Download Lifetime Health Ch 03

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Transcript
Chapter 3
Self-Esteem and
Mental Health
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
How frequently do you engage in the following behaviors?
SCORING:
1 = never
2 = occasionally
3 = most of the time
4 = all of the time
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
I praise myself when I do a good job.
I do what I know is right, even if others use pressure
to try to stop me from doing the right thing.
I am confident enough to try new things, even if I
might fail at them.
I ask people for help if I need it.
I like to volunteer to help others when I can.
I concentrate on my strengths and work to improve
my weaknesses.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Point
Chapter 3
Ranges:
19 or more points:
You show respect for yourself
and others and probably have
high self-esteem.
10 - 18 points:
You probably have a healthy
self-esteem but could make
improvements in behavior to
self and others.
9 points or less:
You should be working hard
to make improvements in how
they show respect for
yourself and others.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Self-Esteem and
Mental Health
Contents
Section 1 Building Your Self-Esteem
Section 2 Using Good Communication Skills
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Section 4 Understanding Mental Disorders
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Self-Esteem and Mental Health
Section 1
Building Your Self-Esteem
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 1 Building Your Self-Esteem
What is Self-Esteem?
Self-esteem: how much you value, respect, and
feel confident about yourself.
Benefits of High Self Esteem:
• respect for yourself
• ability to reach goals
• willingness to try new things
• feel valued by others
Risks of Low Self Esteem:
• Vulnerable to peer pressure
• More likely to make unhealthy decisions
• More likely to be critical of yourself and others
• Increased risk of depression and suicide
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 1 Building Your Self-Esteem
Self-concept:
a measure of how you view yourself in
society.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 1 Building Your Self-Esteem
Your self-esteem affects the way you interpret
“negative” messages from others….
•Try to view negative messages as
constructive criticism.
•Your self-esteem does not have to suffer
from the negative messages of others!
•You alone have the power to control your
self-esteem and moods—don’t give others the
power to control your self esteem! (Don’t let
other people dictate your mood/feelings!!!)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 1 Building Your Self-Esteem
Tips for Improving Your Self-Esteem:
•
•
•
•
•
Use Positive Self-Talk (say positive messages
to yourself when in doubt)
Act with Integrity (doing what you know is
right, regardless of the situation)
Choose Supportive Friends (your friends
should support your values and goals)
Accept Yourself (focus on your strengths and
let go of weaknesses that you cannot change)
Take Care of Your Health (feeling good,
physically, can help your self-esteem)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Self-Esteem and Mental Health
Section 2
Using Good
Communication Skills
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 2 Using Good
Communication Skills
Good Communication is Important
1. Prevents Misunderstandings
(unclear communication can cause hurtful
misunderstandings)
2. Building Healthy Relationships
(communication is a tool for building good
relationships)
3. Expressing Yourself
(good communication skills help you let others
know what you want and need…and this will help
you get what you want out of your relationships)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 2 Using Good
Communication Skills
Communication Styles
1. Passive (does not speak up when challenged or
pressured)
2. Aggressive (hostile and unfriendly)
3. Assertive (when you communicate assertively,
you express yourself in a direct, but respectful way)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 2 Using Good
Communication Skills
Speaking Skills Can Improve Communication:
Voice Volume Speaking too loudly or too softly can
send a bad message.
Tone and Pitch (conveys your attitude)
“I” Messages and “You” Messages
An “I” message explains how you feel.
A “you” message can seem like blame.
Empathy (the ability to understand another person’s
feelings)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 2 Using Good
Communication Skills
Listening Skills Can Improve Communication
1. Active Listening
• lets the speaker know you are listening and
clarifying anything confusing
• ex: saying uh-huh, right, yes, I see, etc. while
listening
2. Paraphrasing
• using your own words to restate what someone
else says
• ex: “So what you’re saying is……….”
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 2 Using Good
Communication Skills
Body Language Can Affect Communication:
What do you think each of the following may
be communicating to others?
•
•
•
•
•
•
WHILE SPEAKING
Making poor eye contact
Maintaining eye contact
Scratching your head
Touching your hand to
your face
Covering your mouth
Standing straight and tall
•
•
•
•
•
•
WHILE LISTENING
Opening your eyes wide
Making poor eye contact
Maintaining eye contact
Opening your mouth wide
Squinting or scrunching
your eyebrows in a “V”
Crossing your arms
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Self-Esteem and Mental Health
Section 3
Mental and Emotional Health
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Mental Health
• Mental health: A state of mental well-being (you
can cope with the demands of daily life)
• Characteristics of mentally and emotionally
healthy people include:
• A sense of control
• Ability to endure failures and frustrations
• Ability to see events positively
• Can express emotions in a healthy way
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
• A list of the basic needs
one must achieve on
the way to selfactualization.
• Self-actualization is the
achievement of the best
that a person can be.
• Abraham Maslow
believed that everyone
has a drive to reach
self-actualization.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Expressing Emotions can make you HAPPIER!
• Emotion: a feeling produced in response to life
experiences.
•
Expressing emotions in a healthy way is
important for your mental and emotional health.
•
We learn to express our emotions by observing
others (you’re a product of your environment)
•
You can RELEARN how to express
emotions more constructively!
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Tips for Managing Emotions constructively:
•
Talk it out with a friend or trusted adult, or in your
own head
•
Blow off steam with physical activity (can help
you release negative energy and release
endorphins)
•
Be creative Creative activities also help release
tension.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Managing Emotions when you’re angry:
• Frustration leads to anger (prevent or manage your
frustrations before they get out of hand)
• Learn to recognize when you feel angry.
• When you do feel angry, try to calm down before taking
action.
• Anger can ALWAYS be dealt with APPROPRIATELY!
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Managing Other Negative Emotions
1. Fear:
• (bad): can be debilitating
• (good): can protect you from real danger.
•
use positive self-talk to get over fear.
2. Guilt:
• alerts you when you are acting against your
values.
• do your best to right the wrong.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Managing Other Negative Emotions
3. Jealousy
• fear that you will lose someone or something you
love.
• talking about it and restructuring your thoughts
and feelings is usually the best way to cope.
4. Loneliness
• feeling emotionally isolated from others.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 3 Mental and Emotional Health
Defense Mechanisms:
Unconscious thoughts or behaviors used to avoid
(or cope with) unpleasant emotions.
•
•
•
Most DM’s do NOT fix the real problem (they’re a
coping skill that help us deal with difficult
emotions temporarily).
DM’s can mask your true (uncomfortable)
feelings.
It’s best to manage your emotions in a
constructive, problem-solving, way (focus on the
real issue and deal with that).
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Self-Esteem and Mental Health
Section 4
Understanding Mental
Disorders
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
Bellringer
What symptoms or behaviors do you
associate with depression?
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
What Are Mental Disorders?
Mental disorder: an illness that affects a person’s:
THOUGHTS
EMOTIONS
BEHAVIORS
…are often misunderstood.
…many are treatable.
…knowing the symptoms can help you understand
mental disorders.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
Symptoms of Mental Disorders:
Symptom: a change in a person’s body or mind,
caused by a disease or disorder.
• The following are common symptoms of many
mental disorders:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Too much or too little sleep
Feelings of extreme sadness
Unexplained mood changes
Drug or alcohol abuse
Inability to concentrate
Extreme anxiety or irrational fear
Personality changes
False perceptions of reality
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
Types of Mental Disorders…….
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
DEPRESSION: sadness and hopelessness that
keeps a person from carrying out normal,
everyday activities.
Symptoms:
•
Lack of energy
•
Withdrawal from people
•
Loss of appetite or overeating
•
Too much or too little sleep
•
Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
If you are experiencing depression…
1. Face the problem and seek professional help.
2. Identify the “real” problem
• loneliness?
• a loss of something significant?
(ex: loved one, job, etc)
• chemical imbalance?
3. Take action
• change negative thinking
• seeking support from others
• increasing physical activity
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
ATTENTION DEFICIT / HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER:
• the most commonly diagnosed mental disorder in
children
• It is a lifelong disorder
Symptoms
• being frequently inattentive or impulsively hyperactive
Causes
• unknown
Can be treated (finding the best treatment can be
difficult)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
ANXIETY DISORDERS:
• fear-based
• can keep you from taking part in daily activities
• Phobias (extreme fear of something that poses
no real danger)
PANIC DISORDERS:
• extreme terror and panic attacks
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER:
• characterized by uncomfortable thoughts called
obsessions
• repetitive behaviors called compulsions
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
Causes of Mental Disorders:
• Some develop from traumatic or stressful life
experiences.
• Some can be inherited.
• Some are caused by physical disorders or injuries.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
Section 4 Understanding Mental
Disorders
Many mental disorders can be treated or cured…
Treatments:
• Psychotherapy--especially useful in treating mental
disorders caused by traumatic experiences.
• Group therapy--a licensed therapist leads a group of
people who may have a similar disorder.
• Medication--can also help in the treatment of some
mental disorders.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
End of Chapter 3
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Document related concepts

Controversy surrounding psychiatry wikipedia, lookup

Child psychopathology wikipedia, lookup

Abnormal psychology wikipedia, lookup

History of psychiatry wikipedia, lookup

History of psychiatric institutions wikipedia, lookup

History of mental disorders wikipedia, lookup

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders wikipedia, lookup

Causes of mental disorders wikipedia, lookup

Mental health professional wikipedia, lookup

Classification of mental disorders wikipedia, lookup

Deinstitutionalisation wikipedia, lookup

Pyotr Gannushkin wikipedia, lookup

Community mental health service wikipedia, lookup

Mental disorder wikipedia, lookup

Mentally ill people in United States jails and prisons wikipedia, lookup