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Transcript
Interconnection Guideline
Customer Generation Capacity Not Exceeding 100 kW
(Includes Class 1 Net Metering Service)
Date:
Version:
Nova Scotia Power Inc.
P.O. Box 910
Halifax,
Nova Scotia
B3J 2W5
Phone 902 428 6230
www.nspower.ca
2011-07-08
1.6
Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Purpose ............................................................................................................... 4 1.1. Customer Generation at NSPI ................................................................. 4 1.2. Limitations .............................................................................................. 4 Getting Connected – The Interconnection Process ............................................ 5 Safety Requirements ............................................................................................ 6 3.1. NSPI Safety Requirements - Standard Protection Code ......................... 6 3.2. Electrical Inspection Act and the Canadian Electrical Code Parts I & II 6 3.3. Permission to Operate ............................................................................. 6 Interconnected Systems ....................................................................................... 6 4.1. NSPI Distribution System ....................................................................... 7 4.1.1. Distribution System Configuration ..................................................... 7 4.1.2. System Grounding .............................................................................. 7 4.1.3. Phasing ................................................................................................ 7 4.1.4. System Frequency ............................................................................... 7 4.1.5. System Voltage ................................................................................... 7 4.1.6. Flicker and Voltage Distortion............................................................ 8 4.1.7. Voltage Unbalance .............................................................................. 8 4.1.8. Voltage and Current Surges ................................................................ 8 4.1.9. Fault and Line Clearing ...................................................................... 9 4.1.10. Fault Levels ......................................................................................... 9 4.2. Generator Types ...................................................................................... 9 4.2.1. Synchronous Generators ..................................................................... 9 4.2.2. Induction Generators ........................................................................... 9 4.2.3. Power Electronic Converter (Inverter) Systems ............................... 10 General Requirements for Interconnection ...................................................... 10 5.1. Isolation – Safety Disconnect Switch ................................................... 10 5.2. Grounding ............................................................................................. 10 5.3. Protection .............................................................................................. 10 Interconnection Protection Requirements ........................................................ 10 6.1. Response To Abnormal Voltage Levels ............................................... 10 6.2. Response To Abnormal Frequencies .................................................... 11 6.3. Over-current Protection ........................................................................ 11 6.4. Harmonics ............................................................................................. 11 6.5. Flicker ................................................................................................... 12 6.6. Fault Clearing........................................................................................ 12 6.7. Synchronizing ....................................................................................... 12 6.8. Islanding................................................................................................ 12 6.9. Voltage Control ..................................................................................... 12 6.10. Protection Requirements Summary ...................................................... 13 Metering ............................................................................................................ 13 7.1. Customer-generator Requirements ....................................................... 13 7.2. Bi-directional Metering ......................................................................... 13 7.3. Meter Testing ........................................................................................ 13 7.4. Net Metering ......................................................................................... 14 Operating Requirements ................................................................................... 14 8.1. General Operating Requirements .......................................................... 14 8.2. Interconnection Agreement ................................................................... 14 Page 2 of 19
Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
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8.3. Testing................................................................................................... 14 9. Responsibility for Costs .................................................................................... 14 10. Glossary of Terms ......................................................................................... 14 11. Appendices .................................................................................................... 16 Appendix A – Flicker Curve ...................................................................................... 17 Appendix B: Specific Technical Requirements – Inverter-Based Systems................ 18 Appendix C - References ........................................................................................... 19 Page 3 of 19
Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
1. Purpose
This document establishes the minimum requirements for safe and effective operation of
small-scale generation interconnected with the Nova Scotia Power Inc. (NSPI) Distribution
System. This guide describes NSPI’s interconnection requirements, the minimum design
standards the Customer-generator must satisfy, and a range of normal and emergency
system conditions the generating equipment could encounter while connected to the NSPI
Distribution System.
Customer-generators should discuss project plans with NSPI before purchasing or installing
equipment, as requirements will vary depending on capacity, type, location and the existing
NSPI facilities in place.
Implementing the requirements of this guideline will help ensure that the Customergenerator’s equipment does not operate in a manner that would compromise the safe
operation, reliability or power quality of the NSPI Distribution System. The Customergenerator is required to install, operate and maintain its generating and interconnection
equipment in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations to ensure good working
order and fitness for service at all times.
This guideline is based on the following assumptions and principles:

The addition of the Customer-generator’s equipment to the Distribution System will
not appreciably change the Distribution System and its characteristics.

The installation meets the installation requirements of the Canadian Electrical Code
(CE Code) Part 1 and the equipment is certified to the relevant CE Code Part 2
product standard. Other local and provincial construction and installation regulations
may apply.

The safety of NSPI personnel, the public and equipment is of primary concern in the
design of the interconnection systems.
1.1. Customer Generation at NSPI
A Customer-generator may be permitted to operate at 60 Hertz, three phase generators up to
100 kW or single phase generators up to 30 kW, in parallel with the NSPI Distribution
System, provided the Customer-generator meets or exceeds the requirements of these
guidelines. In all cases, establishment of an Interconnection Agreement by the Customergenerator is required.
1.2. Limitations
The criteria and requirements of this document are applicable to all generation technologies,
with aggregate capacity up to 100 kW for three phase generators and 30 kW for single-phase
generators. Based on this size limitation, it is anticipated that the generation systems will be
interconnected with radial Distribution Systems at typical primary voltages (rated less than
26,400 V phase to phase) or secondary voltages (less than 750 volts phase to phase).
For generators with capacity greater than 100 kW refer to the document “Interconnection
Technical Requirements for Customer Generation With Capacity Above 100 kW Connected to Distribution Circuits (Rated 26,400 V and under)”
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
This document does not apply to emergency back-up generators utilizing automatic or
manual transfer schemes in which load is transferred between the distributed generation and
the NSPI Distribution System in a momentary “break-before-make” operation.
The requirements in this guideline are not intended to provide protection of the Customergenerator’s equipment. The Customer-generator is fully responsible for protecting their
equipment in such a manner that faults or other disturbances on the NSPI system do not
cause damage to their equipment, and NSPI shall not be liable for any such fault, damage or
disturbance.
2. Getting Connected – The Interconnection Process
The first step in getting connected is to have the project assessed. This is initiated by
completing and submitting the “Interconnection Request And Equipment Information Form” .
The basic steps in the process are as follows:
2.1. The NSPI coordinator will acknowledge receipt of the Interconnection Request and will
then perform a review of the interconnection request and NSPI’s field conditions (i.e. is
the transformer large enough, is there three phase at site, does the metering have to be
changed, etc.) This review will identify any new NSPI equipment or upgrades to the
existing Distribution System that are required to enable the connection of the generator.
This review takes into account the size, type and location of the proposed generation
equipment.
2.2. NSPI will develop specific interconnection requirements and cost estimates for required
system additions/upgrades (If required), including changes to the NSPI revenue
metering equipment.
2.3. The cost estimates for the required system additions or changes will be provided to the
Customer-generator for review. Once the Customer-generator accepts the requirements
and pays the identified costs, the required construction work can be scheduled to
commence.
2.4. As part of the electrical and generating equipment installation, the Customer-generator’s
electrician must obtain a Wiring Permit and arrange to have all required electrical
inspections performed and passed.
2.5. After the wiring inspections are performed and passed, and the Interconnection
Agreement is signed, NSPI will advise the Customer-generator that interconnection of
the generator with the NSPI system can proceed.
2.6. At this stage, NSPI may require and/or witness the commissioning and testing of the
generation equipment.
2.7. Final reconciliation of NSPI’s costs will determine the actual costs (or refunds) to be paid
by (to) the Customer-generator.
2.8. The Customer-generator is now operational.
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
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3. Safety Requirements
3.1. NSPI Safety Requirements - Standard Protection Code
Safe work procedures described in NSPI’s Standard Protection Code1 will be followed by
NSPI in providing isolation for work on any part of the interconnected Distribution System.
3.2. Electrical Inspection Act2 and the Canadian Electrical Code Parts I & II3
The Customer-generator’s installation must meet all applicable national, provincial and
municipal electrical construction and safety codes, including, without limitation, the Electrical
Installation and Inspection Act and Code Regulations. Except as expressly permitted by law,
all electrical equipment must be approved by a recognized certification agency e.g. CSA, or
equivalent, approval.
3.3. Permission to Operate
Under no circumstances shall the Customer-generator begin parallel operation of the
generator until final written approval in the form of a signed “Interconnection Agreement” has
been given by NSPI.
4. Interconnected Systems
An interconnected system is defined as one in which the Customer-generator’s generation is
connected at a point common with the NSPI Distribution System, resulting in a transfer of
power between the two systems. As a result of this interconnection, the generator system
becomes an integral part of the NSPI Distribution System and must be considered in the
electrical protection and operation of the NSPI Distribution System.
Section 4.1 lists the typical Distribution System operating and power quality conditions within
which the Customer-generator’s equipment must operate. It lists representative values of
parameters that the Distribution System normally maintains and some abnormal conditions
that the generating equipment needs to be designed to withstand. It is the Customergenerator’s responsibility to ensure that the generating equipment operates correctly in this
environment.
Sections 5 & 6 list typical conditions and response to abnormal conditions that the Customergenerator’s system must meet as well as typical interconnection protective function
requirements.
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4.1. NSPI Distribution System
4.1.1. Distribution System Configuration
NSPI's primary Distribution System is a 3-phase, 4-wire multi-grounded common neutral
system (“effectively grounded-wye”) operated at three typical voltage levels:



4,160 Volts line to line (4 kV),
12,470 Volts line to line (12 kV)
24,940 Volts line to line (25 kV)
Distribution transformers, which step the primary voltage down to utilization voltages, are
mainly single-phase units with primaries connected phase to ground. Three phase distribution
transformers are normally configured grounded wye- grounded wye. This generally provides
a single intentional ground path for short-circuit currents (one zero-sequence path) and has
been utilized in the design of short-circuit protection applied to distribution feeder systems.
NSPI’s standard secondary voltages are:



120/240 Volts 1-Phase
120/208 Volts Solidly Grounded Wye 3-Phase, 4-Wire
347/600 Volts Solidly Grounded Wye 3-Phase, 4-Wire
4.1.2. System Grounding
Distribution Systems are typically three-phase 4-wire multi-grounded systems incorporating
single-phase distribution taps. They are typically operated as effectively (solidly) grounded.
Following the addition of any generating equipment, the Distribution System must remain
effectively grounded at all locations.
4.1.3. Phasing
Phasing is not standardized across Distribution Systems. For three phase generation, the
phase sequence and the direction of rotation must be coordinated with NSPI’s Distribution
System.
4.1.4. System Frequency
The Distribution System operates at 60 Hz. Frequency deviations are typically 59.7 Hz to
60.2 Hz.
4.1.5. System Voltage
NSPI’s Regulation 2.74 provides general guidance as to appropriate Distribution System
steady state service voltage levels. Customer-generator systems must operate satisfactorily
within the extreme voltage level variation limits shown in Table 1.
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
Table 1: Normal Service Voltage Variation Limits
Recommended Voltage Variation Limits for Circuits
Up to 1000 volts, Applicable at Service Entrance
Nominal
System
Voltages
Extreme Operating Conditions
Normal Operating Conditions
Single Phase
120/240
240
480
600
106/212
212
424
530
110/220
220
440
550
125/250
250
500
625
127/254
254
508
635
Three Phase
4-Conductor
120/208Y
240/416Y
277/480Y
347/600Y
110/190
220/380
245/424
306/530
112/194
224/388
254/440
318/550
125/216
250/432
288/500
360/625
127/220
254/440
293/508
367/635
Three Phase
3- Conductor
240
480
600
212
424
530
220
440
550
250
500
625
254
508
635
Source: Preferred Voltage Levels for AC Systems, 0 to 50 000V- Canadian Standards Association
4.1.6. Flicker and Voltage Distortion
Standard IEEE-519-19925 establishes the quality of power that the utility is to deliver to the
customer and describes the typical voltage and current waveforms that exist throughout the
Distribution System. Transient conditions exceeding the limits may be encountered. Remote
sections of rural Distribution Systems may not meet the limits. IEEE 519-1992 Section 11.5
recommends that the voltage distortion limits as a percentage of the nominal fundamental
frequency voltage should not exceed 3% for any individual harmonic, and 5% for the total
voltage harmonic distortion THD.
4.1.7. Voltage Unbalance
The voltage unbalance on the Distribution System under normal operating conditions is
typically under 3% but may reach 5% due to the unbalanced loading and single-phase
voltage regulation. Voltage unbalance is included in the range of Table 1 in section 5.1.3.
Voltage unbalance is calculated using RMS voltage levels measured phase to phase at the
service entrance under no load conditions:
Voltage unbalance (%) = 100 x [(max. deviation from average) / (average)]
4.1.8. Voltage and Current Surges
The Distribution System may experience voltage and current surges which varies by location
due to the effects of other types of equipment connected to the Distribution System, including
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
switched loads, other generating equipment, switched power factor correction capacitors, and
voltage regulation equipment.
4.1.9. Fault and Line Clearing
NSPI’s power lines are subject to a variety of natural and man-made hazards. The resulting
electric problems are principally short circuits, grounded conductors, and broken conductors.
These fault conditions require that the damaged equipment be de-energized as soon as
possible because of the hazards they pose to the public and the operation of the NSPI
Distribution System.
To maintain the reliability of the Distribution System, NSPI uses automatic re-closing to
automatically re-energize the power lines after a fault has occurred. The Customer-generator
must be aware of line re-closing when selecting and setting up their generator protection
schemes to ensure that the generator ceases to energize the Distribution System prior to any
automatic re-close of NSPI’s circuit breakers or reclosers.
4.1.10. Fault Levels
Fault levels on distribution circuits will vary depending on circuit configuration. NSPI will
provide information on fault levels at a given site upon request by the Customer-generator.
4.2. Generator Types
Although it is anticipated that the majority of generators encountered in this size category will
be either induction or inverter-interface types, synchronous units may also be utilized as well.
4.2.1. Synchronous Generators
Synchronous generators are generally capable of supplying sustained current for faults
occurring on the NSPI Distribution System. Re-closing by the utility onto synchronous units
must be blocked to prevent out-of-synchronous paralleling and to prevent the energization of
a de-energized NSPI line.
For this type of generator, synchronizing equipment must be provided by the Customergenerator to ensure proper synchronizing of the Customer-generator’s equipment to the NSPI
system.
Sufficient time must be allowed to ensure the NSPI system has stabilized following a
protection operation.
4.2.2. Induction Generators
Induction generators are basically induction motors that are mechanically driven above
synchronous speed to produce electric power. Reactive power supply for induction
generators may pose design problems, depending on the generator size. Special
considerations for induction generators are:

Capacitors may be necessary to limit the adverse effects of reactive power
flow on NSPI's system voltage regulation.

Self-excitation of the induction generator due to installed capacitors can
produce abnormal high magnitude, distorted voltages

Voltage flicker resulting from induction generators starting, particularly on low
capacity Distribution Systems may be unacceptable to NSPI’s
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
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4.2.3. Power Electronic Converter (Inverter) Systems
Inverters convert direct current (dc) power to alternating current (ac) power by means of
electronic switching devices. Switching can be controlled by the ac voltage waveform of the
NSPI's supply system (grid-dependent) or by internal electronic circuitry (grid-independent).
Inverters are generally not capable of supplying sustained fault current. Grid-independent
inverters are capable of supplying load current independently of the NSPI supply system.
Excessive harmonic output of power inverters may interfere with other NSPI customers.
5. General Requirements for Interconnection
5.1. Isolation – Safety Disconnect Switch
A manual disconnecting device for isolation purposes must be provided. The form of this switch
will vary with the service voltage and capacity but in all cases must be capable of providing a
visible break that can be confirmed via visual inspection, opening all phases simultaneously
(Gang-operated), being locked in the open position and be accessible at all times to NSPI
personnel. Location and form of the device is subject to approval by NSPI.
5.2. Grounding
The Customer-generator’s equipment must be grounded as per manufacturer’s
recommendations, the Canadian Electrical Code Part I, and in accordance with the normal
practices of NSPI.
Interconnection of three phase transformers, and transformer grounding systems on three
phase Distribution Systems, shall be coordinated with NSPI and shall not cause voltage
disturbances nor disrupt coordination of NSPI’s Distribution System ground fault protection.
5.3. Protection
The interconnecting customer’s generator shall be equipped with protective functions or devices
designed to:

Prevent the generating equipment from being connected to a de-energized NSPI
Distribution System;

Prevent connection or parallel operation of the generating equipment with the NSPI
Distribution System unless the voltage and frequency are of normal magnitude;

Prevent isolated operation of the generator (islanding) with any part of the NSPI
Distribution System; and,

Interrupt the maximum available fault current at the point of connection with the NSPI
Distribution System.
See Section 6 for specific requirements.
6. Interconnection Protection Requirements
6.1. Response To Abnormal Voltage Levels
Every grid-connected generator requires under/over voltage protection.
Three-phase generator systems shall automatically cease to energize when any individual
phase-to-neutral voltage on a grounded-wye system or any individual phase-to-phase voltage
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2011/07/08
on a ungrounded-wye or delta system goes outside the range of Table 2. Single-phase
inverter systems shall detect the phase-to-neutral voltage if connected to neutral. Singlephase equipment connected line-to-line but not to the neutral conductor shall detect the lineto-line voltage.
When any voltage is in an abnormal range of Table 2 below, the Customer-generator’s
equipment shall cease to energize the NSPI Distribution System.
Table 2: Response to Abnormal Voltage Levels
Voltage Range
Maximum Clearing Time
On 120V Base
% Of Base Voltage
V ≦ 60
V ≦ 50%
60 < V < 106
50% < V < 88%
106 ≦ V ≦ 127
88% ≦ V ≦ 106%
127 < V < 144
106% < V < 120%
V ≧ 144
V ≧ 120%
Cycles
Instantaneous
Seconds
Instantaneous
120 cycles
2 sec.
Normal Operation
30 cycles
Instantaneous
0.5 sec.
Instantaneous
*Inverters meeting the specific technical requirements of Appendix C meet this requirement.
6.2. Response To Abnormal Frequencies
Every grid-connected generator requires under/over frequency protection.
When a system frequency is in a range given in Table 3 below, the Customer-generator’s
equipment shall automatically cease to energize the NSPI Distribution System. Adjustable
under-frequency settings shall be coordinated with the NSPI Distribution System
representative.
Table 3: Response to Abnormal Frequencies
Utility Voltage
Condition
Frequency Condition
Maximum number of cycles to
disconnect
Seconds
Normal Voltage
>60.5
10
0.16
Normal Voltage
<59.5
10
0.16
*Inverters meeting the specific technical requirements of Appendix C meet this requirement.
6.3. Over-current Protection
The Customer-generator’s interconnection equipment must detect and promptly cease to
energize for over-current fault conditions.
6.4. Harmonics
Harmonic current injection by the Customer-generator’s equipment into the NSPI Distribution
System shall not exceed the limits listed in Table 4 below.
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
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Table 4: Current Harmonic Limits*
Individual
harmonic
order “n”
(odd)1
n<11
Percent (%)
4.0
11≤n<17
2.0
17≤n<23
1.5
23≤n<35
0.6
35≤n
0.3
Total
Demand
Distortion
(TDD)
5
1
Even harmonics are limited to 25% of the limits above
*Source IEEE P15476
Inverters meeting the specific technical requirements of Appendix C meet this requirement.
6.5. Flicker
The Customer-generator’s facility shall not create objectionable flicker for other customers
served from the NSPI Distribution System. It is recognized that flicker is a site dependent
condition.
Voltage flicker and deviation is governed by the flicker curve attached as Appendix B. This
shows the permissible voltage fluctuation and frequency based on the annoyance factor of
lamp flicker.
6.6. Fault Clearing
The Customer-generator may reconnect only when the utility Distribution System voltage and
frequency return to normal range (Table 2 & 3) and is stabilized for a period of at least five (5)
minutes.
6.7. Synchronizing
Generating systems that can generate an ac voltage waveform independent of the NSPI
Distribution System shall be connected in parallel with NSPI only in combination with
synchronizing capabilities. The generator shall synchronize to the Distribution System while
meeting the flicker requirements of Section 6.5 and without causing voltage variation at the
Point of Interconnection of greater than 5%. The generating system may synchronize to the
Distribution System only if the NSPI Distribution System is stable and operating within the
normal limits of Table 2 and Table 3.
6.8. Islanding
Islanding is not permitted.
The Customer-generator’s equipment shall be equipped with an approved non-islanding
protection function design to prevent the generator from being connected to a circuit that is
not energized by the utility supply. Alternatives to this protection function will be considered at
NSPI’s discretion, where local loads sufficiently exceed the generator capacity (i.e. the
aggregate capacity is less that 50% of the minimum circuit loading, or where a transfer trip
function is deployed.)
All inverters shall be “non-islanding type” as defined by CSA C22.2 No. 107.1-01 Standard
6.9. Voltage Control
The Customer-generator’s equipment shall not cause the voltage level of the local distribution
system to be sustained outside the limits of CSA CAN3-C235-837, Normal Operating
Conditions Range (Table in NSPI Regulation 2.7), measured at the Point of Interconnection.
The generator is not required to be capable of adjusting the power factor, but each
generating unit shall be capable of operating within a range of 0.95 power factor lag to 0.95
power factor lead.
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6.10.
Protection Requirements Summary
Table 5: Protection Requirements Summary
Guide
Section
Device Category
Up to 10 kW
Greater than
10 kW up to
100 kW
Interconnection Disconnect Device
(Lockable, Accessible, Visible, Gang
Operated)
YES
YES
Dedicated Transformer
NO
YES
6.1
Over-Voltage Trip
YES
YES
6.1
Under-Voltage Trip
YES
YES
6.2
Over/Under Frequency Trip
YES
YES
6.8
Anti-Islanding*
YES
YES
6.3
Overcurrent Trip/Shutdown
YES
YES
6.7
Synchronizing/Synch Check**
YES
YES
5.1
*Per Section 6.8 requirements
** Synchronous Types Only
7. Metering
7.1. Customer-generator Requirements
The Customer-generator must provide and install at Customer-generator’s expense, and in
accordance with NSPI Metering Standards8, meter sockets and metering cabinets in a
suitable location to permit access to NSPI.
7.2. Bi-directional Metering
Where required, additional revenue-class metering will be installed so that kW.h (in) and
kW.h (out) are separately recorded. Additional metering costs will be borne by the Customergenerator.
7.3. Meter Testing
All revenue metering equipment shall be routinely tested in accordance with Measurements
Canada requirements. At any time, either Party may request a test of the accuracy of the
revenue metering equipment at its own expense. The results of meter calibrations or tests
shall be available for examination by the Parties at all times. If at any time, any meter
equipment is found to be inaccurate by more than three percent (3%), NSPI shall cause such
metering equipment to be made accurate or replaced as soon as possible. If the meter is
found to be accurate within 3%, no adjustment will be required. Each Party shall comply with
any reasonable request of the other concerning the sealing of meters, the presence of a
representative of the other Party when the seals are broken and when tests are made, and
other matters affecting the accuracy of the measurement of electric energy delivered. If
either Party believes that a meter is operating inaccurately, it shall immediately notify the
other Party.
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7.4. Net Metering
Nova Scotia Power offers Net Metering service. The details for qualification for this service
are detailed in NSPI Regulation 3.6.
8. Operating Requirements
8.1. General Operating Requirements
NSPI may require operational control over interconnection equipment, as necessary, to
ensure safety, reliability or serviceability of the NSPI Distribution System.
8.2. Interconnection Agreement
Prior to operation of the generating equipment, an Interconnection Agreement shall be
established between the Customer-generator and NSPI to identify key contacts, desired
electrical operating characteristics, and other relevant operating responsibilities
considerations.
8.3. Testing
All protective devices or functions supplied to satisfy the requirements in Section 6 shall be
routinely tested by qualified personnel at the Customer-generator’s expense. Reports and
findings of this routine testing shall include the "as left” settings. Test reports will be made
available to NSPI.
Special tests may also be requested by NSPI to investigate apparent mis-operations that
have had an adverse effect on the NSPI system. The Customer-generator shall conduct, or
allow NSPI to conduct such tests and the costs of such tests will be at Customer-generator’s
expense.
9. Responsibility for Costs
The Customer-generator is responsible for all capital, operating and maintenance costs of all
equipment on the generator side of the Point of Interconnection.
Where upgrades and/or revisions are required to existing NSPI systems, to accommodate the
generation addition, the Customer-generator shall pay the actual cost of the
installation/changes. The Customer-generator shall pay a capital contribution for any required
line extensions necessary to extend the NSPI system to the point of interconnection. If this
line is dedicated to serve the Customer-generator, all maintenance, repair and replacement
costs are the responsibility of the Customer-generator. NSPI will perform and manage the
maintenance of these facilities.
10.
Glossary of Terms
CSA: Canadian Standards Association, an accredited standards development o o
organisation within Canada.
Customer-generator: The owner/operator of the interconnected generation facilities.
Distributed generation: Electric generation facilities connected to the NSPI Distribution
System.
Electric Distribution System (NSPI power system):
electric power to loads.
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NSPI’s facilities that deliver
Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
Hertz (Hz): The common unit used to describe periodic event frequency. It is a measure
of the number of times or cycles that a periodic signal repeats in a second, also denoted
as cycles per second.
IEEE: The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., an organisation that
develops voluntary standards relating to electrical safety and product performance.
Interconnection: The addition of a distributed generation unit to the NSPI Distribution
System.
Interconnection Agreement: A document describing terms for the safe and orderly
operation of the electrical facilities interconnecting the Customer-generator’s Facility and
the NSPI’s Distribution System.
Inverter: A power electronic device, which converts dc power into ac power.
Islanding: A condition in which a portion of the NSPI Distribution System is energized
solely by a distributed generation source.
Isolation: Physically disconnected or separated from all sources of dynamic energy by
approved devices or procedures.
Point of Interconnection: The point where NSPI`s Distribution System is connected to
the Customer-generator’s facilities or conductors.
Standard Protection Code: A set of safe work practices for work on the NSPI
Distribution System designed to ensure the safety of workers and security of the NSPI
Distribution System.
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
11.
Appendices
11.1.
Appendix A – Standard Voltage Flicker Curve
11.2.
Appendix B - Specific Technical Requirements – Inverter-Based Systems
11.3.
Appendix C – References
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
Appendix A – Flicker Curve
Figure 1: Flicker Curve
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
Appendix B: Specific Technical Requirements – Inverter-Based
Systems



Output rating of inverter is less than 30 kW
Systems are rated and connected at a secondary voltage level, i.e. less than 600V
nominal, measured line to line
Systems meet CSA C22.2 No.107.1-01 Standard “General Use Power Supplies”9 and are
so marked.
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Nova Scotia Power – Interconnection Guideline: Systems Not Exceeding 100 kW
2011/07/08
Appendix C - References
1
Nova Scotia Power Inc. “Standard Protection Code” - Current version
Province of Nova Scotia “Electrical Installation and Inspection Act” R.S.N.S. 1989, c. 141
3
CSA Canadian Electrical Code Part 1, C22.1-02, Safety Standards for Electrical Installations (CE
Code)
4
NSPI Regulation 2.7 “Electric Service Availability and Standard Voltages”
5
IEEE Recommended Practices and Requirements for Harmonic Control in Electrical Power Systems
6
IEEE 1547 Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems
7
CSA Standard CAN3 C235-83 – “Preferred Voltage Levels for AC Systems 0 to 50,000V”
8
Nova Scotia Power Inc. “Metering Standards” Current version
9
CSA C22.2 No.107.1-01 Standard “General Use Power Supplies”
2
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