Download GEOS 101 The Dynamic Earth Fall 2011

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Transcript
GEOS 101 The Dynamic Earth M, W, F 2:30‐3:20, Weyandt 208 Fall 2011 Professor: Dr. Thomas Gerber Office: 309 Weyandt Email: [email protected] Phone: 724‐357‐2611 Office Hours: Mon 3:30‐4:30, Tues 9:00‐11:00, Fri 10:00‐12:00, or by appointment The Course From volcanic eruptions and catastrophic earthquakes to the slow drift of continents and the passage of ice ages, Earth processes have shaped the history of life and altered the development of human civilization. In this course, you will be introduced to both what we know about Earth and how we know it. We will consider the origin of Earth and its anatomy, plate tectonics and the rock cycle, and agents that shape Earth’s surface, such as rivers, waves, and glaciers. We will also explore phenomena that directly affect our society and economy, such as natural hazards (e.g. earthquakes and volcanoes), the generation of natural resources (e.g. oil and natural gas), and climate change. Format The Dynamic Earth is a lecture‐based course. Lectures will be presented with the aid of MS Powerpoint. I will upload slides for each lecture prior to class so you can make notes alongside my figures and text. Textbook There is no required textbook for this course. However, the sequence of lectures will generally follow the text by Tarbuck, Lutgens, and Tasa, Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology. This text is currently in its 10th edition, but the 8th and 9th editions are similar in content and layout. Acquiring this book is optional. All exams and quizzes will be based on lecture, but I will use many figures and illustrations from this text. Grading Your grade for this course is ONLY for the lecture; it will NOT be combined or averaged with your grade in lab (if you are enrolled in one). Your final lecture grade will be determined by your performance on the following: a.
Quizzes (160 points) – You will have the chance to earn up to 160 points by correctly answering online Desire2Learn quizzes. These quizzes (4) will be available Monday morning through Friday afternoon during the weeks indicated in the schedule below. The system will not allow you to take the quiz before or after that time, and it will only allow you 1 hour to complete it. Questions will be similar to those given on the exams, and since you’ll complete them at home you’ll have access to notes, books, etc… b.
Geoscience in the news (40 points) – One of the goals of this course is to increase your Earth‐
science literacy. To that end, I will ask you to identify and post to a course folder the title, publication, and a 2‐4 sentence summary of 3 articles related to geology and Earth science throughout the semester. This assignment will be explained further in class. c.
In‐class exams (100 points each) – Four computer‐graded exams will be given in this course. The last of these will be given during the final exam period, but it will not be comprehensive. Questions will be multiple‐choice, true/false, or matching. You cannot miss an exam. I will drop your lowest exam score, so if you miss one of the first 3 exams it will be dropped. The fourth and final exam is mandatory. Your final grade will be calculated as a percentage of the total available points (500). Your letter grade will be assigned according to the following scale 90‐100%=A; 80‐89%=B; 70‐79%=C; 60‐69%=D; and below 60%=F. (Adjustments may be made to this scale, but it will be no stricter than this.) Schedule DATE
LECTURE TOPIC
SUGGESTED
READING
8/29
8/31
9/2
9/5
9/7
9/9
9/12
9/14
9/16
9/19
9/21
9/23
9/26
9/28
9/30
10/3
10/5
10/7
10/10
10/12
10/14
10/17
10/19
10/21
10/24
10/26
10/28
10/31
11/2
11/4
11/7
11/9
11/11
11/14
11/16
11/18
11/21-25
11/28
11/30
12/2
12/5
12/7
12/9
12/12
12/16
Introduction to the course and scientific inquiry
Chapter 1
Geology, Earth’s origin, and its makeup
Plate Tectonics: The evidence
Chapter 2
Labor Day – No Class
Plate Tectonics: The theory
Minerals
Chapter 3
The rock forming minerals
Igneous Rocks and Activity I
Chapter 4
Igneous Rocks and Activity II
Chapter 5
Weathering and Soils
Chapter 6
NSF Workshop – No Class
Chapter 7
Sedimentary rocks and environments I
EXAM 1
Sedimentary rocks and environments II
Chapter 8
Faculty Workshop – No Class
Metamorphic rocks and environments
The geological timescale: Relative chronology
Chapter 9
The geological timescale: Absolute chronology
How rocks deform
Chapter 10
Deformation of Earth’s crust
Earthquake mechanics
Chapter 11
Earthquakes, plate tectonics, and hazards
Earth’s Interior
Chapter 12
EXAM 2
Divergent boundaries and ocean basins I
Chapter 13
Divergent boundaries and ocean basins II
Convergent boundaries and mountain belts I
Chapter 14
Convergent boundaries and mountain belts II
Surface gravity flows
Chapter 15
Rivers
Chapter 16
Fluvial landforms
Groundwater
Chapter 17
Glaciers
Chapter 18
Glacial landforms
EXAM 3
The coastal environment
Chapter 20
Fall Break – No Class
Coastal landforms
Chapter 20
Earth’s climate and natural variability
Chapter 21
Anthropogenic climate change
Earth’s mineral resources
Chapter 23
Earth’s hydrocarbon resources
Earth history
Chapter 22
TBD
EXAM 4 (2:45-4:45)
D2L
QUIZ
ARTICLE
#1 Opens
#1 Closes
#1 Due
#2 Opens
#2 Closes
#3 Opens
#3 Closes
#2 Due
#4 Opens
#4 Closes
#3 Due