Download General Principles of Pharmacology

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts
no text concepts found
Transcript
Chapter 1
Information, Sources, and
Regulatory Agencies
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
Information, Sources, and
Regulatory Agencies

Pharmacology and the Oral Health Care
Provider

Obtaining a medication/health history
 Medication administration in the dental office
 Appointment scheduling
 Information sharing
 Handling medical emergencies
 Knowledge of and recommending
nonprescription medications
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
2
Sources of Information
•
Where to Look

Drug interactions references
 Prescription medications
 Over-the-counter medications
 Herbal and dietary supplements
 Age-related references
 Illness-related references
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
3
Sources of Information

Types of Media

Pharmacology textbooks specific to dentistry
 Dental drug reference guides
 General pharmacology reference guides
• Goodman and Gilman: The Pharmacologic Basis
of Therapeutics
• Physician’s Desk Reference
• Drug Facts and Comparison
• United States Pharmacopeia - Drug Information
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
4
Sources of Information

Types of Media

General pharmacology reference guides
• American Health-Systems Formulary Service
• Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs
 Specific to herbal supplements
• PDR for Herbal Medicine
 Consumer-oriented publications
 Specific medical textbooks
 Current medical and dental journals
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
5
Drug Names



Chemical Name – Determined by the
chemical structure of the drug
Trade Name – Registered as a trademark
under the Federal Trademark Law;
usually chosen because it can easily be
remembered and promoted commercially
Generic Name – Official name of the drug
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
6
Figure 1-1A comparison between the trade and
generic drug names of lidocaine.
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
7
Drug Substitution



Chemically Equivalent – Two formulations of a
drug meet established chemical and physical
standards
Biologically Equivalent – Two formulations
produce similar concentrations in blood and
tissues
Therapeutically Equivalent – Equal therapeutic
effects during a clinical trial
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
8
Federal Regulatory Agencies

Drug Legislation

The Food and Drug Act of 1906
 Harrison Narcotic Act of 1914
 Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938
 Durham-Humphrey Law of 1952
 Kefauver-Harris Bill (1962)
 Controlled Substance Act of 1970
 Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990
Mosby items and derived items © 2007 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
9