, L. (1996). Automaticity of social behavior: Direct effects of trait
construct and stereotype activation on action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,
71, 230-244.
Choi, I., & Nisbett, R. E. (1998). Situational salience and cultural differences in the correspondence
bias and actor-observer bias. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 24, 949-960.
Linville, P. W. (1985). Self-complexity and affective extremity: Don't put all your eggs in one
cognitive basket. Social Cognition, 3, 94-120.
Petty, R. E., Cacioppo, J. T., & Goldman, R. (1981). Personal involvement as a determinant of
argument-based persuasion. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 41, 847-855.
Santos, M. D., Leve, C., & Pratkanis, A. R. (1994). Hey buddy, can you spare seventeen cents?
Mindful persuasion and the pique technique. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 24, 755764.
Johns, M., Schmader, T., & Martens, A. (2005). Knowing is half the battle: Teaching stereotype threat
as a means of improving women’s math performance. Psychological Science, 16, 175-179.