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Transcript
100 years of vitamins
Media clippings
1st January – 31st December 2012
1
Foreword from
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer
Dear Reader,
The year 2012 is the 100th anniversary of vitamins – 100 years since
Polish scientist Casimir Funk coined the term “vitamin” to describe
bioactive substances essential for human and animal health. During
this time, our understanding of the vital role of vitamins in both
nutrition and personal care has grown considerably.
the importance of improved access to these micronutrients so that
everyone has a chance to build a healthy and prosperous future.
Much has been achieved: a number of events have taken place
around the world on the role of vitamins in health and wellness;
there has been wide ranging media coverage in Europe, Asia and
the Americas; and, crucially, our advocacy activities have helped to
place vitamins higher up the agenda of key decision-makers.
To celebrate this anniversary, DSM and our nonprofit nutrition
think tank, Sight and Life, have launched the ‘100 Years of
Vitamins’ campaign to celebrate the century of contributions that
micronutrients have made in protecting and improving human and
animal health.
We have not done this alone. Focusing on a range of topics,
from vitamin A blindness through pregnancy and motherhood to
osteoporosis, we have partnered with a number of organizations:
NGOs, nutritionists, academics, and charities. The campaign could
not have had such a positive impact without such dedicated and
expert partners.
Vitamins are essential for good health throughout every stage of the
human lifecycle: from pregnancy through infancy and childhood,
and into adulthood and old age. Our bodies need vitamins to grow,
to function, to stay healthy and to prevent the onset of disease.
As a company, DSM is committed to ensuring that our bright science
is translated into brighter living. We will therefore continue to be a
powerful advocate for the importance of nutrition and ensuring that
the benefits of vitamins and other nutrients are fully understood
and acted upon around the world.
However, despite the clear evidence, most people have low
vitamins status. One billion people – one in seven – suffer from
a lack of access to adequate food and at least two billion people
around the world experience “hidden hunger,” and do not receive a
satisfactory intake of vitamins. Even in the developed world, where
nutritious foods are more plentiful, shifting patterns of diet and
lifestyle are leading to ever growing nutritional gaps.
We look forward to building on the ‘100 years of vitamins’
campaign in order to ensure another century of improved health
and prosperity for us all.
The impact of hidden hunger in both the developed and developing
world is enormous. Globally, stunted growth and anemia in children
are major causes of health problems later in life, including the
increasing burden of obesity and chronic diseases. Hidden
hunger negatively impacts individuals, communities, health systems
and economies.
Kind regards,
It is essential that we also raise awareness of the benefits of
vitamins among both decision makers and the general public.
An additional objective of the campaign was therefore to build a
much greater understanding amongst key audiences of the role
and importance of vitamins in terms of public health, and highlight
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer,
Senior Vice President
Nutrition Science & Advocacy,
DSM Nutritional Products
2
Foreword from
Elizabeth Somer, M.A., R.D.
muscle in tip top shape, while magnesium is critical
for coping with stress, maintaining a healthy heartbeat
and blood pressure, and improving muscle, nerve, and
bones. Unless you include at least three servings daily of
calcium-rich milk products or fortified soymilk and lots
of magnesium-rich soybeans, nuts and wheat germ, you
should supplement these two minerals. Dear reader,
We have come a long way in the past 100 years. Now we recognize
that vitamins do far more than just prevent classic nutrient
deficiency diseases, which are uncommon in the developed world.
Many Americans, for example, are marginally deficient in one
or more vitamins. That means they consume enough to prevent
the classic deficiency, but not enough to be optimally nourished.
Marginal deficiencies smolder under the surface and result in
compromised health in a subtle way today and serious conditions
later in life. Osteoporosis is a good example. Get some, but not
enough vitamin D, and over the course of a lifetime your bones
slowly lose calcium until they no longer can support your weight,
yet there are no tell-tale signs in the meantime.
•If your multi or calcium does not have at least 1000
IU of vitamin D, then consider a separate vitamin D
supplement since you can’t get enough from food and
optimal intake is associated with lowered risk for muscle
weakness, gum disease, diabetes, insulin resistance,
arthritis, multiple sclerosis, hypertension and certain
cancers, including colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate
cancers.
The irony is that if you ask people how they think they are
doing diet-wise, most people will tell you they know they don’t
eat perfectly, but feel they do OK. I’ve found that most people
are misguided. In fact, 99 out of 100 people don’t meet even
minimum standards of a balanced diet, according to FDA data,
yet nine out of 10 think they are doing pretty well.
•If you don’t consume at least two servings a week of fatty
fish, such as salmon, mackerel, or herring, then take a
DHA omega-3 supplement. You need at least 220mg of
DHA, and possibly up to 900mg/day to lower the risk for
heart disease (the number one killer for both men and
women), depression and possibly even lower Alzheimer’s
risk by 70 percent.
Marginal deficiency symptoms are subtle, but they can have a
significant long-term impact. For instance, low vitamin B12 leads
to memory loss and low intake of folic acid can contribute to
cancer, as well as memory problems and birth defects.
One obvious sign that you may not be meeting the
recommended daily amounts of the essentials is your mood food and mood go hand in hand. As I always point out, if you
don’t feel great, then take a look at your plate. You may need to
add a few extra servings of colorful fruits and vegetables and a
supplement program to help boost your nutrition and mood.
I have a four-step supplement program to make sure we are
combating marginal deficiencies and supplementing responsibly.
•Select a broad-range multiple that supplies as close to
100 percent, but no more than 300 percent, of the Daily
Value for a wide variety of vitamins and minerals. A
multiple should complement an excellent diet and fill in
the gaps on days when you don’t eat perfectly. It’s not a
substitute for a healthy diet, it’s a supplement.
The ‘100 Years of Vitamins’ campaign – and in particular the
Basel Symposium – has served as an important platform to
discuss the role of vitamins in human health, bringing together
professionals and experts to look at how vitamins help with
health and wellbeing.
•Add a separate calcium plus magnesium supplement.
You need calcium to keep your bones, skin, nerves, and 3
Table of Content
Die Renaissance der Vitamine Donnerstag Badische Zeitung — 16 August 2012
25
Rep. Pallone Honors 100th Anniversary of Vitamins 26 September 2012
27
DSM marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of vitamins 7
Penton Insight — 23 January 2012
Congress recognizes 100th anniversary of the vitamin
Nutraingredients – 27 Septemeber 2012
27
DSM Highlights 100 Years of Vitamins The Poultry Site — 24 January 2012
8
100 Years of Vitamins Elizabeth Somer KOIB-TV CBS Portland — 17 October 2012 (VIDEO)
28
100 years of vitamins highlighted by DSM GFMTvlogspot.be – 1 February 2012
9
100 Years of Vitamins Elizabeth Somer WHUD-FM New York — 22 October 2012 (AUDIO)
28
100 Years of Vitamins WPFO FOX Portland ME (VIDEO)
28
11
100 Years Vitamins Wall street journal (AUDIO)
28
12
Global population demands, ‘confusing’ media coverage
and the 100 year old vitamin nutraingredients-usa.com — 19 November 2012
12
Vitamins Celebrate 100 Years! directsellingnews.com — 19 November 2012
29
Belangstelling voor vitamines neemt na 100 jaar weer Voeding nu — 30 November 2012
31
100 YEARS
DSM’s Sight and Life publishes history of battle against
micronutrient deficiencies Penton Insight – 9 February 2012
Vitamins Celebrate 100 Years TrueHealth.com — 14 February 2012
DSM initiative publishes history of the global battle against
micronutrient deficiencies Asia Food Journal — 29 February 2012
DSM Highlights 100 Years of Vitamins China Chemical Reporter — 7 March 2012
6
9
Clayton Ajello Celebrates with Sight and Life in Switzerland 13
Vitaminangels.org — 13 March 2012
Vitamins Discovered 100 Years Ago EQUInews.com — 4 April 2012
14
100 years of vitamins for a brighter world PETS International — 13 April 2012
14
Piece from Chinese Nutrition Society China Food Newspaper — 17 April 2012
14
Der Mensch bleibt ein Gewohnheitstier Aargauer Zeitung — 8 May 2012
14
100 years of vitamins Innovations in Food Technology — May 2012
14
100 Jahre Vitamine...und immer noch topaktuell BAZ Life Sciences — 12 May 2012
15
Commentary Series Tackling Poverty with
Nutrition Innovations globalfoodforthought — 5 December 2012
28
31
“4 Steps to Choosing the Right Vitamins, Supplements” NBC Today Show — 14 January 2013 (VIDEO)
32
VITAMIN A
33
Preventing blindness and saving lives with vitamin A Vitaminangels.org — 11 October 2012
34
VITAMIN B
35
UU vitamin research combats stroke risk
BBC News — 11 May 2012
36
INTERVIEW: DSM - 100 Years of Vitamins and Further
Optimization of Animal Nutrition Feedinfo News Service — 22 May 2012
16
B-Vitamine halten geistig fit Ärzte Zeitung — 21 May 2012
36
DSM conmemora los 100 años del descubrimiento de
las vitaminas Eurocarne — 24 May 2012
18
VITAMIN D
38
100 Years of Vitamins: Adequate Intake in the Elderly Is Still
a Matter of Concern Lindamentar.blogspot.com — 30 May 2012
Nur hoch dosiertes Vitamin D kann Frakturen verhindern 5 July 2012
39
18
Hüftbruch: Volle Vitamin D-Kraft voraus
krm-media.de — 5 July 2012
39
19
Brüchige Knochen Speiegel.de — 9 July 2012
40
Micronutrients: The smartest investment the world can make 19
Globalpost.com — 8 June 2012
Vitamin-D-Mangel: Risiko für Senioren ab 60 Mercure Magazine — 11 July 2012
41
100 Jahre Vitamine ... und immer noch topaktuell CH-D Wirtschaft — July 2012
20
CRN celebrates 100 years of vitamins Drug Store News — 19 July 2012
21
Altersmediziner empfehlen Vitamin D als
Nahrungsergänzung nächste Meldung Innovations Report — 11 July 2012
Age Matters: Vitamins for Every Life Stage Journal Sentinel — 3 August 2012
22
Nur viel Vitamin D schützt vor Knochenbrüchen
Dradio.de — 12 July 2012
43
Warning Signs of a Bad Diet Elizabethsomerblog.com — 15 August 2012
23
Vitamin D macht Knochen im Alter stabil
DIE BILD — 13 July 2012
44
Keimzelle der industriellen Vitamin Produktion Region Basel Badische Zeitung — 16 August 2012
24
Senioren: Viel Vitamin D macht die Knochen stabil
netdoktor.de — 13 July 2012
45
100 Years of Vitamins Journal of Nutrition Cover — 1 June 2012
4
42
Das Sonnenvitamin macht die Knochen stark
gesund-durch — 28 August 2012
46
Vitamins and dietary supplements too much of a good thing?
The Science would suggest not…
69
Nutra-Ingridients — 3 August 2012
47
Study highlights low dietary vitamin intakes
Food and Beverage Reporter — August 2012
71
Vitamin D insufficiency stats reveal a bleak picture FoodBev.com — 3 September 2012
48
Vitamins You Need At Every Age KATU — 20 August 2012
72
Bringing the ‘Sunshine Vitamin’ Out of the Shadows HuffingtonPost — 3 September 2012
49
Vitamins women need most SheKnows — 4 September 2012
73
Nutraceuticals what can be achieved today
Nutraceuticals Now — 27 September 2012
74
Breaking Down Silos: Integrating Nutrition For Impact Global Health and Diplomacy – Fall 2012
74
Americans and Europeans Don’t Get Enough Vitamins Muscle & Body — 1 October 2012
76
What Should a World of Nine Billion People Look Like?
The Huffington Post — 15 October 2012
77
International Osteoporosis Foundation launches
vitamin D map NutraIngredients.com — 3 September
Majority of adults risk bone health from chronic
Vitamin D deficiency Elixir News — 3 September 2012
50
Global vitamin D map launched DSM calls for urgent action
to address major public health issue
FoodBeverageAsia — 4 September 2012
51
Internationale Osteoporose Stichting lanceert online Vitamine D 52
Voeding Nu — 5 September 2012
DSM und die Internationale Osteoporose Foundation
Krm-media.de — September 2012
54
Vitamin D insufficiency is a major public health issue Nutri-facts.org — 14 September 2012
55
DSM und die Internationale Osteoporose Foundation
cityblick24
56
IOF launches global vitamin D map Posted on Asia food journal gesund - durch — 19 October 2012
57
Vitamin D Status Weltkarte erstellt (vitamin D map launch, see attached)
58
VITAMIN E
59
Forgotten vitamin would help cut premature births ‘by 30%’
Food Manucfacture.co.uk — 17 October 2012
60
OLYMPIC NUTRITION
61
DSM Backs Dutch and German Olympians with Nutrient Solutions
Nutra-Ingredients.com — 24 July 2012
62
DSM and Dutch Olympic Committee Partner on “Optimum Sports Nutrition”
Nutritionhorizon.com — 24 July 2012
62
Forgotten vitamin would help cut premature births ‘by 30%’78
Food Manucfacture.co.uk — 17 October 2012
Scaling up nutrition with public and private partnerships79
africareview.com — 9 November 2012
Africa: Development Targets Ride on Vitamins allafrica.com — 26 November 2012
81
Rice Fortification: The ‘Game Changer’ in Helping Solve
Malnutrition and Poverty? 82
Huffpost Lifestyle — 27 November 2012
Development Targets Ride on Vitamins Interpress service — 27 November 2012
Looking forward: The emerging evidence for vitamins
and health
nutraingredients.com — 28 November 2012
Harnessing the power of vitamins to prevent wellness foodbev.com — 3 December 2012
84
86
87
Vitamine: Die beste Dosis für die Gesundheit / Zukunftsvision
der Vitaminforschung ist die perfekt ausgewogene individuelle
Versorgung mit Vitaminen für einen optimal funktionierenden
Körper
88
Bloomberg — 4 December 2012.
Vitamins: The best dose for health
The future vision of vitamin research is a perfectly balanced
individual vitamin intake for an optimally functioning body
Bloomberg — 4 December 2012.
DSM helps Dutch athletes go for Olympic gold
Food Product Design — 25 July 2012
63
GENERAL VITAMINS
64
Health & Wellnes – The industry view: Dr. Manfred Eggersdorf,
DSM Senior VP, nutrition and Science Advocacy 90
foodingredientsfirst.com — 4 December 2012.
65
Interview with Dr. Klaus Kraemer on Tackling Malnutrition
and Micronutrient Deficiencies
Globalfoodforthought — 12 December 2012
Dietary surveys indicate vitamin intakes below
recommendations are common in representative
Western countries British Journal of Nutrition — 13 June 2012
Changing Lives with Vitamin Angels Blog.Wholefoodsmarket.com — 21 July 2012
DSM research reveals ‘inadequate’ vitamin intake in
Europe and USA
Nutra-Ingridients — 21 June 2012
66
Dietary vitamin intakes using “traffic lights” suggest
widespread inadequacies in Europe, US Asia Food Journal — 26 June 2012
67
Vitamin-D-Mangel: Risiko für Senioren ab 60
Mercure Magazine – 11 July 2012
We can’t address food security without addressing
nutrition security The Economist Group Management Thinking Blog
— 13 December 2012
65
68
5
89
92
94
100 years
6
DSM marks the 100th anniversary of the
discovery of vitamins
Vitamins are also vital for animal nutrition and health. A
diet rich in vitamins and essential micronutrients is vital for
animal production and ensures that animals remain healthy
throughout their lifecycle, which is central to the sustainability
and efficiency of the food chain as well as to the welfare of
the animals themselves. In a world facing growing global
demand for animal protein, DSM works with leading institutions
worldwide researching and developing optimum animal
nutrition, and it delivers essential vitamin premix solutions to its
customers to support the increasing demand for animal protein,
as well as to benefit the health and sustainability of the food
chain as a whole.
Penton Insight
23 January 2012
The last century has witnessed remarkable discoveries and
research that have advanced understanding of vitamins and
their vital role in health and wellness.
In 1912, the Polish biochemist Casimir Funk isolated the first
vitamin (B1) from rice bran. At that time, European rice hulling
machines were brought to Asia to process rice. However,
the hulling process stripped the rice of its vital nutritional
elements. As a consequence, new health problems began
emerging among the people and animals who relied upon
rice as a staple food. Symptoms included weakness, fatigue,
and as the condition progressed, apathia, polyneuropathy,
paralysis, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. This dietary
deficiency disease is now known as beriberi. Funk realized that
a compound inside of the rice bran that had been removed
in the hulling process could in fact cure patients. He gave the
substance he discovered the name “vitamine” — a combination
of “vita” (Latin for “life”) and “amine” (= nitrogen compound).
For 100 years the word “vitamin” has been an umbrella term for
a group of essential, organic micronutrients that play a range
of vital roles in our bodies. The majority of vitamins cannot be
directly produced by the body and must therefore be obtained
through dietary means (exceptions: niacin and vitamin D). If
vitamin intakes are insufficient, it can result in serious health
problems. Despite extensive knowledge now available on the
crucial role of vitamins in the body, vitamin inadequacies are
not yet merely the topic of history books: even today, billions of
people do not have sufficient intakes of essential micronutrients
compared to recommendations.
Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice-President Nutrition
Science & Advocacy at DSM commented:
“At DSM, we are proud to have been part of the vitamin journey
for human nutrition and health, animal nutrition and health,
and personal care, and we are committed to further scientific
advancements in these fields for generations to come.”
100 years of vitamins for a brighter world
In 1912, the world first learned about ‘vitamins’, a term coined
by Casimir Funk to describe bioactive substances essential
for human and animal health. The past century has witnessed
remarkable discoveries that have advanced our understanding
of vitamins and their vital role in health and wellness. DSM,
the global leader in vitamins, is proud to have been part of this
vitamin journey and is committed to making further scientific
advances for generations to come.
DSM – Bright Science. Brighter Living. ™
Royal DSM N.V. is a global science-based company active
in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique
competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is
driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social
advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM
delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve
performance in global markets such as food and dietary
supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medical
devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life
protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM’s
22,000 employees deliver annual net sales of about € 9 billion.
The company is listed on NYSE Euronext. More information can
be found at www.dsm.com
In many developing countries, people do not have access to
vitamin-rich foods, which leads to high mortality rates and serious
health problems. However, even closer to home, in the world of
abundant and modern lifestyles, inadequate vitamin intakes are
also surprisingly common. DSM works in partnership with other
organizations, such as the World Food Programme (WFP) and the
International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), to help close up the
gaps in essential micronutrient intakes and promote the essential
role of micronutrients in promoting health.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
7
100 years
DSM Highlights 100 Years of Vitamins
In many developing countries, people do not have access to
vitamin-rich foods, which leads to high mortality rates and
serious health problems. However, even closer to home, in the
world of abundant and modern lifestyles, inadequate vitamin
intakes are also surprisingly common. DSM works in partnership
with other organizations, such as the World Food Programme
(WFP) and the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), to help
close up the gaps in essential micronutrient intakes and promote
the essential role of micronutrients in promoting health.
The Poultry Site
24 January 2012
GLOBAL - The year 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the
discovery of vitamins. In 1912, a scientist named Casimir Funk
coined the term “vitamins” to describe bioactive substances
essential for human and animal health. In the years that
followed, a series of scientific breakthroughs were made that
identified 13 vitamins and explored many of their functions in
the body.
Vitamins are also vital for animal nutrition and health. A
diet rich in vitamins and essential micronutrients is vital for
animal production and ensures that animals remain healthy
throughout their lifecycle, which is central to the sustainability
and efficiency of the food chain as well as to the welfare of
the animals themselves. In a world facing growing global
demand for animal protein, DSM works with leading institutions
worldwide researching and developing optimum animal
nutrition, and it delivers essential vitamin premix solutions to its
customers to support the increasing demand for animal protein,
as well as to benefit the health and sustainability of the food
chain as a whole.
The last century has witnessed remarkable discoveries and
research that have advanced understanding of vitamins and
their vital role in health and wellness.
In 1912, the Polish biochemist Casimir Funk isolated the first
vitamin (B1) from rice bran. At that time, European rice hulling
machines were brought to Asia to process rice. However, the
hulling process stripped the rice of its vital nutritional elements.
As a consequence, new health problems began emerging among
the people and animals who relied upon rice as a staple food.
Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice-President Nutrition
Science & Advocacy at DSM commented: “At DSM, we are proud
to have been part of the vitamin journey for human nutrition
and health, animal nutrition and health, and personal care, and
we are committed to further scientific advancements in these
fields for generations to come.”
Symptoms included weakness, fatigue, and as the condition
progressed, apathia, polyneuropathy, paralysis, cardiomyopathy
and heart failure. This dietary deficiency disease is now known
as beriberi. Funk realized that a compound inside of the rice
bran that had been removed in the hulling process could in
fact cure patients. He gave the substance he discovered the
name “vitamine” - a combination of “vita” (Latin for “life”) and
“amine” (= nitrogen compound).
For 100 years the word “vitamin” has been an umbrella term for
a group of essential, organic micronutrients that play a range
of vital roles in our bodies. The majority of vitamins cannot be
directly produced by the body and must therefore be
obtained through dietary means (exceptions: niacin and vitamin
D). If vitamin intakes are insufficient, it can result in serious
health problems.
Despite extensive knowledge now available on the crucial role
of vitamins in the body, vitamin inadequacies are not yet merely
the topic of history books: even today, billions of people do not
have sufficient intakes of essential micronutrients compared
to recommendations.
100 years
8
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
100 years of vitamins highlighted by DSM
GFMTblogspot.be
DSM’s Sight and Life publishes history of
battle against micronutrient deficiencies
1 February 2012
Penton Insight
9 February 2012
The year 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of
vitamins. In 1912, a scientist named Casimir Funk coined the
term “vitamins” to describe bioactive substances essential for
human and animal health. In the years that followed, a series of
scientific breakthroughs were made that identified 13 vitamins
and explored many of their functions in the body. The last
century has witnessed remarkable discoveries and research that
have advanced understanding of vitamins and their vital role in
health and wellness.
Entitled Micronutrients, Macro Impact: The story of vitamins and
a hungry world, this book tells how, for the past 25 years, Sight
and Life has championed the battle against hidden hunger
among theworld’s poorest and most vulnerable populations.
The book launch will take place on 10th February2012 at the
headquarters of DSM Nutritional Products in Switzerland,
within the wider frameworkof DSM’s celebration of 100 Years of
Vitamins in 2012.
In 1912, the Polish biochemist Casimir Funk isolated the first
vitamin (B1) from rice bran. At that time, European rice hulling
machines were brought to Asia to process rice. However, the
hulling process stripped the rice of its vital nutritional elements.
As a consequence, new health problems began emerging among
the people and animals who relied upon rice as a staple food.
The term ‘vitamines’ was coined a hundred years ago by the
Polish biochemist Casimir Funk to describea group of bioactive
substances essential for health. As the world’s leading producer
of vitamins, DSM isleading the way in celebrating the first
hundred years of vitamin science and initiating the nexthundred
years of developments in this field.
This blog is written by Martin Little, The Global Miller, published
and supported by the GFMT Magazine and the International
Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers.
Micronutrients, Macro Impact recounts the first quartercentury of Sight and Life’s existence. Drawingon documentary
evidence as well as recent interviews with leading thinkers
in the micronutrient arena,it explains the vital importance of
micronutrients and makes a powerful plea for using these
vitalsubstances to help build healthier, more prosperous, and
more sustainable societies.
The publication of Micronutrients, Macro Impact is one of
a wide range of activities underscoring DSM’scommitment
to the next century of vitamin science. The book launch
in Kaiseraugst, Switzerland, willbe followed by a minisymposium on Micronutrients: From the Past to the Future with
participantsfrom Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN),
Groupe de Recherche et d‘Echange Technologique(GRET), the
Universities of Hohenheim, Newcastle & Ulster, and Vitamin
Angels, as well as DSM, Sightand Life and the United Nations
World Food Programme (WFP).
Dr. Klaus Kraemer, Director Sight and Life, concludes:
“If we have learned anything over the past 25 years, it is
that all relevant stakeholders must work together to solve
the problems of a hungry world– scientists, visionaries,
policymakers, governments and non-governmental
organizations,philanthropist and the private sector.”
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
9
100 years
DSM – Bright Science. Brighter Living. ™
Royal DSM N.V. is a global science-based company active
in health, nutrition and materials. Byconnecting its unique
competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is
driving economicprosperity, environmental progress and social
advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders.
DSM delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and
improve performance in global markets suchas food and
dietary supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals,
medical devices, automotive,paints, electrical and electronics,
life protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials.
DSM’s22,000 employees deliver annual net sales of about
€ 9 billion. The company is listed on NYSEEuronext.
On February 8th DSM was sponsoring the Economist conference
Feeding the World: The 9-billion peoplequestion in Geneva,
Switzerland, at which the keynote speech was made by
Graziano da Silva, theDirector General of the United Nations
Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).Stephan Tanda, DSM
Managing Board Member with responsibility for DSM’s Nutrition
activities, comments: “Micronutrients, Macro Impact clearly
shows that our work to advance the science of vitamins is
more important than ever. Working together with a wide range
of stakeholders has brought the opportunity to sustainably
improve the nutritional status of millions of people within
reach. Turning this possibility into a reality requires also the
engagement and support of the public at large. We hope that
Micronutrients, Macro Impact will help rally this support and is
a great example for the positive change that Sight and Life has
championed for the past 25 years.”
More information can be found at www.dsm.com.
About SIGHT AND LIFE
Sight and Life is a humanitarian initiative of DSM and a well
respected nutrition think tank. We careabout the world’s
most vulnerable populations, and exist to help improve their
nutritional status.Acting as their advocates, we guide original
nutrition research, disseminate its findings and facilitatedialog
to bring about positive change. We believe that the right mix of
funding, knowledge, technologyand policy will lead to better
health. We work through advocacy and leadership to address
societalchanges affecting dietary quality. We act responsibly
to disseminate information that reflects currentknowledge
and evolving scientific evidence. We also aim to promote
partnerships that are able to solveoutstanding problems.
www.sightandlife.org
100 years of vitamins for a brighter world
In 1912, the world first learned about ‘vitamins’, a term coined
by Casimir Funk to describe bioactivesubstances essential for
human and animal health. The past century has witnessed
remarkablediscoveries that have advanced our understanding
of vitamins and their vital role in health andwellness. DSM, the
global leader in vitamins, is proud to have been part of this
vitamin journey and is committed to making further scientific
advances for generations to come.
100 years
10
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamins Celebrate 100 Years
• Vitamin K—Supports healthy blood clotting and coagulation.
Vitamin K can be found naturally in liver, cereals, and
members of the cabbage family.
TrueHealth.com
14 February 2012
It’s important to eat a balanced meal—rich with fresh produce,
lean meat, nuts, and whole grains—to be sure you’re consuming
a variety of vitamins every day. Without them, your body would
struggle to maintain its status as a well-oiled machine, and your
health would dwindle.
If you’ve been looking for an occasion to celebrate, what better
occasion than great health? You’re well and active—largely
thanks to the vitamins you consume, whether in supplement
form or from the food you eat. And while celebrating, take a
moment to recognize this: 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of
the discovery of vitamins!
But sometimes there’s just no time to prepare fresh, healthy
meals. I’ve been there too! Frozen food becomes convenient
and can even trick your taste buds into satisfaction if you train
them just right.
That’s right—in 1912, a biochemist named Casimir Funk coined
the term “vitamin” when he isolated vitamin B1 from rice bran.
You’ve heard the term vitamin before—you may even be taking
vitamins every day—but do you really know what vitamins
are? They’re organic substances that are essential for proper
nutrition for people, animals, and even some plants. Vitamins
are found in many natural foods, and your body even produces
several types of vitamins, but not enough of what you need.
That’s why supplementation is so important!
There are 13 types of vitamins, many of which fall into
the vitamin B category. I know what you’re thinking—that
adds up to way to many pills to take each day. That’s why
multivitamins—like Ultimate Multi-Complete—are great for
overall wellness, but if you’re looking for specific benefits,
here’s a breakdown of what vitamins can do for you:
Here’s an idea that I started doing myself. I go grocery shopping
over the weekend and buy plenty of fresh fruit, and then early in
the week I wash it all thoroughly and chop it up into a big fruit
salad. That way, whatever I end up eating for a meal as the week
goes on, I at least can top it off with healthy fruit salad, chock
full of vitamins and nutrients!
If you’re looking to supplement with vitamins, be sure to visit
our sister company, Vitamin Research Products. VRP has a
wide variety of single vitamins so you can give your body extra
support where you need it most.
We’d love to hear from you! How do you get your daily dose of
vitamins?
• Vitamin A—Supports healthy teeth, skin, and vision. Vitamin
A can be found naturally in carrots, kale, broccoli, dairy
products, and meat.
• B vitamins—Supports your heart, nervous system, red blood
cell production, and maintains energy. The vitamin B complex
(B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, and B12) can be found naturally in grains,
green vegetables, fish, beans, and dairy products.
• Vitamin C—Supports immune defense, healthy teeth and gums,
and provides antioxidant protection. Vitamin C can be found
naturally in citrus fruits, broccoli, cabbage, spinach, tomatoes,
and many other fruits and veggies, notably strawberries.
• Vitamin D—Support strong bones, healthy teeth, and aids in
calcium absorption. Known as the “sunshine vitamin,” D3 is
produced in the body when your skin is exposed to sunlight.
Vitamin D can be found naturally in fish, egg yolk, dairy
products, and from 10-15 minutes of sun exposure (without
sunscreen) each day.
• Vitamin E—Supports red blood cell production and provides
antioxidant protection. Vitamin E can be found naturally in
whole grains, leafy greens, and nuts.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
http://www.truehealth.com/blog/healthy-perspectives-vitaminanniversary.aspx
11
100 years
DSM initiative publishes history of the global
battle against micronutrient deficiencies
DSM Highlights 100 Years of Vitamins
Asia Food Journal
7 March 2012
China Chemical Reporter
29 February 2012
The year 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of
vitamins. In 1912, a scientist named Casimir Funk coined the
term “vitamins” to describe bioactive substances essential for
human and animal health. In the years that followed, a series of
scientific breakthroughs were made that identified 13 vitamins
and explored many of their functions in the body. The last
century has witnessed remarkable discoveries and research that
have advanced understanding of vitamins and their vital role in
health and wellness.
Sight and Life, the humanitarian initiative of DSM and a
nutrition think tank has launched a book that documents the
history of the global battle against micronutrient deficiencies in
its Switzerland headquarters.
Entitled Micronutrients, Macro Impact: The story of vitamins and
a hungry world, the book tells how, for the past 25 years, Sight
and Life has championed the battle against hidden hunger
among the world’s poorest and most vulnerable populations.
The book launch took place on February 10, 2012 at the
headquarters of DSM Nutritional Products in Switzerland, within
the wider framework of the company’s celebration of 100 Years
of Vitamins in 2012.
For 100 years the word “vitamin” has been an umbrella term for
a group of essential, organic micronutrients that play a range
of vital roles in our bodies. The majority of vitamins cannot be
directly produced by the body and must therefore be obtained
through dietary means (exceptions: niacin and vitamin D). If
vitamin intakes are insufficient, it can result in serious health
problems. Despite extensive knowledge now available on the
crucial role of vitamins in the body, vitamin inadequacies are
not yet merely the topic of history books: even today, billions of
people do not have sufficient intakes of essential micronutrients
compared to recommendations.
The term ‘vitamines’ was coined a hundred years ago by the
Polish biochemist Casimir Funk to describe a group of bioactive
substances essential for health.
Drawing on documentary evidence as well as recent interviews
with experts in the micronutrient arena, the book explains the
vital importance of micronutrients and makes a powerful plea
for using these vital substances to help build healthier, more
prosperous and sustainable societies.
In many developing countries, people do not have access to
vitamin-rich foods, which leads to high mortality rates and
serious health problems. However, even closer to home, in the
world of abundant and modern lifestyles, inadequate vitamin
intakes are also surprisingly common. DSM works in partnership
with other organizations, such as the World Food Programme
(WFP) and the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), to help
close up the gaps in essential micronutrient intakes and promote
the essential role of micronutrients in promoting health.
The book launch was followed by a mini-symposium with
participants from Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition, Groupe
de Recherche et d‘Echange Technologique, the Universities of
Hohenheim, Newcastle & Ulster, and Vitamin Angels,
as well as DSM, Sight and Life and the United Nations World
Food Programme.
Vitamins are also vital for animal nutrition and health. In a world
facing growing global demand for animal protein, DSM works
with leading institutions worldwide researching and developing
optimum animal nutrition, and it delivers essential vitamin
premix solutions to its customers to support the increasing
demand for animal protein, as well as to benefit the health and
sustainability of the food chain as a whole.
http://www.asiafoodjournal.com/article/dsm-initiativepublishes-history-of-the-global-battle-against-micronutrientdeficiencies/8187
100 years
12
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Clayton Ajello Celebrates
with Sight and Life in Switzerland
Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice-President Nutrition
Science & Advocacy at DSM commented: “At DSM, we are proud
to have been part of the vitamin journey for human nutrition
and health, animal nutrition and health, and personal care, and
we are committed to further scientific advancements in these
fields for generations to come.”
Vitaminangels.org
13 March 2012
Our technical partner, Sight and Life (the well-respected
nutrition think tank humanitarian initiative of DSM) turned 25
this February!
To celebrate, Sight and Life recently sponsored a symposium on
“100 Years of Vitamins”. The symposium’s speakers recapped
important past and current developments in the discovery
and deployment of essential micronutrients. In addition, Sight
and Life marked this milestone with the launch of a new book:
Micronutrients, Macro Impact: The Story of Vitamins and a
Hungry World, describing their history battling hidden hunger.
The book launch was held February 10 at the headquarters of
DSM Nutritional Products in Switzerland and Vitamin Angels’
Senior Technical Advisor, Clayton Ajello, DRPH, MPH was there
to join the celebration:
“The Sight and Life sponsored symposium is an appropriate
reminder of the important and ongoing contributions made by
Sight and Life to raise awareness to hidden hunger and to their role
in facilitating practical solutions to connect essential micronutrients
to populations at-risk – especially children who reside in
families that occupy the lowest 30% of the income pyramid.”
Sight and Life recently transferred to Vitamin Angels “the
responsibility for both the management of direct distribution
of vitamin A and Sight and Life’s initiatives intended to catalyze
locally sustainable vitamin A supply and distribution systems.”
We congratulate Sight and Life on 25 years of contributions to
the cause of alleviating hidden hunger, and look forward to our
ongoing partnership with Sight and Life.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
13
100 years
Vitamins Discovered 100 Years Ago
100 years of vitamins for a brighter world
EQUInews.com
PETS International
4 April 2012
13 April 2012
Vitamins have been around for a long time, but the term
“vitamin” and an appreciation of the importance of these
substances dates back only about a hundred years.
In 1912, the world first learned about ‘vitamins’, a term
coined by Casimir Funk to describe bioactive substances
essential to human and animal health. The past century
witnessed remarkable discoveries, which have advanced our
understanding of vitamins and their vital role in health and
wellness. DSM is proud to have been part of this vitamin journey
and is committed to making further scientific advances for
generations to come.
In 1912, Casimir Funk, a Polish biochemist, realized that the
increase in cases of the nutritional deficiency disease beri-beri
coincided with the practice of polishing the bran layer off rice
kernels, a staple food in Asia. Isolating a curative substance
from the rice bran, he called it a “vitamine,” combining terms
denoting nitrogen compounds and life. Other scientists isolated
several similar compounds that were included in the grouping.
Vitamins are defined as organic substances that are necessary
for the proper nutrition of plants and animals. Ingested in
minute quantities, vitamins act as coenzymes and precursors
of coenzymes in the regulation of many metabolic processes.
Some vitamins must be provided by food, while others are
produced within the body. Not all animals are able to produce
the same vitamins, which is one reason feeds designed for one
species are not necessarily suitable for another type of animal.
Broadly classified as water-soluble or fat-soluble, many vitamins
are available from the forages and grains eaten by horses. To be
certain your horse is getting the vitamins necessary for health,
provide access to fresh grass or recently baled hay as well as a
fortified grain product.
The full article (or download) is available for subscribers to the
PETS International.
Piece from Chinese Nutrition Society
China Food Newspaper
17 April 2012
In Chinese – full article attached in PDF. Mentions vitamin
celebration event in Shanghai. Manfred Eggersdorfer pictured.
http://www.aspectconsulting.eu/en/?LinkServID=0C7E8DB9D39B-E22B-28F2524599388E40
Der Mensch bleibt ein Gewohnheitstier
Aargauer Zeitung
http://www.equinews.com/article/vitamins-discovered-100years-ago
8 May 2012
The PDF contains an article on the 100 years of vitamins from
the Aargauer Zeitung.
http://www.aspectconsulting.eu/en/?LinkServID=DFE89A30FED3-260F-B00990D311F61FEC
100 years of vitamins
Innovations in Food Technology
May 2012
Article and ad in the PDF below.
http://www.aspectconsulting.eu/en/?LinkServID=0CCB4751C889-E14B-875626C89C78BBCF
100 years
14
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
100 Jahre Vitamine...und immer noch topaktuell
sein. In zahlreichen Entwicklungsländern ist Vitaminmangel
ein Problem. Denn stehen den Menschen nicht ausreichend
vitaminhaltige Nahrungsmittel zur Verfügung, führt dies
früher oder später zu offenkundigen Erkrankungen,
Entwicklungsstörungen oder gar erhöhten Sterblichkeitsraten.
Man spricht hier vom Hidden Hunger, vom versteckten Hunger.
Zahlreiche Organisationen und Unternehmen haben es sich
zur Aufgabe gemacht, diesen Zustand zu beheben. Zu diesen
Unternehmen gehört auch DSM, der Vitamin-Marktführer sowie
weltweit das einzige Unternehmen, das die Vitamine A, B, C, D,
E und K selber herstellt.
BAZ Life Sciences
12 May 2012
100 Jahre sind sie jung, 13 an der Zahl, lebensnotwendig für
Körper und Geist - die Vitamine. Chemisch ausgedrückt sind
Vitamine organische Verbindungen, die der Körper nicht
selbst herstellen kann (außer Niacin und Vitamin D) und die
darum über die Nahrung aufgenommen werden müssen. Und
da das nicht immer in ausreichenden Mengen der Fall ist,
ob aus Mangel an geeigneten Nahrungsmitteln, Gewohnheit
oder schlicht Bequemlichkeit, gibt es neben den in der Natur
vorkommenden Vitaminen auch die industriell hergestellten,
die der Nahrung zugefügt oder in Form von Vitamintabletten
eingenommen werden können.
Gemeinsam mit dem United Nations World Food Programme
(WFP) kämpft DSM gegen den versteckten Hunger, von dem
weltweit etwa zwei Milliarden Menschen betroffen sind. Zu
diesem Zweck wurde beispielsweise MixMeTM entwickelt, eine
Tagesdosis von Vitaminen und Mineralien, die als Pulver über
gekochten Reis, Mais usw. gestreut werden kann, ohne dass
sich Aussehen und Geschmack des Nahrungsmittels ändern.
Das Problem existiert allerdings nicht nur in den
Entwicklungsländern, sondern auch in der industrialisierten
Welt, wo man es eher nicht vermuten würde. Studien haben
gezeigt, dass viele europäische Verbraucher nicht ausreichend
vitamin- und nährstoffreiche Nahrung zu sich nehmen, obwohl
diese überall zugänglich ist. Das liegt teilweise daran, dass
wir oft viel aber nicht immer richtig essen. Zum anderen liegt
es an unserem modernen Lebensstil, in welchem die frische
Zubereitung von Mahlzeiten manchmal zu kurz kommt.
Die Auswirkungen sind nicht sofort als schwerer Vitaminmangel
erkennbar, haben aber langfristig einen negativen Einfluss
auf Gesundheit und Wohlbefinden. Dennoch zeichnet sich ein
allgemeiner Trend zu gesundem Leben ab, dem immer mehr
Menschen folgen, und dazu gehört untrennbar auch eine
vernünftige Versorgung mit Vitaminen.
Die Geschichte der Vitamine beginnt mit der Einführung neuer
Reisschältechnologien im asiatischen Raum zu Beginn des 20.
Jahrhunderts. Da dem Reis beim Schälen lebensnotwendige
Nährstoffe entzogen worden waren, litten die Menschen in
der Folge an einer Mangelerkrankung, mit der verschiedene
Symptome von Kräfteverlust bis hin zu Lähmungserscheinungen
einhergingen. Diese Krankheit nannte man Beriberi.
Nachdem er über diese Krankheit gelesen hatte, forschte
der polnische Biochemiker Casimir Funk – wie auch viele
andere Wissenschaftler - nach einem geeigneten Gegenmittel.
Schließlich gelang es ihm, in der Reiskleie einen aktiven Stoff
zu identifizieren, mit dem die Patienten geheilt werden konnten.
Er nannte diesen Stoff 1912 erstmals „Vitamine“ —
zusammengesetzt aus Vita (lat. = Leben) und Amine (=
Stickstoffverbindung). Letzteres basierte auf der später
widerlegten Annahme, dass Stickstoffverbindungen das
kennzeichnende Merkmal dieser neuen Stoffgruppe seien,
während heute allgemein anerkannt ist, dass Vitamine
lebensnotwendig sind. Entgegen den Erwartungen ging der
erste Nobelpreis für Arbeiten zu Vitaminen im Jahr 1929 nicht an
Casimir Funk, sondern an den Niederländer Christiaan Eijkman
und den Engländer Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins für die
Entdeckung des Anti-Beriberi Vitamin B1.
Neben dem Bedienen weltweit wachsender Märkte stehen
bei DSM Forschung und Wissenschaft im Vordergrund. „Wir
investieren jährlich über 100 Millionen Euro in die Innovation“,
erklärt Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice President Nutrition
Science & Advocacy von DSM Nutritional Products mit Sitz
in Kaiseraugst bei Basel. „Auch die allgemeine Aufklärung
über Vitamine - wie ist der Versorgungsstatus, wo liegen die
optimalen Zufuhrmengen, wie beugen wir mit ihrer Hilfe gegen
Krankheiten vor - sind für uns wichtig.
Seit nunmehr 100 Jahren ist die Bezeichnung „Vitamine“
ein Oberbegriff für eine Gruppe essentieller, organischer
Mikronährstoffe, die in unserem Körper zahlreiche wichtige
Aufgaben haben und die unser Organismus nicht selbst
herstellen kann. Vitamine müssen mit der Nahrung
aufgenommen werden; und ist die Zufuhr nicht ausreichend,
können schwerwiegende Mangelerscheinungen die Folge
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
15
100 years
Aktuell arbeiten wir z.B. an Vitamin-Mangel-Weltkarten, die
einen Überblick darüber geben, in welchen Ländern die
Menschen unterversorgt sind“, erklärt er weiter.
INTERVIEW: DSM - 100 Years of Vitamins and
Further Optimization of Animal Nutrition
Die Folgen eines solchen Mangels sind nicht nur für die direkt
Betroffenen, sondern, beispielsweise in Form erheblicher
Zusatzkosten in unserem Gesundheitssystem, auch in Ländern
mit einer grundsätzlich guten Lebensmittelversorgung bzw.
relativ hohem Wohlstand nicht zu vernachlässigen.
Obwohl der Begriff Vitamine seit hundert Jahren existiert, sind
Vitamine immer noch topaktuell und werden dies aufgrund ihrer
Lebensnotwendigkeit auch bleiben.
22 May 2012
Feedinfo News Service
22 May 2012 - The year 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of
the discovery of vitamins as bioactive substances essential for
human and animal health.
In 1912, Polish biochemist
Casimir Funk isolated the
first vitamin (B1) from rice
bran. At the time, European
rice hulling machines were
brought to Asia to process
rice. However, the hulling
process stripped the rice
of its vital nutritional
elements. Funk realized that
a compound inside the rice
bran that had been removed
in the hulling process could in fact cure patients.
He gave the substance he discovered the name “vitamine” - a
combination of “vita” (Latin for “life”) and “amine” (= nitrogen
compound).
Over the last century, a series of scientific breakthroughs were
made that identified 13 vitamins and explored their vital role in
health and wellness nutrition.
Numerous published studies also demonstrated the importance
of vitamins for animal nutrition and health. These all show
that a diet rich in vitamins and essential micronutrients is vital
for commercial animal production and ensures that animals
remain healthy and profitable throughout their lifecycle, which
is central to the sustainability and efficiency of the food chain as
well as to the welfare of the animals themselves.
DSM, which has been part of the vitamin journey for Animal
Nutrition and Health, Human Nutrition and Health, and Personal
Care for over 80 years, recently published the 12th edition of
the “DSM Vitamin Supplementation Guidelines”, which provides
a summary of best scientific research and industry practices
in meeting the vitamin needs of animals under sustainable
commercial and profitable production. These guidelines
100 years
16
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Dr. Litta goes on to say that the cost of optimizing vitamin
supplementation following DSM guidelines is relatively small,
amounting to less than 1.5% of total diet cost and can provide a
return on investment of up to 4 to 1.
are recognized as the feed industry’s key reference tool on
“Optimum Vitamin Nutrition” (OVN™ - a DSM concept) levels
since the appearance of the 1st edition in 1958.
Dr. Gilberto Litta, Global Category Manager Vitamins Marketing Animal Nutrition and Health at DSM states that the optimization
of vitamins in animal diets is even more relevant today as
recommendations for vitamin supplementation levels currently
used in the industry are sometimes outdated, and, therefore, do
not match the biological and feeding requirements of modern
and more genetically-advanced animals compared to some
years ago. Consequently, animals can underperform when
considering parameters designed by genetics specialists. He
views the 100th anniversary as a good reason to re-iterate the
importance of vitamins in animal nutrition.
Asked whether or not markets are today still under-utilizing
vitamins in animal diets, Dr. Litta argues that livestock industries
show different levels of maturity and growth according to where
they are located.
He comments: “There are different requirements in the industry
and also different perceptions. Some see vitamins as more
of a cost rather than as a benefit for healthy production. We
have customers who just target the minimum requirements for
supplementation, whereas other customers understand better
the concept of optimum vitamin supplementation and the
profit you obtain from increased animal performance and the
resulting financial returns.
Dr. Litta states: “The 100th anniversary of the discovery of
vitamins is an important milestone in the history of science.
Although vitamins are not a new topic in the animal industry, it
is, today, no more the question of having vitamins in the feed
or not, but the question of optimizing the productivity and the
health of animals as well as the quality of animal origin foods”.
“We need to find ways to feed a growing population with an
increased demand for animal protein, but with fewer resources.
Livestock industry production efficiencies have also significantly
increased over time, resulting in increased animal metabolic
demands and the need for vitamins, which play a part in
energy metabolism, cell integrity, fertility... Modern strains
show improved efficiency with lesser feed intake. Nutrient
levels must be adjusted accordingly and this has to be done
also for vitamins. A 1% adjustment each year has for example
been proposed for laying hens (Leeson, 2007). With the OVN™
concept we aim exactly for that”, he adds.
“There is still great potential to improve animal performance
globally. Optimum Vitamin Nutrition is a sound way of doing so
in all industries”.
http://www.feedinfo.com/console/PageViewer.
aspx?page=3038529
In recent years, DSM has placed a lot of focus on communicating
the benefits of its enzyme, carotenoid and eubiotic portfolio.
However, in 2012 the company has increased its marketing
efforts for vitamins as nutritionists are seeking more and more
to optimize the efficiency of their feeding regimes.
Commenting on this, Dr. Litta says: “We realized that the market
tends to forget about the benefits of vitamins. Today, with a new
generation of nutritionists, we believe it is necessary to reiterate
the importance of vitamins and to mention the topic on a
regular basis - similar to the frequency of updates of our OVN™
(Optimum Vitamin Nutrition) guidelines”.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
17
100 years
DSM conmemora los 100 años del
descubrimiento de las vitaminas
100 Years of Vitamins: Adequate Intake in the
Elderly Is Still a Matter of Concern
Eurocarne
Lindamentar.blogspot.com
24 May 2012
30 May
DSM commemorates the 100th anniversary of Casimir Funk’s
discovery of vitamins.
Demographic changes lead to an ever greater number
of elderly people and mounting evidence suggests an
association between vitamin status and the development
of noncommunicable diseases. However, even in affluent
Western countries, data from dietary intake surveys indicate
that vitamin inadequacy is widespread even in healthy elderly.
Changes inherent to the aging process lead to the need for
increased nutrient density, which is difficult to achieve from
diet alone. Where this is not sufficient to close the gap between
actual vitamin intakes and recommendations, fortified foods
and dietary supplements specifically targeted at the growing
segment of healthy elderly can be a pragmatic solution.
En 2012 se cumplen 100 años del descubrimiento de las
vitaminas. En 1912, el bioquímico polaco Casimir Funk acuñó el
término vitaminas para describir las sustancias esenciales para
la salud de las personas y de los animales. Avances científicos
posteriores, permitieron identificar 13 vitaminas y descubrir
muchas de sus funciones en el organismo.
Durante 100 años, el término “vitamina” se ha utilizado para
designar un grupo de micronutrientes orgánicos esenciales,
que desempeñan una gran diversidad de funciones vitales en
nuestro organismo. La mayoría de las vitaminas no pueden ser
producidas directamente por el mismo, y por tanto, deben ser
incorporadas en la dieta (excepciones: niacina y vitamina D). Ya
en el siglo XXI, con estilos de vida modernos, también es común
la ingesta inadecuada de vitaminas.
DSM colabora con organizaciones tales como el Programa de
Alimentación Mundial (WFP – World Food Programme) y la
Fundación Internacional de Osteoporosis (IOF), promoviendo el
papel fundamental de los micronutrientes en la promoción de
la salud. Por todo esto, DSM trabaja con instituciones líderes
en todo el mundo, en la investigación y en el desarrollo de una
nutrición animal óptima, ofreciendo soluciones a sus clientes
con el suministro de premezclas de vitaminas esenciales para
hacer frente a la creciente demanda de proteínas de origen
animal, así como en beneficio de la salud y la sostenibilidad de
la cadena alimentaria en su conjunto. En palabras de Manfred
Eggersdorfer, vicepresidente senior de Nutrition Science &
Advocacy en DSM “en DSM, estamos orgullosos de haber
formado parte de la jornada de vitaminas para la nutrición y la
salud humana, salud y nutrición animal y el cuidado personal,
y estamos comprometidos a seguir científica los avances en
estos campos para las generaciones venideras”.
http://www.eurocarne.com/noticias.
php?codigo=23950&titulo=dsm_conmemora_100_anos_
descubrimiento_vitaminas
100 years
18
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
100 Years of Vitamins
Journal of Nutrition Cover
Micronutrients: The smartest investment
the world can make
1 June 2012
Globalpost.com
8 June 2012
Cover image: Thiamin crystal. Thiamine was one of the first of
the vitamins to be characterized biochemically and crytallized in
pure form. See Commentary by Troesch et al. on pages 979–980
of this issue. Photo courtesy of Peter Weber.
Dr. Klaus Kraemer is Director of Sight and Life, a humanitarian
initiative of DSM, committed to fighting hidden hunger—
malnutrition caused by micronutrient (vitamin and mineral)
deficiencies. Dr. Kraemer has over 25 years of experience in
research and advocacy in the field of health and safety of
vitamins, minerals, carotenoids, and nutraceuticals.
What is the single smartest way to allocate our global aid
dollars? The most cost-effective investment, proven to best
address today’s complex challenges? The one intervention
that will have the greatest impact on worldwide health and
prosperity? After a year-long assessment, the Copenhagen
Consensus 2012 Expert Panel—which includes four Nobel
Laureates—declared their answer earlier this month: providing
micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) to the world’s
malnourished people.
For global leaders, this presents a tremendous opportunity to
take advantage of the research and expertise pointing to the
proven impact of nutrition on improving the lives of millions.
“Bundled micronutrient interventions,” particularly for children,
are at the top of the Copenhagen Consensus list because proper
nutrition early in life impacts a child’s ability to grow, to fight
disease, to learn in school and to earn more as an adult.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
19
100 years
100 Jahre Vitamine ... und immer noch topaktuell
The announcement that vitamins and minerals are the single
best global aid investment comes as we celebrate 100 years of
vitamins—in 1912 the term “vitamin” was coined to describe the
bioactive substances we now know are absolutely essential for
health and development.
CH-D Wirtschaft
July 2012
Über 100 Millionen CHF Investitionen jährlich Anita Fechtig für
Innovation im Kanton Aargau
Micronutrients have played a vital role in protecting our health
for the last 100 years, and they are key to solving our global
nutritional challenges. We know that malnutrition leads to
irreversible physical and cognitive damage. But we also know
that mothers who are well nourished will give birth to healthier
babies. And children who receive the best nutrition during their
first two years will reach their full cognitive potential, complete
more school and grow to become healthier, more productive
adults, contributing to a more prosperous future for their
families and their nations.
100 Jahre sind sie jung, 13 an der Zahl, lebensnotwendig für Körper
und Geist – die Vitamine. Vitamine sind organische Verbindungen,
die der Körper nicht selbst herstellen kann (ausser Niacin und
Vitamin D) und die darum über die Nahrung aufgenommen
werden müssen. Die meisten der industriell gefertigten Vitamine
kommen aus der Region um Basel, wo der Marktführer DSM den
Sitz seiner Ernährungssparte angesiedelt hat.
Die Geschichte der Vitamine beginnt mit der Einführung neuer
Reisschältechnologien im asiatischen Raum zu Beginn des 20.
Jahrhunderts. Da dem Reis beim Schälen lebensnotwendige
Nährstoffe entzogen wurden, litten die Menschen an Symptomen,
die von Kräfteverlust bis hin zu Lähmungserscheinungen reichten.
Nach eingehender Forschung gelang es dem ehemaligen Berner
Studenten Casimir Funk, in der Reiskleie eine Substanz zu
definieren, mit der die Patienten geheilt werden konnten. Er nannte
diesen aktiven Stoff 1912 erstmals «Vitamine» — zusammengesetzt
aus Vita (lat. = Leben) und Amine (= Stickstoffverbindung).
More from GlobalPost: Health, nutrition become priorities at Davos
At Sight and Life we are proud to be a part of the broad base
of global momentum building around nutrition. We know that
combating malnutrition is a grand challenge, with far-reaching
impacts, and will not be overcome by one group alone. We
support global partnerships such as the Scaling Up Nutrition
(SUN) Movement, working to champion nutrition at global and
national levels. And we are committed to growing the evidence
base for nutrition in order to provide crucial information for
global leaders as they work to transform research—like the
Copenhagen Consensus—into action.
Vitamine müssen mit der Nahrung aufgenommen werden;
und ist die Zufuhr nicht ausreichend, können noch heute
schwerwiegende Mangelerscheinungen die Folge sein. In
zahlreichen Entwicklungsländern ist das Problem akut. Denn
stehen den Menschen zu wenig vitaminhaltige Nahrungsmittel
zur Verfügung, führt dies früher oder später zu Erkrankungen,
Entwicklungsstörungen oder gar erhöhten Sterblichkeitsraten.
Man spricht hier vom Hidden Hunger, vom versteckten Hunger.
Zahlreiche Organisationen und Unternehmen haben es
sich zur Aufgabe gemacht, diesen Zustand zu beheben. Zu
diesen Unternehmen gehört auch DSM, weltweit das einzige
Unternehmen, das alle Vitamine A, B, C, D, E und K herstellt.
Gemeinsam mit dem United Nations World Food Programme
(WFP) kämpft DSM gegen den verstecktenHunger, von dem
weltweit etwa zwei Milliarden Menschen betroffen sind. Zu
diesem Zweck wurde beispielsweise MixMeTM entwickelt,
eine Tagesdosis von Vitaminen und Mineralien, die als Pulver
über gekochten Reis, Mais usw. gestreut wird, ohne dass sich
Aussehen und Geschmack des Grundnahrungsmittels ändern.
Das Problem existiert allerdings nicht nur in den
The fact is, combating malnutrition is at the top of the list
because its impact can be felt across sectors—from health to
agriculture to the economy. Improving nutrition is the most
effective way to secure a better future. We must support global
leaders who have committed to investing in nutrition. We must
support developing countries to improve their capacity to scale
up nutrition programs and policies. And we must work together
so that everyone, everywhere has access to the right foods and
the vitamins and minerals they need to grow healthily, nourish
their families and support a prosperous future for their nations
and the world.
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/
global-pulse/micronutrients-copenhagen-consensus
100 years
20
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
CRN celebrates 100 years of vitamins
Entwicklungsländern, sondern auch in unserer Weltgegend,
woman es eher nicht vermuten würde. Studien haben
gezeigt, dass viele Europäer nicht ausreichend vitamin- und
nährstoffreiche Nahrung zu sich nehmen, obwohl diese überall
zugänglich ist. Das liegt teilweise daran, dass wir oft viel aber
nicht immer richtig essen. Zum anderen liegt es am modernen
Lebensstil, in welchem die frische Zubereitung von Mahlzeiten
manchmal zu kurz kommt. Die Auswirkungen sind nicht sofort
als schwerer Vitaminmangel erkennbar, haben aber langfristig
einen negativen Einfluss auf Gesundheit und Wohlbefinden.
Andererseits zeichnet sich ein allgemeiner Trend zu gesundem
Leben ab, dem immer mehr Menschen folgen, und dazu gehört
auch eine vernünftige Versorgung mit Vitaminen.
Drug Store News
July 19, 2012
The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Wednesday honored
the 100th anniversary of the “vitamin,” a term that was coined
by Casimir Funk, a Polish-American biochemist, in 1912. In
the century since then, scientists have uncovered the specific
functions of vitamins and established the many benefits of
adequate intakes of the nutrients.
“Even the most conscientious consumers find it difficult to get
all the nutrients they need from food alone,” stated Annette
Dickinson, author of a new book, “The Benefits of Nutritional
Supplements” published by the Council for Responsible
Nutrition. “We hope that the 100th anniversary commemoration
will remind consumers that nutrient shortfalls can have health
consequences and that supplementing the diet with vitamins
can positively benefit our lives.”
Neben der Bedienung dieses weltweit wachsenden Bedarfs
stehen bei DSM Forschung und Wissenschaft im Vordergrund. «Wir
investieren jährlich weit über hundert Millionen Schweizerfranken
in die Innovation, einen grossen Teil davon in der Region», erklärt
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice President Nutrition Science
& Advocacy von DSM Nutritional Products. «Auch die allgemeine
Aufklärung über Vitamine – wie ist der Versorgungsstatus, wo
liegen die optimalen Zufuhrmengen, wie beugen wir mit ihrer Hilfe
gegen Krankheiten vor – sind für uns wichtig. Aktuell arbeiten wir
zum Beispiel an Vitaminstatus-Weltkarten, die einen Überblick
darüber geben, in welchen Ländern die Menschen unterversorgt
sind», erklärt er. Die Folgen eines solchen Mangels sind nicht nur
für die direkt Betroffenen, sondern zum Beispiel als erhebliche
Zusatzkosten im Gesundheitssystem auch in Ländern mit einer
grundsätzlich guten Lebensmittelversorgung beziehungsweise
relativ hohem Wohlstand nicht zu vernachlässigen.
CRN recently released the fourth edition of “The Benefits of
Nutritional Supplements,” which assesses the current state of
the science on the health benefits associated with nutritional
supplements. The report relays that consistent, rational use of
vitamins contributes to overall health and wellness throughout
all age groups, lifestyles, and life stages.
The book can be downloaded at no charge at Crnusa.org/
benefits. http://drugstorenews.com/article/crn-celebrates-100years-vitamins
Der holländische Vitamin-Marktführer DSM ist mit rund 3‘000
Mitarbeitenden im Dreiländereck vertreten, mit Fabriken in
Süddeutschland (Grenzach) und im Elsass (Village- Neuf) sowie
mit einer starken Präsenz in der Nordwestschweiz. Im Kanton
Aargau beschäftigt DSM Nutritional Products ca. 2‘000 Personen.
Die Hälfte davon im Werk in Sisseln, welches die weltgrösste
Produktionsanlage für die Vitamine A und E ist. In Kaiseraugst
befinden sich der Hauptsitz der Ernährungssparte sowie das DSM
Nutrition Innovationszentrum und die Leitung der Region Europa.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
21
100 years
Age Matters: Vitamins for Every Life Stage
30s: Antioxidant vitamins, including C and E are important
for men and women in their 30s because these vitamins help
protect against the development of cataracts and macular
degeneration. Adults with high levels of these antioxidants are
at a low risk of vision loss later in life.
Journal Sentinel
3 August 2012
40s and beyond: Vitamins D and B12 are important in the 40s
and well after. As we get older, we are less efficient at making
vitamin D and we may be susceptible to drops in the levels of
vitamin absorption. Vitamin B12 deficiencies are typically due to
insufficient diet and absorption challenges.
Somer shares tips to help you get more of the essentials into
your daily diet.
Tip 1: Survey what you’re eating. Use a food journal to see what
you need to add or remove from your diet. Make a weekly food
schedule to help you meet nutritional requirements. Gain an
understanding of the vitamins found in different foods - one
helpful resource is the 100 Years of Vitamins website.
(ARA) - It was 100 years ago, in 1912, when Polish-American
scientist Casimir Funk identified the first vitamin. Now, on the
100th anniversary of the discovery of vitamins, men and women
still do not get recommended daily intake levels of vitamins.
According to a paper published in the American Journal of
Clinical Nutrition, only 1 percent of the population meets
minimum standards of a balanced diet.
Tip 2: Up your fruit and vegetable intake to help add one or
two extra servings of these vitamin-packed foods. Have a cup
of frozen blueberries; it will give you about 25 percent of your
vitamin C requirement. Eat about a half cup of baby carrots and
get 120 percent of your Vitamin A requirement. Try dipping the
carrots in low-fat vegetable dip or salsa for added flavor.
Age matters when it comes to vitamins. All vitamins are
essential - meaning our bodies can’t make them, so they must
be obtained from the diet. Throughout life, we all need the right
mix of the 13 essential vitamins, but some are more important
than others when it comes to different life stages.
Tip 3: Add one or two enriched or fortified foods to your daily
diet, like whole grain cereal or oatmeal fortified with vitamin
D, soy milk and other soy products fortified with B12, or whole
wheat tortillas - like Mission Life Balance - fortified with vitamin A.
Tip 4: Eat “real” unprocessed foods at least 75 percent of the
time. You may want to add a multi-vitamin supplement to your
diet to help fill in the gaps on days when you don’t eat perfectly.
“With a century of vitamin knowledge upon us, it’s a good reminder
to stay up to date on the latest vitamin recommendations,” says
Elizabeth Somer, registered dietitian and author of “Eat Your Way
to Sexy” (Harlequin, 2012). “New vitamin research findings are
continuously being uncovered around the needs of men and
women during unique times in their lives.”
A quick stroll through life’s stages reveals:
20s: Folic acid is important for women in their 20s - a prime
childbearing age - because this B vitamin is essential in
preventing birth defects like spina bifida in infants. Women
need at least 400mcg per day, but often don’t get enough. By
the time a pregnancy test comes back positive and women
ponder taking a supplement, it could be too late.
100 years
22
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Warning Signs of a Bad Diet
The Solution: Include two to three weekly servings of fatty fish
(i.e., salmon) for the omega-3s and vitamin B12, two dark green
leafies or legumes a day for folic acid, and several vitamin B6rich bananas, whole grains, asparagus, and legumes in your diet.
Elizabethsomerblog.com
15 August 2012
Just Do This Today
1. Munch on a whole-grain toaster waffle topped with
blueberries, rather than a blueberry toaster waffle. The
blueberry waffle has a half teaspoon of fruit, while a half cup
of real blueberries has more antioxidants than five servings
of apples. In fact, USDA rates blueberries #1 in antioxidants
compared to 40 other fruits and vegetables. The deep bluishpurple skin contains antioxidant-rich anthocyanins, while the
insides contain ellagic acid and resveratrol, all phytochemicals
with anti-cancer capabilities. Other phytochemicals in
blueberries, such as proanthocyanidins and tannins, might help
promote urinary tract health by blocking the grown of bacteria.
Don’t you wish a thorough diet check-up was as simple as an
annual physical exam? The appointment might start with the
dietitian asking you to say “ah.” “Hmmm, not eating enough
broccoli I can see,” she might say or “Just what I thought, there
is too much cheese whiz and not enough sweet potatoes down
there.” Unfortunately, every attempt at an accurate appraisal
of our nutritional status – take for example hair analysis – has
proved more quackery than quality. Don’t expect much help
from most physicians either; they seldom probe beyond a blood
test for anemia when it comes to nutritional status. So how are
you supposed to know if you are eating right or wrong?
Luckily, many signs of a careless diet are right in front of your
nose. While you explain away subtle inconveniences like
fatigue, dry skin, or moodiness as “normal,” think again. These
are red flags that your diet isn’t a good as you think.
Warning Sign #1. Low Energy/Fatigue
The Cause: If you’re on a low-carbohydrate fad diet, this could be
the culprit. Too few carbs – the body’s prime source of immediate
fuel – leaves you physically tired and mentally sluggish. Low intake
of iron and/or water also causes fatigue, while a diet based on
convenience, fast and processed foods is a downer.
2. Add a small glass of orange juice at breakfast. A glass of
OJ every morning reduces your risk for stroke (by up to 20%),
lowers the “bad” cholesterol called LDLs and boosts the good
cholesterol called HDLs, thus reducing heart disease risk. That
little glass of juice also lowers colon cancer risk and reduces
blood pressure, while supplying twice your daily requirement for
vitamin C, plus ample amounts of potassium, folic acid, and a
phytochemical called D-limonene that detoxifies cancer-causing
substances. Choose the calcium- and vitamin D-fortified OJ to
help maintain bones and possibly curb PMS symptoms.
The Solution: Skip the packaged and processed stuff, and eat
a few quality carbohydrates (whole grains) and you’ll stay
energized and mentally sharp while still losing weight. Add
more iron-rich foods, such as dark green leafies and extra-lean
meat, and at least 8 glasses of water, too. Oh, and don’t forget
to exercise almost every day!
3. Add grated carrots to a burrito or into your spaghetti sauce. A
carrot a day could slash stroke risk by 68%. Carotenes in carrots
also lower heart attack risks by up to 45%. While beta carotene
supplements might increase lung cancer risk in smokers, beta
carotene-rich carrots lower risk. Besides, they add color and
crunch to that burrito!
WarningSigh #2. DrySkin/Wrinkling and Hair Loss
The Cause: Are you eating enough vegetables? If not, your skin
will age before it’s time. Vegetables are Mother Nature’s perfect
source of antioxidant vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals
that protect the skin from the sun’s damaging rays (along with
sunscreen!). Dark green leafies and deep-orange produce
prevent hair loss and dry, itchy scalp and skin.
Hot Off the Diet Press
1. Vitamin Poor: This year marks the 100th anniversary of the
discovery of the first vitamin – thiamin. Yet, Americans still
fall short of optimal. More than three out of four Americans
consume vitamin-poor diets, according to a study from
Kaiseraugst, Switzerland. Data from the National Health and
Nutrition Examination Survey from 2003 to 2008 was used
to categorize vitamin intakes into five classes of people who
consumed less than the recommended intake: <5%, 5 to 25%,
>25 to 50%, > 50 to 75% and > 75%. Results showed that more
than 75% of the Americans studied consumed sub-optimal
amounts of vitamins A, D, and E. Up to 75% consumed too little
vitamin C, and up to one in two women consumed inadequate
amounts of vitamins B1, B6, and folic acid.
The Solution: Aim for no less than eight servings of dark-colored
fruits and vegetables every day – at least two at every meal and
one at every snack.
Warning Sign #3. Depression
The Cause: Not enough of the omega-3 fats in fish or the B vitamins,
especially folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12, and you’re
likely to feel down in the dumps, even down-right depressed.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
23
100 years
Keimzelle der industriellen Vitamin
Produktion Region Basel
2. Overloaded Planet: Researchers at the London School of
Hygiene and Tropical Medicine weighed in on the planet’s total
population weight and the numbers are staggering. Using 2005
global data, the study found that if the entire 7+ billion people
stepped on a scale, the total weight would be 316 million tons
or 632 billion pounds. Overweight people add 16 million tons
of excess body fat, the equivalent of 242 million normal-weight
people. Obese people carry 3.8 million tons of excess body fat,
which is the equivalent of 56 million normal-weight folks. North
America has only 6% of the world’s population, but 34% of the
human biomass in the world caused by obesity. In contrast, Asia
has 61% of the world’s population, but only 13% of it’s biomass
from obesity. If all countries had as many overweight people
as the U.S., the total population weight would increase by 63
million tons, equivalent to the weight of 473 million normalweight people. Whew!
Badische Zeitung
16 August 2012
Schon in den 30er und 40er Jahren war die Region Basel
führend in der synthetischen Herstellung von Vitaminen.
Die Vitaminfabriken von DSM in der Region Basel hatten einst
Schlüsselrollen für die Vitamin-Produktion im großen Maßstab.
Damals noch Teil des Roche-Konzerns war vor allem das Werk
Grenzach bis zum Zweiten Weltkrieg eine Keimzelle der frühen
Massenproduktion wichtiger Vitamine. Der in Kiew geborene
Chemiker und Professor Tadeusz Reichenstein, der seit 1938
an der Uni Basel lehrte, erzeugte Vitamin C bereits 1932 auf
einem chemischen Weg. Auf Basis dieser Reichenstein-Synthese
produzierte Roche 1934 in Grenzach die ersten 50 Kilogramm
Vitamin C in einem technischen Verfahren, stellte es von 1936
an auch industriell her und wurde hierzulande nicht zuletzt
dank der Vitaminpräparate bekannt. Unterbrochen vom Zweiten
Weltkrieg wurde die Vitamin-C-Kapazität in Grenzach 1958 dann
sogar auf 10 000 Tonnen erweitert, die Produktion 1994 aber
eingestellt und ins schottische Dalry verlagert.
3. Beige Is the New Brown: First there was regular ol’ white
body fat. Then there was brown fat that burns calories. Now,
researchers at Harvard Medical School report there is a third
type of body fat – beige fat. In their study, beige fat cells from
mice were cloned and found to be genetically somewhere
between white and brown fat, and can burn energy like brown
fat when “turned on” by the hormone “irisin, which is released
from muscle while exercising.
In Perspective: The researchers suggest it might be possible
to treat obese people with irisin to boost the calorie-burning
ability of their beige fat cells, but wouldn’t it be much better if
they turned on those cells by exercising more?!
Ähnliche Pionierleistungen wiederholte Roche später mit den
Vitaminen E und A, die heute in Sisseln hergestellt werden.
Dies Kapitel führt unweigerlich zu dem legendären Schweizer
Chemiker Otto Isler, der Mitte der 40er-Jahre zunächst Öl
mit hohem Vitamin-A-Gehalt entwickelte und daraus 1947
kristallisierten Vitamin-A-Alkohol beziehungsweise Vitamin-AAcetat synthetisierte, ein Verfahren, das im Prinzip in der 1967
in Sisseln in Betrieb genommenen und nach wie vor größten
Vitamin-A-Produktion der Welt noch heute verwendet wird.
Isler aber war nicht nur Chemiker: Er bot die ersten Kilogramm
Vitamin A, die er synthetisiert hatte, dem Margarinehersteller
Unilever an. Was den dazu brachte, Margarine mit
synthetischem Vitamin A anzureichern, den Verkauf natürlicher
Vitamin-A-Konzentrate aus Fischölen einbrechen und die
Vitamin-A-Synthese zum wirtschaftlich einträglichen Geschäft
werden ließ.
Food & Mood Tip
If you want to be brain-dead, do the following: Skip breakfast
and you probably will forget where you put your keys by midafternoon. Try to make up the difference with cookies for a
mid-day snack and you also won’t remember your name. A diet
lacking in antioxidant-rich produce and vitamin E-rich nuts,
seeds, and wheat germ leaves the brain vulnerable to damage
by oxygen fragments called free radicals that also contribute to
memory loss.
Instead, to boost brain power, eat breakfast and skip
sugary snacks mid-day. Also protect delicate brain tissue
with antioxidant-rich foods. According to a study from Tufts
University in Boston, the best sources of antioxidants in the
diet include prunes, raisins, berries, plums, oranges, kale,
spinach, Brussels sprouts, beets, red bell peppers, red grapes,
and cherries. Consider taking a multiple vitamin and mineral
supplement that contains extra vitamin E, and add a DHA
supplement to the daily regimen, too. The MIDAS study found
that 900 milligrams of this omega-3 improved memory in seniors.
http://elizabethsomerblog.com/august-15-2012/
100 years
24
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Die Renaissance der Vitamine
Der leidenschaftliche Forscher Isler, der übrigens auch einen
Rebberg am Tüllinger Berg hegte, hat für Roche später noch
weitere Mikronährstoffe entwickelt wie die Carotinoide und
zahlreiche Derivate des Vitamin A, die nicht zuletzt in der
Hautpflege eingesetzt werden. Roche, die zeitweise größter
Vitaminproduzent der Welt war, hat das Geschäft mit der
Neuausrichtung des Konzerns Ende 2003 indes an den
holländischen DSM-Konzern verkauft. Der hat aus diesem Kern
und mit einigen für die Belegschaft schmerzhaften und zum
Teil immer noch schmerzhaften Anpassungsprozessen seine
inzwischen sehr erfolgreiche Nutritionsparte geformt. Ob das
nun beginnende zweite Jahrhundert der Vitamin-Produktion
noch einmal ähnlich bahnbrechende Erfindungen bringen
wird wie das vergangene, wird sich indes wohl erst im Lauf der
nächsten Jahrzehnte weisen.
Donnerstag Badische Zeitung
16 August 2012
Vor 100 Jahren
entschlüsselte die
Wissenschaft das erste
Vitamin – mittlerweile
erleben die Mikronährstoffe
eine Renaissance. Vitamine
verkörperten in den ersten
Jahrzehnten des 20.
Jahrhunderts den Aufbruch
in die Moderne. In den
gesundheitsbewussten
und konsumorientierten
Gesellschaften der Gegenwart verzeichnen sie seit Jahren einen
zweiten Frühling und künftig werden diese Mikronährstoffe,
wie sie die Fachleute nennen, für die Ernährung und das
Wohlbefinden einer weiter wachsenden Weltbevölkerung
wohl noch wichtiger werden. Diese These vertritt Manfred
Eggersdorfer, für Forschung und Wissenschaft zuständiger
Vizepräsident der Nutritionsparte (Info) des holländischen
DSM-Konzerns. Ob die Einschätzung zutrifft, wird zwar erst in
den nächsten Jahren sichtbar werden, klar aber ist, dass die
Vitaminwerke von DSM in der Region Basel seit Jahrzehnten
Pionierfunktionen (Text unten) für die industrielle Entwicklung
und erbreitung der Technologie übernehmen.
http://www.badische-zeitung.de/aargau/keimzelle-derindustriellen-vitamin-produktion--63149357.html
DAS GESTERN
Sie waren die Geißeln der frühen Moderne – Volkskrankheiten,
wie der in Seefahrerfilmen bis heute mit dem Bild blutenden
und faulenden Zahnfleisches verknüpfte Skorbut, die weichen
Knochen der “englischen Krankheit”, wie Rachitis auch genannt
wurde, oder Beriberi, dies einst vor allem in Asien auffällige
Leiden, das sich in Symptomen wie Apathie, Lethargie und
Bewegungsunfähigkeit zeigte. Im 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert
konzentrierte sich die Creme der Biowissenschaften auf
diese Krankheiten. Lösungen aber setzten voraus, diese
Mangelkrankheiten überhaupt als solche zu erkennen. Beriberi
etwa galt auch Anfang des 20.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
25
100 years
Ernährung – eine Entdeckungsgeschichte, die wie – oft – “eine
der Zufälle ist”, beschreibt Eggersdorfer.
Repräsentative Daten belegen aus Sicht des Konzerns
jedenfalls, dass eine Anreicherung von Nahrungsmitteln
oder ergänzende Gaben für Risikogruppen in “großem Maß
Gesundheitskosten sparen könnten”, betont Eggersdorfer. Klaus
Krämer, Leiter des humanitären Programms “Sight and Life”,
einem von DSM finanzierten Thinktank für Ernährungsfragen,
macht noch eine andere Rechnung auf: Jährlich sterben seinen
Angaben zufolge 3,5 Millionen Kinder an Unterernährung;
zudem leide jedes dritte Kind weltweit unter Vitaminmangel
mit meist fatalen Folgen: Denn die Defizite münden in
Entwicklungsstörungen und Leistungsschwächen. Deren
Folgekosten wiederum belasteten die Gesellschaften und
verewigen die Verhältnisse: ein Teufelskreis.
Das gilt auch für Vitamine: Der polnische Biochemiker Casimir
Funk isolierte 1912 in London bei Forschungen zu Beriberi in
ungeschälten Reiskörnern zufällig ein Amin, einen Baustein
der Vitamine. In Folge keimte der Wunsch, die neuentdeckten
Stoffe technisch und in größeren Mengen herzustellen, schildert
Eggersdorfer weiter. Wobei auch da “Zufälle zusammenwirkten”,
weiß er. Letztlich aber wurde daraus eine Initialzündung
und eine Erfolgsgeschichte. Auf deren Habenseite stehen
unter anderem die spürbare Verringerung der Kinder- und
Säuglingssterblichkeit durch die Ergänzung der Nahrung mit
Vitamin A oder die Reduktion von Neuralrohrdefekten um bis zu
50 Prozent mittels der Anreicherung von Mehl mit Folsäure, wie
sie in den USA, Kanada und Südafrika üblich ist.
DIE ZUKUNFT
Ein Auslaufmodell werden Vitamine und Mikronährstoffe damit
auch im zweiten Jahrhundert seit ihrer Entdeckung wohl kaum.
Im Gegenteil: Angesichts der weltweit nach wie vor wachsenden
Bevölkerung, angesichts knapper werdender Ressourcen,
neuer wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse und des außerhalb
Europas längst nicht ausgerotteten versteckten Hungers sind
sie für Eggersdorfer und Krämer ein Schlüssel, Ernährung und
Gesundheit langfristig abzusichern. “Die einzige Möglichkeit,
diese wichtige Ressource erschwinglich und für die breiten
Massen herzustellen, bleibt die industrielle Produktion”, stellte
das Duo dieser Tage in internen Jubiläumsveranstaltungen in
Sisseln und Grenzach-Wyhlen fest.
DIE GEGENWART
Vitamine und Mikronährstoffe sind technisch betrachtet
inzwischen zwar ein reifes Produkt. Gleichwohl entpuppen
sie sich dank wachsenden Wissens um ernährungsbedingte
Krankheiten als “Evergreen”, wie Eggersdorfer sagt. “Der
vermeintliche Ladenhüter erlebt seit Jahren eine Renaissance”,
erfährt er denn auch – im Gesundheitswesen aber auch in
der Lebensmittel- und der Futtermittelindustrie sowie der
Kosmetikbranche. Heutzutage gibt’s dort kaum noch Produkte,
die ohne Vitaminzusätze auskommen (Info).
http://www.badische-zeitung.de/aargau/die-renaissance-dervitamine--63149376.html
Jahrhunderts noch als Infektionskrankheit. Die Einsicht, dass
das eine Sackgasse ist, diese kopernikanische Wende im
Wissen um den Stoffwechsel, dieser “Paradigmenwechsel”, wie
es Manfred Eggersdorfer nennt, keimte vor exakt 100 Jahren.
Damals fesselten Beriberi oder Rachitis die Aufmerksamkeit der
Wissenschaft und in letzter Konsequenz auch die der Industrie –
so wie heute Krebs oder Nervenleiden wie Alzheimer. Schritt für
Schritt entschlüsselten Wissenschaftler damals die Rätsel des
Stoffwechsels und erkannten die Folgen von Unter- oder auch
falscher.
Zudem werden im Verbund mit Wissenschaft, Politik und
Betroffenverbänden wie der Internationalen OsteoporoseVereinigung immer neue, letztlich den Absatz ankurbelnde
Nutzeffekte aufgezeigt. Aktuelles Beispiel ist die
wissenschaftlich durchaus kontrovers diskutierte Bewertung
des Vitamin-D-Status in Europa und dessen Bedeutung für
die Knochengesundheit und andere Körperfunktionen bis zur
Stärkung des Immunsystems und der Senkung des Blutdrucks.
100 years
26
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Rep. Pallone Honors
100th Anniversary of Vitamins
Congress recognizes 100th anniversary
of the vitamin
26 September 2012
Nutraingredients
27 Septemeber 2012
WASHINGTON—Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) honored the 100th
anniversary of the vitamin last week in the U.S. House of
Representatives’ Congressional Record. The American Herbal
Products Association(AHPA), the Council for Responsible
Nutrition (CRN), the Natural Products Association (NPA), and the
United Natural Products Alliance (UNPA) joined Congressman
Pallone in his support of the milestone.
If only Casimir Funk were alive today to see what he hath wrought.
A resolution in the U.S. Congress on Wednesday recognized the
100th anniversary of the discovery of the vitamin, a discovery—
attributed to Funk—that set the stage for the 21st century’s
multiple-billion dollar supplement and functional food industry.
Rep. Frank Pallone, D-NJ, read a statement into the Congressional
Record recognizing Funk, a Polish-American scientist, and his first
use of the term “vitamin” in 1912 to describe a group of bioactive
substances vital to health. Rep. Pallone said in his statement:
“Because of [Casimir Funk’s] work, we know that vitamins are
essential for good health through every stage of [the] human
life cycle and that our bodies require vitamins to grow, to
function, to stay healthy and to prevent the onset of disease.”
Rep. Pallone is co-chair of the Dietary Supplement Caucus and is
considered on of the champions of the industry on Capitol Hill.
Polish-American scientist Casimir Funk first used the term
“vitamin” in 1912, describing bioactive substances crucial
for human well being. Rep. Pallone, co-chair of the Dietary
Supplement Caucus, referenced Funk in his official statement.
“Because of [Casimir Funk’s] work, we know that vitamins are
essential for good health through every stage of [the] human
life cycle and that our bodies require vitamins to grow, to
function, to stay healthy and to prevent the onset of disease,”
Pallone said. Wissenschaft und in letzter Konsequenz auch
die der Industrie – so wie heute Krebs oder Nervenleiden wie
Alzheimer. Schritt für Schritt entschlüsselten Wissenschaftler
damals die Rätsel des Stoffwechsels und erkannten die Folgen
von Unter- oder auch falscher.
Thiamine discovered
Funk, who lived from 1884 to 1967, isolated thiamine, or vitamin
B1, from brown rice after reading in the literature that beriberi, a
vitamin B1 deficiency disease, was more prevalent among those
who ate an exclusively white-rice diet as opposed to brown rice.
Funk was able to isolate this vital element present in brown rice
that was polished away to make the white version. He called it
a“vital amine” for the amine group it contained; the “vitamine”
contraction was later shortened to vitamin after it became clear
that not all of these vital substances found in food contained
amine groups. Funk’s work was presaged by Kanehiro Takaki, a
Japanese naval medical officer, who investigated cases of beriberi
on naval ships in the 1880s. Beriberi became a serious problem
in the Japanese Navy around that time as it was the era in which
the country’s ships began to regularly undertake long overseas
voyages and the reliance on white rice to make up the lion’s share
of calories for the crew first started to have observable effects.
A press release from the four leading industry trade
associations—the American Herbal Products Association
(AHPA), the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the Natural
Products Association (NPA), and the United Natural Products
Alliance (UNPA)—joined Rep. Pallone in recognizing the
anniversary of Funk’s achievement.
http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Industry/Congressrecognizes-100th-anniversary-of-the-vitamin
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
27
100 years
100 Years of Vitamins Elizabeth Somer
KOIB-TV CBS Portland (Video)
Global population demands, ‘confusing’
media coverage and the 100 year old vitamin
17 October 2012 (Video)
Nutraingredients-usa.com
Link no longer available
19 November 2012
It’s 100 years since Casimir Funk came up with the term
‘vitamin’, but with an ever-increasing global population and
negative reports in the media of their ‘ineffectiveness’ for select
health conditions, what does the future hold for the humble
vitamin? Speaking with NutraIngredients-USA at the recent
SupplySide West show in Las Vegas, Dr Deshanie Rai, senior
scientific leader, human nutrition & health, DSM Nutritional
Products, answered questions on vitamin supply, understanding
the benefits and limitations of the nutrients, and whether the
vitamin family will be extended to include some emerging
nutrients.“Our global population is increasing in size, but
other factors need to be taken into account in addressing the
adequacy of our vitamin supply,” she said.
100 Years of Vitamins Elizabeth Somer
KOIB-TV CBS Portland (Audio)
17 October 2012
Link no longer available
100 Years of Vitamins
WPFO FOX Portland ME (Video )
Link no longer available
100 Years Vitamins
Wall street journal (Audio)
Link no longer available
“For example, global food production needs to increase in order
to feed all these people. Additionally, the incidence of chronic
disease is increasing developed and developing countries.
Likewise, the prevalence of hidden hunger is increasing, and
people are living longer.“Given all these points, yes I do believe
that we have an adequate vitamin supply. This is where we need
to depend on the manufacturers and suppliers of vitamins who,
throughthe use of science and technology, provide vitamins for
use in dietary supplements, and food and beverages through
fortification and enrichment.”
So are the negative reports in the media, with a little help from
the medical journals, confusing consumers?
“The mixed messages in the media can be confusing to
consumers,” said Dr Rai. “This is where we as scientists,
healthcare profession, and journalists can help to educate
consumers about the value of vitamins. They are essential
nutrients that help to support basic physiological functions from
the time of conception throughout our life cycle. “We should
also realize that vitamins cannot do everything, including curing
and preventing a plethora of diseases.
100 years
28
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamins Celebrate 100 Years!
“We should recognize the successes and achievements of
vitamins in terms of actual human health outcomes, like
reducing the incidence of neural tube defects. Likewise, the use
of vitamins to help ensure our nutritional adequacy, and narrow
nutrient gaps.”Talking about neural tube defects (NTDs), the
main vitamin for that – folate/folic acid – was identified only in
1941. With calls from some quarters for other nutrients to join
the ‘vitamin’ family, can we expect to see new nutrients named
‘vitamins’ or is the list closed?
directsellingnews.com
19 November 2012
According to a May 2012 McKinsey & Company consumer shopper and insight report, the functional nutrition category—including vitamin nutrition as supplements and in fortified foods and
beverages—is a $225–275 billion industry.
What’s more, a recent Nutrition Business Journal report indicated vitamin sales in the direct selling channel grew about 10
percent to $1.6 billion in 2011, accounting for about 35 percent
of all supplement sales, which represents a huge market share.
And condition-specific vitamin supplements are helping to lead
the way. With one baby boomer turning 60 years old every 7.5
seconds, maintaining brain health has become extremely top
of mind. B vitamins as well as other ingredients such as DHA
omega-3 are just some of the nutrients used to support brain
health. (NBJ, Volume XVII | No. 4 | April 2012).
“It depends on the strength of the overall science,” said Dr Rai.
“As the science on nutrients and nutrition in general evolves,
I believe these advances will help to drive new insights and
perspectives on this topic.”
http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Industry/Globalpopulation-demands-confusing-media-coverage-and-the-100year-old-vitamin
Casimir Funk
The history of vitamins dates back to 1912 when the PolishAmerican biochemist Casimir Funk isolated the first vitamin (B1
from rice bran. At that time, European rice hulling machines
were brought to Asia to process rice. However, the hulling process stripped the rice of vital nutritional elements. As a consequence, new health problems began emerging among people
that relied on de-hulled rice as a staple food.
Funk realized that a compound inside rice bran was essential. He
gave the newly discovered substance the name vitamine—a combination of vita (Latin for “life”) and amine (nitrogen compound).
For 100 years the word vitamin has been an umbrella term for a
group of essential micronutrients that play a range of important
roles in our bodies. Most vitamins must be obtained from the
diet, classifying them as “essential.” When intake is inadequate,
vitamin deficiency disorders occur. Vitamins are present in food
in minute quantities compared to the macronutrients protein,
carbohydrates and fat.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
29
100 years
• Traceability: It’s important to understand where the ingredients you purchase come from. Not all ingredients are produced with the same quality controls in place.
• Bioavailability: Perform bioavailability studies or make sure
the ingredient supplier can provide you with bioavailability
studies on their ingredients. This will ensure that the ingredients can be efficiently absorbed by the body.
• Technical Assistance and Scientific Support: Many ingredient suppliers have in-house technical and scientific support
teams that are accessible to its customers. It’s important to
inquire about technical assistance and scientific support so
that you get the full benefits of your partnership.
While the benefits of each vitamin remain consistent, the delivery methods are evolving, creating more and more opportunities for direct sellers. Innovation paves the way to make it easier
and more convenient for families to get the recommended
daily amounts of vitamins. There are new delivery applications,
including:
• Regulatory Knowledge: This area is critical and essential.
Have a dedicated team focused on staying up to date on the
regulatory environment.
• vegetarian softgels
• sprinkle packs
• gels
• effervescents
• Education, Marketing and Communications Support: Develop
educational and other marketing material that clearly articulates the health benefits of your products.
Vitamins can even be disguised in traditionally indulgent foods
such as chocolates. For instance, there are chocolate truffles on
the market fortified with folic acid (one of the B vitamins) for
pregnant women. So, while not your typical delivery system for
vitamins, fortified foods such as chocolates can help to increase
consumer compliance and improve nutrient intake.
As we celebrate a century of vitamins, we are cognizant of the
tremendous scientific accomplishments that helped us get to
where we are today in a relatively short period of time, but we
also need to be motivated to increase awareness of the importance of vitamin intake on a global level. Nutritional supplements have certainly become a major category of products sold
through the direct selling channel, which provides the opportunity to tell the story behind the products. The outlook for the
future is very promising!
Consumers also want assurance that the supplements or fortified foods and beverages they buy are safe and effective and
composed of ingredients that are sustainably sourced. With
such high expectations, direct selling companies provide a
credible competitive advantage and should look for innovative
supplier partners that can develop new applications to help
boost consumer compliance while delivering high-quality and
traceable ingredients. Working with an ingredient supplier/manufacturer that is knowledgeable in the product development
process adds value to the partnership, and most important, to
the end product.
http://directsellingnews.com/index.php/view/vitamins_celebrate_100_years#.UQvHFx3BHSg
Consumers want assurance that the supplements or fortified
foods and beverages they buy are safe and effective.
Direct selling companies considering capturing a share of this
market should use the following checklist when partnering with an
ingredient supplier to ensure development of a quality product:
100 years
30
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Belangstelling voor vitamines neemt na
100 jaar weer
Commentary Series
– Tackaling poverty with Nutrition
Voeding nu
Innovations Globalfoodforthought
30 November 2012
5 December 2012
“You see that interest in research on vitamins increases again,
not only when it comes to developing countries, but also in the
western world still deficiencies may occur.” That says Wim Saris,
corporate scientist at DSM Food Specialties and Professor of
Human Biology at Maastricht University.
One hundred years ago, a scientist named Casimir Funk stood
in a laboratory, determined to figure out why chickens fed a diet
of white rice were more likely to die of beriberi disease than
chickens fed brown rice. He eventually isolated vitamin B1 and
coined the term “vitamin” to describe the bioactive substances
we now know to be essential for human health. It was a pivotal
discovery that has contributed to a century of innovative
research, improved health and increased prosperity.
Saris responded after the symposium ‘100 years of vitamins
“today at the University of Basel took place. It was held this year
because 100 years ago is that the Polish scientist Casimir Funk
was first isolated vitamin (B1). He was also inspired by the work
of the Dutch researcher Eijkman already late nineteenth century
had described that people who ate brown rice were less likely
to beriberi. “He wrote sadly in Dutch and therefore the honor to
him gone,” remarked the American researcher Richard Semba
during his presentation at the symposium, which he got some
laugh on his hand.
Vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) are key to addressing
hunger and poverty. Micronutrient deficiencies lower the
productivity of individuals and entire populations, seriously
hindering economic development. Malnutrition, especially
during the 1,000 days between pregnancy and a child’s
second birthday, can lead to irreversible physical stunting and
cognitive impairment. But children who are well nourished
grow up to learn more and earn more. They achieve more in
school, are better able to fight off diseases and tend to be
more productive as adults. The 2012 Copenhagen Consensus
experts pronounced providing micronutrients to children under
five as the best way to spend global aid dollars, with every
$1 spent generating $30 in benefits. And research has found
that investing in nutrition can raise a country’s GDP by at least
2 – 3 percent. When children are properly nourished, they
can grow up to be healthy and productive, helping to lift their
communities—and their countries—out of poverty.
Vitamin D and blood pressure.
“I notice that there a renewed belanstelling for research into the
effectiveness of vitamins “, goes further Saris. “I see the growing
research, for example in the field of vitamin D.” The German
researcher Heike Bischoff-Ferrari went during the day deeper
into this vitamin and they described the positive relationship of
sufficient vitamin D with a reduction in the risk of hip fractures,
the stronger love muscles in later life and lower blood pressure.
Vitamin Claims
In unlike many rejected claims for the effects of various dietary
components, and adopted the European Food Safety Authority
EFSA many claims about vitamins good. “About 90 of the 240
approved health claims shall refer to vitamins,” said Manfred
Eggersdorfer, senior vice president nuri stationed science of
DSM Nutritional Products and co-organizer of the symposium.
Scientific innovation is unlocking better ways to provide
vitamins and minerals to the two billion people worldwide
who lack the micronutrients they need, a condition known as
“hidden hunger.” And in fact, such innovation is critical. We will
not be able to adequately address today’s nutrition challenges
unless we continue to identify and develop new scientific
solutions and then scale up those solutions. One example of
such innovation is food fortification: the deliberate addition of
essential micronutrients to food. Fortifying staple foods (such as
rice and wheat) is a simple, safe and cost-effective way to add
essential micronutrients to food. It can increase the health and
productivity of whole populations, especially in regions where
diets consist mainly of staple crops.
“Vitamins are in the right corner, which of course is not unusual
for substances which have been many years of research that
has been done and much experience has been gained. I think
that in the future more of the claims about vitamins in foods to
hear, they are not approved for nothing. “
http://www.voedingnu.nl/belangstelling-voor-vitamines-neemtna-100-jaar.190090.lynkx
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
31
100 years
“4 Steps to Choosing the
Right Vitamins Supplements”
But the challenge for scientists is to develop technology that
enables them to produce, for example in the case of rice,
a molded pellet that looks like a grain of rice, cooks like a
grain of rice, tastes like a grain of rice and contains essential
micronutrients—and that won’t lose those nutrients during
transport, washing or cooking. Not only have scientistssolved
this challenge, they have also developed fortified flour, sugar and
cooking oil, as well as micronutrient powder packets that can be
sprinkled on food or dissolved into a drink immediately before
serving. I am proud to say that DSM is a leader in this technology,
and that in partnership with the World Food Programme, we have
fed and nourished over 10 million people and counting in countries
including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Kenya and Nepal with fortified
rice and micronutrient powder packets.
NBC Today Show
14 January 2013
The result of increased access to micronutrients? Some of
the most significant public health successes of the past
century: iodized salt is now in 70 percent of developing-world
households, up from 20 percent in 1990, preventing mental
retardation; folic acid fortification of flour is now required by
57 countries, including the US and UK, reducing cases of brain
and spine birth defects by up to 70 percent; and vitamin A
supplement distribution programs have led to a 25 percent
reduction in deaths among children under five.
Link no longer available
Micronutrients are key to solving our global health and
development challenges—including hunger and poverty—and
investing in vitamin science and technological innovations
is essential to increasing access to micronutrients. As we
commemorate 100 years of vitamins, we look back at a century
of innovation, but also look forward to the critical role vitamins
will continue to play in advancing health and prosperity
worldwide.
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer is a Senior Vice President and Head
for Nutritional Science Advocacy at DSM Nutritional Products,
the world leader in vitamins, carotenoids and nutritional
ingredients. DSM and its nonprofit humanitarian initiative, Sight
and Life, are currently celebrating 100 Years of Vitamins.
http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-food-forthought/2012/12/commentary-series-tackling-poverty-withnutrition-innovations.html
100 years
32
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamin A
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
33
Vitamin A
Preventing blindness and saving lives
with vitamin A
These efforts don’t just save sight—they save lives. Vitamin A
distribution has resulted in a 25 percent reduction in under-five
child deaths.
Vitaminangels.org
11 October 2012
Vitamin supplementation is not only low cost, it also has
an incredibly high return on investment. Providing essential
micronutrients, including vitamin A, to children is the single
smartest way to invest global aid dollars, according to the 2012
Copenhagen Consensus panel of experts. They determined that
every $1 spent on micronutrients for preschoolers generates
$30 in benefits—an astounding return on investment.
Another great blog post for World Sight Day World Sight Day is a time to
reflect back on the tremendous progress to date in addressingvitamin
A deficiency, and to call on the global community to prioritize vitamin
A supplementation so we can continue to prevent blindness and
save lives. Although a simple, cost-effective solution exists, vitamin
A deficiency remains the No. 1 cause of preventable blindness in
children. It also claims an estimated 670,000 lives each year by
weakening the immune system, increasing the risk of death from
common diseases like measles and diarrhea.
We know that providing micronutrients to children is a low-cost,
high-impact solution that prevents blindness and saves lives.
This solution is ready to be further scaled up. Delivering vitamin
A and other essential micronutrients to whole populations
requires strong partnerships among governments, civil society,
donors, aid agencies, local NGOs and business. More can
be done to scale up the delivery of essential micronutrients,
such as focusing on hard-to-reach populations, committing
national resources, being transparent and holding each other
accountable with evaluation metrics. Although much work has
been done and great success has been achieved, we cannot
become complacent; in the words of William Pollard, “The
arrogance of success is to think that what we did yesterday is
good enough for tomorrow.
These cases of blindness and death are largely preventable. A
simple, affordable and proven solution exists: supplementing
children with vitamin A. While many health and development
challenges are complex to tackle—they can be expensive and
require multiple interventions—preventing vitamin A deficiency
can be accomplished by reaching children 6 to 59 months with
just one dose of vitamin A every six months. Vitamin Angels’
cost to reach one child for one year is just 25 cents.
According to the World Health Organization, an estimated
190 million preschool children worldwide suffer from vitamin
A deficiency. One-quarter to half a million of these children
become blind each year—and half of those die within 12 months
of losing their sight.
As we celebrate World Sight Day and more than a decade of
successful vitamin A interventions, we look forward to a new
decade of commitments and the role vitamins will continue to
play in a healthy, prosperous global future. Klaus Kraemer, Ph.D. is
the director of Sight and Life, a non-profit humanitarian nutrition
think tank of DSM, which cares about the world’s most vulnerable
populations and exists to help improve their nutritional status.
Acting as their advocates, Sight and Life guides original nutrition
research,disseminates its findings and facilitates dialogue to bring
about positive change. Sight and Life is currently celebrating their
100 Years of Vitamins campaign.
Vitamin A deficiency is most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa
and South Asia. Poor populations in these countries cannot
afford or do not have access to foods rich in vitamin A, such
as liver, egg yolk, dairy products, orange-colored fruit and
vegetables and green leafy vegetables.
We’ve made tremendous progress to date—in 1999, only 16 percent
of children were receiving the necessary two annual doses of vitamin
A; by 2007, that figure had more than quadrupled to 72 percent.
Today, in some countries, 100 percent coverage has been achieved.
Sight and Life and Vitamin Angels are proud to participate, along with
UNICEF, Micronutrient Initiative, national governments and others in
implementing vitamin A supplementation programs in developing
countries. In 2011 alone, Vitamin Angels provided more than 24 million
infants and children under five in 38 countries with vitamin A. With
collective global efforts, vitamin A supplementation programs are
active in 103 countries.
Vitamin A
Howard Schiffer is the president and founder of Vitamin
Angels, a non-profit organization that reduces child mortality
worldwide by connecting infants and children under five with
vital micronutrients, primarily vitamin A. In 2012, Vitamin
Angels will reach approximately 25 million children in over 40
countries, including the U.S., with the micronutrients they need as
a foundation for good health. To learn more, visit vitaminangels.org.
34
Vitamin B
35
UU vitamin research combats stroke risk
B-Vitamine halten geistig fit
BBC News
Ärzte Zeitung
11 May 2012
21 May 2012
Vitamin B2, which is found in dairy products, can help lower
high blood pressure, according to research by the University of
Ulster. UU nutrition experts said one in ten people, depending
on their genes, could significantly lower their blood pressure by
increased use of the B2.
Menschen über 60 können offenbar ihren geistigen Abbau
verzögern, wenn sie sich verstärkt mit B-Vitaminen versorgen.
Darauf deuten mehrere Studien hin.
Es könnte sich lohnen, ab einem Alter von etwa 60 Jahren
vermehrt auf eine gute Versorgung mit B-Vitaminen zu achten,
denn mehrere Studien deuten darauf, dass sich damit der
geistige Abbau verzögern lässt.So hatten US-amerikanische
Forscher vor kurzem gezeigt, dass bei niedrigen Vitamin-BWerten das Gehirn im Alter schneller schrumpft und parallel
dazu die kognitiven Funktionen abnehmen.
High blood pressure is the leading cause of stroke and heart
disease. Together, they are responsible for about one-third of all
deaths in Northern Ireland.
The UU said B2, also known as riboflavin, reduced high blood
pressure which is often linked to a particular genetic factor
found in 10% of the population. The research was conducted
by Dr Carol Wilson in conjunction with staff at Antrim and
Altnagelvin Hospitals and Trinity College Dublin.
Vitamin B12 und Folsäure im Fokus
Zuvor hatte eine britische Arbeitsgruppe eine Studie präsentiert,
nach der eine Behandlung mit B-Vitaminen und Folsäure eine
solche Hirnatrophie bremsen kann.
Dr Wilson said: “These findings are so exciting because they
focus on novel non-drug treatment for high blood pressure,
targeted at individuals with a particular genetic factor. “The
blood pressure-lowering response described in this research
paper is hugely relevant in terms of its clinical implications.”
In Western societies, milk and other dairy products account for
more than 50% of riboflavin intake, along with some fortified
products such as breakfast cereals and other foods. “In the
genetically at-risk group, vitamin B2 was able to lower blood
pressure to within recommended target values while having no
adverse effects on individuals who didn’t have the gene,” Dr
Wilson said.
Nun legen Forscher um Dr. Babak Hooshmand vom KarolinskaInstitut in Stockholm nach: Sie stellten fest, dass die geistigen
Fähigkeiten bei gesunden Menschen über 65 Jahren umso
stärker abnehmen, je höher ihre Homocysteinwerte und je
niedriger die Werte für die homocystein-senkenden Vitamine
B12 und Folsäure sind (J Intern Med 2012; 271: 204-212).
Für ihre Studie haben die schwedischen Wissenschaftler
das Schicksal von 274 demenzfreien Finnen im Alter von
65 bis 75 Jahren beobachtet. Zu Beginn bestimmten sie die
Serumwerte für Homocystein, Holotranscobalamin - die
biologisch aktive Vitamin-B12-Form - sowie für Folsäure.
Zudem durften die Teilnehmer unterschiedliche Kognitionstests
absolvieren, mit denen die Gedächtnisleistung, die sprachliche
Ausdrucksfähigkeit sowie die Exekutivfunktion geprüft wurden.
“The response occurred irrespective of any blood pressurelowering drugs being taken by the study participants.The extent
of blood pressure reduction translates into a 30% predicted
reduction in the risk of stroke death in the at-risk group.”
Erfolgreicher in den Tests
Sieben Jahre später wurden die Studienteilnehmer erneut
gründlich untersucht. Dabei zeigte sich, dass Teilnehmer
im Quartil mit den höchsten Homocysteinwerten bei den
Kognitionstests deutlich schlechter abschnitten als diejenigen
im Quartil mit den niedrigsten Werten.
“It would take about 10 kilos of weight loss to achieve the blood
pressure lowering that was reported in our findings.”
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-18025721
36
Beim Mini-Mental-Status-Test ergab sich hierbei ein Unterschied
von 10 Prozent. Zu Beginn der Studie waren praktisch keine
Unterschiede festgestellt worden. Ähnliche Differenzen wurden
bei einem Test auf verbale Ausdrucksfähigkeit (minus 11
Prozent) und bei den Exekutivfunktionen per Stroop-Test (minus
14 Prozent) ermittelt.
Beim Stroop-Test müssen die Teilnehmer die Farben von bunt
gedruckten Farbwörtern benennen; so wird etwa das Wort
“Gelb” in roter Farbe gedruckt. Die richtige Antwort auf die Frage
“Welche Farbe hat das Wort?” wäre dann “Rot” und nicht “Gelb”.
Umgekehrt schnitten Teilnehmer, die zu Studienbeginn
hohe Vitamin-B12- und Folsäurewerte und damit niedrige
Homocysteinspiegel hatten, in solchen Tests um etwa 9 bis
13 Prozent besser ab. Bei der Auswertung waren Faktoren
wie Alter, Bildung, Blutdruck, Raucher- und ApoE4-Status
berücksichtigt worden.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
37
Vitamin B
Vitamin D
38
Nur hoch dosiertes Vitamin D kann
Hüftbruch: Volle Vitamin D-Kraft voraus
Frakturen verhindern
krm-media.de
5 July 2012
5 July 2012
Zürich – Randomisierte Studien zur Vitamin-D-Prophylaxe
von osteoporotischen Frakturen im Alter haben bisher keine
eindeutigen Ergebnisse geliefert. Eine neue Meta-Analyse im
New England Journal of Medicine (2012; 367:40-49) kommt zu
dem Ergebnis, dass ein Effekt nur bei höheren Dosierungen zu
erwarten ist. Vitamin D fördert die Resorption von Kalzium im
Darm und dessen Einbau in den Knochen. Die Substitution mit
Vitamin D ist deshalb ein plausibler Ansatz in der Präven¬tion
der Osteoporose, zumal viele ältere Menschen niedrige Vitamin
D-Werte haben, da sie sich zu wenig im Freien aufhalten und
sich oft vitaminarm ernähren.
Weil die Knochen mit zunehmendem Alter schwächer und
zerbrechlicher werden, steigt das Hüftbruchrisiko ab 65 Jahren
kontinuierlich. Eine Studie kommt nun zu dem Schluss, dass
Vitamin D Hüftbrüche nur bei hoher Dosierung (800 Einheiten
oder mehr pro Tag) verhindern hilft.
Gesunde Knochen erneuern sich, indem sie mit Hilfe von Vitamin
D fortwährend Kalzium und Phosphat aufnehmen. Fehlt das
Vitamin D, werden die Knochen brüchig. Oft geschieht dies im
Alter, wenn die Fähigkeit der Haut nachlässt, mit der Energie des
Sonnenlichts Vitamin D zu produzieren. Deshalb sind drei Viertel
aller Knochenbrüche bei Personen über 65 Jahren zu verzeichnen.
In Europa nimmt diese Altersklasse stark zu, bis 2050 ist daher mit
einer Verdoppelung von Hüftbrüchen zu rechnen.
Die Ergebnisse der zahlreichen randomisierten klinischen
Studien waren nicht eindeutig. Eine Cochrane-Analyse auf der
Basis von 45 Studien mit 84.585 Teilnehmern kam zuletzt zu
dem Ergebnis, dass allenfalls die Kombination von Vitamin D
mit Kalzium in der Lage ist, Frakturen zu vermindern. Doch auch
hier wurde nur eine Reduktion um relativ 16 Prozent erreicht.
Widersprüchliche Resultate
Mehrere klinische Studien haben untersucht, ob die Anzahl
Hüftbrüche und die damit verbundenen horrenden Kosten
mit einer präventiven Verabreichung von Vitamin D reduziert
werden können. Sie gelangten zu widersprüchlichen Resultaten.
Nun haben sich die Forscher um Heike Bischoff-Ferrari vom
Zentrum Alter und Mobilität der Universität Zürich einen neuen
Überblick über die Daten verschafft. In ihrer soeben im “New
England Journal of Medicine” veröffentlichten Metaanalyse
gelingt es ihnen, die Widersprüche aufzulösen.
http://www.aerzteblatt.de/nachrichten/50786
Bischoff-Ferrari und ihre Kollegen vom Universitätsspital
Zürich und Stadtspital Waid haben sich mit den Originaldaten
von etwas mehr als 30.000 betagten Personen befasst,
die an elf verschiedenen klinischen Studien zur Vitamin
D-Supplementation teilgenommen hatten. Erstmals
berücksichtigten sie dabei, dass einige Personen weniger
Vitamin-D-Tropfen schluckten als vorgesehen, andere aber auch
ausserhalb der Studie zusätzliches Vitamin D zu sich nahmen.
Umstrittene Dosis-Wirkungs-Beziehung
So belegten die Forscher um Bischoff-Ferrari eine bisher
umstrittene Dosis-Wirkungs-Beziehung: Nur wenn Vitamin
D tatsächlich in ausreichender Menge eingenommen wird,
entfaltet es seine schützende Wirkung. Das Hüftbruchrisiko
verminderte sich um dreissig Prozent bei denjenigen Personen,
die mindestens 800 internationale Einheiten (IE) Vitamin D
pro Tag zu sich nahmen. Von dieser Dosierung profitieren
39
Brüchige Knochen
sowohl gebrechliche als auch gesunde, noch zu Hause lebende
Senioren. “Unsere Studie bildet die im Moment wichtigste
Evidenzbasis, um die vom Bundesamt für Gesundheit
empfohlene höhere Dosierung bei älteren Personen zu
bekräftigen”, sagt Bischoff-Ferrari.
Speiegel.de
9 July 2012
Eine Mehrheit der Deutschen leidet unter Vitamin-D-Mangel.
Nun raten sogar Hautärzte: Geht raus in die Sonne!
http://news.doccheck.com/de/article/209942-hueftbruch-vollevitamin-d-kraft-voraus/
Jakob Linseisen vom Helmholtz Zentrum München sitzt nach
dem Mittagessen gern noch mit einer Tasse Kaffee in der Sonne.
Nie käme er auf die Idee, sich vorher Sonnencreme auf die Haut
zu schmieren. Und wenn er zu Besprechungen mit den Kollegen
quer über den Campus laufen muss, krempelt er sich extra noch
die Hemdsärmel hoch - damit auch ja genug Sonnenlicht auf
seine Arme kommt.
Natürlich weiß Linseisen, dass zu viel UV-Strahlung Hautkrebs
verursachen kann. Aber der Ernährungswissenschaftler macht
sich auch Sorgen, das die Menschen inzwischen zu wenig
Sonnenlicht abbekommen. Denn durch die UV-Strahlung wird in
der Haut das Hormon Vitamin D produziert, das unter anderem
für stabile Knochen sorgt.
In einer Stellungnahme der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Ernährung
(DGE), für die Linseisen zusammen mit anderen Experten alle
wichtigen Studien zu Vitamin D ausgewertet hat, kam er zu einem
erschreckenden Ergebnis: Die Mehrheit der Deutschen leidet unter
Vitamin-D-Mangel. Vor allem ältere Menschen sollten täglich 20
Mikrogramm des Vitamins zusätzlich aufnehmen, durch Tabletten oder durch mehr Sonnenlicht.
Damit haben Linseisen und seine Kollegen unter Dermatologen
eine hitzige Debatte ausgelöst: Ist es vertretbar, zu empfehlen,
mehr in die Sonne zu gehen? Bislang dienten die Appelle der
Hautärzte dazu, die Menschen von der krebserregenden UVStrahlung fernzuhalten.
“Die Diskussion um den Vitamin-D-Mangel ist hochaktuell”,
bestätigt Jörg Reichrath, Leitender Oberarzt an der Klinik
für Dermatologie am Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes,
der ebenfalls an der DGE-Stellungnahme mitgearbeitet hat.
“Da tut sich gerade sehr viel.” Auch die Arbeitsgemeinschaft
Dermatologische Prävention hat sich mit dem Thema befasst
und wird demnächst gemeinsam mit anderen Verbänden neue
Empfehlungen veröffentlichen.
Bei älteren Menschen, so zeigen Studien, erhöht sich durch
Vitamin-D-Mangel das Risiko von Knochenbrüchen. Bei Kindern
Vitamin D
40
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamin-D-Mangel: Risiko für Senioren ab 60
besteht die Gefahr, an Rachitis zu erkranken, einer schmerzhaften
Knochenverformung. Umgekehrt deutet einiges darauf hin, dass
Menschen mit viel Vitamin D im Blut länger leben.
Mercure Magazine
11 July 2012
Nur etwa zehn Prozent des Vitamins wird normalerweise mit der
Nahrung aufgenommen; es ist besonders in fettem Fisch enthalten.
Der Rest muss in der Haut mit Hilfe des Sonnenlichts gebildet
werden. Rachitis und Knochenerweichung wurden daher zu Beginn
der industriellen Revolution zu einem weitverbreiteten Problem, als
Smog, Kellerwohnungen und 80-Stunden-Wochen in den Fabriken
für ewige Dunkelheit sorgten.
Zürich - Vitamin-D ist wichtig für Knochen und das
Immunsystem. Neue Studie zeigen jetzt, dass vor allem ältere
Menschen einem Mangel vorbeugen sollten.
Senioren ab 60 sollten Vitamin-D-Mangel vorbeugen. Die
Fähigkeit der Haut zur Vitamin-D-Bildung nimmt im Alter ab.
Vitamin-D ist wichtig für die Regulierung des Calcium-Spiegels
im Blut und beim Knochenaufbau. Kinder mit Vitamin-DMangel erkranken an Rachitis. Bei Erwachsenen begünstigt
ein Vitamin D-Mangel einem Knochenabbau und erhöht das
Knochenbruchrisiko. Außerdem sind Muskelschwäche und
-schmerzen sowie ein erhöhtes Sturzrisiko Folgen des VitaminD-Mangels. Auch sind in der Wissenschaft negative Folgen für
das Immunsystem, die Entwicklung von Herz-Kreislauf- und
Krebserkrankungen beschrieben worden.
“Doch auch heute fehlt den Menschen wieder zunehmend das
Sonnenlicht”, sagt Linseisen. Viele Arbeitnehmer bewegen
sich nur noch mit dem Auto zwischen Wohnung und dem
Büro; Kinder hocken stundenlang vor dem Computer; Rentner
dämmern im Altersheim dahin und kommen nur selten ins
Freie. Dazu kommen all jene Hautkrebs-Phobiker, die sofort
Sonnencreme mit Lichtschutzfaktor 50 auftragen, wenn die
Wolken vom Himmel verschwinden.
Bleibt als Ausweg also nur, regelmäßig Vitaminpillen zu
schlucken? Zumindest für Babys, die nicht ungeschützt in die
Sonne dürfen, gilt diese Empfehlung schon länger. Aber auch
für Erwachsene? In den USA haben sich die Umsätze mit den
Vitamin-D-Pillen seit 2001 mehr als verzehnfacht. Die Experten
der DGE-Stellungnahme setzen lieber auf die natürliche Lösung.
Linseisen rät zur Vitamintablette nur in solchen Fällen, in denen es
nicht anders geht, etwa bei manchen alten Menschen. Ansonsten
empfiehlt der Vitaminforscher: “Leute, geht raus in die Sonne!”
Allerdings in Maßen: “Wir raten dringend davon ab, einen
Vitamin-D-Mangel durch exzessive Sonnenbestrahlung oder
Solariumsbesuche zu beheben”, sagt der Hautkrebsforscher
Rüdiger Greinert vom Elbe Klinikum Buxtehude. “Aber gegen
einen kurzen Sonnenspaziergang in der Mittagspause haben
wir Dermatologen natürlich nichts einzuwenden.”
Prof. Dr. med. Heike Annette Bischoff-Ferrari vom Zentrum Alter
und Mobilität der Universität Zürich und Stadtspital Waid hat
nun in einer Studie herausgefunden, dass ältere Patienten, die
regelmäßig Vitamin-D einnehmen, sicherer gehen, seltener
stürzen und weniger Knochenbrüche erleiden.
Die Einnahme von Vitamin-D ist demnach eine günstige und
effektive Maßnahme, um die Gesundheit im Alter zu erhalten.
Auch die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung (DGE) empfiehlt
daher seit kurzem die Einnahme von Vitamin-D.
Vitamin-D wird zu rund 80 Prozent in der Haut mit Hilfe der
UV-B Strahlung des Sonnenlichtes gebildet und zu rund 20
Prozent über Lebensmittel aufgenommen. Allerdings ist die
Sonne keine verlässlich Quelle: in den Monaten November bis
Mai reicht in ganz Europa die Sonnenintensität nicht aus.
Für eine ausreichende Vitamin-D-Versorgung genüge es, so
lautet auch die Empfehlung in dem DGE-Papier, von Frühling
bis Herbst Hände, Arme und Gesicht mindestens dreimal pro
Woche der Sonne auszusetzen - und zwar je nach Hauttyp
zwischen 5 und 25 Minuten. Linseisen: “Wir müssen beim
Umgang mit UV-Strahlung zur richtigen Balance zwischen
Nutzen und Schaden kommen.”
„Die Fähigkeit der Haut zur Vitamin-D-Bildung nimmt im Alter
gegenüber einem 20-Jährigen um den Faktor vier ab“, sagt Prof.
Dr. med. Ralf-Joachim Schulz Präsident der DGG.
Sonnenschutz durch Kleidung oder
(*) UV-Bestrahlung bei Kindern in Berlin.
http://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-86752112.html
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
41
Vitamin D
Sonnencreme (ab Faktor 6) reduziert die hauteigene VitaminD-Produktion zudem deutlich. Außerdem enthalten nur wenige
Lebensmittel Vitamin-D in größeren Mengen, dazu gehören
fettreiche Fische, zum Beispiel Aale, und in deutlich geringerem
Maße Margarine, einige Pilze und Eigelb.
Altersmediziner empfehlen Vitamin -D als
Nahrungsergänzung nächste Meldung
Das Vitamin wird nach der Aufnahme über Nahrungsmittel oder
die Bildung in der Haut zunächst in der Leber und danach in der
Niere in die aktive Form umgewandelt.
Senioren ab 60 Jahren sollten täglich 800 sogenannte
Internationale Einheiten Vitamin-D als Narungsergänzung zu
sich nehmen.
http://www.merkur-online.de/gesundheit/allgemein/vitamin-dmangel-vorbeugensenioren-2387002.html
Das empfehlen Wissenschaftler und Ärzte auf dem
Jahreskongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geriatrie (DGG)
Mitte September in Bonn. Studienergebnisse zeigen, dass
Patienten, die 700 bis 1000 Internationale Einheiten Vitamin-D
einnehmen, 34 Prozent seltener stürzen (British Medical
Journal 2011) und 20 Prozent weniger Knochenbrüche erleiden
(Archives of Internal Medicine 2009).
Innovations Report
11 July 2012
Vitamin-D ist wichtig für die Regulierung des Calcium-Spiegels
im Blut und beim Knochenaufbau. Kinder mit Vitamin-DMangel erkranken an Rachitis. Bei Erwachsenen begünstigt
ein Vitamin D Mangel einem Knochenabbau und erhöht das
Knochenbruchrisiko. Außerdem sind Muskelschwäche und
-schmerzen sowie ein erhöhtes Sturzrisiko Folgen des VitaminD-Mangels. In den vergangenen Jahren sind außerdem mögliche
negative Effekte des Vitamin-D-Mangels auf das Immunsystem,
die Entwicklung von Herz-Kreislauf- und Krebserkrankungen
beschrieben worden.
Vitamin-D-Einnahme vermindert Stürze und Knochenbrüche
In einer Übersichtsstudie konnte Prof. Dr. med. Heike Annette
Bischoff-Ferrari vom Zentrum Alter und Mobilität der Universität
Zürich und Stadtspital Waid die Daten von acht hochqualitativen
Doppelblindstudien bezüglich Stürzen und zwölf Studien
bezüglich Knochenbrüchen auswerten. Die Ergebnisse zeigen,
dass Patienten, die 700 bis 1000 Internationale Einheiten
Vitamin-D einnehmen, 34 Prozent seltener stürzen (British
Medical Journal 2011) und 20 Prozent weniger Knochenbrüche
erleiden (Archives of Internal Medicine 2009). Andere Studien
bestätigen, dass alte Menschen die Vitamin-D einnehmen
sicherer gehen, seltener stürzen und weniger Knochenbrüche
erleiden. Die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung (DGE) empfiehlt
daher seit kurzem die Einnahme von Vitamin-D. ...mehr zu:
Vitamin D
42
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Wichtige patientennahe Themen des Kongresses sind unter
anderen:
Gesunde Ernährung reicht nicht„Eine gesunde Ernährung reicht
nicht aus, um den Bedarf älterer Menschen mit Vitamin-D zu
decken“, betont der künftige Präsident der DGG (Präsidentelect) Prof. Dr. med. Ralf-Joachim Schulz aus Köln. Auch die Haut
könne im Alter nicht mehr genug wichtige Vorstufen des aktiven
Wirkstoffes bilden, um den Bedarf zu decken. „Die Fähigkeit
der Haut zur Vitamin-D-Bildung nimmt im Alter gegenüber
einem 20-Jährigen um den Faktor vier ab“, so Schulz. Der
Ernährungsexperte verweist auf eigene Studien, wonach nur
rund drei Prozent der Patienten, die in die geriatrische Abteilung
eines Krankenhauses kommen, ausreichende Vitamin-DSpiegel haben. „Regelmäßig Vitamin-D einzunehmen ist eine
kostengünstige und effektive Maßnahme, um seine Gesundheit
im Alter zu erhalten“, ist er sich mit Bischoff-Ferrari einig.
• „Demenz – ist Vorsorge möglich?“
• „Schlaf und Schlaflosigkeit im Alter“
• „Die Ernährung des alten Menschen“
• „Stress – Lebenselexier oder Risiko?“
• „Arzneimitteltherapie im Alter“ und vieles mehr.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/medizin_
gesundheit/altersmediziner_empfehlen_vitamin_d_198798.html
Zusatzinformationen zu Vitamin-D
Vitamin-D wird zu rund 80 Prozent in derHaut mit Hilfe der UV-B
Strahlung des Sonnenlichtes gebildet und zu rund 20 Prozent
über Lebensmittel aufgenommen. Allerdings ist die Sonne keine
verlässlich Quelle: in den Monaten November bis Mai reicht
in ganz Europa die Sonnenintensität nicht aus. Sonnenschutz
durch Kleidung oder Sonnencreme (ab Faktor 6) reduziert die
hauteigene Vitamin-D-Produktion zudem deutlich. Außerdem
enthalten nur wenige Lebensmittel Vitamin-D in größeren
Mengen, dazu gehören fettreiche Fische, zum Beispiel Aale, und
in deutlich geringerem Maße Margarine, einige Pilze und Eigelb.
Das Vitamin wird nach der Aufnahme über Nahrungsmittel oder
die Bildung in der Haut zunächst in der Leber und danach in der
Niere in die aktive Form umgewandelt.
Geriatriekongress Bonn 2012
Vom 12. bis 15. September 2012 findet im World-Conference Center
in Bonn, dem ehemaligen Bundestag, das im deutschsprachigen
Raum größte Treffen zum Thema Krankheit und Gesundheit im Alter
statt. Der Titel des Kongresses ist Programm: „Alternsforschung:
Transnational und translational“. „Gemeinsam schlagen wir auf
dem Kongress eine Brücke zwischen klinisch-praktischer Arbeit
und Forschung in der Altersmedizin“, sagte der Präsident-elect
der DGG und Kongresspräsident, Prof. Dr. Ralf-Joachim Schulz
aus Köln. Die DGG veranstaltet den Kongress gemeinsam mit der
Deutschen Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie e. V. (DGGG),
der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Geriatrie und Gerontologie
(ÖGGG), der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Gerontologie (SGG
SSG) sowie der Schweizerischen Fachgesellschaft für Geriatrie (SFGG).
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
43
Vitamin D
Nur viel Vitamin D schützt vor Knochenbrüchen
Wintermonaten reicht die Strahlung nicht aus. Hinzu kommt,
dass sich die meisten Menschen so kleiden, dass nur etwa fünf
Prozent des Körpers der Sonne ausgesetzt sind. Ein weiterer
Faktor sind die Sonnenschutzcremes. Die sind zwar wichtig, um
uns vor dem schwarzen Hautkrebs, dem Melanom zu schützen.
Aber es gibt einen Haken, so Bischoff-Ferrari:
Dradio.de
12 July 2012
Noch immer gelten Hüftbrüche als die häufigsten
Knochenbrüche überhaupt, besonders bei älteren Menschen.
Grund genug, dass man inzwischen vor allem eines versucht:
den Stürzen und damit den Knochenbrüchen vorzubeugen.
Viel Vitamin D soll hier genau das Richtige sein, wie eine neue
Studie im “New England Journal of Medicine” berichtet.
“Man muss einfach wissen, dass der Sonnenschutzfaktor
bereits ab einem Faktor 6 deutlich die hauteigene Vitamin
D-Produktion vermindert, und das ist eben auch wichtig bei den
Kindern, die konsequent den Sonnenschutz tragen.”
Einfach raus an die Sonne, die Empfehlung reicht also nicht. Vor
allem nicht bei älteren Menschen. Bischoff-Ferrari:
Vitamin D scheint schon fast ein Universalheilmittel. Zumindest,
wenn man den Forschungsergebnissen der letzten Jahre glaubt.
Es stärkt Knochen und Muskeln, hilft dem Immunsystem, schützt
vor Herzinfarkten und senkt damit die Sterberate. Auch die
deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung hat Anfang des Jahres
ihren Referenzwert auf 20 Mikrogramm pro Tag erhöht. Völlig
zu Recht, meint auch Heike Bischoff-Ferrari, Ärztin am Zentrum
für Alter und Mobilität der Universität Zürich. Sie hat die
Originaldaten von über 30.000 älteren Menschen untersucht,
die in Amerika, Europa und Australien an Studien zu Vitamin
D teilgenommen hatten. Für ihre Analyse hat sie vier Gruppen
gebildet, die jeweils verschieden hohe Dosierungen von Vitamin
D bekommen hatten.
“Bei den Älteren in der Bevölkerung kommt noch ein wichtiges
zusätzliches Risiko mit dazu, nämlich die Tatsache, dass mit
dem Alter die hauteigene Vitamin D-Produktion abnimmt, und
das ist etwa ein Faktor 4 verglichen zu jüngeren Menschen.”
Dabei haben gerade Leute über 60 Jahre Vitamin D besonders
nötig. Das schützt nämlich nicht nur vor Knochenbrüchen, weil
es eine bessere Calciumaufnahme aus dem Darm bewirkt und
den Calciumeinbau in den Knochen fördert. Es hat auch noch
einen positiven Effekt auf die Muskulatur. Die besitzt eigene
Vitamin D-Rezeptoren, über die mehr Muskelproteine gebildet
werden. Dadurch nehmen vor allem die sogenannten schnellen
Muskelfasern vom Typ 2 zu, und zwar sowohl in der Anzahl als
auch im Durchmesser.
“Mit diesem Ansatz zeigte sich, dass nur die höchste
eingenommene Dosierung von Vitamin D das
Knochenbruchrisiko vermindert, und das aber signifikant,
also es zeigte sich eine 30-prozentige Verminderung des
Hüftbruchrisikos.”
“Und das ist natürlich hochspannend, weil die Typ2 schnellen
Muskelfasern sind die, die vor allem mit dem Alter abnehmen,
und das sind aber auch gleichzeitig die Muskelfasern, die wir
brauchen, um ein Sturzereignis abzufangen, da muss man
ja ganz schnell reagieren. Und wir haben auch dort klinische
Studien, die zeigen, dass man mit dieser Dosierung, eben um
die 800 Einheiten Vitamin D das Sturzrisiko um etwa 34 Prozent
vermindern kann.”
30 Prozent weniger Hüftbrüche, aber auch 14 Prozent weniger
Frakturen an anderen Knochen wie am Handgelenk oder Oberarm.
- Ein deutlicher Effekt, der aber nur mit einer Dosierung erreicht
wurde, die 800 Einheiten oder 20 Mikrogramm pro Tag entspricht,
also genau jener Menge, die offiziell empfohlen wird. Bei all jenen,
die weniger geschluckt hatten, zeigte das Vitamin keinen Effekt.
Doch wie kann man so grosse Mengen an Vitamin D überhaupt
aufnehmen? Bischoff-Ferrari:
Vitamin D-Präparate führen also zu weniger Stürzen und
weniger Knochenbrüchen, dazu sind sie preiswert und haben
keine schädlichen Nebenwirkungen. - Für Bischoff-Ferrari mehr
als genügend Argumente, Vitamin D als Nahrungsergänzung für
jeden ab 60 zu empfehlen.
“Also die gesündeste Ernährung enthält nicht genug Vitamin D,
ist die schlechte Nachricht. Die Hauptquelle von Vitamin D ist
ja eigentlich die Sonne, wichtig hier ist einfach, dass die Sonne
keine verlässliche Quelle ist für Vitamin D…”
...was gleich mehrere Ursachen hat. So ist die Sonne oberhalb
des 33.Breitengrades zu wenig intensiv, damit die Haut
immer genügend Vitamin D bilden kann. Vor allem in den
Vitamin D
http://www.dradio.de/dlf/sendungen/forschak/1810199/
44
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamin D macht Knochen im Alter stabil
DIE BILD
Senioren: Viel Vitamin D macht die
Knochen stabil
13 July 2012
netdoktor.de
13 July 2012
Mit viel Vitamin D kann Hüftbrüchen im Alter wirkungsvoll
vorgebeugt werden. Das geht aus einer Analyse des Zentrums
„Alter und Mobilität“ am Universitätsspital Zürich hervor. Die
Studie ist in der aktuellen Ausgabe des „New England Journal of
Medicine“ veröffentlicht. Weil die Knochen mit zunehmendem
Alter zerbrechlicher werden, steigt das Bruchrisiko demnach
ab 65 Jahren stetig. Vitamin D helfe, dies zu verhindern.
Die Wissenschaftler haben die Daten von mehr als 30 000
älteren Menschen ausgewertet, die an elf klinischen Studien
teilgenommen hatten.
Berlin (dapd). Mit viel Vitamin D kann Hüftbrüchen im Alter
wirkungsvoll vorgebeugt werden. Das geht aus einer Meta-Analyse des Zentrums «Alter und Mobilität» am Universitätsspital
Zürich hervor.
Die Studie ist in der aktuellen Ausgabe des «New England
Journal of Medicine» veröffentlicht. Weil die Knochen mit zunehmendem Alter zerbrechlicher werden, steigt das Bruchrisiko
demnach ab 65 Jahren stetig. Vitamin D helfe, dies zu verhindern, allerdings nur bei hoher Dosierung. Diese sollte nach den
Erkenntnissen der Schweizer Forscher um Heike Bischoff-Ferrari
bei mindestens 800 Internationalen Einheiten (IE) pro Tag liegen.
http://www.bild.de/newsticker-meldungen/ratgeber/medizin/
vitamin-d-macht-knochen-im-alter-stabil-25136910.bild.html
http://www.netdoktor.de/News/Senioren-Viel-Vitamin-Dmac-1137067.html
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
45
Vitamin D
Das Sonnenvitamin macht die Knochen stark
Die Internationale Osteoporose Stiftung (IOF) empfiehlt VitaminD-Ergänzungen für alle Erwachsenen, die 60 Jahre oder älter
sind, da Vitamin D erwiesenermaßen Stürze und Frakturen verringert. „Die Kombination aus einem körperlich aktiven Leben,
einer kalziumreichen Ernährung und einer ausreichenden Vitamin-D-Versorgung bietet enorme Möglichkeiten, die Gesundheit
von Knochen und Muskeln zu verbessern und das Risiko für
eine Osteoporose zu senken“, sagt Frau Professor Dr. Heike
Bischoff-Ferrari, Leiterin des Zentrums für Alter und Mobilität der
Universität Zürich.
gesund-durch
28 August 2012
Kalzium ist gut für die Knochengesundheit, kann aber ohne Vitamin D nicht aktiv warden (dbp/auh) Kalzium macht die Knochen
stark. Das weiß jedes Kind. Aber wer weiß schon, dass Vitamin D
mindestens genauso wichtig ist?
„Vitamin D hilft dem Körper, Kalzium und Phosphat in die
Knochen einzulagern und sorgt so für ein stabiles und belastbares Skelett und feste Zähne“, erklärt Nicole Battenfeld,
Ernährungswissenschaftlerin bei der Techniker
Krankenkasse. Außerdem unterstützt es das Immunsystem
. „Nur etwa 20 Prozent des Vitamin-D- Bedarfs kann man mit
der richtigen Ernährung abdecken“, sagt Battenfeld. VitaminD-reiche Lebensmittel stehen allerdings bei den wenigsten
Menschen regelmäßig auf dem Speiseplan, denn dazu gehören
in erster Linie fette Fische wie Hering und Makrele, in deutlich
geringerem Maße Leber, Avocado, Eigelb und einige Speisepilze. Ohne Sonne keine körpereigene Vitaminproduktion
Der Informationsflyer „Bone Appetit“ des Kuratorium Knochengesundheit e.V. informiert umfassend und gemäß dem
aktuellen wissenschaftlichem Erkenntnisstand über die
Grundlagen knochengesunder Ernährung. Er weist Lebensmittel
mit hohem Kalzium- und Vitamin-D-Gehalt aus und bietet einen
kleinen Ernährungsfahrplan, mit dessen Hilfe man knochengesunde Kost einfach in den Alltag einbauen kann. Der Flyer
„Bone Appetit“ kann gegen 1,45 Euro in Briefmarken zzgl. eines
mit 0,55 Euro frankierten Rückumschlages angefordert werden
beim: Kuratorium Knochengesundheit e.V., Stichwort „Flyer
Bone Appetit“, Leipziger Str. 6, 74889 Sinsheim
Den weitaus größten Teil des Vitamins bildet der Körper selbst:
in der Haut mit Hilfe der UV-B-Strahlen der Sonne. Die dafür
nötige Sonneneinstrahlung ist in unseren Breiten nur von April
bis Oktober ausreichend. Daher kann es in den Wintermonaten zu einer Unterversorgung kommen. Nach Angaben der
Deutschen Gesellschaft für Ernährung (DGE) sind rund 60 Prozent der Deutschen nicht ausreichend mit Vitamin D versorgt.
Folge eines längeren Vitamin-D-Mangels könnte zum Beispiel
Osteoporose sein.
Neue Zufuhrempfehlung der DGE
Neuesten Empfehlungen der DGE zufolge sollte ein Erwachsener
täglich 20 Mikrogramm Vitamin D aufnehmen statt wie bisher
5 Mikrogramm. Besonders ältere Menschen müssen auf eine
gute Vitamin D-Versorgung achten, denn mit zunehmendem
Alter nimmt die körpereigene Fähigkeit zur Bildung von Vitamin
D stark ab. Dadurch kann es zu einer Knochenerweichung mit
Muskelschwäche und Knochenschmerzen, der Osteomalazie,
kommen. Zur Vorbeugung sollten gerade ältere Menschen
täglich mindestens eine halbe Stunde im Freien verbringen.
Vitamin D
46
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
International Osteoporosis Foundation
launches vitamin D map
Vitamin D insufficiency stats reveal
a bleak picture
NutraIngredients.com
FoodBev.com
3 September
3 September 2012
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched an
interactive map that details global vitamin D consumption levels.
DSM, which contributed to the map’s construction, said the
results highlighted vitamin D deficiencies around the world.
“There is far too little data available, for example, in relation
to adolescents and young people, and across the developing
world in general. These maps are an important starting point,
but it is essential that research continues to better understand
the scale of vitamin D insufficiency,” said DSM Nutritonal
Products’ Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, senior vice president in
nutrition science and advocacy.
Both called for policy makers around the world to prioritise the
issue, especially in countries with low sunlight levels, or among
demographaics like non-Hispanic blacks in the US, where
deficiencies rise as high as 70%. Vitamin D deficiency is strongly
linked to a range of bone development and bone strength
issues as well as rickets in children and other ailments.
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched
an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents a
snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide.
Key findings
Judy Stenmark, CEO of the International Osteoporosis Foundation,
said: “IOF urges people at risk of osteoporosis and generally all
seniors aged 60 years and older to ensure optimal levels of vitamin
D. In these high risk groups IOF recommends 800-1000 IU/day
supplementation for fall and fracture prevention.”
• Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more
than one third of the study population.
• Vitamin D insufficiency affects the developing world and
industrialised world.
• The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny
countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below
recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny
country, yet with low vitamin D status).
• Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher among women
than men.
• It’s estimated that 50–70% of the European adult population
have insufficient levels of vitamin D.
• In US adults, vitamin D insufficiency estimates range from
20% (non-Hispanic whites) to 70% (non-Hispanic blacks).
• Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency,
including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis,
and those living indoors in institutionalised care.
“With the launch of these maps, we are calling on health
professionals to be aware of the status of vitamin D
insufficiency within their own country and urge them to take
simple and inexpensive steps to correct it. This will ultimately
improve, and even save, lives.”
Professor Heike Bischoff-Ferrari, PhD, Director of the Centre on
Aging and Mobility at the University of Zurich added: “The reality
is that natural production of vitamin D through sunlight decreases
with age, and it is very difficult to achieve sufficient vitamin D
through diet alone, especially in the senior population. The
good news is that vitamin D supplementation offers an effective,
inexpensive, and safe public health strategy that can make a
significant difference to people’s health and quality of life, by
reducing 30% of falls and hip fracture.”
The maps can be found here .
The map and accompanying publication confirm that vitamin
D insufficiency is a major public health issue in the developing
and industrialised world, with more than one third of all the
populations studied showing insufficient levels of vitamin D.
http://www.nutraingredients.com/Industry/InternationalOsteoporosis-Foundation-launches-vitamin-D-map
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
47
Vitamin D
DSM, which contributed to developing the data and the map,
‘strongly supports’ IOF’s call for healthcare decision makers
to take immediate action to address vitamin D insufficiency
as a priority public policy issue, and emphasise the role of
supplementation as a key tool for addressing this problem.
Bringing the ‘Sunshine Vitamin’
Out of the Shadows
http://www.foodbev.com/news/vitamin-d-insufficiency-statsreveal-a-b
This week marked a very important event in what is a very
important year for vitamins - the 100th anniversary of their
discovery. The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF),
with the assistance of DSM, has just launched a major mapping
exercise designed to better understand the global vitamin
D situation. The conclusion is clear: it’s time to bring the
“sunshine vitamin” out of the shadows.
HuffingtonPost
3 September 2012
Before we explore the findings and their significance it’s
important to remind ourselves of the role that vitamin D
plays in human health. Vitamin D is essential for building and
maintaining healthy bones and muscle strength, and we all
need it in early childhood to prevent rickets, and throughout
adulthood for healthy bones, and especially into old age to
avoid osteoporosis.
So what do the maps tell us? Well, for a start, they provide the
most complete picture yet of the global vitamin D deficiency
situation. Unfortunately, this picture confirms many of our worst
fears about vitamin D.
More than a third of people worldwide, in both the developing
and industrialized world, are lacking in vitamin D, with,
for example, an estimated 50 -70 % of the European adult
population having insufficient vitamin D levels. And Asia, with
a few exceptions - Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam - showed
a widespread insufficient vitamin D status across different
countries. Despite sunlight being the main source of vitamin
D, even in sunny countries and regions such as India and
the Middle East, Vitamin D levels are generally low and
below recommended levels. It also confirms the elderly as a
population group that is particularly vulnerable to deficiency.
This raises some fundamental questions. Firstly, we are faced
with numerous global health problems, so how “major” is
vitamin D? And, secondly, what should be done about it?
The latest estimate is that 9 million osteoporotic fractures occur
worldwide every year, and in the European Union (EU) someone
has a fracture as a result of osteoporosis every 30 seconds. With an
ageing population, the yearly incidence of hip fracture alone in the
EU is expected to more than double over the next decade.
Vitamin D
48
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
The research shows that in the US, where certain foods such
as milk, yoghurt, juices and cereals are routinely fortified with
vitamin D, the overall vitamin D status is significantly higher
compared to other regions. There are other factors involved, of
course, but I don’t think this is a coincidence.
So if we are agreed that the human costs of vitamin D deficiency
are unacceptable and we must act now to address it, what form
should this action take?
There are two main sources of Vitamin D; people’s diet; and, the
most important source, sunlight. The solution would therefore
appear to be fairly straightforward: ensure that people get
enough vitamin D through exposure to sunlight and their diet.
The reality is somewhat different.
And vitamin D supplements have been found to reduce the risk
of falls and hip fractures by 30%, safely and inexpensively. The
IOF recommends vitamin D supplementation for everyone over
the age of 60 - around 75% of hip fractures occur in people
65 years and older - as well as for those who are known to be
deficient or at high risk of osteoporosis.
Although it is possible to meet vitamin D needs through diet,
the reality is that even if you eat all the right foods this is still
difficult to achieve. This is compounded by the fact that for
cultural, economic and practical reasons not everybody can
have access to, or would want to eat, enough of the right
vitamin rich foods. I am a big fan of eggs - but I would not, for
example, want to eat 40 a day to reach my recommended daily
intake! And many people cannot access or afford the fatty fish
that are the best source of vitamin D.
The maps also tell us that significant gaps exist in our
knowledge and understanding of vitamin D status between and
within different countries and regions. The data is, for example,
limited for Africa, Central and South America. And, in terms of
population groups, the most striking data gaps are found in
children and adolescents. Just as my company DSM supported
the mapping work of the IOF, we will work with all relevant
stakeholders to ensure that these gaps are filled.
Again, you would have thought that getting enough vitamin D
through sun exposure would be pretty straightforward; however,
as the Maps confirm, it is anything but. There are many reasons
for this, including: geographical location (poor UVB at higher
latitudes), lack of sun during winter months, wearing concealing
clothing and modern lifestyles with limited outdoor activity. And,
of course, we also need to be very careful about sun exposure. So
whilst the increasing use of sun screen protects .
When I step back and think about the mapping exercise and
what it all means, I am torn between two emotions: frustration
on the one hand, and optimism on the other. Frustration that
even 100 years on from the first discovery of vitamins, people
around the world are still frequently not getting enough of the
vitamins that they need and suffer unnecessarily because of this.
Yet I am also optimistic that if action is taken to take the
“sunshine vitamin” out of the shadows through greater
awareness, an increase in the recommended intake, fortifying
more foods, enabling proper access to supplements, and
educating consumers about their choices, then this is a battle
that we can win.
Various socio-economic and demographic developments are also
working against our ability to generate vitamin D. You can see
this in countries such as India, where the shift from an agrarian
to a more modern and diversified economy means that people
are spending less time working outside and more of their time
in offices and factories. Our ageing populations are creating
additional challenges in relation to vitamin D. This is partly because
the capacity of elderly people to generate vitamin D through
sunlight deteriorates with age, but also because more and more
are house-bound or living in institutional settings. Too many are
quite literally living in the shadows.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/stephan-b-tanda/vitamind_b_1851391.html
Diet and sunlight exposure are therefore key to combating vitamin
D deficiency, and awareness of their importance has to be raised,
but an effective strategy has to take account of their limitations and
find additional ways to close the vitamin D gaps. This is where food
fortification and supplements become so important.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
49
Vitamin D
Majority of adults risk bone health from
chronic Vitamin D deficiency
improving muscle strength, balance, and leg function which
decreases the risk of falling and sustaining a fracture in the
first place. As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been
linked to a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures.
Elixir News
3 September 2012
Studies show that adequate vitamin D can reduce the risk of
falls and fractures by around 30%[4]. In Germany, research
indicated that regular vitamin D supplements can help achieve
healthcare cost savings of between Euro 585-778 million in one
country alone[5].
An estimated 50-70% of adults are at risk of the bone disease,
osteoporosis and other health problems, as a result of a
deficiency in vitamin D.
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) today
published evidence of what is describes as “a major public
health issue” with a global map of vitamin D status worldwide.
Judy Stenmark, CEO of the International Osteoporosis
Foundation commented: “IOF urges people at risk of
osteoporosis and generally all seniors aged 60 years and older
to ensure optimal levels of vitamin D. In these high risk groups
IOF recommends 800-1000 IU/day supplementation for fall
and fracture prevention. With the launch of these maps, we
are calling on health professionals to be aware of the status
of vitamin D insufficiency within their own country and urge
them to take simple and inexpensive steps to correct it. This will
ultimately improve, and even save, lives.”
“The map and accompanying publication confirm that vitamin
D insufficiency is a major public health issue in both the
developing and industrialized world, with more than one third
of all the populations studied, showing insufficient levels of
vitamin D[2],” says the IOF.
DSM, the life science company, which contributed to developing
the data and the map, strongly supports IOF’s call for healthcare
decision makers to take immediate action to address vitamin D
insufficiency as a priority public policy issue, and emphasize the
role of supplementation as a key tool for addressing this problem.
Prof. Heike Bischoff-Ferrari, DrPH, Director Centre on Aging and
Mobility, University of Zurich added: “The reality is that natural
production of vitamin D through sunlight decreases with age,
and it is very difficult to achieve sufficient vitamin D through
diet alone, especially in the senior population. The good news is
that vitamin D supplementation offers an effective, inexpensive,
and safe public health strategy that can make a significant
difference to people’s health and quality of life, by reducing
30% of falls and hip fracture.”
Key findings include:
• Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more
than one third of the study population
• Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and
industrialized world
• The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny
countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below
recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny
country; yet, with low vitamin D status)
• Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher amongst women
than men
• It is estimated that 50 -70 % of the European adult population
have insufficient levels of vitamin D
• In US adults, vitamin D insufficiency estimates range from
20% (non-Hispanic whites) - 70 % (non-Hispanic blacks).
• Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency,
including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis
and those living indoors in institutionalised care.
Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice President Nutrition Science
& Advocacy DSM commented: “The maps are a major advance
in the fight against vitamin D deficiency. We know that vitamin
D deficiency is linked to serious diseases such as rickets in
children and osteoporosis in the elderly, but our understanding
of the scale and extent of the problem was far too limited. We
now have a much better understanding of the picture of vitamin
D insufficiency, and confirmation of its importance as a global
public health issue.
The map has also created a very clear picture as to where the
vitamin D insufficiency knowledge gaps exist and where further
research is required. Dr Eggersdorfer added, “There is far too
little data available, for example, in relation to adolescents and
young people, and across the developing world in general.
Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects
hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves
bone mineral density, which lowers risk of fracture, whilst also
Vitamin D
50
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
• Most regions offer some data, however no information was
available for Central America, South America (except Brazil)
and much of Africa.
• The most striking data gaps are found in children and
adolescents
These maps are an important starting point, but it is essential
that research continues to better understand the scale of
vitamin D insufficiency.”
DSM joins IOF in calling on healthcare policymakers to raise
awareness of vitamin D insufficiency and to take action to
ensure intake of recommended vitamin D levels, including
through safe and effective measures such as food fortification,
access to proper supplements and better consumer education.
Royal DSM is a global science-based company active in
health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique
competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is
driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social
advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM
delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve
performance in global markets such as food and dietary
supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medical
devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life
protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM’s
22,000 employees deliver annual net sales of around €9 billion.
The company is listed on NYSE Euronext.
About the map - drawing on scientific studies from across the
world, the maps color code levels of vitamin D status based
on national scientific data, with green indicating an optimal/
desirable vitamin D status, and yellow as (in-) adequate or
suboptimal. Orange highlights vitamin D blood levels below
50 nmol/l which are considered insufficient, and red indicates
severe vitamin D deficiency (below 25nmol/l) based on a
sliding scale[6]. The maps will be updated annually and provide
researchers, medical practitioners and policymakers with an
invaluable resource in the fight against vitamin D deficiency.
More information can be found at www.dsm.com
http://www.elixirnews.com/news/majority_of_adults_face_
health_risk_from_lack_of_vitamin_d.html
The maps can be found on the website of the International
Osteoporosis Foundation at www.iofbonehealth.org.
Additional country findings include:
• In Germany 57% of men and 58% of women had vitamin D
status below recommended levels, rising to 75% amongst 6579 year olds
• UK studies focused on older people reveal that nearly two
thirds of women (57%), and half of men (49%) are not getting
enough vitamin D
• In the Netherlands, around half of all study participants had
sub-optimal vitamin D levels
• In the US, around 30% of the study population has suboptimal vitamin D levels, rising to around 70% amongst
participants with black skin color, highlighting skin color as a
risk factor for vitamin D insufficiency. Overall the US vitamin
D status was significantly higher compared to other regions,
which may in part, be attributable to the routine fortification
of foods with vitamin D (such as milk, juice and cereals)
• The Middle East revealed lower vitamin D status compared
to Europe which could result from cultural factors such as
clothing and lifestyle.
• Asia showed a widespread insufficient vitamin D status across
different countries. with a few exceptions (vitamin D status
was ranked desirable in Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam )
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
51
Vitamin D
Global vitamin D map launched DSM calls
for urgent action to address major public
health issue
As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a
higher risk of osteoporotic fractures.
Studies show that adequate vitamin D can reduce the risk of
falls and fractures by around 30%[4][4]. In Germany, research
indicated that regular vitamin D supplements can help achieve
healthcare cost savings of between Euro 585-778 million in one
country alone[5].
FoodBeverageAsia
4 September 2012
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) launched
an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which
presents a snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide. The map
and accompanying publication[1][1] confirm that vitamin
D insufficiency is a major public health issue in both the
developing and industrialized world, with more than one third
of all the populations studied, showing insufficient levels of
vitamin D[2][2].
Judy Stenmark, CEO of the International Osteoporosis
Foundation commented: “IOF urges people at risk of
osteoporosis and generally all seniors aged 60 years and older
to ensure optimal levels of vitamin D. In these high risk groups
IOF recommends 800-1000 IU/day supplementation for fall
and fracture prevention. With the launch of these maps, we
are calling on health professionals to be aware of the status
of vitamin D insufficiency within their own country and urge
them to take simple and inexpensive steps to correct it. This will
ultimately improve, and even save, lives.”
DSM, which contributed to developing the data and the map,
strongly supports IOF’s call for healthcare decision makers
to take immediate action to address vitamin D insufficiency
as a priority public policy issue, and emphasize the role of
supplementation as a key tool for addressing this problem.
Key findings include:
Prof. Heike Bischoff-Ferrari, DrPH, Director Centre on Aging and
Mobility, University of Zurich added: “The reality is that natural
production of vitamin D through sunlight decreases with age,
and it is very difficult to achieve sufficient vitamin D through
diet alone, especially in the senior population. The good news is
that vitamin D supplementation offers an effective, inexpensive,
and safe public health strategy that can make a significant
difference to people’s health and quality of life, by reducing
30% of falls and hip fracture4.”
• Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more
than one third of the study population[3][3]
• Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and
industrialized world
• The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny
countries, vitamin D levels are generally low and below
recommended levels (taking India as example: a sunny
country; yet, with low vitamin Dstatus)
• Rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher amongst women
than men
• It is estimated that 50 -70 % of the European adult population
have insufficient levels of vitamin D
• In US adults, vitamin D insufficiency estimates range from 20%
(non-Hispanic whites) - 70 % (non-Hispanic,blacks).
• Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency,
including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis,
and those living indoors in institutionalised care.
Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice President Nutrition Science
& Advocacy DSM commented: “The maps are a major advance
in the fight against vitamin D deficiency. We know that vitamin
D deficiency is linked to serious diseases such as rickets in
children and osteoporosis in the elderly, but our understanding
of the scale and extent of the problem was far too limited. We
now have a much better understanding of the picture of vitamin
D insufficiency, and confirmation of its importance as a global
public health issue.
The map has also created a very clear picture as to where the
vitamin D insufficiency knowledge gaps exist and where further
research is required. Dr Eggersdorfer added, “There is far too
little data available, for example, in relation to adolescents and
young people, and across the developing world in general.
Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects hundreds
of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves bone mineral
density, which lowers risk of fracture, whilst also improving muscle
strength, balance, and leg function which decreases the risk of
falling and sustaining a fracture in the first place.
Vitamin D
52
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
These maps are an important starting point, but it is essential
that research continues to better understand the scale of
vitamin D insufficiency.
Internationale Osteoporose Stichting lanceert
online Vitamine D
DSM joins IOF in calling on healthcare policymakers to raise
awareness of vitamin D insufficiency and to take action to
ensure intake of recommended vitamin D levels, including
through safe and effective measures such as food fortification,
access to proper supplements and better consumer education.
5 September 2012
Voeding Nu
De International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) heeft een online
kaart gelanceerd waarop staat hoe het met de vitamine D-status
is gesteld in bepaalde landen. De kaart werd mede mogelijk
gemaakt door DSM, leverancier van onder andere vitamine D.De
kleuren op de kaart geven aan of de vitamine D-status optimaal,
sub-optimaal of ontoereikend is of dat er sprake is van een
vitamine D-tekort. Voor de samenstelling van de kaart zijn 200
onderzoeken uit 46 landen gebruikt, die zijn gepubliceerd
tussen 1990 en 2011. De IOF wil met de kaart een hulpmiddel
bieden aan zorgprofessionals die te maken hebben met het
bestrijden van vitamine D-tekorten.
http://foodbeverageasia.com/detail.php?tid=2164. – Food and
Beverage Asia
Vitamine D-status
Professor Bess Dawson-Hughes, algemeen secretaris van de
IOF, zegt: ‘De kaart geeft informatie over vitamine D-tekorten
in veel gebieden van de wereld en over verschillende
bevolkingsgroepen. Het aantal ouderen groeit over de hele
wereld. Vitamine D-tekorten kosten de gezondheidszorg van
landen wereldwijd veel geld. Het is dus belangrijk om iedereen
wakker te schudden en duidelijk te maken hoe belangrijk een
optimale vitamine D-status is.’
http://www.voedingnu.nl/internationale-osteoporose-stichtinglanceert.173895.lynkx
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
53
Vitamin D
DSM und die Internationale
Osteoporose Foundation
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice President Nutrition
Science & Advocacy DSM: “Die Karten sind ein großer Schritt
im Kampf gegen den Vitamin-D-Mangel. Wir wissen, dass ein
Mangel Krankheiten wie Rachitis bei Kindern und Osteoporose
bei Älteren begünstigen kann, aber bisher wussten wir noch zu
wenig darüber. Jetzt können wir uns ein viel besseres Bild vom
Vitamin-D-Mangel machen und von seinen Auswirkungen auf
die Gesundheit.“
Krm-media.de
September 2012
Die Internationale Osteoporose Foundation (IOF) hat
eine interaktive weltweite Karte des Vitamin-D-Status der
Bevölkerung verschiedener Länder vorgestellt. Die Karte und
die dazugehörige Publikation verdeutlichen, dass ein VitaminD-Mangel ein Gesundheitsproblem sowohl in den Entwicklungsals auch den Industrieländern darstellt.
Wer mehr erfahren möchte, folgt dem weiterführenden Link zur
englischsprachigen Seite http://www.krm-media.de/gesundheit/gesundheitsratgeber/11516dsm-und-die-internationale-osteoporose-foundation-.html
DSM hat bei der Entwicklung der Karten geholfen und unterstützt
die IOF dabei, auf dieses Problem aufmerksam zu machen.
Wichtige Ergebnisse:
Insgesamt wurde ein Vitamin-D-Mangel bei einem Drittel der
untersuchten Bevölkerung festgestellt (Blood levels below 50
nmol/l considered as insufficient) Ein Vitamin-D-Mangel kommt
sowohl in Entwicklungs- als auch Industrieländern vor. Obwohl
Sonne die wichtigste Quelle für Vitamin D ist, ist der Status
auch in sonnigen Ländern generell niedrig und unterhalb der
empfohlenen Level. (In Indien beispielsweise ist der Vitamin-DStatus niedrig, obwohl es ein sonniges Land ist).
Mehr Frauen als Männer sind betroffen.
Schätzungsweise 50-70% der Erwachsenen in Europa haben
ein niedriges Vitamin-D-Level.
Ältere Menschen sind besonders gefährdet, insbesondere
ältere Frauen gehören zu den Risikogruppen für Osteoporose.
Ebenfalls gefährdet sind Menschen, die in Institutionen leben
und sich hauptsächlich drinnen aufhalten. Osteoporose ist
eine ernste chronische Erkrankung die hunderte Millionen
Menschen betrifft. Studien haben gezeigt, dass Vitamin D das
Risiko von Stürzen und Knochenbrüchen um etwa 30% senken
kann . Untersuchungen in Deutschland haben ergeben, dass
eine regelmäßige Vitamin-D-Zufuhr die Gesundheitskosten
eines Landes zwischen 585-778 Millionen Euro senken kann .
(Mueller,2009 and Grant, 2009
Judy Stenmark, CEO der International Osteoporosis Foundation:
“Die IOF rät Menschen mit einem Osteoporoserisiko und
generell Menschen über 60 Jahren ausreichend Vitamin D
zuzuführen. Bei diesen Risikogruppen liegt die empfohlene
tägliche Zufuhr bei 800-1000 IU.”
Vitamin D
54
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamin D insufficiency is a major
public health issue
This could ultimately improve, and even save, many lives.
Experts have noted that the body’s natural ability to produce
vitamin D from sunlight decreases with age, making it very
difficult to achieve sufficient vitamin D levels through the diet
alone, especially in the elderly. Vitamin D supplementation
therefore offers an effective, inexpensive, and safe public health
alternative that can make a significant difference to people’s
health and quality of life, possibly reducing falls and hip fractures by up to 30%.
Nutri-facts.org
14 September 2012
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched
an interactive global map based on a review of literature
published between 1990 and 2011, which confirms that more
than one third of all the populations studied in the developing
and industrialized world show insufficient levels of vitamin D.
The map (1) and an accompanying publication (2) show
that vitamin D deficiency affects both the developing and
industrialized world, with deficient statuses detected in more
than one third of the populations studied. It is estimated that
50–70% of the European adult population have insufficient
levels of vitamin D (mean 25(OH)D values below 50 nmol/L).
In US adults, vitamin D deficiency estimates range from 20%
(non-Hispanic whites) to 70% (non-Hispanic blacks).The main
source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny countries such
as India, vitamin D levels are generally low and remain below
the recommended amounts. Rates of vitamin D deficiency are
higher amongst women than men. Older people are particularly
at risk of vitamin D deficiency, particularly older women, who
are an at-risk group for osteoporosis, and those living indoors in
institutionalized care.
http://www.nutri-facts.org/eng/news/detail/backPid/859/
article/vitamin-d-insufficiency-is-a-major-public-healthissue/#c7537
Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects
hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves
bone mineral density, which lowers the risk of fracture, while
also improving muscle strength, balance and leg function,
which lowers the risk of falling and sustaining a fracture in the
first place. As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been
linked to a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. Studies show
that adequate vitamin D levels can reduce the risk of falls and
fractures by around 30% (3). In Germany, research has indicated
that regular supplementation of vitamin D can help achieve
healthcare cost savings of between €585-778 million in one
country alone (4).
The IOF is urging people at risk of osteoporosis, and generally
all seniors aged 60 or over, to ensure they have an optimal
intake of vitamin D. For these high-risk groups, the IOF
recommends a daily supplementa-tion of 800¬-1000 IU in order
to prevent falls and fractures. With the launch of these maps,
the IOF is calling on health professionals to take note of the
level of vitamin D deficiency within their own countries and is
urging them to take simple and inexpensive steps to correct it.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
55
Vitamin D
DSM und die Internationale
Osteoporose Foundation
Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer, Senior Vice President Nutrition
Science & Advocacy DSM: “Die Karten sind ein großer Schritt
im Kampf gegen den Vitamin-D-Mangel. Wir wissen, dass ein
Mangel Krankheiten wie Rachitis bei Kindern und Osteoporose
bei Älteren begünstigen kann, aber bisher wussten wir noch zu
wenig darüber. Jetzt können wir uns ein viel besseres Bild vom
Vitamin-D-Mangel machen und von seinen Auswirkungen auf
die Gesundheit.“
cityblick24
... stellen weltweite Vitamin-D-Karten vor
Die Internationale Osteoporose Foundation (IOF) hat
eine interaktive weltweite Karte des Vitamin-D-Status der
Bevölkerung verschiedener Länder vorgestellt. Die Karte und die
dazugehörige Publikation verdeutlichen, dass ein Vitamin-DMangel ein Gesundheitsproblem sowohl in den Entwicklungsals auch den Industrieländern darstellt. DSM hat bei der
Entwicklung der Karten geholfen und unterstützt die IOF dabei,
auf dieses Problem aufmerksam zu machen.
Wichtige Ergebnisse: Insgesamt wurde ein Vitamin-D-Mangel
bei einem Drittel der untersuchten Bevölkerung festgestellt
(Blood levels below 50 nmol/l considered as insufficient)
Wer mehr erfahren möchte, folgt dem weiterführenden Link zur
englischsprachigen Seite - www.iofbonehealth.org/facts-andstatistics/vitamin-d-studies-map
http://www.iofbonehealth.org/facts-and-statistics/vitamin-dstudies-map
Ein Vitamin-D-Mangel kommt sowohl in Entwicklungs- als auch
Industrieländern vor.
Obwohl Sonne die wichtigste Quelle für Vitamin D ist, ist der
Status auch in sonnigen Ländern generell niedrig und unterhalb
der empfohlenen Level. (In Indien beispielsweise ist der
Vitamin-D-Status niedrig, obwohl es ein sonniges Land ist).
Mehr Frauen als Männer sind betroffen.
Schätzungsweise 50-70% der Erwachsenen in Europa
haben ein niedriges Vitamin-D-Level. Ältere Menschen sind
besonders gefährdet, insbesondere ältere Frauen gehören zu
den Risikogruppen für Osteoporose. Ebenfalls gefährdet sind
Menschen, die in Institutionen leben und sich hauptsächlich
drinnen aufhalten.
Osteoporose ist eine ernste chronische Erkrankung die
hunderte Millionen Menschen betrifft. Studien haben gezeigt,
dass Vitamin D das Risiko von Stürzen und Knochenbrüchen
um etwa 30% senken kann . Untersuchungen in Deutschland
haben ergeben, dass eine regelmäßige Vitamin-D-Zufuhr die
Gesundheitskosten eines Landes zwischen 585-778 Millionen
Euro senken kann . (Mueller, 2009 and Grant, 2009 Judy
Stenmark, CEO der International Osteoporosis Foundation: “Die
IOF rät Menschen mit einem Osteoporoserisiko und generell
Menschen über 60 Jahren ausreichend Vitamin D zuzuführen.
Bei diesen Risikogruppen liegt die empfohlene tägliche Zufuhr
bei 800-1000 IU.”
Vitamin D
56
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
IOF launches global vitamin D map Posted on
As a consequence, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a
higher risk of osteoporotic fractures.
Studies show that adequate vitamin D can reduce the risk
of falls and fractures by about 30%. In Germany, research
indicated that regular vitamin D supplements can help achieve
healthcare cost savings of €585-778 million ($759-1,009 million)
in one country alone.
Asia food journal gesund - durch
19 October 2012
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched
an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents a
snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide.
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has launched
an interactive global map of vitamin D status, which presents
a snapshot of vitamin D levels worldwide. The map and
accompanying publication confirm that vitamin D insufficiency
is a major public health issue in both the developing and
industrialized world, with more than one third of all the
populations studied, shopowing insufficient levels of vitamin D.
DSM, which contributed to developing the data and the map,
strongly supports IOF’s call for healthcare decision makers
to take immediate action to address vitamin D insufficiency
as a priority public policy issue, and emphasize the role of
supplementation as a key tool for addressing this problem.
http://www.asiafoodjournal.com/article/iof-launches-globalvitamin-d-map/8372
Key findings include:
• Overall, insufficient vitamin D levels were detected in more
than one third of the study population.
• Vitamin D insufficiency affects both the developing world and
industrialized world.
• The main source of vitamin D is sunlight, but even in sunny
countries, vitamin D levels are generally
low and below recommended levels (taking India as example: a
sunny country; yet, with low vitamin D status).
• The rates of vitamin D insufficiency are higher amongst
women than men.
• It is estimated that 50-70 % of the European adult population
has insufficient levels of vitamin D.
• In US adults, vitamin D insufficiency estimates range from 20%
(non-Hispanic whites) – 70% (non-Hispanic blacks).
• Older people are especially at risk for vitamin D insufficiency,
including older women who are a risk group for osteoporosis,
and those living indoors in institutionalised care.
Osteoporosis is a serious chronic disease which affects hundreds
of millions of people worldwide. Vitamin D improves bone mineral
density, which lowers risk of fracture, whilst also improving muscle
strength, balance, and leg function which decreases the risk of
falling and sustaining a fracture in the first place.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
57
Vitamin D
Vitamin D Status
Weltkarte erstellt (vitamin D map launch)
Vitamin D
58
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamin E
59
Forgotten vitamin would help cut premature
births ‘by 30%’
Food Manucfacture.co.uk
17 October 2012
The number of premature babies born in the UK could be
reduced by as much as 30% if expectant mothers had adequate
intakes of vitamin E.
The number of premature babies born in the UK could be
reduced by as much as 30% if expectant mothers had adequate
intakes of vitamin E. This is a particular issue in the UK, where
54,000 babies are born prematurely each year in England alone.
Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, vice president of Switzerland-based
DSM Nutrition, last night (Tuesday, October 16) told a vitamins
seminar that greater education, fortification of products and
supplements for specific at risk groups was essential to tackle
inadequate vitamin E levels.
THIS CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT PROTECTED
However, if you would like to share the information in this article, you may use the headline, summary and link below:
http://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Ingredients/Forgottenvitamin-would-help-cut-premature-births-by-30
http://www.foodproductdesign.com/news/2012/07/dsm-helpsdutch-athletes-go-for-olympic-gold.aspx
Vitamin E
60
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Olympic
nutrition
61
DSM Backs Dutch and German Olympians
with Nutrient
DSM and Dutch Olympic Committee Partner
on “Optimum Sports Nutrition”
Solutions Nutra-Ingredients.com
Nutritionhorizon.com
24 July 2012
24 July 2012
DSM is using the Olympic Games to highlight its sports nutrition
offerings like carotenoids and vitamin D by sponsoring different
teams within the Dutch and German contingents at the London
Olympiad which begins on Friday.
DSM is applying its science to deliver the latest advances in sports
nutrition to London 2012 athletes. As innovation partner of the
Dutch Olympic Committee, DSM uses its knowledge of health,
nutrition and materials to help improve the performance of the
athletes. In partnership with the Dutch Olympic Committee, DSM
is studying optimal levels of vitamin D for performance sportsmen
and women. And beach volleyball players Sara Goller and Laura
Ludwig from Germany will be using DSM’s innovative carotenoid
supplements, FloraGLO Lutein and OPTISHARP Zeaxanthin to boost
their visual performance.
Different teams will be given vitamin D and German beach
volleyball players Sara Goller and Laura Ludwig from Germany will
be given lutein and zeaxanthin supplements to improve eyesight.
Maurits Hendriks, Chef de Mission of the Olympic Team
Netherlands said: “Good nutrition is essential for the fitness of
our athletes at the starting line, and can actually help make the
difference between victory or defeat on the day.”
Even top athletes often underestimate the importance of proper
nutrition. Over the years, a great deal of knowledge has been
gained on the effects of specific nutrition regimens.
Rob van Leen, DSM chief innovation officer noted: “As we share
in the excitement and build up to the Olympics, we are inspired
by working with athletes and teams, to take nutrition innovation
to the next level.”
Maurits Hendriks, Chef de Mission of the Olympic Team
Netherlands commented: “Good nutrition is essential for the
fitness of our athletes at the starting line, and can actually help
make the difference between victory or defeat on the day. And
yet even at the Olympic level, we see that there is still room for
optimizing athletes’ diets. In our approach, a perfect diet is part
of the integral training program. That is why the Dutch Olympic
team is pleased to work in partnership with DSM to help our
athletes to achieve their best possible performance.”
The Dutch company recently opened a new office in Kenya to
work on food fortification activities
DSM is working together with the Dutch Olympic Committee,
to undertake a study into optimal levels of vitamin D for
performance sportsmen and women. Vitamin D delivers vital
benefits to bone health, as well as improves muscle strength.
It is produced in the skin when exposed to sunlight, but even
athletes training outdoors can still face deficiencies. Vitamin D
can also be found in the diet through foods such as oily fish and
eggs, but athletes would need to consume several dozens of
eggs per day to achieve optimal amounts.
Rob van Leen, Chief Innovation Officer at DSM noted: “At DSM,
we aim to provide nutrition solutions that are game-changing
and life changing for people all over the world. As we share in
the excitement and build up to the Olympics, we are inspired by
working with athletes and teams, to take nutrition innovation to
the next level.”
Olympic nutrition
62
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
DSM helps Dutch athletes go for Olympic gold
Besides supporting the Dutch Olympic Committee with a
comprehensive innovation program, DSM also supports a
number of individual athletes. German beach volleyball medal
hopefuls, Sara Goller and Laura Ludwig, for example, will be
using DSM’s carotenoid supplements to boost their visual
performance. Being exposed to the bright sun or stadium
lights whilst playing beach volleyball can temporarily impair
vision, which will have a significant impact on their game.
The carotenoid supplements provided by DSM act as a pair
of ‘internal sunglasses’ to protect the eyes, and reduce the
impact of strong light. Lutein and Zeaxanthin are found in the
diet through vegetables such as spinach and bell peppers,
and naturally accumulate in the retina. The yellow filter formed
by lutein and zeaxanthin blocks out blue light and haze
from strong light, but it’s difficult for performance athletes to
achieve optimal levels through diet alone. DSM’s innovative
supplements such as FloraGLO and OPTISHARP are used to
help the eyes become naturally more ‘glare-resistant’, which
may benefit the split-second, hand-eye coordination needed
in performance sports such as volleyball.Sara Goller and Laura
Ludwig commented: “Since taking the new DSM supplements,
we are more confident about the visual performance of our
eyes. This is very important in a sport like ours where you’re
playing in very bright sunlight much of the time.”FloraGLO and
OPTISHARP can also benefit other sports disciplines in which
visual performance is key and where the athletes experience
similar conditions of glare and exposure to bright sunlight.
For that reason, several other athletes have also included
these products in their daily diet, including a number of Dutch
Olympic sailors.
Food Product Design
25 July 2012
DSM Nutritional Products partnered with the Dutch Olympic
Committee to study how vitamin D and the carotenoids lutein
and zeaxanthin affect the performance of top-tier athletes.
Vitamin D delivers vital benefits to bone health and improves
muscle strength. It is produced in the skin when exposed to
sunlight, but even athletes training outdoors can still face
deficiencies.
Vitamin D can also be found in the diet through foods, such as
oily fish and eggs, but athletes often do not consume enough
to achieve optimum levels. The company also is working with
individual athletes, including beach volleyball players Sara
Goller and Laura Ludwig, to help boost their visual performance
with lutein and zeaxanthin, which are found naturally in
kale, spinach, broccoli and corn. The women will use DSM’s
carotenoid supplements to act as a pair of “internal sunglasses”
to protect their eyes and reduce the impact of strong outdoor
sunlight and glare.
http://www.foodproductdesign.com/news/2012/07/dsm-helpsdutch-athletes-go-for-olympic-gold.aspx
This is just one of the ways in which DSM uses its scientific
knowledge in health, nutrition, and materials to help top
athletes to raise the bar and improve their chances of winning
that all-important 2012 medal. Since 2001, DSM has worked
with the top-level sports community on a range of innovations
from sailing, to cooling, and nutritional ingredients for faster
recovery which have contributed to sporting success. In the runup to the Olympic Games in London 2012, rowing and cycling
have spearheaded in this innovation program. In cooperation
with the Dutch Rowing Federation, DSM has developed new
boats for the Olympic rowing fleet, and together with the Cycling
Union, DSM has presented the Olympic cycling outfit.
http://www.nutritionhorizon.com/news/DSM-and-DutchOlympic-Committee-Partner-on-Optimum-Sports-Nutrition.html
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
63
Olympic nutrition
General
vitamins
64
Dietary surveys indicate vitamin intakes
below recommendations are common in
representative Western countries
Changing Lives with Vitamin Angels - Blog.
Wholefoodsmarket.com
21 July 2012
British Journal of Nutrition
In the second part of our interview with founder Howard
Schiffer, listen in to learn about the Vitamin Angels programs
having the most impact on malnourished children and discover
simple ways to support their profound efforts. Howard Schiffer
is the founder of Vitamin Angels and the recipient of numerous
awards recognizing his accomplishments for helping to reduce
child mortality by providing essential nutrients to at-risk
children around the world.
13 June 2012
Abstract
Vitamins play a crucial role in health, but modern lifestyles may
lead to suboptimal intakes even in affluent countries. The aim
of the present study is to review vitamin intakes in Germany, the
UK, The Netherlands and the USA and to compare them with
respective national recommendations. Data on adults from the
most recently published national dietary intake surveys for the
first three countries and data for adults from the US National
Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2003 to 2008 for
the USA were used as a basis for the analysis. The proportions
of the populations with intakes below recommendations were
categorised as < 5, 5-25, >25-50, >50-75 and >75 % for each vitamin.
Vitamin Angels has two programs that help improve children’s
lives every day:
Thrive to Five is a domestic and international program to get
children’s multivitamins to children under 5, and prenatal vitamins
to pregnant women as early in their pregnancy as possible.
Operation 20/20 focuses on getting vitamin A to children under
5 around the world in order to decrease the effects of vitamin A
deficiency and improve their immune function and survival.
The data generated are presented in a ‘traffic light display’,
using colours from green to red to indicate degrees of
sufficiency. The trends found were compared with the results
from the European Nutrition and Health Report 2009, even
though in that report, only information on mean intakes in the
different countries was available. We showed that, although
inter-country differences exist, intakes of several vitamins are
below recommendations in a significant part of the population
in all these countries. The most critical vitamin appears
to be vitamin D and the least critical niacin. The variation
between the countries is most probably due to differences
in recommendations, levels of fortification and local dietary
habits. We show that a gap exists between vitamin intakes and
requirements for a significant proportion of the population,
even though diverse foods are available. Ways to correct this
gap need to be investigated.
Twenty five cents is the cost to reach one child for one year
with vitamin A, which can reduce their risk of mortality from all
causes by 24%.
Today, Vitamin Angels is on track to reach 25 million children in
more than 40 countries this year.
There are many ways to get involved with the Vitamin Angels cause:
One of the easiest ways to support Vitamin Angels is by
choosing supplements that have the Vitamin Angels logo on
them. These companies donate a percentage of sales or provide
nutrients for the programs.
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage
=online&aid=8668978
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Whole Body team members are trained and available to answer
any shopper questions about Vitamin Angels programs.
65
General vitamins
DSM research reveals ‘inadequate’ vitamin
intake in Europe and USA
“Vitamins play a vital role in the diet, delivering long term
benefits to health, and yet this research highlights that 100
years after their discovery there are still major gaps that urgently
need closing - to improve people’s long term health and to
drive down healthcare costs,” said Eggersdorfer.
Study details
Nutra-Ingridients
21 June 2012
Writing in the British Journal of Nutrition, researchers from DSM
reveal that despite the wide range of foods available, many
developed countries – including Germany, the Netherlands,
the UK, and the USA – suffer from ‘widespread’ vitamin
inadequacies in the population.
The analysis reveals that three quarters of the population in
Germany, the UK, and the USA, do not meet the dietary intake
recommendations of the respective countries for a number of
essential micronutrients.
Speaking with NutraIngredients, Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer,
senior vice-president for nutrition and science advocacy at DSM
revealed that the research is built on publically available data,
which was then analysed and visualised using a traffic light
scoring system.
The study used a traffic light system to indicate vitamin status.
They assigned a red light to cases where more than 75% of
the population has an intake status lower than the nationally
recommended level, a yellow light.
Red lights were presented for vitamin D status in Germany, the
UK and the USA – whilst vitamin E was also shown to have a red
light in the UK and the USA. Vitamin B9 (folate) received a red
light ‘warning’ in Germany, along with vitamin A in the USA
“I think that for the first time there is now comparative data which
can differentiate between vitamin status in different countries in
a visual way,” said Eggersdorfer - who said he believes the traffic
light system is an ‘excellent tool’ for visualising and communicating
the sometimes stark differences between what is recommended for
intake and what is actually achieved.
Of the countries monitored, the Netherlands was found to have
the fewest red lights.
The DSM expert said the results show the need for a “call to action”
on the topic of vitamin intakes, arguing that government bodies
and policy makers need to help the public realise the right balance
when it comes to dietary intake, fortification, and supplementation.
“What we see in these countries is not a deficiency, however
there is an inadequate intake when compared to the
recommended daily levels,” said Eggersdorfer – noting that
such information needed to be effectively communicated to
both consumers and policy makers.
We want scientists to engage with regulatory bodies and
policy makers so that we can try to get the best
recommendations for intakes.”
“We know inadequate intake of vitamins does have an effect
on long-term health, especially in terms of nutrition related
diseases such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and
diabetes.”
Vitamin intake
In 1912, Polish biochemist Casimir Funk coined the term
‘vitamine’ to define vital organic compounds that helped to
prevent conditions such as beriberi and scurvy – and with it
modern micronutrient science was born. Since then, researchers
have identified and characterized a wide range of vitamins – 13
in total – with a range of functions at both a molecular and a
cellular level, all playing an important role in human health.
General vitamins
“Sufficient intake will support lowering the risk of these noncommunicable diseases and aid healthy aging.”
66
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Dietary vitamin intakes using “traffic lights”
suggest widespread inadequacies in
Europe, US
Asia Food Journal
26 June 2012
A new assessment published in the British Journal of Nutrition
suggests that 75% of the population in Germany, the UK, and
the US, does not meet the dietary intake recommendations
of the respective countries for a number of essential
micronutrients.
A new assessment published in the British Journal of Nutrition
suggests that 75% of the population in Germany, the UK, and
the US, does not meet the dietary intake recommendations
of the respective countries for a number of essential
micronutrients.
Based on large-scale population-based national dietary
intake surveys, scientists at DSM evaluated data using a
traffic light system to measure actual intakes against national
recommendations in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and
the US.
A red light was assigned where more than 75% of the
population has an intake status lower than the nationally
recommended level.
The results show that in Germany, the UK and the USA, Vitamin
D has a red light status, indicating that at least 75% of the
population have poor vitamin D intake and are not meeting
recommended intakes.
Vitamin D is vital to bone health and muscle strength while it
can reduce the risk of falls and fractures linked to osteoporosis
by 20%.
It is also essential for children in the prevention of rickets.
Vitamin E was also branded with a red light in the UK and US,
indicating that more can be done in these countries to raise intake
levels to those recommended by national public health experts.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
67
General vitamins
Vitamin-D-Mangel: Risiko für Senioren ab 60
Vitamin B9 (folate), which is especially important for pregnant
women, was given a red light in Germany; Vitamin A also
received a red light in the US.
Mercure Magazine
11 July 2012
Of the countries monitored, the Netherlands fared best,
with fewer red lights than Germany, the UK and the US.The
variation between countries is most likely due to differences
in recommendations, levels of fortification, and local dietary
habits.
Zürich - Vitamin-D ist wichtig für Knochen und das
Immunsystem. Neue Studie zeigen jetzt, dass vor allem ältere
Menschen einem Mangel vorbeugen sollten.
Senioren ab 60 sollten Vitamin-D-Mangel vorbeugen. Die
Fähigkeit der Haut zur Vitamin-D-Bildung nimmt im Alter ab.
“Vitamins play a vital role in the diet, delivering long term
benefits to health, and yet this research highlights that 100 yrs
after their discovery there are still major gaps that urgently need
closing – to improve people’s long term health and to drive
down healthcare costs,” says Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer, senior
VP for Nutrition and Science Advocacy.
Vitamin-D ist wichtig für die Regulierung des Calcium-Spiegels
im Blut und beim Knochenaufbau. Kinder mit Vitamin-DMangel erkranken an Rachitis. Bei Erwachsenen begünstigt
ein Vitamin D-Mangel einem Knochenabbau und erhöht das
Knochenbruchrisiko. Außerdem sind Muskelschwäche und
-schmerzen sowie ein erhöhtes Sturzrisiko Folgen des VitaminD-Mangels. Auch sind in der Wissenschaft negative Folgen für
das Immunsystem, die Entwicklung von Herz-Kreislauf- und
Krebserkrankungen beschrieben worden.
http://www.asiafoodjournal.com/article/dietary-vitaminintakes-using-traffic-lights-suggest-widespread-inadequaciesin-europe-us/8269
Prof. Dr. med. Heike Annette Bischoff-Ferrari vom Zentrum Alter
und Mobilität der Universität Zürich und Stadtspital Waid hat
nun in einer Studie herausgefunden, dass ältere Patienten, die
regelmäßig Vitamin-D einnehmen, sicherer gehen, seltener
stürzen und weniger Knochenbrüche erleiden.
Die Einnahme von Vitamin-D ist demnach eine günstige und
effektive Maßnahme, um die Gesundheit im Alter zu erhalten.
Auch die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung (DGE) empfiehlt
daher seit kurzem die Einnahme von Vitamin-D.
Vitamin-D wird zu rund 80 Prozent in der Haut mit Hilfe der
UV-B Strahlung des Sonnenlichtes gebildet und zu rund 20
Prozent über Lebensmittel aufgenommen. Allerdings ist die
Sonne keine verlässlich Quelle: in den Monaten November bis
Mai reicht in ganz Europa die Sonnenintensität nicht aus.
„Die Fähigkeit der Haut zur Vitamin-D-Bildung nimmt im Alter
gegenüber einem 20-Jährigen um den Faktor vier ab“, sagt Prof.
Dr. med. Ralf-Joachim Schulz Präsident der DGG.
Sonnenschutz durch Kleidung oder
Sonnencreme (ab Faktor 6) reduziert die hauteigene VitaminD-Produktion zudem deutlich. Außerdem enthalten nur wenige
Lebensmittel Vitamin-D in größeren Mengen, dazu gehören
General vitamins
68
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamins and dietary supplements too
much of a good thing? The Science would
suggest not…
fettreiche Fische, zum Beispiel Aale, und in deutlich geringerem
Maße Margarine, einige Pilze und Eigelb.
Das Vitamin wird nach der Aufnahme über Nahrungsmittel oder
die Bildung in der Haut zunächst in der Leber und danach in der
Niere in die aktive Form umgewandelt.
Nutra-Ingridients
3 August 2012
Earlier this week we ran a story based on a Euromonitor blog
that asked some questions of the efficacy, safety and marketing
of food supplements. Here Alan Ruth, PhD, CEO of the Irish
Health Trade Association responds...
On 17 July 2012, Euromonitor International published a blog
by consumer health analyst Stephanie Prymas titled:’ Vitamins
and Dietary Supplements: Too Much of a Good Thing?’. The
blog states: “Unfortunately, there is a growing body of evidence
showing that overdoing it on certain nutrients can indeed be
harmful.”
http://www.merkur-online.de/gesundheit/allgemein/vitamin-dmangel-vorbeugensenioren-2387002.html
The seven statements and the studies they refer to, provide very
weak support for the statement regarding growing evidence
showing that overdoing it on certain nutrients can be harmful.
The findings of two of the studies cannot be extrapolated to
Europe. The other studies have been criticised by experts
because of their methodological limitations and because they
citerelative risk figures which do not reflect actual risks.
Below, I respond to each of Stephanie’s seven statements.
Statement (1): “A study in the November 2011 American Journal
of Clinical Nutrition, which surveyed nearly 9,000 US adults,
found that supplement users consume more minerals from
their diets than non-users, increasing the risk of conditions
such as kidney stones, which are associated with high calcium
consumption.” It is important to highlight the fact that this
statement relates to an analysis of data from theNational Health
and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006 in
the United States.NHANES is a program of studies designed to
assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children
in the United States. Its findings and conclusions cannot be
extrapolated to other national populations. One of the main
reasons for this is the fact that the use of dietary supplements is
very high in the United States compared to other countries. The
actual conclusions cited in the abstract of the November 2011
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition analysis were: “Individuals
who used mineral-containing dietary supplements had higher
mineral intakes from food sources in the diet than did nonusers.
For all minerals examined, and particularly for calcium and
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
69
General vitamins
Statement (4): “Researchers at Johns Hopkins University
analysed data from more than 15,000 adults and found
that vitamin D supplementation decreased blood levels of
C-reactive protein, or CRP, an indicator of inflammation linked
to cardiovascular disease. After a certain level, however,
additional vitamin D actually increased CRP levels. Most
troublingly, this threshold was at the lower end of the “normal”
range for vitamin D.”
magnesium in men and women and iron in women, supplement
use decreased the prevalence of intake inadequacy for each
respective mineral.”
Statement (2): “Researchers followed almost 24,000 subjects in
Germany for 10 years and discovered that those taking calcium
supplements were 86% more likely to have a heart attack during
the study. While this relationship was not causal, the association
was strong enough to prompt the authors to suggest that dietary
consumption may be a preferable calcium source.”
The Vitamin D Council said of this study: “You can’t draw any
conclusions about CVD (cardiovascular disease) risk because
this was a correlation of two serum levels between two
unmatched groups. It was not an intervention study, and it did
not measure CVD.”
Dr William Ware, Editor of International Health News has noted
that this study received considerable media attention because
it suggested an 86% increase in the risk of having a heart attack
for users of calcium supplements.
Statement (5): “Dutch researchers examined over 245,000
people and found both low and very high levels of vitamin D
were linked to a greater risk of death.”
However, from looking at the data in the tables of the study
write-up and focusing on myocardial infarctions (heart
attacks), he notes that over 11 years, 1.6% of non-takers of any
supplement had heart attacks. 2.73% of those who took only
calcium had heart attacks and 1.87% of those who took calcium
plus another supplement had heart attacks.
Firstly, this study was not carried out by Dutch researchers!
The research was from the University of Copenhagen and
was based on blood samples from 247,574 Copenhageners.
Commenting on the finding of the study on the Vitamin D
Council website, Dr William Grant stated: “This finding flies
in the face of numerous studies reporting benefits of higher
serum 25(OH)D concentrations for the diseases contributing the
most to mortality rates in Europe and the United States.”
Dr Ware notes that the 86% relative risk increase for calcium
alone became a non-significant 20% when the statistical
analysis involved confounders and in addition, took into
account cumulative supplementation.
The International Alliance of Dietary/Food Supplement
Associations (IADSA) highlighted a large number of limitations
of the observational study including that it was not designed to
measure CVD (cardiovascular disease) events as the primary
outcome; didn’t exclude those with high blood cholesterol and
high blood pressure; and contained inaccurate calcium intake data.
Statement (6): “A study of more than 35,000 men in the October
2011 Journal of the American Medical Association found that
those taking vitamin E had a 17% higher risk of developing
prostate cancer versus those receiving a placebo.”
This study reported that those taking vitamin E had a 17% higher
risk of developing prostate cancer versus those receiving a
placebo. This was a relative risk. Relative risk means the probability
of developing a disease relative to an exposure, while absolute
risk represents the probability that a specific event will occur in a
specific population, in a specific time frame.
Statement (3): “Patients with excess levels of vitamin D have a
2.5 times greater risk of developing atrial fibrillation…”
The research cited resulted in an article titled “Industry hits back
at ‘nonsense’ vitamin D heart study” which appeared on the
NutraIngredients website on 18 November 2011. The article cited a
statement by supplier DSM which was headlined ‘Conversion Errors
and Vitamin D Nonsense’. According to the article, DSM stated
that the unpublished research was flawed in its measurement
methodology and would struggle to pass peer review.
General vitamins
Statement (7): “According to a study in The Lancet in February
2012, selenium supplements, which may prevent some cancers
and delay cognitive decline, may also increase the risk of
developing Type 2 diabetes when taken at higher doses.”
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100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Study highlights low dietary vitamin intakes
The main conclusion of this review of the evidence was that
although additional selenium might benefit people who are
lacking in this essential micronutrient, for those who already
have enough selenium in their diet (including a large proportion
of the USA population), taking selenium supplements could
be harmful, and might increase the risk of developing type-2
diabetes.
Food and Beverage Reporter
August 2012
A new assessment published in the British Journal of Nutrition
suggests that 75% of the population in Germany, the UK and the US,
does not meet the dietary intake recommendations of the respective
countries for a number of essential micronutrients. Based on largescale population-based national dietary intake surveys, scientists at
DSM evaluated data using a traffic light system to measure actual
intakes against national recommendations in the UK, Germany, The
Netherlands and the US.
However, it should also be noted that the intake of selenium
varies hugely worldwide. Whilst intakes are high in the USA,
Canada and Japan, they are lower in Europe. The Review found
that studies in different populations with different selenium
status and genetic background have produced divergent results.
Scientists assigned a red light where more than 75% of the
population has an intake status lower than the nationally
recommended level. This was the case with vitamin D intake
in Germany, the UK and the US; vitamin Ein the UK and US;
vitamin B9 (folate) in Germany; and vitamin A in the US. Of the
countries monitored, The Netherlands fared best, with fewer
red lights than Germany, the UK and the US. The scientists
say that the variation between countries is most likely due to
differences in recommendations; levels of fortification; and
changing lifestyles as well as local dietary habits which have
shifted towards fast or convenience foods with a lower density
of vitamins and minerals. Commenting on this traffic light
display, Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, DSM senior vice-preSident for
Nutrition and Science Advocacy, said: “Vitamins playa vital role
in the diet, delivering long term benefits to health, and yet this
research highlights that 100 years after their discovery there are
still major gaps that urgently need closing -to improve people’s
long term health and to drive down healthcare costs.”
http://www.nutraingredients.com/Industry/Vitamins-anddietary-supplements-Too-much-of-a-good-thing-The-sciencewould-suggest-not
“We know inadequate intake of vitamins has an effect on long
term health, especially in terms of nutrition-related diseases,
such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
Sufficient intake will support lowering the risk of these noncommunicable diseases and aid healthy ageing.”
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
71
General vitamins
Vitamins you need at every age
We average less than 1 serving of whole grains a day, which
means important vitamins, like vitamin B6, might be low.
Marginal deficiency symptoms are subtle. For example, low
vitamin B12 leads to memory loss, poor intake of vitamin D
over the years leads to osteoporosis and possibly cancer, MS,
seasonal affective disorder, and more. Low intake of folic acid,
another B vitamin, can contribute to cancer, as well as memory
problems and birth defects.
KATU-TV
20 August 2012
Elizabeth Somer, Registered Dietician and author of Eat Your
Way to Sexy, joined us today to discuss vitamins and answer
all those questions we have about them. The video clip can be
viewed here. http://www.katu.com/amnw/segments/VitaminsYou-Need-At-Every-Age-166567546.html
4. Are their certain vitamins that are particularly important
depending on your age?
1. We’ve only know about vitamins for 100 years, really?
While we all need the 13 vitamins some vitamins seem to be
more important depending on a person’s age. For example,
folic acid is important for women in their 20s. This B vitamin
works its magic in the first weeks after conception, helping
cells to divide properly and preventing birth defects. On the
other hand, the antioxidant vitamins, including C and E are
important in the 30s because this is a time when people’s lives
are so busy it is common for them not to get enough fruits and
vegetables. Vitamins D and B12 are important by the 40s and
beyond because absorption levels begin to drop as we age.
That’s right. Before 1912, the only nutrients known in foods were
carbs, protein, and fat.
2. You don’t hear about scurvy or beri beri anymore, but you say
we still need to be concerned about our vitamin intakes. Why?
Many Americans are marginally deficient in one or more
vitamins. That means they consume enough to prevent the
classic deficiency, but not enough to be optimally nourished.
Marginal deficiencies smolder under the surface and result
in compromised health in a subtle way today and serious
conditions later in life. Osteoporosis is a good example. Get
some, but not enough vitamin D and over the course of a
lifetime, your bones slowly lose calcium until they no longer can
support your weight.
5. So, what do we do to prevent these marginal deficiencies and
make sure we get all the vitamins we need?
First and foremost, eat right! Include at least 6, preferably
9, servings of colorful fruits and veggies in the daily diet, 5
servings of whole grains, 3 servings of vitamin D-rich nonfat
milk products, and a few nutrient-packed servings of legumes or
extra-lean meat, chicken, or fish. But we also know that people
who take supplements are better nourished than people who
don’t.
3. How do you know if you aren’t getting enough?
The irony here is that if you ask people how they think they are
doing diet-wise, most people will tell you they know they don’t
eat perfectly, but feel they do OK. Most are delusional
99 out of 100 people don’t meet even minimum standards of a
balanced diet, according to FDA data, yet 9 out of 10 think they
are doing pretty well
To learn more information, just visit Elizabeth’s website at
http://www.elizabethsomer.com
The average American eats less than three servings of fruit and
vegetables daily (women do slightly better than men in this
category), which means their intakes of vitamins like vitamin C,
E, K, and A are probably marginal.
General vitamins
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100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamins women need most
SheKnows: Are supplements necessary for women?
SheKnows
Elizabeth Somer: Anyone worth their weight in nutrition credentials
will tell you to go to food first. However, the reality is that 99 out of
100 Americans don’t meet even minimum standards of a balanced
diet, FDA data says, let alone optimal. Everyone would benefit from
a moderate-dose multi-vitamin and -mineral supplement to fill in
the gaps on days when you don’t eat perfectly. Vitamin D is needed
in extra amounts often not obtained from diet plus a multi alone.
After that, some people at certain ages may benefit from extra
amounts of certain vitamins. For example, people don’t absorb
vitamin B12 as well as they age or if they are on acid-blocking
medications, so this vitamin may be needed in extra amounts for
those people.
4 September 2012
Differences between the sexes go much deeper than how a
woman or man does laundry, socializes with friends or chooses
a movie. They go as deep as the vitamins working in their
bodies to keep tissues healthy and strong.
All bodies need the right mix of the 13 essential vitamins, but
some are more important than others when it comes to the
sexes. Dietitian and author of Eat Your Way to Sexy Elizabeth
Somer has tips on what vitamins we need most and why.
SheKnows: What vitamins do women need that aren’t so
important for men?
SheKnows: Why all the press about D, the sunshine vitamin, for
health, mood and energy?
Elizabeth Somer: All vitamins are essential, meaning our bodies
can’t make them, so they must be obtained from the diet. That
said, some vitamins are of particular importance for women
-- for example, folic acid, the B vitamin essential to prevent
birth defects like spina bifida. Women need at least 400 mcg a
day, but often don’t get enough. By the time the pregnancy test
comes back positive and they ponder taking a supplement, it
could be too late. Since one in two pregnancies are unplanned,
according to the March of Dimes, it is essential that all women
who are sexually active take a multi that contains folic acid.
Elizabeth Somer: Vitamin E was all over the research and press
a few years ago because of its antioxidant capabilities, now
vitamin D is coming into the limelight. That’s because for years
we thought vitamin D was only important for bone development
and maintenance. Once researchers recognized that every cell
in the body has receptor sites for vitamin D, it became clear
this vitamin was important for much more. I’ve not heard about
“energy” but there is an accumulation of research showing links
with vitamin D, mood, seasonal affective disorder, multiple
sclerosis, certain cancers and muscle strength.
How much liver do you eat?
Eat unprocessed foods 75 percent of the time
SheKnows: Is folic acid difficult to get from food sources?
SheKnows: Is our growing consumption of processed foods one
of the problems in the fight to nourish our bodies properly?
Elizabeth Somer: Folate in food is not as well absorbed as folic
acid in supplements. Also, the main dietary sources of folate
are dark green leafy vegetables, legumes and liver. Since most
women do not get at least two servings of dark greens a day,
seldom eat legumes and almost never eat liver, it is common for
many women to be low in this vitamin.
Elizabeth Somer: Yes! Our bodies evolved over millions of years
designed to eat real food that could be hunted or gathered.
Those foods are rich in vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients,
fiber, protein and other essential nutrients. Man has never
bettered Mother Nature. The more processed a food, the lower
its content of vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and fiber,
and the higher its calories, fat, sugar and/or salt. The fix? Eat
“real” unprocessed foods at least 75 percent of the time ... and
supplement responsibly.
SheKnows: On the other side, what vitamins do men need that
aren’t of as much concern to women?
Elizabeth Somer: Almost everyone is lacking in colorful fruits
and vegetables, but men do worse than women, which means
their diets are often low in vitamins C, E, A and K.
A whole-food diet and supplements for your body’s best health
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
http://www.sheknows.com/health-and-wellness/
articles/970017/vitamins-and-nutrients-women-need-most
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General vitamins
Nutraceuticals what can be achieved today
Nutraceuticals Now
Breaking Down Silos:
Integrating Nutrition For Impact
27 September 2012
Global Health and Diplomacy
Fall 2012
http://www.aspectconsulting.eu/en/?LinkServID=0E04BC15FF82-E7B2-A5983245967B439E
The spotlight, as we head towards the Millennium Development
Goal (MDG) deadline, has been firmly placed on the first 1,000
days of life, which is the critical window of opportunity between
pregnancy and age two. Even by today’s standards, most of the
attention is directed toward treatment rather than prevention
of disease, and the importance of nutrition as a cornerstone for
health and wealth is not sufficiently highlighted. How can this
narrow approach successfully address the pressing problem of
child development, illness and death? How much more could
we accomplish if we could move away from operating in silos?
When I think of silos, I envision the highest elevations in the
corn plains of Iowa. Remarkably, silos rarely exist alone. They
commonly occur at least in pairs or else several in a row and,
interestingly, they are almost all connected in some way. Silos
are hugely important because they are reservoirs for storing
significant produce, grains, or other crops, which are Vital
sources of life for many. Yet, when we use the term ‘silo’ in
today’s world, it generally has a negative connotation. In the
last few years, there has been much talk in the public health
nutrition space about the need to address the “silo effect”,
to “break down silos”, to end the “silo mentality” and to stop
“working in silos”, however, it seems that this is much harder to
do than to talk about. To become fully effective, many sectors
must engage to address the challenges of malnutrition (in its
broadest sense), and no longer function in isolation, with an
inward focus and vertical information and communication.
While there is clear consensus across the technical community
that we must prioritize both reduction of child stunting
[chronic malnutrition] and addressing non-communicable
diseases[NCDs], our continued siloed efforts are keeping us
from achieving what needs to be done. Silos don’t just appear
spontaneously. In his book, Break Out of the Silo Mentality,
Jeffrey Cufaude writes, “They’re created by a mix of mindset,
culture, and process factors that many associations share. The
good news: If you can correct those factors, you can eliminate
silos and keep them from coming back.”
General vitamins
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100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
The challenge of behavior change
pushing ourselves to shift away from the “silo effect” that we are
better at acknowledging than addressing. There is a pervasive
tendency to view conflict as a negative experience that is to be
avoided at all costs.
Behavior change is the hardest of all challenges and it requires
the smartest interventions. So, often, we lament that behavior
change is what makes our work so difficult. How do we get
mothers to move back to breastfeeding? How do we get people
to abandon their sedentary lifestyles and become more active?
How do we mobilize communities to demand nutritious foods?
Now, we have to apply such questioning to ourselves! We all
need to consider the patterns of behavior and, even deeper, the
structures, subconscious beliefs and mental models that may
be helping to perpetuate the continued existence of our silos.
Fortunately, the silos are beginning to break down (we are, in
a sense, seeing our own Behavior change!). In the landmark
2008 Lancet Series on Maternal and Child Undernutrition,
one of the papers in the series, “Effective international action
against undernutrition: why has it proven so difficult and what
can be done to accelerate progress?”, highlighted the fractured
nature of the global nutrition community. In the nearly five years
since the paper was published, significant progress has been
made both in building technical and policy consensus on issues
related to addressing malnutrition, but also in terms of more
effective coordination across sectors.
The very definition of which occurs when, conflict—as
something due to a disagreement, people (or other parties)
perceive a threat to their interests— is enough to make one
fearful. Yet, conflict can be viewed as a way of generating
thinking, for thinking opens the door to innovative solutions.
I, personally, prefer to view conflict as a challenge and catalyst
for positive change. We Should actively seek out people with
different backgrounds, different ways of thinking, different
experiences and different disciplines, and find ways to engage
with them with a view to addressing the challenge.
Real change comes when we are more afraid of the silence
than we are of facing the conflict. It’s time we stopped talking
about the breaking down of silos and the need for dialogue,
and started having the courage to collaborate, as different but
equally necessary stakeholders, amid the conflict we face. Of
course, if it were that easy, it would have been done already.
But as long as we consistently use our best and most innovative
thinking and work together in transformative partnerships, there
is no limit to the impact we can achieve. Ultimately, we owe it to
the millions of children worldwide who deserve the opportunity
to have the very best start in life, through proper nutrition. We
should not settle for anything less.
Moreover, in just the past two years, we have seen a global
movement to catalyze action on an unprecedented Scale. Led
by nearly 30 developing countries that have committed to
improving nutrition, the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement is
an effort backed by more than 100 entities, including civil society
organizations, businesses, governments, UN agencies, and
academia dedicated to improving maternal and child nutrition.
SUN is committed to aligning resources, expertise, and investment
to support the nutrition priorities established by the lead countries.
Why Investing In Nutrition is Important: Copenhagan Consensus 2012
• The Copenhagen Consensus 2012 put fighting chronic
undernutrition in preschoolers, through bundled
micronutrient interventions, as the top priority for policymakers and philanthropists.
• Research shows that even in very poor countries and using
very conservative assumptions, each dollar spent reducing
chronic undernutrition has at least a $30 payoff.
• The International Food Policy Research Institute shows that
for just $100 per child, interventions including micronutrient
provision, complementary foods, treatments for worms and
diarrheal diseases, and behavior change programs, could reduce
chronic under-nutrition by 36 percent in developing countries.
This is a cross-sector effort built on the skills and experience
of the many organizations supporting the movement. Whether
it is in direct nutrition action, such as ensuring access to
micronutrient-rich complementary food or in changing the
factors that impact nutrition such as providing training on
farming practices that can increase crop yield or supporting
strong nutrition policies, all stakeholders have a role to play.
Collaborating in conflict
For more information visit http://www.copenhagenconsensus.
com/Projects/CC12.aspx
While progress has been made, we must step up our efforts
to coordinate for maximum impact. We must continue to seek
new pathways for engagement and coordination—and keep
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
75
General vitamins
Americans and Europeans Don’t Get
Enough Vitamins
protein diet for two years. The researchers, who are from
the Indiana University School of Medicine, found that the
study subjects suffered no harmful effects on variables of
kidney disease — including fluid and electrolyte balance; GFR
(glomerular filtration rate); and albuminuria — compared with
a low-fat diet. This is consistent with other research on highprotein lifestyles.
Muscle & Body
1 October 2012
Vitamin inadequacies are rampant in Europe and the United
States, according to statistics compiled by the European
science-and-research company DSM. The company found
that three-quarters of the population in Germany, the
United Kingdom and the U.S. do not meet the dietary intake
recommendations established by each country for several key
micronutrients.
Tip: The scientists plan on performing more studies, but lowcarb, high-protein diets have not been found to produce any
harmful health effects in normal subjects. M&B recommends
that athletes should ingest 1-2 g of protein per pound of body
weight per day.
DSM says the data indicates the need for a “call to action” for
those in the developed world to address their lack of vitamin
intake. In a statement made to nutraingredients.com, Manfred
Eggersdorfer, PhD, senior vice-president for nutrition and
science advocacy at DSM, said: “We know inadequate intake
of vitamins does have an effect on long-term health, especially
in terms of nutrition-related diseases such as osteoporosis,
cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Sufficient intake will
support lowering the risk of these noncommunicable diseases
and aid healthy aging.”
[Fat-Loss Tip]
Cut Food To Get Cut
College students who ate their food in small pieces ate less
than those who had the same amount of food served to them
but in much larger pieces. The findings come from the Society
for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (sounds like a fun group).
Researchers believe that perceptions of satiety are increased by
the more pieces you eat, no matter their size.
Creatine Fights Depression
An international team of researchers found that women who
suffer from major depression doubled their rate of remission
and speed of recovery by taking 5 g of creatine along with
their daily antidepressant. The research, published in the
American Journal of Psychiatry, discovered that those taking
SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) medications (e.g.,
paxil, prozac, etc.) for depression improved on the Hamilton
Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) at two weeks (32%) and four
weeks (68%) compared to those in the placebo group, who
improved at 3.7% and 29%, respectively. No adverse side
effects were reported in the creatine group.
In research published in the Journal of Applied Physiology,
experts found that adolescents who had higher blood levels of
micronutrients, particularly iron and vitamins, were associated
with health and physical fitness. For muscular fitness, betacarotene and vitamin D were especially important.
Also, a study in Nutritional Neuroscience found that those
serving in the U.S. military were at a higher risk of reduced
cognitive function if their omega-3 levels were low. Said the
researchers: “On the basis of our findings and other research,
educating service members to choose foods high in omega3s and raising the EPA and DHA levels in rations should
be considered for general health promotion and possible
performance optimization.”
Said lead researcher Perry F. Renshaw, MD, “Getting people to
feel better faster is the Holy Grail of treating depression.”
Tip: Micronutrient intake is important on many levels. As
Eggerdorfer stresses, health-care costs are just one of the issues
affected by poor health due to lack of vitamins.
Tip: If you or a loved one suffers from depression, ask the
attending health-care practitioner about adding creatine to your
nutritional regimen.
Low-Carb, High-Protein Diets Do Not Damage Kidneys
http://www.muscleandbodymag.com/news-and-research/
americans-and-europeans-dont-get-enough-vitamins/
That’s the conclusion of a report in the Clinical Journal of the
American Society of Nephrology, which followed a group of
healthy, obese subjects who ate a low-carbohydrate, highGeneral vitamins
76
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
What Should a World of Nine Billion
People Look Like?
Feeding the planet has to be at the top of the priority list; so we
need, for example, to design foods where both the caloric and
the nutritional content is optimised and the bio-availability of
nutrients is as high as possible. In other words, we take as much
of the vitamins, micro-nutrients and other ingredients as we can
from every mouthful we eat. The same kind of zeal for efficiency
has to apply to energy, use of raw materials or water, and so
on. Agriculture will once again become the central activity for
the production of food, energy and materials. We need an
agricultural revolution if we are to ensure enough sustainable
biomass is available and we must maximize the true potential of
plant matter. Thankfully, this process is already underway.
The Huffington Post
15 October 2012
This week we celebrate World Food Day. This is an opportune
moment to address the question - what should a world of
9 billion people look like? This is the single most important
question that we face today. If we address it in the right way,
we can overcome the massive challenges facing the global
population and create a genuinely sustainable future.
According to the UN and other population experts, the number
of people in the world is expected to reach roughly 9 billion
by the year 2050. This means that every month, an extra 6.5
million people are putting ever more demand on the planet’s
resources to meet their health, food and material needs. Under
the assumption that the demographic decline is now spreading
from the established to the emerging economies, the United
Nations Population Fund estimates that the planet’s population
may peak in the late 21st century rather than continue to grow
indefinitely or until it has exhausted available resources. If
this theory is correct, it leads to a clear conclusion: we need to
start constructing a world that works with 9 billion people on
it, especially since up to five billion of our fellow Earth-dwellers
may be middle class (and therefore increasingly resource
hungry). We need a new model, a new framework, a new
approach, design it and take control.
We are pioneering the development of advanced biofuels
which allow us to generate truly renewable energy from the
non edible parts of plants and agricultural residues, including
the stalks, blank cobs, and leaves from corn. In addition to the
sustainability benefits, this development, and the emerging bio
based economy more broadly, will create jobs and transform
rural economies.
We must reduce waste to a minimum. In fact, we need to get
to the point where there is no such thing as waste. Again, this
means bio-refineries must use every single element of biomass
- from starch and sugar to cellulose to lignin - in the most
intelligent and sustainable ways possible to simultaneously
meet our need for energy, materials, and food. The days of
wasting food and casually burning our most precious resource
must come to an end. Being flexible and very strategic in
terms of how we manage our resources will become even
more important. This means, for example, that although
the era of abundant and cheap fossil resources is over, in
certain situations it will still make most sense from a resource
efficiency perspective to generate energy and manufacture
using fossil fuels and traditional chemical routes. The emerging
bio- economy will not, and should not, be a simple like-for-like
replacement for the fossil based economy.
In doing so, it is essential we recognise that if population
growth underpins the great global challenges we face, then
one key driver is fundamental to constructing a solution:
“It’s the resources, stupid!” Therefore, if we are to feed, fuel,
house, clothe, transport and provide a fulfilling future for 9
billion people, we need to do a number of things right: This
means utilising the world’s resources like land, water, biomass,
minerals, fossil energy, or renewables like sun or wind most
efficiently. Everything we do must be as efficient as possible,
maximising the beneficial impact of every type of resource, and
in parallel we have to make a fundamental shift from finite and
rapidly depleting reserves to renewable resources.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
This transformation will require an awful lot of innovation and
an awful lot of science. Luckily, this we have. The capabilities
in industry, but even more so among the partners in academia
around the world with whom we cooperate is significant.
Virtually every fossil-derived product could be manufactured
from biomass, and we are certain we can meet these
challenges by working closely together on this one big goal.
Finally, business has an absolutely vital role to play in this
transformation.
77
General vitamins
Forgotten vitamin would help cut
premature births ‘by 30%
To do so individual companies need to recognise that
sustainability is not a ‘nice to have’ but a ‘need to have’, and
their growth prospects will be determined by their capacity to
fully integrate sustainability into all of their activities.
Food Manucfacture.co.uk
17 October 2012
Now, all this makes the challenge sound very easy. It is not.
The changes required are monumental, and change is never
easy. We firmly believe that we can successfully address these
challenges. But to do so, resource use has to be absolutely
central to our approach, and we have to work towards a shared
vision of what a genuinely sustainable world of 9 billion will
look like.
The number of premature babies born in the UK could be
reduced by as much as 30% if expectant mothers had adequate
intakes of vitamin E.
This is a particular issue in the UK, where 54,000 babies are
born prematurely each year in England alone. Dr Manfred
Eggersdorfer, vice presiden as neural tube defects) by up to 70
per cent. The return on investment from micronutrient provision,
including food fortification, is astounding. According to the
2012 Copenhagen Consensus panel of experts, every $1 spent
providing essential micronutrients to pre-schoolers generates
$30 in benefits.
Just last month, the KNFFA launched the national fortification
logo kuboresha afya (improving health), marking for Kenyan
consumers the range of foods now fortified with vital
micronutrients.
Mineral deficiencies
The logo complements new legislation requiring mandatory
fortification of maize meal, wheat flour and vegetable oils in
Kenya. In partnership with organisations including the Global
Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) and Population Services
International (PSI) and with private sector partners like DSM,
Kenya launched a five-year programme to reach 27 million
people with fortified products.
The effort, which supports Kenya’s Vision 2030 for
development, aims to reduce widespread prevalence of vitamin
and mineral deficiencies, particularly among vulnerable groups
such as children and mothers. Equipment and nutrient blends
will be provided at a subsidised cost to industry along with
training in quality assurance.
In addition, the KNFFA is working to harness the expertise
of this multi-stakeholder group, provide technical expertise
to produce the fortified foods, monitor food quality, create
demand and develop technical guidelines for fortification, to
ensure long-term success and sustainability.
This partnership is a testament to what can be achieved when
General vitamins
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100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
the public and private sectors work together: Governments
create a conducive environment for food fortification,
businesses implement it, and together they communicate the
products and benefits to consumers—and the entire country
benefits from a healthier, more productive society.
Scaling up nutrition with public and
private partnerships
If we are going to improve global health and development,
we need to scale up nutrition. Proven, high-impact, low-cost
interventions like food fortification exist. We need more publicprivate partnerships to implement these interventions.
Kenya continues to shine in addressing malnutrition, a public
health problem that also hinders economic development in
many developing countries. This week, leaders, professionals,
private sector representatives and other partners gathered in
Nairobi for a high-level symposium on Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN).
Africareview.com
9 November 2012
We need more countries like Kenya to join the SUN, to both
share what they have learnt and to learn from other Movement
members. Because we can do far more by working together
than any one of us could do alone.
SUN is a country-led Movement with more than 100
organisations working to increase the effectiveness of existing
programmes by supporting national priorities, encouraging
alignment of resources and fostering broad ownership and
commitment to nutrition. Kenya is one of 31 countries to join
the Movement to date. The SUN event comes on the heels of
the launch of an exciting public-private partnership, expected
to reach 27 million Kenyans with a range of foods fortified with
essential vitamins and minerals (micronutrients).
-Dr Klaus Kraemer is the Director of Sight and Life, a non-profit
humanitarian nutrition think tank of DSM, which cares about the
world’s most vulnerable populations and exists to help improve
their nutritional status.
-Gladys Mugambi is Kenya’s deputy head of the Division of
Nutrition, Food Fortification Project Manager for the Ministry
of Public Health and Sanitation, and Secretary of the Kenya
National Food Fortification Alliance.
Children who are well-nourished—especially in the 1,000
days between pregnancy and the second birthday—grow up
to learn more, earn more and stay healthy. But those who are
malnourished suffer irreversible and life-long damage, including
stunted growth and impaired cognitive development. Based on
this evidence, SUN partners focus on implementing solutions
that improve nutrition, including support for breastfeeding and
ensuring access to essential vitamins and minerals through
supplementation, micronutrient powders and food fortification.
Countries working to scale up nutrition have established targets
tailored to address their own specific challenges and capitalise
on their greatest opportunities for lasting impact.
(Contact: [email protected])
http://www.africareview.com/Opinion/Scaling-up-nutritionwith-public-and-private-partnerships/-/979188/1615852//10uq8ecz/-/index.html
SUN recognises the opportunities to improve health and
development that result when government, civil society, industry
and other partners commit to working together to scale up
nutrition policies, programmes and investment. When the public
and private sectors come together, they can forge particularly
powerful partnerships with far-reaching impacts. In Kenya, 35 per
cent of children under five are stunted and over 10 million people
suffer from poor nutrition and chronic food insecurity.
Lost productivity
Micronutrient deficiencies are widespread, leading to health
problems including blindness, lost productivity, pregnancy
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
79
General vitamins
complications and increased risk of death from diseases like
measles and diarrhoea.
The effort, which supports Kenya’s Vision 2030 for development,
aims to reduce widespread prevalence of vitamin and mineral
deficiencies, particularly among vulnerable groups such as
children and mothers. Equipment and nutrient blends will be
provided at a subsidised cost to industry along with training in
quality assurance.
The Government of Kenya has developed a comprehensive
National Food Security and Nutrition Policy and Strategy
that recognises the need for multi-public and private sector
involvement in addressing malnutrition. They also have a
long history of supporting food fortification. Salt iodisation
(iodine deficiency is the leading cause of preventable mental
retardation) began on a voluntary basis in 1970 and became
mandatory in 1992; it is now a well-established programme.
In addition, the KNFFA is working to harness the expertise
of this multi-stakeholder group, provide technical expertise
to produce the fortified foods, monitor food quality, create
demand and develop technical guidelines for fortification, to
ensure long-term success and sustainability.
In 2005, the Kenya National Food Fortification Alliance
(KNFFA), a public-private partnership, was launched to develop
additional fortification programmes, such as a 2007 project that
made vitamin A-fortified cooking oil available to an estimated
3.6 million Kenyans.
This partnership is a testament to what can be achieved when
the public and private sectors work together: Governments
create a conducive environment for food fortification,
businesses implement it, and together they communicate the
products and benefits to consumers—and the entire country
benefits from a healthier, more productive society.
The fortification of common foods is a proven, cost-effective way
to improve the health and productivity of whole populations. The
fortification of commercially produced staple foods continuously
delivers nutrients to large segments of the population, without
requiring that they change their eating habits.
If we are going to improve global health and development,
we need to scale up nutrition. Proven, high-impact, low-cost
interventions like food fortification exist. We need more publicprivate partnerships to implement these interventions.
The impact is huge. Take the case of fortified flour, now
required by 57 countries. Fortifying flour with folic acid has
reduced cases of brain and spine birth defects (also known
as neural tube defects) by up to 70 per cent. The return on
investment from micronutrient provision, including food
fortification, is astounding. According to the 2012 Copenhagen
Consensus panel of experts, every $1 spent providing essential
micronutrients to pre-schoolers generates $30 in benefits.
We need more countries like Kenya to join the SUN, to both
share what they have learnt and to learn from other Movement
members. Because we can do far more by working together
than any one of us could do alone.
-Dr Klaus Kraemer is the Director of Sight and Life, a non-profit
humanitarian nutrition think tank of DSM, which cares about the
world’s most vulnerable populations and exists to help improve
their nutritional status.
-Gladys Mugambi is Kenya’s deputy head of the Division of
Nutrition, Food Fortification Project Manager for the Ministry
of Public Health and Sanitation, and Secretary of the Kenya
National Food Fortification Alliance.
Just last month, the KNFFA launched the national fortification
logo kuboresha afya (improving health), marking for Kenyan
consumers the range of foods now fortified with vital
micronutrients.
Mineral deficiencies
(Contact: [email protected])
The logo complements new legislation requiring mandatory
fortification of maize meal, wheat flour and vegetable oils in
Kenya. In partnership with organisations including the Global
Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) and Population Services
International (PSI) and with private sector partners like DSM,
Kenya launched a five-year programme to reach 27 million
people with fortified products.
General vitamins
http://www.africareview.com/Opinion/Scaling-up-nutritionwith-public-and-private-partnerships/-/979188/1615852//10uq8ecz/-/index.html
80
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Africa: Development Targets Ride on Vitamins
value of foods that need to be consumed to maintain good
health - most diets of children under-five only consist of corn or
rice or wheat porridge.”
allafrica.com
26 November 2012
Still, there are signs that the trend is changing, largely due to a
renewed push by development practitioners around the world
to tackle the problem.
Brussels — One hundred and ninety million - that’s more than
the populations of Germany, France and Poland combined. It
is also the number of children affected by vitamin A deficiency
around the world. An insufficient intake of this vital nutrient
- found in foods like liver, carrots and kale - can be fatal and
causes blindness in 250,000 to 500,000 children every year.
The Copenhagen Consensus 2012 Expert Panel of top global
economists assessed the most effective ways of allocating funds
to address the world’s toughest challenges, and reported that
“bundled micronutrient interventions” should be the top priority for
investments in global health and development.
One hundred years after Polish scientist Casimir Funk
formulated the concept of vitamins, substantial progress has
been made in promoting awareness that proper nutrition is vital
to health.
One of the participants, Nobel laureate economist Vernon Smith,
explained, “One of the most compelling investments is to get
nutrients to the world’s undernourished. The benefits from doing
so - in terms of increased health, schooling, and productivity - are
tremendous. Indeed, the estimate put forward by the Copenhagen
Consensus is a 17-fold return on every dollar spent.
Yet much remains to be done, especially in the developing
world, to spread awareness that simply solving the problem of
hunger does not necessarily tackle the question of nutrition.
Currently, 7.3 percent of the global health burden is caused by
vitamin and nutrient deficiency.
Achieving the MDGs
Poverty is the leading cause of many vitamin deficiencies,
especially vitamin A. Much of South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa
is affected by severe cases of vitamin A deficiency - since many
diets in this part of the world include only staples. For instance,
rice can represent up to 70 percent of caloric intake in many
Asian countries, while cassava - rich in calories but poor in
nutrients - is the main food source for many Africans. In contrast
to other countries in South Asia, such as Bangladesh and Nepal,
India has been slow to tackle vitamin A deficiency. As a result,
India represents 37 percent of victims, including roughly 80
million children.
Experts argue these benefits should be seen in the light of the
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), targets agreed upon
by all U.N. member states in 2000 to tackle extreme poverty
and improve lives. The most recent U.N. scorecard showed that
hunger and malnutrition rates are still abysmally high.
In particular, sub-Saharan Africa is experiencing very high
levels of hunger - in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo
and Eritrea, over 60 percent of the population was listed as
“undernourished”. The U.N. and national governments provide
vitamin A capsules equivalent to the needs of 390 million of the
540 million children with deficiencies, but a lack of coordinated
action has left millions outside the scope of these efforts.
Dr. Klaus Kraemer of Sight and Life, a Swiss nutrition advocacy
group, laments this lack of focus. “The World Health Organisation
recommends two to three doses of vitamin A per year for children
under the age of five years. This is based on scientific evidence
indicating a mortality reduction of 24 percent.
Now, the private sector has stepped in to fill the breach, providing
supplements and helping to build capacity. DSM - a global leader
in vitamins, with headquarters in the Netherlands - has teamed up
with organisations such as the World Food Programme (WFP), the
World Bank, and the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN),
as well as charities like Vitamin Angels, to provide vital vitamins and
nutrients to poor communities.
“It is tragic that India is lagging behind in implementing this
guideline, resulting in needless child deaths,” he said.
Dr. Shilpa Vinod Bhatte, a medical professional based in
Mumbai, told IPS that the Indian problem is partly due to local
diets: “Hidden hunger and vitamin A deficiency in India is not
just due to poverty but a lack of knowledge about the nutritive
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
DSM provides direct financial support - one million dollars for
rice fortification in 2012 alone - as well as capsules, powders,
technical expertise and logistical resources.
81
General vitamins
Rice Fortification: The ‘Game Changer’ in
Helping Solve Malnutrition and Poverty?
“Vitamin Angels supports more than 100 NGOs in high-risk
Indian states who help us reach close to three million children
under five years at risk of going blind or dying due to vitamin A
deficiency,” explained Bhatte.
Huffpost Lifestyle
27 November 2012
Vitamin Angels, alongside Sight and Life and DSM, also works
in communities across India to engage stakeholders on the
ground, from NGOs and local governments to community
leaders, to formulate long-term goals such as working through
local institutions to set up a sustainable vitamin A distribution
system.
During November, Poverty Week will see over 70 national
broadcasters run a series of films on the theme of “Why
Poverty?” The event is designed to trigger a broader debate
about the causes of poverty and what can and should be done
to counter it. The good news is that we have reached a defining
moment in the fight against poverty: we have begun to realise
the massive contribution that nutrition can make. And this
contribution looks set to be transformed by the “game changer”
in the fight against poverty: fortified rice.
Already, there are tangible results. Private contributions could
push the number of children with access to Vitamin A capsules
to 50 million by the close of 2013. These joint efforts are
currently meeting approximately 17 percent of the unmet global
demand.
Micronutrients and poverty
At least 2 billion people around the world still lack the nutrients
they need to live healthy, active and economically productive
lives, even if they have access to enough calories to survive.
The effects of this ‘hidden hunger’ are rife in the developing
world, where poverty and poor nutrition are a devastating
combination, locking generations into a downward spiral of
stunting, poor health and economic hardship.
Private sector efforts have nudged the European Union
and its member states to spotlight the problem as a crucial
development issue. At a recent conference on development,
the European Commission’s Francesca Mosca explained, “It is
unbearable that so many children are dying from malnutrition.
The time to act is yesterday, not tomorrow.”
When you look at the root cause of the hidden hunger problem,
lack of iron, vitamin A and zinc are most often to blame.
Vitamin A deficiency is, for example, responsible for 1.2 million
children going blind every year: overall, vitamin deficiencies
lead to stunted growth in children, negatively affecting the
development of body and mind.
Mosca rightly pointed out that some efforts have started to bear
fruit, based on a successful public-private partnership model.
“We have been extremely involved in the Scaling Up Nutrition
(SUN) movement”, a country-led initiative launched in 2010 to
increase the efficacy of existing programmes. “I think it was the
first time that all the actors came together: private sector, public
sector, donors and partner countries.”
As the Copenhagen Consensus 2012 Expert Panel of top global
economists has consistently argued, the single best investment
that can be made in terms of global health and development
are ‘bundled micronutrient interventions’. The thinking is quite
straightforward: the better people’s nutrition; the healthier
and more productive they are, and the less strain there is on
healthcare systems. The estimate is a 17-fold return on every
dollar spent.
Paulus Verschuren, the Dutch Government’s Special Envoy on
food and nutrition security for development, speaking at the
same event, stressed, “The (period) of a child’s life during which
we can intervene is very short. Children’s futures depend on
nutrition... it’s really a moment that we can’t afford to miss.”
Nutrition plays a role in achieving almost every MDG - its
impact on child health, for instance, could also boost the
number of children attending school, promote gender equality
by empowering women to take a more active role in their
children’s health, and also improve maternal health, thereby
reducing the maternal mortality ratio.
Partnerships: the key to progress
Over the past few years, we have seen a fundamental shift in
the recognition of the importance of nutrition to health and
poverty. We have seen a number of major and complementary
initiatives all focused on harnessing the power of nutrition,
including the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), the
United Nation’s Scale-Up-Nutrition (SUN) Framework, and new
http://allafrica.com/stories/201211270157.hctml
General vitamins
82
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
public private partnerships (PPP), like the one of my company
with the United Nation’s World Food Programme or PPP
projects like Project Laser Beam, or the Amsterdam Initiative on
Malnutrition.
resources of public bodies, NGOs and the private sector, and
it is about creating an effective, sustainable approach to rice
fortification, backed up by the right supply chains and longer
term, market-based solutions.
Real progress has been made, and central to this has been
the willingness of the development community to draw on the
private sector’s expertise and technology. My company has
worked very closely with the World Food Programme (WFP),
developing nutrition products that are tailored to the needs
of particular population groups, and helping WFP to further
develop their nutrition strategy. To date, 12 million people have
benefited from this partnership, but what is really exciting is that
this is just the beginning. We are now working to dramatically
scale to ultimately cover hundreds, rather than tens of millions
of people.
Fortified rice - the game changer
I’ve spent a lot of time travelling in Africa and Asia - so I
know just how essential rice is to the diets of hundreds of
millions of people in the developing world. As the world’s
most important staple, rice is eaten by 2 billion people
virtually every day, making up 20% of the planet’s caloric
intake. In the main rice consuming regions, that figure is much
higher - up to 70%. However, rice in its basic form consists
essentially of carbohydrates, delivering calories, but not the
major micronutrients that are essential for good health. It is no
surprise therefore that a large number of these regions also
suffer from ‘hidden hunger’. However, if we can find a way to
fortify the rice eaten around the world to ensure it contains the
necessary vitamins and minerals, this could be a game-changer
in terms of health care and poverty.
The good news, and a real cause for optimism, is that the WFP
is currently working on a strategic approach to rice fortification,
which my company is supporting as a partner. Earlier this
year, DSM dedicated USD 1 million to World Food Programme
nutrition activities in Asia. The USD 1 million, which will support
rice fortification policy and programme development, will also
include an in-kind donation of fortified rice, containing essential
micronutrients which can be mixed in with regular rice, with no
change to taste or color. But this is just the beginning - far more
can and will be done to turn rice into a solution for malnutrition
in the developing world.
The answer to the question is therefore a clear yes; it can
be done. We have the opportunity to turn the world’s staple
food into a “game changer” to help solve malnutrition and as
a consequence poor health and poverty. It’s a very exciting
opportunity, and one that we must seize.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/stephan-b-tanda/ricefortification-the-ga_b_2196393.html
Can it be done?
Speaking from the industry perspective, fortification of rice is
not straightforward. In order to work, it is essential that the
micronutrients are retained after the rice is washed and cooked,
without affecting taste. This takes advanced technology, but it
can be done.
There are also costs involved in fortification, but these are
very modest - the additional cost of fortification for rice is
around 2-5% of the current price. This cost is far outweighed by
increased productivity and reduced healthcare costs.
The key to realising the massive potential of rice fortification
from my perspective is not, however, technology or resources:
it is the need to bring together the expertise, knowledge and
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
83
General vitamins
Development Targets Ride on Vitamins
“It is tragic that India is lagging behind in implementing this
guideline, resulting in needless child deaths,” he said. Dr.
Shilpa Vinod Bhatte, a medical professional based in Mumbai,
told IPS that the Indian problem is partly due to local diets:
“Hidden hunger and vitamin A deficiency in India is not just due
to poverty but a lack of knowledge about the nutritive value
of foods that need to be consumed to maintain good health –
most diets of children under-five only consist of corn or rice or
wheat porridge.”
Interpress service
27 November 2012
Children living on Sri Lanka’s tea estates are among the
country’s most malnourished. Credit: Amantha Perera/IPS
BRUSSELS, Nov 26 2012 (IPS) - One hundred and ninety million
– that’s more than the populations of Germany, France and
Poland combined. It is also the number of children affected by
vitamin A deficiency around the world.
Still, there are signs that the trend is changing, largely due to a
renewed push by development practitioners around the world
to tackle the problem.
An insufficient intake of this vital nutrient – found in foods like
liver, carrots and kale – can be fatal and causes blindness in
250,000 to 500,000 children every year.
The Copenhagen Consensus 2012 Expert Panel of top global
economists assessed the most effective ways of allocating
funds to address the world’s toughest challenges, and reported
that “bundled micronutrient interventions” should be the top
priority for investments in global health and development.
One of the participants, Nobel laureate economist Vernon
Smith, explained, “One of the most compelling investments is
to get nutrients to the world’s undernourished. The benefits
from doing so – in terms of increased health, schooling, and
productivity – are tremendous.”
One hundred years after Polish scientist Casimir Funk formulated
the concept of vitamins, substantial progress has been made in
promoting awareness that proper nutrition is vital to health.
Yet much remains to be done, especially in the developing
world, to spread awareness that simply solving the problem of
hunger does not necessarily tackle the question of nutrition.
Currently, 7.3 percent of the global health burden is caused by
vitamin and nutrient deficiency.
Indeed, the estimate put forward by the Copenhagen Consensus
is a 17-fold return on every dollar spent.
Poverty is the leading cause of many vitamin deficiencies,
especially vitamin A. Much of South Asia and sub-Saharan
Africa is affected by severe cases of vitamin A deficiency – since
many diets in this part of the world include only staples. For
instance, rice can represent up to 70 percent of caloric intake
in many Asian countries, while cassava – rich in calories but
poor in nutrients – is the main food source for many Africans. In
contrast to other countries in South Asia, such as Bangladesh
and Nepal, India has been slow to tackle vitamin A deficiency.
As a result, India represents 37 percent of victims, including
roughly 80 million children.
Achieving the MDGs
Experts argue these benefits should be seen in the light of the
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), targets agreed upon
by all U.N. member states in 2000 to tackle extreme poverty
and improve lives. The most recent U.N. scorecard showed that
hunger and malnutrition rates are still abysmally high.
In particular, sub-Saharan Africa is experiencing very high levels
of hunger – in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo
and Eritrea, over 60 percent of the population was listed as
“undernourished”. The U.N. and national governments provide
vitamin A capsules equivalent to the needs of 390 million of the
540 million children with deficiencies, but a lack of coordinated
action has left millions outside the scope of these efforts.
Dr. Klaus Kraemer of Sight and Life, a Swiss nutrition advocacy
group, laments this lack of focus. “The World Health Organisation
recommends two to three doses of vitamin A per year for children
under the age of five years. This is based on scientific evidence
indicating a mortality reduction of 24 percent.
Now, the private sector has stepped in to fill the breach,
providing supplements and helping to build capacity.
General vitamins
84
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Paulus Verschuren, the Dutch Government’s Special Envoy on
food and nutrition security for development, speaking at the
same event, stressed, “The (period) of a child’s life during which
we can intervene is very short. Children’s futures depend on
nutrition… it’s really a moment that we can’t afford to miss.”
Nutrition plays a role in achieving almost every MDG – its
impact on child health, for instance, could also boost the
number of children attending school, promote gender equality
by empowering women to take a more active role in their
children’s health, and also improve maternal health, thereby
reducing the maternal mortality ratio.
DSM – a global leader in vitamins, with headquarters in the
Netherlands – has teamed up with organisations such as the
World Food Programme (WFP), the World Bank, and the Global
Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), as well as charities like
Vitamin Angels, to provide vital vitamins and nutrients to
poor communities.
Renu Devi, of Bagwanpur Rati village in India’s Bihar state, with her
children who take the Vitamin A doses. Credit: Sujoy Dhar/IPS
DSM provides direct financial support – one million dollars for
rice fortification in 2012 alone – as well as capsules, powders,
technical expertise and logistical resources.
http://www.ipsnews.net/2012/11/development-targets-ride-onvitamins/
“Vitamin Angels supports more than 100 NGOs in high-risk
Indian states who help us reach close to three million children
under five years at risk of going blind or dying due to vitamin A
deficiency,” explained Bhatte.
Vitamin Angels, alongside Sight and Life and DSM, also works
in communities across India to engage stakeholders on the
ground, from NGOs and local governments to community leaders,
to formulate long-term goals such as working through local
institutions to set up a sustainable vitamin A distribution system.
Already, there are tangible results. Private contributions could
push the number of children with access to Vitamin A capsules
to 50 million by the close of 2013. These joint efforts are currently
meeting approximately 17 percent of the unmet global demand.
Private sector efforts have nudged the European Union
and its member states to spotlight the problem as a crucial
development issue. At a recent conference on development,
the European Commission’s Francesca Mosca explained, “It is
unbearable that so many children are dying from malnutrition.
The time to act is yesterday, not tomorrow.”
Mosca rightly pointed out that some efforts have started to bear
fruit, based on a successful public-private partnership model.
“We have been extremely involved in the Scaling Up Nutrition
(SUN) movement”, a country-led initiative launched in 2010 to
increase the efficacy of existing programmes. “I think it was the
first time that all the actors came together: private sector, public
sector, donors and partner countries.”
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
85
General vitamins
Looking forward: The emerging evidence
for vitamins and health
In addition supplementation has been backed to help boost the
recovery of critically ill children , and improve the development
of the baby brain and motor skills , in addition to increasing life
expectancy by battling diabetes and heart disease.
Nutraingredients.com
28 November 2012
Cancer risk
A host of essential vitamins have been suggested to play a role
in cancer risk reduction and helping to slow tumour growth,
including vitamins A, B, D, and E,
In the last 100 years vitamins have been found to play vital
roles in our health and wellbeing, but the full benefits of many
vitamins is yet to be elucidated. In this special edition article
NutraIngredients looks at some of the areas of vitamin research
that are showing promise for the future.
Vitamin A is known to play a key role in regulating cell growth
and division, which has led to many suggesting the potential of
vitamin A in battling cancers. For example research published
in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology suggests that
supplementation with vitamin A in the form of retinol could offer
protection against skin cancer such as melanoma by up to 40%
in women.
While many of the links between vitamin consumption and health
are relatively well established, there are many other areas that
show great promise but have so far produced mixed results.
From the potential for vitamin K to reduce the risk of developing
diabetes , or the suggestions that vitamin C is needed to help
baby brain development , right through to the long suggested
but not yet established links between vitamin D levels and the
risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) – there is a wealth of research
activity focusing on how vitamins function and how they may be
implicated in human health. All eyes are on this new research
for development and growth in vitamins for the next 100 years.
Meanwhile supplementation with vitamin E could help to
prevent cancer in patients with an under-recognized genetic
disorder known as Cowden Syndrome (CS), and may also have
benefits for liver cancer . Vitamin D has been suggested to
play a role the prevention of certain cancers – including colon
cancer and pancreatic cancer – on many occasions, with recent
research from Japan linking the sunshine vitamin to a 40%
lower risk of colorectal cancer .
Vitamin D
Often referred to as ‘the sunshine vitamin’ because of the
body’s ability to produce it from sunlight, the fat soluble vitamin
has a well-established role in maintaining calcium levels in the
body and in building strong bones.
Emerging areas
Supplements of vitamins C and E may benefit women taking oral
contraceptives by protect against the increase in markers of
oxidative stress in those taking oral contraceptives. Researchers
from Scotland, UK, have also suggested that vitamin E fortified
foods could help in fight against childhood asthma . The team
based at the University of Aberdeen recently launched a new
study to test whether a vitamin E rich diet for mothers can help
to modify the risk of childhood asthma.
However the vitamin has been linked to a huge range of
health benefits, including the development of MS , and
modifications to the immune system that could help people
with tuberculosis (TB)
Because many cells in the body use vitamin D to help regulate
critical cellular functions, deficiency has been suggested to lead
to several chronic health problems and diseases, including a
weakened immune system, mobility limitations and disability
for older people ,increased risk of diabetes , and an increased
possibility of developing cancers.
Vitamin E has also been suggested to reduce the risk of motor
neurone diseases , with long-term use of supplements linked to
a lower risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by
researchers analysing data from over one million people.
Meanwhile researchers have suggested that women who
experience painful menstrual cramps could find relief from highdose supplementation with vitamin D.
General vitamins
86
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Harnessing the power of vitamins to
prevent wellness
vitamin B6. A simple multivitamin and mineral tablet before
you become pregnant can supply these needs.”
foodbev.com
Moving away from the vitamin arena, he also had a very useful
measure when it comes to food portions: “Use your hand to size
portions so it adapts to your body scale, whether you’re a child
or an adult. Two handfuls of vegetables to one of meat (or any
protein) is the best ratio.”
3 December 2012
I attended an international conference on ‘100 Years in
Vitamins’ in Basel last week.
Sponsored by DSM, it involved speakers from all over the
globe and revealed a number of facts about our vitamin
impoverished diets and the power of vitamins to prevent illness
and ageing, cognitive development and immune deficiencies.A
black-tie dinner held in the Tinguely Museum the night before
the conference celebrated the work of Jean Tinguely and his
sculptural machines. Somewhat Heath Robinson in appearance
and built on a grand scale, these moving monoliths underline
the supremely balanced interaction of our physical make-up
and how, without vital components, our bodily machines can
falter and fail.
The last speaker, lecturer Jeff Blumberg of Tufts University,
ran through some of the most obvious benefits of the various
vitamins saying how many can “delay the onset of frailty”.
Others have particular optimal effects and can reduce colon
cancer and the potential to suffer from Alzheimer’s disease.
Did you know that:
• Vitamin A reduces risk of melanoma.
• Vitamin D protects neonatal brain development.
• Vitamin E reduces the risk of liver cancer.
• Vitamin K1 reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes.
Here are the top comments I gleaned from this presentationpacked day:
Finally, he quoted Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “Willing is not
enough. We must do.”
• DSM’s Manfred Eggersdorfer said: “A few years ago, we
started talking about personalised nutrition, but we soon
realised that we were 20 years too early. Nutrition cannot
be reduced to individual vitamins. A great deal of research
is already taking place. Nestlé for instance has six million
children on vitamin programmes all over the world.”
• Dr Jim Kaput of the Nestlé Institute of Science & Health talked
about some of the progress made so far in pinpointing
genetic diversity. “We can put you within 400 metres of where
your grandparents were born with 95% accuracy. If a species
does not adapt to its environment for food, then it will either
die or move.”
• Heike Bischoff-Ferarri, visiting scientist at the Bone
Metabolism Laboratory, Tufts University, spoke on how one
of the most serious worldwide vitamin deficiencies – that
of vitamin D – has been the subject of a study into muscle
control and falling: “We could prevent every third hip
fracture,” she explained, “and reduce the chance of falling
by 30% at age 65 and 50% at age 80. By using sunscreen
on ourselves and our children, we are putting ourselves at
greater risk.”
• Professor Ibrahim Elmadfa talked about the importance of
vitamin intake during the first 1,000 days of a child’s life: “A
deficiency in vitamin A leads to an increase in respiratory tract
infection. Folic acid (iron) is also critical to optimal health and
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
From a healthy scepticism that a balanced diet is enough, I’m
off to buy some multivitamin tablets.
http://www.foodbev.com/opinion/harnessing-the-power-ofvitamins-to-prev
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General vitamins
Vitamine: Die beste Dosis für die Gesundheit
/ Zukunftsvision der Vitaminforschung
ist die perfekt ausgewogene individuelle
Versorgung mit Vitaminen für einen optimal
funktionierenden Körper
Blumberg zeichnete ferner ein Szenario für die Zukunft
der Vitaminforschung, in dem genetische Untersuchungen
(“Genomics”) immer weiter verfeinert und genutzt werden
sollen, um für jeden Menschen entsprechend seines
genetischen Profils und der Eigenschaften seines Stoffwechsels
die optimalen Zufuhrmengen für die einzelnen Vitamine
definieren zu können.
Bloomberg
4 December 2012
Quelle:
Bloomberg, Jeffrey B. Vitamins: Preparing for the future. Vortrag
auf dem Symposium “100 Years of Vitamins - Past, present,
future: Micronutrients - Macro Impact”, 30. November 2012,
Universität Basel
Friedrichsdorf (Taunus) (ots) - Dass eine Unterversorgung mit
einzelnen Vitaminen oft unbemerkt zu Funktionsstörungen
im Organismus und langfristig gar zu Erkrankungen führen
kann, ist bekannt. In Zukunft sollen gezielte Vitamineinnahmen
nicht nur dem Ausgleich einer Unterversorgung und
somit der Vorbeugung vor Krankheiten dienen, sondern
maßgeschneidert Körperfunktionen optimieren. Dafür hat
jüngst der amerikanische Antioxidantienforscher Prof. Jeffrey
Blumberg von der Tufts University in Boston anlässlich des
Symposiums “100 Jahre Vitamine” am 30. November 2012 an
der Universität im schweizerischen Basel plädiert. Dabei wird
es darauf ankommen, genauer zu definieren, in welcher Dosis
die Vitamine am besten wirken und inwieweit individuelle
Unterschiede im Organismus dabei eine Rolle spielen.
Außerdem erklärte Blumberg, warum für die Erforschung
der Wirksamkeit von Vitaminen so genannte Plazebokontrollierte Studien - der Goldstandard für Arzneimitteltests
- letztlich nur eingeschränkt geeignet seien. Denn während
Arzneimittelwirkungen in diesen Studien mit einer dem
getesteten Arzneistoff nicht ausgesetzten (Plazebo-)Gruppe
abgeglichen werden, seien Nährstoffuntersuchungen mit
einer Vergleichsgruppe ohne jegliche Nährstoffzufuhr nicht
möglich bzw. wären unethisch. Zudem würden zahlreiche
Studien mit Probanden durchgeführt, die bereits bestens mit
Vitaminen versorgt seien, so dass es nicht verwunderlich sei,
dass zusätzliche Vitamingaben keine weiteren messbaren
Effekte zeigen würden. Außerdem sollen Medikamente in
diesen Studien innerhalb relativ kurzer Zeit bei der Behandlung
bestehender Erkrankungen Wirkung zeigen, während der
Nachweis, dass Vitamine der Entstehung von Krankheit
vorbeugen können, hingegen Jahrzehnte benötigen kann. Bei
Nährstoffen laute die Frage nicht, ob sie wirken, sondern wie
viel für eine optimale Wirkung nötig ist.
General vitamins
88
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
Vitamins: The best dose for health
The future vision of vitamin research is a
perfectly balanced individual vitamin intake
for an optimally functioning body.
Blumberg also sketched out a scenario for the future of vitamin
research in which genetic studies (“genomics”) would be
continually refined and applied to pinpoint the optimal intake of
each vitamin for each individual based on their genetic profile
and the characteristics of their metabolism.
Bloomberg
Source: Blumberg, Jeffrey B. Vitamins: Preparing for the future.
Talk at the “100 Years of Vitamins – Past, present, future:
Micronutrients – Macro Impact” symposium, November 30,
2012, University of Basel
4 December 2012
That an insufficient intake of individual vitamins can often go
unnoticed and lead to malfunctions in the body – or even to
long-term illness – is already known. In the future, targeted
vitamin intake should not only serve to compensate for a
deficiency and thus prevent diseases, but should also serve to
optimize bodily functions on an individual basis. This was the
case recently argued by the American antioxidants researcher
Professor Jeffrey Blumberg of Tufts University in Boston at the
“100 Years of Vitamins” symposium, held at the University of
Basel in Switzerland on November 30, 2012. He noted that to
achieve this, it would be important to better define the doses at
which vitamins operate best and to what extent differences in
individuals’ bodies play a role.
Blumberg also explained why so-called placebo-controlled
trials – the gold standard for drug testing – ultimately only
have limited applicability when studying vitamins’ efficacy.
He asserted that, while drug effects are being compared to a
(placebo) group that has not been in contact with the drug on
trial in those studies, nutritional studies with a control group
that has no nutrient intake would be impossible, i.e. unethical.
In addition, numerous studies have been conducted with
subjects who were already well supplied with vitamins, so it
is not surprising that additional vitamin supplements showed
no further measurable effects. Moreover, the drugs in these
studies are intended to produce effects in a relatively short time
when being used to treat existing diseases, whereas evidence
that vitamins prevent the onset of diseases can take decades
to collect. Where nutrients are concerned, the question is not
whether they are effective, but how much of them are necessary
for optimal performance.
100 Years of Vitamins | Media clippings
89
General vitamins
Health & Wellnes - The industry view: Dr.
Manfred Eggersdorf, DSM Senior VP,
Nutrition and Science Advocacy
One of the largest food companies has just launched a nutrition
institute and is assessing aging research. The focus here is really
about vitamins, as companies realize that vitamins are essential
and can provide information about them for the customers, due
to the Regulation.
foodingredientsfirst.com
4 December 2012
You are marking 100 years since vitamins were defined.
What have been key milestones in benefiting people’s
nutrition around the globe?
2012 marked the 100 year anniversary of vi¬tamins. Although
diets have improved overall during this time, recent research
highlights that population-wide vitamin intake inadequacies
still exist even in the West¬ern World where plenty of food is
available. For example, an assess¬ment published in the British
Journal of Nutri¬tion this year suggests that three quarters of the
population in Germany, the UK, and the US, does not meet the
dietary intake recommendations of the respective countries for
a number of essential micronutrients, including vitamin D.
In 1890, the thinking was still largely that the macronutrients of
protein, carbohydrates and fat were what you need for life. This
changed in the years to follow and in 1934, the first commercial
production of vitamin C started. Step by step, the other vitamins
followed in the ensuing years. Nowadays, vitamins from
industrial production are available and they are used in animal
as well as in human nutrition. In the past 100 years, I believe
we have seen the eradication of certain nutritional deficiency
diseases. You can look at the impact of vitamin B1 deficiency
in Asia and the thousands that died as a result and you can
also think about vitamin C deficiency and the impact that that
had on life. A great milestone was the fortification with folic
acid in the 1990s, as a result of discovering the risk in folic
acid deficiency and neural tube defects in babies. A number
of countries immediately started mandatory fortification. This
generated a storm around the world. Even though there were
just 60 countries with mandatory fortification, a lot of countries
have recommendations in place. Now we have a greater
understanding of the relationship between nutrients for long
term health and for healthy aging. The EU has a strategy to add
two healthy life years to EU citizens by 2020. The key will be
educating them about healthy lifestyles and improving diets. I
now see a renaissance in vitamin research in the last decade.
This started with the access to the hu¬man genome. We now
understand the interaction of vitamins at a genetic level and a
number of insights are now available. Scientists say that people
with a certain genetic setup need more vitamin D and vitamin
A because they cannot metabolize it well and therefore require
supplementation.
DSM has been campaigning for increased fortification with
vitamin D for some time, includingg through research work in
partnership with the International Osteoporosis Foundation.
Now the company will focus more of its efforts on assessing
vitamin E deficiency. DSM commissioned a recent YouGov poll
which showed most Britons were not aware of the benefits of
antioxidants more generally and vitamin E in particular. Vitamin
E can have a substantial impact in reducing pre-term births:
according to a recent study, vitamin E treatment can bring a
reduction of nearly 30% in pre-term births – a particular issue
on the UK, where 54,000 babies are born pre¬maturely in
England alone. We spoke to Dr. Manfred Eggersdorfer, DSM
Senior Vice-President for Nutrition and Science Advocacy about
the century of vitamins and the potential in the new EU health
claims environment.
There have been so many Article 13 claims rejected by
EFSA in general, but vitamins performed well. Has this led
to a shift in marketing?
Yes. Right now you have around 220 claims approved; more
than 80% of which are for vitamins. In addition, there are claims
for things like PUFAs and minerals, so micronutrients did very
well with regards to EFSA. I expect that for consumer companies
this will be a differentiating factor; that they can really use the
health claim and what is connected to the product. I do see
good chances for our products, as they maintain a high quality
and we provide infor¬mation that our customers require around
the products in terms of stability, bioavailability etc.
90
You speak a lot about the financial potential of nutritional
intervention programs (e.g. vitamin D in Europe). But
what is the actual cost of fortifying in both developed and
developing countries?
So is there a role for traditional vitamins to be customized
within the personalized nutrition approach and aimed at
particular target groups?
Developments are definitely going in that direction and I see
things moving forward in the following way. There will be tools
available which measure the status on a vitamin/micronutrient
level in general and then people can select foods which are rich
in those micro¬nutrients and others in which they are lower. It
is then a choice for the individual to take foods/supplements
in order to compensate for a lower vitamin/mineral status. We
now have tools available for measuring vitamin D and we have
a meeting with a company which allows you to gain feedback
on your micronutrient status via your mobile phone, together
with recommendations. I do see that people will take far more
care in the future than they do today, as one of the findings
nowadays.
In the case of taking vitamin D supplements, you can buy
portions for one person, for a year in the range of €20-30, which
is low, when compared to the impact of having a fracture or the
higher risk of diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. In the case
of vitamin A and B vitamins, you would not believe how low the
cost of fortification is! For just €1-2 per person, per year you can
provide the key vitamins in these countries. The Copenhagen
Consensus recently reported that there is no greater payback
than the advantages that come with food fortification.
by Robin Wyers
What would you like to see 20 years down the line from
now in terms of fortification advances?
Looking forward and considering the speed that we have in
science and also on all the efforts taking place to address
malnutrition in developing countries, my dream is that in 20
years from now people all over the world will get the right diet,
with the right micronutrients. I believe that this is achievable.
An essential part of being successful in this is public/private
partnerships, so to jointly make it happen. And we need the
industrial production of the vitamins. It cannot be done by
just providing the food. When you look at the development of
the global population, we have growing mega-cities of over 5
million inhabitants; so access to fresh food will not always be
pos¬sible. There is a trend towards processed food. So we
need foods which are fortified with micronutrients and I strongly
believe that closing this gap will be possible in the next 20 years.
91
Interview with Dr. Klaus Kraemer on Tackling
Malnutrition and Micronutrient Deficiencies
micronutrients to preschoolers as the single smartest way to
allocate global aid dollars, with every $1 spent generating $30
in benefits—an astounding return on investment. Investing
in nutrition can also raise a country’s GDP by at least 2 – 3
percent. When children are properly nourished, they can
grow up to be healthy and productive, helping to lift their
communities—and their countries—out of poverty. The link
is clear, and so tackling malnutrition and micronutrient
deficiencies has to become a global focus if we are to address
poverty.
Globalfoodforthought
12 December 2012
Klaus Kraemer, Ph.D. is the Director of Sight and Life, a nonprofit humanitarian nutrition think tank of DSM, which cares
about the world’s most vulnerable populations and exists to
help improve their nutritional status. Acting as their advocates,
Sight and Life guides original nutrition research, disseminates
its findings and facilitates dialogue to bring about positive
change. Sight and Life is currently celebrating their 100 Years of
Vitamins campaign.
What are some concrete examples of nutritional
intervention programs that saved lives and reduced
malnutrition?
You have recently launched a campaign to celebrate 100
Years of Vitamins. How has our knowledge of vitamins and our
approach to promoting nutrition changed in the past century?
A great example is vitamin A supplementation programs, now
implemented in 103 countries. Vitamin A deficiency affects
an estimated 190 million preschool children worldwide; onequarter to half a million of these children become blind each
year—and half of those die within 12 months of losing their
sight. We’ve made tremendous progress addressing these
cases of preventable blindness and death through twice-yearly
distribution of vitamin A supplements to children under five. In
1999, only 16 percent of children were receiving the necessary
doses of vitamin A; by 2007, that figure had more than
quadrupled to 72 percent. Today, in some countries, 100 percent
coverage has been achieved. These vitamin A supplementation
programs have reduced under-five child deaths by 25 percent.
Before the discovery of vitamins and their naming 100 years
ago, people thought all food offered the same sustenance—that
a pound of potatoes was the same as a pound of apples. Now
we know that is not the case, and that there are 13 different
vitamins essential for good health at every stage of the human
lifecycle. Our bodies need these vitamins to grow, function,
stay healthy and fight disease. Sadly, today one billion people
suffer from hunger and do not get enough food, and at least
two billion experience “hidden hunger”—they might get
enough calories, but they do not get enough of the vitamins
and minerals (micronutrients) their bodies need. The signs of
vitamin deficiencies are not always visible (hence the name,
“hidden hunger”); they include birth defects, anemia, blindness,
impaired physical and mental growth, maternal and child
death, brittle bones and increased susceptibility to disease.
These affect not only health but an individual’s future potential.
Vitamin deficiencies commonly occur when populations cannot
afford or do not have access to enough diverse nutritious
foods (such as meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, fruit and
vegetables). As we connect the dots between optimal nutrition
and health, our approach has shifted to promote a world where
everyone not only has enough food, but enough of the right
foods and sufficient essential vitamins—whether through diet,
supplementation or fortification.
Food fortification is another low-cost, high-impact intervention
that is improving nutrition and saving lives. Food fortification
is the addition of essential micronutrients to the staple foods
people normally eat (such as rice, wheat and maize flour,
sugar, salt and cooking oil); the practice delivers vital missing
nutrients to whole populations without requiring them to
change their eating habits. Iodized salt is now found in 70
percent of developing-world households—up from 20 percent
in 1990—preventing mental retardation and giving millions a
better future. Folic acid fortification of flour is now required by
57 countries, reducing cases of brain and spine birth defects by
up to 70 percent. These are amazing initiatives making a real
difference in people’s lives, but now we need to scale these
up and continue to develop innovative ways of improving the
health and outcomes of the most vulnerable.
Why is it so important to tackle micronutrient deficiencies
to reduce global poverty?
What has been the impact of the Scaling Up Nutrition
(SUN) Movement in raising awareness of the prevalence of
this “hidden hunger”?
Micronutrient deficiencies prevent children from reaching their
full potential as adults; malnutrition, especially during the 1,000
days between pregnancy and a child’s second birthday, can
lead to irreversible physical stunting and cognitive impairment.
But children who are well nourished are able to grow, learn
and prosper. They achieve more in school, are better able to
survive illnesses and tend to earn more as adults. The 2012
Copenhagen Consensus panel of experts ranked providing
The impact of SUN—a country-led Movement with more
than 100 organizations and entities working to increase the
effectiveness of existing programs by supporting national
priorities, encouraging alignment of resources and fostering
broad ownership and commitment to nutrition—has been
that 31 countries to date have committed to address hidden
92
hunger by scaling up nutrition programs and policies. These
countries are home to more than 50 million children who
have not reached the desired height for their age (who are
stunted)—more than one quarter of all stunted children in the
world. Stunting is an indicator of chronic malnutrition. With an
emphasis on the 1,000 day window of opportunity between the
start of pregnancy and a child’s second birthday, SUN countries
and partners focus on implementing solutions that directly
improve nutrition—such as support for exclusive breastfeeding
for the first six months of life and continued breastfeeding
until at least two years of age; and ensuring access to essential
vitamins and minerals through a variety of interventions
including supplementation, fortification and increasing dietary
diversity—as well as efforts that have a broader influence on
nutrition, such as empowering women, improving farming
practices to increase the availability of nutrient-rich crops and
improving access to health services.
Food security and nutrition are closely related. What actions
are needed to increase the chances of the pathways linking
agriculture and nutrition?
Angels, a leading independent humanitarian organization
dedicated to combating malnutrition by connecting at-risk
populations in need with essential micronutrients. By partnering
with Vitamin Angels, Sight and Life strengthens local supply
and distribution capacity of vitamin A, mobilizes communities
and governments to recognize and address vitamin A deficiency
and fosters the creation of vital public-private partnerships to
combat vitamin A deficiency, improving the lives of millions
of children and women. Over the years, we have widened our
focus to include other essential micronutrients as well as the
eradication of hidden hunger as major areas of our work. With
our new focus on a multiple micronutrient approach, Sight and
Life’s activities now include a range of activities and innovations
including in-home fortification programs. These provide
micronutrient powder mixtures packaged individually in singledose sachets.
They can be added to meals in appropriate amounts during
food preparation at home or at school, and fill the micronutrient
gap of those most vulnerable to vitamin deficiencies. Sight
and Life, as a non-profit nutrition think tank, has a triple focus:
promoting research, sharing best practices and mobilizing
support in order to improve the lives of the world’s people.
In the past there has been a tendency to only talk about the
need for food security, but we now know that food security
without nutrition security will do little to improve lives—the
two have to go hand in hand. It is crucial that we break down
the silos we have traditionally worked within. Nutritionists,
agriculturists, public health workers, financiers and businesses
need to come together to develop and implement innovative
solutions and business models to reach all people—poor and
rich, urban and rural—with affordable nutritious foods. Some
examples of success include the promotion of orange-fleshed
sweet potatoes (rich in vitamin A), fortification of staple foods
with missing vitamins and minerals, and specialty products and
delivery models for the most vulnerable.
http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-foodfor-thought/2012/12/interview-with-dr-klaus-kraemer-ontackling-malnutrition-and-micronutrient-deficiencies.html
<http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-food-forthought/2012/12/interview-with-dr-klaus-kraemer-on-tacklingmalnutrition-and-micronutrient-deficiencies.html>
We also need to break down silos within governments
themselves. Per Pinstrup-Andersen, the only economist to win
the World Food Prize, recently warned, “There are few incentives
in government for multi-disciplinary problem solving. The
economy is set up around silos and people are loyal to their
silos. Agricultural and health sectors are largely disconnected
in their priorities, policy and analysis.” Within government,
we need to change incentives to encourage working across
ministries. In this way, we can begin to pinpoint the health and
nutrition-related factors driving food systems, and identify the
best policies and programs to boost nutrition in crops and diets.
Fortunately, the SUN Movement is providing a mechanism by
which to coordinate our collective solutions.
What is Sight and Life doing to address malnutrition?
Sight and Life was established in 1986 to improve access to
vitamin A, which prevents blindness and saves lives (hence our
name, Sight and Life). Forming strategic partnerships with other
organizations is one way in which we contribute to achieving
better nutrition for all. One such partnership is with Vitamin
93
We can’t address food security without
addressing nutrition security
We also need to change incentives within governments themselves. Per Pinstrup-Andersen recently warned: “There are few
incentives in government for multi-disciplinary problem solving.
The economy is set up around silos and people are loyal to their
silos. Agricultural and health sectors are largely disconnected in
their priorities, policy and analysis.”
Within government, we need to remove silos and encourage
working across ministries in order to pinpoint the health and
nutrition-related factors driving food systems, and identify the
best policies and programs to boost nutrition in crops and diets.
Recent global efforts have provided a mechanism by which to
coordinate our collective solutions—from food fortification to
other actions to address nutrition—and that is the Scaling Up
Nutrition, or SUN, Movement.
The Economist Group Management Thinking Blog
13 December 2012
Last month, global thought leaders gathered in South Africa to
discuss the challenge of boosting crop yields and nutrition at
the “Feeding the World: Africa’s Role in Solving the Global Food
Crisis” Economist Conference. The most important takeaway:
nutrition impacts all sectors and needs to be addressed across
the whole agro-food value chain.
Expanded food production has done little to address the fact
that malnutrition contributes to one-third of all under-five child
deaths in developing countries. We know now that just increasing crop yields and filling bellies with staple foods doesn’t
necessarily lead to improved nutrition. Some two billion people
live with a chronic shortage of vital vitamins and minerals—a
condition known as hidden hunger—that prevents them from
being as healthy and productive as they could be.
The SUN Movement is a global push for action and progress
on improving nutrition. SUN is country-led, with more than 100
organizations working to increase the effectiveness of existing programs by supporting national priorities, encouraging
alignment of resources and fostering broad ownership and
commitment to nutrition. SUN partners focus on implementing
solutions that improve nutrition, from supporting breastfeeding
to improving farming practices and increasing the availability
of nutrient-rich crops—and work across sectors to ensure that
nutritional needs are met.
To ensure that the citizens of Africa—and the world—have
not only enough food, but enough nutritious food, we must
acknowledge the inextricable link between food security and
nutrition security. We need to consider not just the quantity of
the food available, but the quality of the food as well.
Africa must continue to take a leadership role in ensuring food
and nutrition security for its citizens—it could even become the
global breadbasket. The good news is that already, many leaders
have stepped up: of the 31 countries that have joined the SUN
Movement, 22 are African. We need even more leaders to join this
commitment to investing in nutrition. Because when children are
properly nourished, they can grow up to be healthy and productive
adults. And when they are healthy and productive, their families,
communities and countries become stronger.
To accomplish this, it is critical that we break down the silos
we have traditionally worked within. Nutritionists, agriculturists, public health workers, financiers and businesses need to
come together to develop and implement innovative solutions
and business models to reach all people—regardless of their
income, or where they live—with affordable, nutritious foods.
Some examples of success include the increased use of orangefleshed sweet potatoes (rich in vitamin A), fortification of staple
foods with missing vitamins and minerals, and specialty products and delivery models for the most vulnerable.
Klaus Kraemer, Ph.D. is the director of Sight and Life, a humanitarian nutrition think tank of DSM, which cares about the world’s most
vulnerable populations and exists to help improve their nutritional
status. Acting as their advocates, Sight and Life guides original
nutrition research, disseminates its findings and facilitates dialogue
to bring about positive change. Sight and Life is currently celebrating their 100 Years of Vitamins campaign.
We all have a role to play in improving nutrition, but in order
to do so, businesses need support from government to create,
maintain and enforce the legal framework for interventions like
food fortification, making public-private partnerships a critical
way to improve nutrition. When governments create incentives
and conducive environments for food fortification, businesses
act—and the entire country benefits from a healthier, more
productive society.
http://www.management-thinking.org/content/wecan%E2%80%99t-address-food-security-without-addressingnutrition-security
94
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DSM Nutritional Products
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