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PROSTATE
CANCER
Facilitator Guide
AN
INITIATIVE OF
THE AKDN
WORKPLACE
WELLNESS
PROGRAMM
E
Facilitator
Guide
Contents
Overview .......................................................................................................... 3
Session delivery model............................................................................. 3
Materials and equipment....................................................................... 5
Session plan ................................................................................................... 5
Session introduction and goals ........................................................... 5
Pre-assessment test ..................................................................................... 5
Instructional video ..................................................................................... 6
Open discussion ........................................................................................... 6
Session feedback .......................................................................................... 8
Basic terminology ....................................................................................... 9
Frequently-asked questions ............................................................... 10
Reference materials ................................................................................ 14
Annex A: Pre-assessment test ............................................................ 11
Annex B: Participant feedback form ............................................ 12
An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
Overview
This Facilitator Guide is the Workplace Wellness Champion’s primary
resource for delivering an awareness session on prostate cancer. It aims to
help you, the facilitator, run an awareness session in your company
without the need for external support or expertise. The objective is for you
and other Workplace Wellness Champions to become self-sufficient in the
delivery of awareness sessions in order to scale the Workplace Wellness
initiative in as many organisations, locations and contexts as possible.
This Facilitator Guide contains detailed suggestions on how to conduct the
awareness session and provides some additional information on the topic at
hand to help you prepare and run the awareness session seamlessly and
confidently.
Amongst other things, this Facilitator Guide gives you:

Recommendations on how to structure the awareness session on
prostate cancer

Suggestions of questions to stimulate discussion among participants

A pre-prepared Pre-Assessment Test on prostate cancer

A pre-prepared Session Feedback Form

A link for downloading the Instructional Video on prostate cancer

Basic terminology related to prostate cancer

Frequently Asked Questions on prostate cancer

Further references on prostate cancer
Session delivery model
The awareness session on prostate cancer is part of the WellbeingNET
blended learning series on workplace wellness and general wellbeing. The
awareness sessions are intended to be engaging, hands-on and highly
interactive and should therefore not exceed 25 participants per session.
The goal is for participants to raise their level of awareness of the topic at
hand and to become motivated to share the information they gain in the
awareness session with their colleagues, family members and community
members.
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Facilitator Guide
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An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
As the awareness session facilitator, you are responsible for organising the
session at a company location and inviting participants from your
company to attend. In the session, participants will watch an instructional
video together, engage in group discussion, and take short self-assessment
quizzes to check their level of understanding and reinforce their learning.
Please note that the awareness session on prostate cancer is intended for a
female audience.
Awareness sessions rely on a high level of interactivity, discussion and
sharing. To ensure such a high level of engagement, which is not always
easy to achieve, you are encouraged to practice your general facilitation
skills and to use gamification techniques, such as icebreakers and
energisers. Your goal should be to make learning fun and engaging and to
ensure all participants get the most out of the session.
PROSTATE CANCER
Facilitator Guide
4
An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
Materials and equipment
To effectively facilitate the awareness session, you will need the following
materials and equipment:

Printed Self-Assessment Forms on prostate cancer (1 per participant)

Computer to project the video (1)

Video projector (1)

White wall or screen (1)

External speakers (2)

Wellbeing NET Instructional Video on prostate cancer loaded onto the
computer

Printed Session Feedback Forms (1 per participant)
Session plan
Time
Activity
Resources
5 min
Introduction and goals
5 min
Pre-assessment test
Pre-assessment
10 min
Instructional video
Prostate cancer video
15 min
Open discussion
5 min
Session feedback
Session feedback form
Total session time: 40 minutes
Session introduction and goals
In the session introduction, you should briefly introduce the topic that
will be covered in the awareness session to make sure everyone understands
what the objective of the session is. To set participants’ expectations, briefly
explain how the session will be structured and how long it will take.
Pre-assessment test
Next, hand out the Pre-Assessment Test on prostate cancer to the
participants. Give participants about 5 minutes to answer the Yes/No
questions on this test.
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An initiative of the AKDN
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Pre-assessment tests play a critical role in instruction. They focus the
participants’ attention on the topic and motivate them to find out more. A
pre-assessment test is not an exam.
Once the participants have completed the Pre-Assessment Test, move on to
the next step – the Instructional Video. There is no need to review the
results of the pre-assessment or the extent to which participants got answers
wrong or right. The Pre-Assessment Test’s main purpose is to pique the
interest of participants.
The Pre-Assessment Test on prostate cancer can be found in Annex A.
Answers to pre-assessment test:
YES:
1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10
NO:
3, 6
Instructional video
A short Instructional Video on prostate cancer adapted to your audience
and the needs of the Workplace Wellness Programme has been provided for
you. The video is designed to be short and engaging and use relatively
simple language that most can understand. It can be downloaded from
Wellbeing NET at: www.wellbeingnet.org/modules/
Make sure to load the Instructional Video onto a computer ahead of the
awareness session and then project it to the participants.
You are encouraged to watch the video several times ahead of the awareness
session in order to become familiar with its content. You are also advised to
check the technical setup for the video projection ahead of time as well as
on the day of the awareness session to make sure the computer, projector,
speakers and Instructional Video are all working properly.
Open discussion
Once the participants have viewed the Instructional Video, you should lead
them through a process of reflection of what they saw and how it might
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Facilitator Guide
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An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
relate to them. This should take the form of an open large-group discussion
and should take at least 15 minutes – or longer, if more time is available.
Please be sure to take the necessary steps to create a positive atmosphere in
which all participants feel at ease. Participants should feel free to ask any
questions they might have. They should feel supported by the facilitator
and the group throughout the awareness session. A positive environment
will maximise both discussion and learning.
Below are some suggested open-ended questions that may help you to begin
a more open discussion around prostate cancer:
1. Was there any information in the video that surprised you? Was
there any information in the video that seems contrary to what you
previously knew about prostate cancer?
2. Is there anything in the video that wasn’t completely clear and that
you would like to discuss further? Do you have any other questions
about prostate cancer?
3. Based on what you heard in the video, who do you think is most at
risk of developing prostate cancer?
4. Do you all know about your family’s cancer history, if any? Have
you ever had the chance to discuss your family’s cancer history with
your parents or other relatives? Discuss with the person sitting next to
you what you can do to learn about your family’s cancer history.
Next, let’s share some of these ideas with the whole group.
5. What steps can organisations such as ours take to promote prostate
cancer prevention among their employees?
6. What role do you think each one of us can play in preventing
prostate cancer, not just within our organisation but also within our
communities? What can we do together to raise awareness about
prostate cancer more generally?
7. Take a couple of minutes to think about the concrete steps that you
can take to prevent prostate cancer in yourself and your family.
Discuss these with the person next to you. Let’s then share some of
these key points with the entire group so that we can all learn from
each other.
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Session feedback
Once you have concluded the discussion, please be sure to hand out the
Participant Feedback Form which you can find in Annex B. Make sure to
have enough copies printed out before the start of the session (one per
participant) and to collect the completed forms at the end of the session.
After collecting the forms, please access the online Wellbeing NET Feedback
Form to submit the session’s information and feedback.
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Facilitator Guide
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Basic terminology
Adherence: Closely following a given treatment plan (taking the correct
dose at the correct time).
Benign: Refers to a tumour that is not cancerous. Benign tumours don’t
have the ability to invade nearby healthy tissue or spread to other parts
of the body and are therefore much less dangerous than malignant
tumours.
Biopsy: Removal of a tissue sample that is then examined under a
microscope to check for cancer cells.
Bladder: An organ that collects and stores urine.
Cancer: A group of more than 100 different diseases that can begin
almost anywhere in the body, characterised by abnormal cell growth
and the ability to invade nearby tissue.
Cell: The basic unit that makes up the human body.
Chemotherapy: The use of drugs to kill cancer cells.
Chronic disease: A disease or condition that persists or progresses over a
long period of time.
CT scan: The abbreviated term for “computed” or “computerised axial
tomography”. The test may involve injecting a radioactive contrast into
the body. Computers are then used to scan for radiation and to create
cross-sectional images of internal organs.
Gene: A length of DNA that carries the genetic information necessary for
the production of a protein. Genes are located on chromosomes and are
the basic units of heredity.
Immune system: System in the human body that protects the body by
fighting/killing bacteria, viruses and other foreign cells.
Localised cancer: Cancer that is confined to the area where it started
and has not spread to other parts of the body.
Lymph nodes: One of many small, bean-shaped organs located
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An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
throughout the lymphatic system. They are important in the function of
the immune response and also store special cells that can trap cancer
cells or bacteria that are traveling through the body through the lymph.
Malignant: Refers to a tumour that is cancerous. Malignant tumours can
invade nearby healthy tissue or spread to other parts of the body.
Pandemic: Refers to an epidemic that has spread over several countries
or continents, usually affecting a large number of people.
Precancerous: Changes in cells that may, but do not always, become
cancerous. Also called pre-malignant.
Prostate: A small gland, the size of a walnut, found only in males. It’s
located just in front of a man’s rectum, between his bladder and his
urethra and makes some of the fluid that is part of semen.
Prostate gland: Walnut-sized male sex gland. It lies underneath the
bladder.
Radiation therapy/Radiotherapy: The use of high-energy rays (such as
X-rays) to kill or shrink cancer cells. The radiation may come from a
machine outside the body (external radiation) or from radioactive
materials placed inside the body near cancer cells (brachytherapy or
internal radiation).
Remission: The disappearance of the signs and symptoms of cancer, but
not necessarily the entire disease. The disappearance can be temporary
or permanent.
Tumour: A mass formed when normal cells begin to change and grow
uncontrollably. A tumour can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant
(cancerous, meaning it can spread to other parts of the body). Also called
a nodule or mass.
Urethra: A little tube that carries urine from the bladder, through the
penis, to the outside world.
Frequently-asked questions
What is prostate cancer?
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Facilitator Guide
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Prostate cancer is a type of cancer which affects men. It occurs when a
tumour forms in the tissue of the prostate. In its early stage, prostate cancer
needs the male hormone testosterone to grow and survive.
What are the symptoms of prostate cancer?
Most men will not experience any symptoms if prostate cancer is caught
early. Some of the symptoms which men will experience include:

Difficulty in having an erection

Pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips or upper thighs

A need to urinate frequently, especially at night

Inability to urinate

Weak or interrupted flow of urine
These symptoms can also indicate the presence of other diseases.
If there are no symptoms, how is prostate cancer detected?
Most prostate cancers are first found during screening with a prostatespecific antigen (PSA) blood test or a digital rectal exam (DRE).
Is a son more likely to get prostate cancer if his father had it?
Genes which are inside every cell of our body are inherited from parents.
Genes control how the body grows, works and what it looks like. If
something goes wrong with one or more genes, it can sometimes cause
cancer.

Studies show that a man is two and a half times more likely to get
prostate cancer if his father or brother had it, compared to a man
who has no relatives with a history of prostate cancer.

The chances of getting prostate cancer may be even greater if the
father or brother was under 60 when diagnosed, or if the man has
more than one close relative who has had prostate cancer.
Does drinking alcohol increase one’s risk of getting prostate cancer?
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Facilitator Guide
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It is not exactly known if alcohol has a specific effect on one’s risk of
getting prostate cancer. However, it is known that drinking too much
alcohol can make you gain weight. Being overweight increases your risk of
advanced or aggressive prostate cancer. Being overweight also increases your
risk of other health problems such as heart disease and other types of
cancer.
Where can prostate cancer spread to?
Prostate cancer can spread beyond the prostate, to the area just outside of it
(locally advanced prostate cancer) or to other parts of the body (advanced
prostate cancer).
What is locally advanced prostate cancer?
This is cancer that has started to break out of the prostate, or that might
have spread to the area just outside the prostate. This might include:

the seminal vesicles (two glands that sit behind the prostate and
produce some of the fluid in semen)

pelvic lymph nodes (part of the immune system, near the prostate)

neck of the bladder

back passage (rectum).
What is advanced prostate cancer?
This is cancer that has spread from the prostate to other parts of the body. It
develops when tiny prostate cancer cells move from the prostate to other
parts of the body through the blood stream or lymphatic system. Prostate
cancer can spread to any part of the body, but most commonly to the bones.
Another common place for prostate cancer to spread to is the lymph nodes
(sometimes called lymph glands).
Will I have to undergo chemotherapy?
Chemotherapy is only offered if your cancer has spread beyond the prostate
to other parts of the body. Chemotherapy does not get rid of prostate cancer
but aims to shrink it and slow down its growth. This helps some men to
live longer and can help to control or delay symptoms such as pain.
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Should I get a second opinion from a doctor who specialises in another
approach?
Doctors who treat prostate cancer often specialise in a particular treatment
approach, which influences what they recommend. A doctor who
specialises in radiation oncology, for example, is likely to recommend
radiation. A surgical oncologist will feel most comfortable recommending
surgery. It is advised to seek a second or even third opinion before making a
decision on the treatment option.
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Reference materials
1. American Cancer Society. (2016) Prostate Cancer. Available from:
http://www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/detailedguide/prostatecancer-what-is-prostate-cancer
2. CancerUK. (2016) Frequently asked questions about prostate cancer.
Available from: http://prostatecanceruk.org/prostateinformation/further-help/faq
3. Globocan. (2016) Prostate Cancer Estimated Incidence, Mortality and
Prevalence Worldwide in 2012. Available from:
http://globocan.iarc.fr/old/FactSheets/cancers/prostate-new.asp
4. NIH Senior Health. (2013) Prostate Cancer. Available from:
http://nihseniorhealth.gov/prostatecancer/faq/faqlist.html
5. Prostate Cancer Foundation. (2015) Understanding Prostate Cancer.
Available from:
http://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.5699537/k.BEF4/Home.htm
6. Prostate.com. (2016) Glossary of medical terms. Available from:
http://www.prostate.com/patient/ProstateCancerTools/ProstateCancer
Glossary.aspx
7. Webmed. (2016) Prostate Cancer Health Centre. Available from:
http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/features/prostate-cancerquestions?page=4
8. WHO. (2005) Global Action Against cancer. Available from:
http://www.who.int/cancer/media/en/GlobalActionCancerEnglfull.p
df?ua=1
9. World Cancer Research Fund International. (2014) Prostate cancer
statistics. Available from: http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-factsfigures/data-specific-cancers/prostate-cancer-statistics
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Annex A: Pre-assessment test
Take five minutes to answer yes or no to the following questions. A preassessment test is not an exam. It will help you discover what you may
already know about the topic.
Yes
1.
Prostate cancer is a non-communicable disease.
2.
The prostate is found only in males.
3.
Prostate cancer is transmitted through sexual
contact.
4.
Prostate cancer can be prevented.
5.
The risk of developing prostate cancer increases
with age.
6.
Prostate cancer treatments work best when the
cancer is caught early.
7.
Women can develop prostate cancer.
8.
Decreasing the amount of fatty, greasy foods you
eat can help prevent prostate cancer.
9.
Adopting a healthier lifestyle, eating healthier
food, and exercising regularly can all help to
prevent prostate cancer.
10.
Treatments for prostate cancer include surgery
and radiation therapy.
No
An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
Annex B: Participant feedback form
Now that you have participated in a Wellbeing NET Session, let us know
how it went! Your feedback will be used to improve future sessions.
1. Date of session
Example: 15 December 2016
2.
Gender
Mark an X in one box
Male
Female
3. Module
Mark an X in one box
Lung cancer
Breast cancer
Cervical cancer
Prostate cancer
4. Please indicate your level of agreement with the statements below:
Mark only one X per row.
Neither
Strongly
disagree
Disagree
agree
nor
disagree
I would recommend this
session to a colleague
The facilitator was prepared,
knowledgeable and engaging
I learned something in this
session that will help me to
change my personal behaviour
5. What did you like most about this session?
Agree
Strongly
agree
An initiative of the AKDN
Workplace Wellness Programme
6. What areas can be improved for future sessions?