Download GREEK MYTHOLOGY

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Modern Greek grammar wikipedia, lookup

Malay grammar wikipedia, lookup

Causative wikipedia, lookup

French grammar wikipedia, lookup

Scottish Gaelic grammar wikipedia, lookup

Ojibwe grammar wikipedia, lookup

Inflection wikipedia, lookup

Old Norse morphology wikipedia, lookup

Kannada grammar wikipedia, lookup

English clause syntax wikipedia, lookup

Polish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Udmurt grammar wikipedia, lookup

Portuguese grammar wikipedia, lookup

Chinese grammar wikipedia, lookup

Proto-Indo-European verbs wikipedia, lookup

Macedonian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Ukrainian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Japanese grammar wikipedia, lookup

Old Irish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Navajo grammar wikipedia, lookup

Modern Hebrew grammar wikipedia, lookup

Swedish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Ancient Greek grammar wikipedia, lookup

Ancient Greek verbs wikipedia, lookup

Turkish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Germanic strong verb wikipedia, lookup

Spanish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Germanic weak verb wikipedia, lookup

Latin syntax wikipedia, lookup

Russian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Lexical semantics wikipedia, lookup

Old English grammar wikipedia, lookup

Icelandic grammar wikipedia, lookup

Yiddish grammar wikipedia, lookup

Georgian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Sotho verbs wikipedia, lookup

German verbs wikipedia, lookup

Serbo-Croatian grammar wikipedia, lookup

Pipil grammar wikipedia, lookup

Kagoshima verb conjugations wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
VERBS
 A verb shows action or helps to make a
statement.
 RULE: Every sentence must have at least one
verb.
 If you don’t have a verb, you don’t have a
sentence!
VERBS
 There are three types of verbs:
Action Verbs
Helping Verbs
Linking Verbs
ACTION VERBS
 Action verbs express action.
EXAMPLES
attend
draw
make
say
take
carry
forget
plan
scream
talk
cheer
laugh
pretend
sit
try
close
leave
read
skip
walk
copy
let
refuse
slam
write
cry
like
run
sleep
yell
HELPING VERBS
 Helping verbs help an action or linking verb.
 Helping verbs help to tell when a verb happened.
 Helping verbs also express fine differences in
meaning that would otherwise be difficult to
express.
HELPING VERBS
 RULE: If there is more than one verb in a verb
phrase, there is at least one helping verb present.
 RULE: The last verb in the verb phrase is always
the main verb. Any preceding verbs are helping
verbs.
HELPING VERBS
 The following verbs can be helping verbs:
is
being
shall
has
am
been
should
had
are
will
may
do
was
would
might
does
were
can
must
did
be
could
have
ought
HELPING VERBS
EXAMPLES
We have been taking notes all day.
• Have and been are helping verbs.
• Taking is an action verb.
What are you thinking?
• Are is a helping verb.
• Thinking is an action verb.
She will be cold without a jacket.
• Will is a helping verb.
• Be is a linking verb.
I can understand how verbs can be
confusing.
• Can is a helping verb.
• Understand is an action verb.
• Be is a linking verb.
HELPING VERBS
EXAMPLES
I should walk home.
•
Should indicates that the speaker feels compelled
to walk home, but does not necessarily wish to
do so.
I will walk home.
•
Will indicates that the speaker is planning to walk
home in the future.
I might walk home.
•
Might indicates that the speaker is unsure about
whether or not he will walk home.
I must walk home.
•
Must indicates that the speaker does not have
any choice, except to walk home.
I could walk home.
•
Could indicates that the speaker is able to walk
home if necessary.
LINKING VERBS
 Linking verbs link two words together.
 Linking verbs tell us how someone or something
is.
 These verbs can be linking verbs:
EXAMPLES
appear
grow
seem
stay
become
look
smell
taste
feel
remain
sound
turn
LINKING VERBS
 RULE: The verb am, when it appears alone, is
always a linking verb.
FORMS OF THE VERB AM:
am
is
were
being
are
was
be
been
 RULE: If you can substitute a form of the verb am
in the sentence and it still makes sense, you are
dealing with a linking verb.
LINKING VERBS
 Most of the time, you can think of a linking
verb as if it were an equals sign in the middle of
a sentence, usually connecting a noun to an
adjective.
EXAMPLES
Austin seems bored
Austin = bored (adjective)
Sara was excited.
Sara = excited (adjective)
Reading is my favorite class.
Reading = class (noun)
LINKING VERBS
 Verbs relating to the five senses can sometimes
be linking verbs.
 Look at the way the word is being used in the
sentence to determine whether the word is
functioning as a linking verb or an action verb.
LINKING VERBS
EXAMPLES OF SENSORY LINKING VERBS
The soup smells good.
Soup = good (adjective)
That birthday cake tasted delicious!
Cake = delicious (adjective)
Your new car looks really nice.
Car = nice (adjective)
Patrick felt sick all day.
Patrick = sick (adjective)
That sounds like a good idea.
That = idea (noun)
EXAMPLES OF SENSORY ACTION VERBS
Bryan smelled smoke coming
from the engine.
The speaker is referring to the action of smelling
smoke.
Look at his new car!
The speaker is referring to the action of looking at
a car.
Libby felt the soft blanket.
The speaker is referring to the action of feeling a
blanket.