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Transcript
An Introduction to Rhetoric:
Using the “Available Means”
Chapter 1: The Language of
Composition
AUDIENCE
Those who read, watch, or listen to
elements of literature, written or
spoken; one’s listener or readership
CONTEXT
The occasion or the time and place
(setting) in which a work is written or
spoken or a word is used; the
surrounding material in which information
is written
PURPOSE
The goal, intention or objective of a
speaker or writer; the reason for writing
a particular work or giving a speech
THESIS, CLAIM,
ASSERTION
A proposition advanced as an
argument; a statement serving as
a premis in an argument; the
central idea in a work
SUBJECT
The topic that is being discussed,
examined, or otherwise dealt with
in a piece of writing
SPEAKER
The author, person or voice (real or
imagined) whose perspective is being
advanced in a speech or piece of
writing
RHETORICAL OR
ARISTOTELIAN
TRIANGLE
A diagram that represents a
rhetorical situation as the
relationship among the speaker, the
subject, and the audience
PERSONA
The speaker, voice, or character
assumed by the author of a piece
of writing
ETHOS
A Greek term referring to the
character or authority of a person
or speaker
LOGOS
A Greek term that means “word”;
an appeal to logic
PATHOS
A Greek term that refers to suffering
but has come to be associated with
broader appeals to emotion
ASSUMPTION
A belief or statement taken for
granted without proof
COUNTERARGUMENT
A challenge to a position; an
opposing argument
CONCEDE
To reluctantly acknowledge or
yield to the opposing argument as
having some element of truth
REFUTE
To discredit an argument,
particularly a counterargument
CONNOTATION
That which is implied by a word, as
opposed to the word’s literal meaning;
the emotional overtones of a word
PROPAGANDA
A negative term for writing
designed to sway opinion rather
than present information
POLEMIC
An argument against an idea,
usually regarding philosophy,
politics, or religion
SATIRE/SATIRIC
An ironic, sarcastic, or witty composition that
claims to argue for something, but actually
argues against it (for the purpose of bringing
about change)
THE CLASSICAL
RHETORICAL MODEL
FOR ORATORY
5-PARAGRAPH
STRUCTURE
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•
The introduction
The narration
The confirmation
The refutation
The conclusion
PATTERNS OF
DEVELOPMENT
•
•
•
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•
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NARRATION
DESCRIPTION
PROCESS ANALYSIS
EXEMPLIFICATION
COMPARISON AND CONTRAST
CLASSIFICATION AND DIVISION
DEFINITION
CAUSE AND EFFECT