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Transcript
LINK Wildlife Forum Species Champions
Slow Worm
Photo: Lucy Benyon
DESCRIPTON
Although superficially snake-like the Slow Worm is
actually a legless lizard. They have shiny scales that
give them a smooth appearance. Slow worms are
usually bronze or gold coloured; females and
juveniles have dark flanks and, often, a stripe down
the back. They can grow up to 40cm. These lizards
love compost heaps, where their invertebrate prey
thrives and are popular with gardeners due to their
slug-eating habits.
Slow Worms are widely distributed throughout
Britain, however populations tend to be smaller and
less frequent in Scotland.
Protected in the UK under the Wildlife and
Countryside Act, 1981, and classified as a Priority
Species in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan.
DISTRIBUTION MAP
Map: Surrey Amphibian and Reptile Group
ACTIONS REQUIRED



Increased Habitat Management to
create and restore terrestrial habitats to
suitable
conditions.
Targeted
agrienvironment strategies to be encouraged
to achieve this.
Improved Planning Processes to take
better account of presence during early
stages of local authority plans and
development.
Increased Survey & Monitoring is
essential
to
allow
species
status
assessments to be made.
MSP SPECIES CHAMPION
Bruce Crawford MSP
Member for: Stirling
Region: Mid Scotland
and Fife
Party: Scottish
National Party
THREATS






Development
&
agricultural
intensification
Habitat fragmentation
Loss of terrestrial habitat
Loss of hibernation sites from changes in
farming practices
Predation from domestic cats
Persecution due to misidentification as
snake
[email protected]
www.froglife.org