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Transcript
ROOK ENDINGS
By the term “Rook Endings” are
understood positions in which both sides
have one or both Rooks and there are
Pawns on the board.
It is not an easy task to deal with this
class of ending from the point of view of
the student. In fact, Rook endings form
one of the most important branches of
end-game theory, as they very frequently
occur in actual play. Their correct
treatment, however, is usually very
difficult, so much so that even the
greatest masters are liable to errors. For
our purposes, it must be sufficient to
provide the student with the most
important general principals, and to
illustrate them by typical examples.
1.e5
Ra6
2.Rb7
Rc6
3.e6
Rc1
4.Kf6
Rf1+
And from now on the Rook either gives
perpetual check or attack the pawn when
it is unprotected by the Rook.
Even when the opposing King is cut off
from the queening square the game
cannot always be won.
A draw
frequently occurs in the case of a Rook
Pawn, as shown by the following
position:
In endings of Rook and Pawn against the
Rook alone, a win is only possible if the
opponent’s King is cut off from the
queening square.
1.Rg6
2.Kg7
3.Kh8
4.Rg8
5.h7
Rf4
Rf7+
Rf8+
Rf6
Kf7
0r
Philidor's Position
Black draws without difficulty by
following the rule that the Rook shall not
leave the sixth rank until the Pawn has
entered it.
1.Rg6
2.Rg8
3.Rg7
4.Rg6
5.Rf6
Rf4
Kf7
Kf8
Rg4+
Rxg7
The student must play through these
variations and look at other possibilities.
10.Rc4 The reason why the R must be
played only to the fourth rank will soon
become apparent. 10...Rf2 11.Kd7 Rd2+
12.Ke6 Re2+ 13.Kd6 Rd2+ 14.Ke5
Now the Rook can interpose and that is
the reason why it had to be played to the
fourth rank. Please study these positions
in your own time and make notes on any
queries that you might have.
Ask
coaches to explain.
In the following position, White’s
progress to a win is very interesting:
Lucena’s Position (1)
White, to play, wins
1.Kf7 Kd7 2.e6+ Kc7 [2...Kd6 3.Rd8+]
3.Ke7 [3.e7?] 3...Re2 4.Rf8 Re1 5.Rf2
Re3 6.Rc2+ Rb7 7.Rd7 Rd3+ 8.Ke8 Rd1
9.e7 Re1
Lucena’s Position (2)
White is now apparently confronted by
an insuperable difficulty: if he moves
his King from e8 he is in perpetual
check, and if the White Rook leaves the
Bishop’s(c) file, then Kc7 follows, and
the White King is blockaded. There is,
however, one winning manoeuvre to
which we which to draw the student’s
attention.
1.Rc8!
[14.Rc7+? Kd6 15.Rb7 Rh1]
1...
Kd6
[14...Kd7 15.Rb8 Rh1 16.Kb7 Rb1+
17.Ka6 Ra1+ 18.Kb5 Rb1+ 19.Kc4
Rc1+ 20.¢d4 Rd1+ 21.¢c3]
2.Rb8
Ra1
3.Kb7
Rb1+
4.Kc8
Rc1+
5.Kd8
Rh1
6.Rb6+
Kc5
7.Rc6+!
Kb5
8.Rc8
Rh8+
9.Kc7
Rh7+
10.Kb8
Rook and two united Pawns generally
win against the Rook alone. The player
with the Pawns must, however, avoid
certain exceptional positions with Knight
and Rook Pawns, such as the following:
Four Pawns against three have a slightly
better chance than three against two.
In cases where there are Pawns on both
sides of the board and the forces are
equal, everything depends on the
position. A case frequently occurring in
practice is that in which on one side
there is an equal number of Pawns, on
the other while one player has a passed
Pawn. In such positions the general rule
is that the Pawn is better placed behind
and not in front of the Rook.
It is useless for White to play Kg4, as the
black Rook never leaves its present rank,
and to 1.Rd5; Ra4+ would follow, and
the White King is cut off.
In this position White, to play, wins by
sacrificing the Rook’s Pawn.
Tarrasch’s Position
White cannot win
1.Rb6+ Ka7 2.Kc7 Rxa5 3.Rb7+ Ka8
4.Rb8+ Ka7 5.b6+ Ka6 6.Ra8+
In endings in which both players have
Rook and Pawns, it makes a difference
whether the Pawns are only on one or on
both sides of the board. In the first case,
if the Kings are near their Pawns and the
forces equal, a draw is almost certain.
Moreover, the advantage of one Pawn is
only decisive in exceptional cases. The
player who has the advantage n material
and is therefore trying to win should
avoid the exchange of Pawns, as his
winning chances are thereby lessened.
By 1. a7, White achieves nothing, for the
black Rook remains on the Rook’s (a)
file and thereby preventing the white
Rook from leaving a8. It is also useless
to bring the King to b7 of perpetual
checks by the Rook. After 1. a7 there is
only one pitfall which black must avoid,
namely 1. …Kf2? The consequence of
this mistake would be 2. Rh8 and Black
lose his Rook if he captures the Pawn!
White, however, might try another plan
of winning the game, namely, 1. Kb7
and a7 in order to continue with Rb8 and
b6 followed by Kb7 and a7. This might
lead to a result typical of this class of
Rook ending. White, it is true, may
succeed in winning the Rook for the
passed Pawn, but in the meantime Black
has the opportunity of also obtaining a
passed Pawn and, thus, forcing a draw.
The game might continue as follows:
1.Kb7
2.h3
3.h4
4.gxh4
5.Ka7
6.Rb8
7.Rb6+
Ra2
Rh2
gxh4
Rxh4
Ra4
Kg6
Kg5
1.a7
Kf6
2.Kf3
Ke5
3.Ke3
Kd5
4.Kd3
h4
5.g4
Ke5
6.Ke3
h3
7.Ra5+ Kf6
8.Ke4
Rook endings quite frequently in
apparently clear and very simple
positions, contain deeply hidden
subtleties, as shown by the two
following examples:
Black to move, White wins
Black cannot stop his opponent’s Pawn
by Ra8, because of the reply Rh8.
Therefore his only move is:
1...Ra6+ 2.Kd5 Rg6 [2...Ra5+? 3.Kc4]
3.Ke5 Kg4 4.Rh1 Kf3 [4...Rxg7 5.Rg1+]
5.Rf1+ Ke2 6.Rf7 Ke3 7.Kf5
8.Kb7
h4
9.a7
h3
10.a8Q
Rxa8
11.Kxa8 Kg4
and the student can workout for himself
if this is a draw or not.
Lasker’s Position
White, to move, wins
White wins
It can be seen at once that this position is
much more favourable for White than
the preceding, in spite that his King is
further away from the passed Pawn.
White can now quietly play a7
threatening to bring his King to b7.
Black can only prevent this by bringing
his own King to the Queen’s side, but in
this case he will lose both his Pawns and
thereby the game. For instance:
1.Kb7
2.Ka7
3.Rh5+
4.Kb7
5.Ka6
6.Rh4+
7.Kb6
Rb2+ 8.Ka5 Rc2
Rc2 9.Rh3+ Ka2
Ka4 10.Rxh2
Rb2+
Rc2
Ka3
Rb2+ Piet van Zyl