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Transcript
 Sample Syllabus for Psychology: Fundamental Issues
Course Materials:
TBA
Course Description
The course explores the fundamental principles and issues of contemporary scientific psychology,
which are approached as a method of inquiry as well as a body of knowledge. It provides an
overview and integration of the many and diverse approaches to the study of behavior and mental
processes, which is the definition of the science of psychology. Students are provided with an
opportunity to obtain a basis for more advanced study in the disciplines of psychology. Students
examine the origins and methods of psychology, biological foundations, consciousness, cognition
and language, and learning and memory.
Course Outcomes
Students will have the opportunity to acquire a broad understanding of the field of psychology as well
as develop knowledge in specific areas including the following:
• The history of psychology and major theorists who have contributed to the study of psychology.
• The methods used in the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes.
• The basic functions of the brain and nervous system and how they direct human behavior.
• The processes involved in learning including classical conditioning, operant conditioning,
and observational learning.
• The varied theories of intelligence and the methods used to assess intelligence.
• The major theories of personality including the differences between the psychoanalytic
and humanistic conceptualizations of personality.
• The major classifications of psychological disorders and the factors that contribute to
presence of the disorders.
• The factors that influence the behavior of an individual in social situations and his or her
interactions with others.
Course Methodology
Students are expected to:
1. Attend classes
2. Complete all assigned readings prior to class
3. Engage in class and on-line discussions
4. Participate in class activities
5. Complete and submit assignments by the due dates
Grading
• Daily Activity Points (Online Discussions) = 30%
• Assignment 1 = 15%
• Assignment 2 = 15%
• Final Exam = 40%
Students will not be allowed to make up quizzes or examinations if they are not present on the
day of administration.
Grading Scale
Percentage
Letter Grade
Grade Points
96-100
A
4.000
90-95
A-
3.667
87-89
B+
3.333
84-86
B
3.000
80-83
B-
2.667
77-79
C+
2.333
74-76
C
2.000
70-73
C-
1.667
67-69
D+
1.333
64-66
D
1.000
60-63
D-
.667
≤ 59
F
.000
Daily Activity Points (Online Discussions)
During each class period, students will complete an activity based on the material covered in the
present or previous days’ lectures or readings. The daily activities may include individual and
small-group exercises, short essays, or quizzes. The purposes of the activities are to reinforce
the students’ understanding of the course content and formatively assess the students’ learning.
The first week of class, students will be asked to comment on readings by responding to a
discussion thread via blackboard.
Assignment 1: Psychological Research Critique (Due: week 1)
Students will be asked to review an article from a current newspaper or magazine that
summarizes a research study in the field of psychology. The students will write a critique of the
study based on the concepts of research methodology discussed in the course. A separate
rubric will be provided.
Assignment 2: Psychological Disorder Summary (Due: week 2)
Students will select a psychological disorder from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and provide an overview of the disorder and its symptoms,
etiology, and treatment. The students will also be asked to conceptualize the disorder using one
of the theoretical models (i.e. psychodynamic, behavioral, etc.) discussed in the course. A
separate rubric will be provided.
Schedule and Topic Outline
Week
1
2
3
Date
Topic
Readings and Assignments
Introduction
Careers in Psychology
Prologue
Survey/Online
Discussion
History of Psychology, Contemporary Issues,
and Scientific Investigation
Chapter 1
Online Discussion
Consciousness
Chapter 3
Online Discussion
Nature vs. Nurture (Environmental Factors
Influencing Behavior)
Chapter 4
Assignment 1 Due
Developmental Psychology
Chapter 5
Biological Bases of Behavior – Part I
Chapter 2
Biological Bases of Behavior – Part II
Chapter 2
Sensation and Perception
Chapter 6
Learning
Chapter 7
Memory
Intelligence
Chapter 8
Chapter 10
Abnormal Psychology and Psychological
Disorders
Chapter 15
Assignment 2 Due
Abnormal Psychology / Psychological Disorders
Supplemental Readings
4
Cognition and Language
Chapter 9
Personality
Chapter 13
Social Psychology
Chapter 14
Review and Final Examination
Academic Honesty and Integrity Statement
The University views academic dishonesty as one of the most serious offenses that a student can
commit while in college and imposes appropriate punitive sanctions on violators. Here are some
examples of academic dishonesty. While this is not an all-inclusive list, we hope this will help you to
understand some of the things instructors look for. The following is excerpted from the University’s
policy on academic honesty and integrity; the complete policy is available at
http://www.cps.neu.edu/about-cps/policies-and-procedures.
•
•
•
•
•
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Cheating – intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information or
study aids in an academic exercise. This may include use of unauthorized aids (notes, texts)
or copying from another student’s exam, paper, computer disk, etc.
Fabrication – intentional and unauthorized falsification, misrepresentation, or invention of any
data, or citation in an academic exercise. Examples may include making up data for a
research paper, altering the results of a lab experiment or survey, listing a citation for a
source not used, or stating an opinion as a scientifically proven fact.
Plagiarism – intentionally representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any
academic exercise without providing proper documentation by source by way of a footnote,
endnote or intertextual note.
Unauthorized collaboration – Students, each claiming sole authorship, submit separate reports,
which are substantially similar to one another. While several students may have the same source
material, the analysis, interpretation and reporting of the data must be each individual’s.
Participation in academically dishonest activities – Examples include stealing an exam, using
a pre-written paper through mail order or other services, selling, loaning or otherwise
distributing materials for the purpose of cheating, plagiarism, or other academically dishonest
acts; alternation, theft, forgery, or destruction of the academic work of others.
Facilitating academic dishonesty – Examples may include inaccurately listing someone as
co- author of paper who did not contribute, sharing a take home exam, taking an exam or
writing a paper for another student.