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Transcript
900 Second Street NE #12
Washington, DC 20002-3560
Society for American Archaeology
Public Education and Outreach
US BOR Contributions to the
Society for American Archaeology
Public Web Pages Project
Prepared for
the US Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation
by
Patrice L. Jeppson, Lead Coordinator of the Public Web Pages Working Group
of the Society for American Archaeology Public Education Committee
and
Maureen Malloy, Manager, Public Education, Society for American Archaeology
May 2007
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Acknowledgements
Executive Summary
Introduction
I.
Project Purpose and Intent: Why Have Public Web Pages?
A.
B.
Meeting Archaeology Outreach and Education Needs
1.
An Economic and Friendly Interface with the Public
2.
Promoting Stewardship of Archaeological Resources
Meeting the Needs of Identified Audiences With Vetted Information
1.
Targeted ‘Outside’ Audiences
2.
Targeted ‘Insider’ Audiences
II. The Development Process: Creating the SAA Public Web Pages
A. Preliminary Research and Creation of the Design Plan
1. Content Area Decisions
2. Navigation Plan Development
3. Design Implementation
B. Content Gathering
1.
Theory, Methodology, Method and Technique
2.
Content Topics
2
C. Oversight: Ensuring Ethical, Peer-Reviewed, Public-Friendly
And Field-Tested Web Pages
D. Launching the Web Pages: Announcement Strategy
1.
Page Optimization
2.
Press Release to Media Targets
3.
A Grass Roots Education Email Campaign
4.
Scholarly Outreach to Peers
5.
Off-Site Outreach to Archaeology’s Public
III. What’s Next?: The Future of Archaeology for the public
A. Management Issues
1. Ensuring A Sustainable Resource
2. Content Updating
References
Appendices
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Acknowledgements
The U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation’s
Cultural Resources Management Office, in particular, Archeologist
and Federal Preservation Officer Thomas Lincoln, as well as Tobi
Brimsek, Executive Officer of the Society for American
Archaeology, Lynne Sebastian, Past President of SAA, the
members of the SAA Board, and Carol Ellick, Chair of the SAA
Public Education Committee 2003-2006, assisted in the granting
of monies and or the administration that seeded development of
this project.
4
Executive Summary
US DOI Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) grant monies facilitated
public outreach about archaeological resources by seeding
technical support for a major, web-based, public archaeology
resource developed by the Society for American Archaeology
(SAA). Entitled Archaeology for the public, this new resource is
comprised of a vast set of informational web pages coordinated
and maintained by the Web Pages Working Group of the SAA
Public Education Committee. In using the cost effective reach of
the Internet, and by employing a navigational strategy designed to
meet the needs of non-professional audiences, Archaeology for
the public shares a vast amount of archaeological information
while communicating the commitment of the archaeology
discipline to its many publics.
The US DOI BOR contribution seeded partial technical support for
the hypertext development of this new resource within
cyberspace. This critical support was in turn leveraged with (a)
content (or web page information) contributed (to date) by more
than 177 individuals (namely archaeologists, archaeology
educators, and archaeologically-interested members of the public)
and (b) technical development and content coordination
performed by the PEC Web Pages Working Group—constituting
(to date) more than 8000 hours of volunteered service— and by
the SAA Manager of Public Education as part of SAA staff duties.
This new resource is now live at the SAA society web site
(SAAWeb) at URLs http://archaeology.saa.org and (mirrored at)
www.saa.org/public. This public archaeology education and
outreach resource presently contains 53.2 MB of information
organized under 33 topic headings and subheadings for a total of,
so far, 282 web pages of original and coordinated content,
including 78 pdfs.
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Introduction
US Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation grant assistance to
Society for American Archaeology public education efforts (2001-2006)
provided partial technical support for the development of Archaeology for
the public. This new, web-based, SAA resource provides a significant
amount of information about archaeology to the general public while
communicating the commitment of the archaeology profession to its
publics. The following reports on the rationale for this project and the
methodologies pursued in the development of this vast set of
informational web pages.
Included here are details about the targeted audiences for this resource,
the design plan and its implementation, the evaluation and oversight
procedures created and active (in place), and the announcement strategy
to promote the resource at the time of its launch at SAAWeb (the Society
for American Archaeology society web pages). A short research summary
of what has been learned from this project is included as the development
and maintenance of this project is providing important insight into how
Public Archaeology as a sub-field of professional practice is being
informed and transformed by the hyperspace medium. This report
concludes with brief comments looking toward the future role of
Archaeology for the public as a medium for sharing archaeological
information with the public.
I. PURPOSE AND INTENT OF THE SAA PUBLIC WEB PAGES PROJECT
A.
Meeting SAA Outreach and Education Needs
The public has long had more than a passing interest in archaeological
sites, archaeologists, and archaeological methods for studying the past.
Moreover, archaeological research and preservation initiatives ultimately
depend on public support making engaging the public an important
concern for archaeology practioners. Actively engaging the public as part
of stewardship development and information sharing is both a principle of
ethical practice (Stewardship [Principle No. 1] and Public Education and
Outreach [Principle No. 4], SAA Principles of Archaeological Ethics 1996;
Lynott and Wylie 1995) and a new an exponentially growing subfield of
6
practice (Earthscan: James and James Publishers [2002], Florida Public
Archaeology Network 2007; SAA Excellence in Public Education Award
Committee [Jeppson] 2005a, SAA Public Education Committee 2005b;
McDavid 2002:2).
The SAA, through the work of its Public Education Committee (the PEC),
has launched Archaeology for the public to help bridge archaeology’s
disciplinary ideals and everyday practice with the public’s needs and
interests.
1. Creating An Economic and Friendly Interface With the Public
The Archaeology for the public web pages form part of the ‘public face’ of
SAA and the profession of archaeology as a whole acting as a major
interface between the discipline and archaeology’s many different publics.
They are a society-based education feature in that they, in practice, help
form how everybody/anybody in cyber-space ‘sees’ the discipline,
including SAA as a professional organization. Concurrently,
archaeological professionals (in the SAA membership and beyond) take
away from this society resource an understanding of how practioners
professionally interact with archaeology’s public(s) at large.
2. Promoting Stewardship of Archaeological Resources
In using the cost effective reach of the Internet, and by employing a
navigational strategy designed to meet the needs of non-professional
audiences, Archaeology for the public forms a major place of contact with
both the friend and, importantly, the foe of archaeology helping to
promote public stewardship (protection) of archaeological resources to all.
B.
Meeting the Needs of Identified Audiences With Vetted Information
1. Targeted ‘Outside’ Audiences
Archaeology does not have just one public. There are many, and varied,
publics for archaeological information. These web pages introduce
archaeology and provide content and resources to both neophytes and
those already holding a deeper understanding of archaeology. In other
words, they constitute a resource for the young and the mature; the lesser
educated, being educated, and very educated; the passive and active
audience (or captive and non-captive web user) -- meaning those directed
by a class exercise or other need to find archaeology information and
those seeking out the world of archaeology willingly; and, of the later,
those with a casual interest and those with a serious passion for
archaeology.
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Identified Audiences
for Public Archaeology Information
· Native Americans with heritage concerns
· K-12 Teachers with education needs
· Retired couples looking up 'travel options
and volunteer opportunities
· College Students seeking graduate
program information
· Individuals (foreign and U.S.) seeking
heritage listings
· Scouts working towards the Boy Scout
Archaeology Badge
· Home Schooling families
· Tourists seeking heritage tourism
destinations…
· Individuals seeking second career options
· Major News and Entertainment Outfits
(print/TV/Magazine/film industry) seeking
reference material and contact numbers for
experts
· Looters/collectors
· Professional colleagues (Historians,
Geographers, Museum Professionals, etc.)
· Avocationalists
· Women and Men seeking second career
options
· archaeology volunteers
· Legislators (or more likely their staffs)
writing environmental bills
· Open Space Advocates, "Smart Growth”
supporters,
· Archaeology Conservancy Members
· Clients of CRM (building designers
contractors, land developers,
mining companies, etc.) who don't
understand the process they are obliged to
conform to
· Potential clients of CRM (people in the
permitting process seeking lists of qualified
professionals
· Site descendants
· Land owners curious and/or concerned
about the archaeological process
· Students researching jobs for Career Day
· Incarcerated Readers
· Heritage Tour Operators
· Individuals who have 'discovered' a site
and are turning to the professionals for
information about what to do
· Interpreters
· Computer Gaming Developers
Members of these publics that
search (i.e., ‘Google’), surf to, or
navigate (within) these web
pages find content that explains
‘what it is that archaeologists do’,
‘why archaeologists do what they
do’, and ‘how archaeologists do
what they do’. The page content
also shares with members of the
public ‘how they can best
participate in and enjoy the study
of the past while protecting our
cultural heritage resources’.
2. Targeted ‘Insider’ Audiences
Also targeted as audiences with
these web pages are professional
archaeologists worldwide
(including the 10,000+
practitioners in the Americas
alone), and archaeology
educators (formally-trained
educators, environmental
specialists, and heritage
interpreters). Both of these
groups deal with archaeology's
various publics on a regular basis
and seek advice and resources to
assist in their efforts.
In short, Archaeology for the
public is an intentional doubleentendre, in that it refers to two
different types of content included
in the public pages: One type of
content includes information
about archaeology for a diversity
of publics. The other is Public
Archaeology information for
archaeology practioners who wish
to communicate with these
diverse publics.
· Professional Archaeologists
· Archaeology Educators
8
II. THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
A. Preliminary Research and Creation of a Design Plan
1. Content Area Design
Content and navigation are the first, most important, issues to address for
any web site—and as this is an archaeological web site assisting the
profession’s practioners to meet ethical practices, design decisions
needed to be made by archaeologists, not by web site designers with little
or no knowledge of the discipline. In this particular instance, decisions
made for these web pages represent both our profession's and our
professional society's aims and practices to the public at large.
As would be expected with any good web site, content will continue be
added. For the purpose of these pages, content will necessarily grow in
an organic fashion, expanding as Public Archaeology as a field of practice
expands and evolves — as new ideas arise, as new ‘best examples’
emerge, as new controversies grip archaeology, and as new publics are
identified. Therefore these SAA public web pages never can and never
will be ‘completely finished’.
These web pages were launched at the SAA server, as part of SAAWeb
at www.saa.org/public and http://archaeology.saa.org, only after a
sufficient mass of content was available to begin adequately serving our
publics. This content includes long term (enduring) page content and
short term, rotating (e.g., news and events) content. This short-term
information was previously (since the early 1990s) collected and
distributed by SAA under the SAA PEC print and (then) e-newsletter,
A&PE [Archaeology and Public Education]. This SAA PEC resource has
now folded into this public web pages resource.
Phase I of this project – supported in part by US DOI BOR grant monies,
and completed and live on the Internet at SAAWeb in August of 2006 -involved development and implementation of the web pages navigation
design plan and the posting of a minimum amount of page content to
begin serving our publics. Phase II, now underway, involves posting
additional long term content, including an additional 300 pages of created
and gathered formal educational resources, and the updating of short
term content.
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2. Navigation Plan Development
The design decisions forming the basis for these public web pages began
with the efforts of more than 30 SAA members who attended a Public
Education Committee Retreat in the spring of 2001 (April 16-18, in New
Orleans). The goal of the Retreat was to develop a new strategic plan for
meeting the Committee's mandate of "promoting awareness about and
concern for the study of past cultures and to engage people in the
preservation and protection of heritage resources” (SAA PEC [Lehrner]
2001). Drawing on topics of concern that the PEC regularly considers and
responds to, these Retreat attendees generated a large and inclusive set
of ideas that were likewise useful for a resource taking advantage of the
cyberspace medium. With this foundation in place, the SAA, with financial
assistance from the Bureau of Reclamation (specifically, the US DOI BOR
Cultural Resources Management Program) funded a working weekend
session for a newly formed PEC Internet Work Group (re’ Web Pages
Working Group), which first met in the fall of 2001. The four SAA PEC
members who attended this working weekend session were either
publicly-engaged archaeologists or archaeological educators. Guidance
was provided remotely by the SAA Manager of Public Education and
Outreach.
The main task of this intensive working session was to develop a design
plan for a set of informational web pages—not to create content, but
rather to create a link hierarchy which would be able to easily incorporate
new content over time. (A forthcoming, second part of the development
process would involve collating and organizing and posting any extant
materials viable as page content along with any new content gathered.)
In preparation for the working session, each Web Pages Working Group
member queried educators and other members of the public that they,
respectively, already engaged as part of their own practice in order to find
out what various publics thought they wanted and/or needed from a set of
public archaeological web pages. The design team also surveyed and
sampled many extant web sites to supplement both the archaeologydirected focus of the content and the gathered interview and survey data.
These previewed sites included, but were not limited to, those of the
National Initiative For a Networked Cultural Heritage (Best Practices in
Networking Cultural Heritage), Webby Award/Community Choice and
Internet Industry Best of the Web sites, and the public pages of parallel
professional societies such as the American Historical Association and
the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Also
examined were public archaeology sites with a strong record of use as a
public resource such as the archaeology page at Independence National
Historical Park and archaeology at about.com. In addition, general
community-based, resource web sites were consulted such as
10
the Business Industry Journal selection for "most successful communitycentered web site" (the fan site for the Washington Capitals sports team).
While appearing unorthodox at first glance, this latter proved a useful
model given SAA's aim of building a community of public stewards that
will work with archaeologists to safeguard the past.
The link hierarchy that emerged was developed during this working
session which was three long days of lively, frequently heated, discussion
(to say that the process was intense—even grueling—is not overstating it,
as anyone who has experienced this type of collaborative design
workshop will know). The results were presented (McDavid et al. 2002) to
the SAA PEC Chair, who apprised the SAA Board of the design plan at
the general board meeting in April of 2002. The information was made
widely available to the SAA Public Education Committee members for
review, comment, and suggestions.
3. Design Implementation
After approval by the PEC and the SAA Board, work to implement the
Design Plan ensued. Using US DOI BOR grant funds, a technical web
consultant was hired to construct a working prototype of the Design Plan,
with the aim of achieving a reasonable balance between attractiveness
and usability. Given the assumption that these pages will be accessed by
members of various non-archaeological publics (including students of all
ages) they were designed to be more user-friendly, colorful, and
graphically interesting than the corporate, managerial style that
distinguishes the rest of the archaeology society’s, member-directed, web
presence. Because these public pages will also be information-driven,
however, our directive to the web design consultant was to avoid
burdening the site with flashing animations, loud colors, confusing page
layouts, and distracting graphics. Instead, NPS-style web pages, aiming
for broadest (i.e., lowest common denominator) technological parameters,
were implemented. The idea throughout this development was that, while
the use of a technical consultant was an essential part of implementing
the proposed design, final decisions about how to utilize both
technological features and graphics needed to rest with the
archaeologists.
The Web Pages Working Group developed a very reciprocal and active
relationship with the web design consultant—the site was not simply
farmed out. By early 2003, a prototype of the link hierarchy was ready to
be shown to members of the PEC (which was done via the PEC listserv)
as well as to sample segments of various publics. All were asked to
review a selection of different template layouts for the page navigation
(Figure 1), and their input allowed a final prototype to be finalized that
could, in turn, be ‘fleshed out’ with content.
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Figure 1:
Prototype Navigation Menu Bar, Home Page, 2003.
B. Content Development
1. Theory, Methodology, Method and Technique
After designing the navigation plan, the Web Pages Working Group
began to solicit and coordinate content to “put flesh on the navigation
skeleton”. Contributions were gathered from archaeologists as well as
members of various publics who use archaeology in various ways. From
this start, as the page content was collected, it began to reshape the link
hierarchy (page navigation) in a transparent and hermeneutic process
that continues today: At any given time, the pages’ contents represent
what our colleagues currently do with their publics and, equally, what our
publics are already doing with archaeology.
This project’s contents are dependent on, and based in, collaborations
across and between professional societies, across professions, and
between professionals and multiple publics. (One example: the thousands
of hours of service volunteered by two members of the Web Pages
Working Group comes courtesy of two professional societies, the SAA
(PEC) and the Society for Historical Archaeology (Public Education and
Interpretation Committee or PEIC). Combined, conjoined, and
cooperative content exchanges for page content are arranged with,
among many other sources, the Society for Historical Archaeology Public
Education and Interpretation Committee, the Foundation for the
Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies’ lesson plan development
(FAMSI), the Smithsonian Institution Anthropology Outreach Office,
archaeology at about.com, BRAVO (Battlefield Restoration and
Archaeological Volunteer Organization), the Georgia Council of
Professional Archaeologists, Center for Archaeology in the Baltimore
County Public Schools, the National Park Service Archeology Program,
SRI Foundation, and the AAA K-12 Anthropology and Education listserv.
12
This collaborative strategy maximizes strengths and limits costly
reproduction and reinvention. In practice, this collaboration has also
served to help clarify the state of Public Archaeology as archaeological
outreach aims and goals vary among US professional societies and US
outreach differs from that found in other regional practices—for instance,
the Near East, Europe and Southern Africa. For example, reflecting the
science orientation of the processual archaeology tradition, prehistory
outreach is often rich in resources about archaeology’s methods and
methodology. Historical archaeology and Near Eastern archaeology on
the other hand, dealing as they do with broader history issues and
multiple descendant communities, tend to have a social studies focus.
Meanwhile, the main established materials currently available stem from
federal agency mandates and help meet archaeology’s important
stewardship goal, while a rapidly evolving and exponentially growing subspecialty of academic scholarship based in post-processual theoretical
frameworks is contributing many new resources aimed at meeting the
public’s needs—for example, subjects already taught in K-12th grade
education or specific descendant communities.
In addition, these pages incorporate a significant amount of existing
public outreach now being produced by non-archaeologist avocationalists
and also by formally trained educators who have contributed significantly
and substantively to Public Archaeology.
Content is also contributed from the leadership of the SAA including, to
date, the SAA President (2005) and the Chair and members of the SAA
Ethics Committee, Council of Affiliated Societies, Excellence in Public
Education Award Committee, and the Committee on the Americas.
Content, guidance, and assistance has come as well from the SAA Staff,
including the Executive Director and the Public Education, Membership
and Marketing, Government Affairs, and Publications Managers.
Throughout the development of this project, the aim has been not to try to
meet the content needs of every potential audience for archaeology, but
rather to create a resource that will accommodate (grow and expand) as
the area of practice known as “Public Archaeology” grows and expands.
This forward-thinking strategy is also a necessity because content does
not yet exist to support outreach for many of archaeology’s identified
audiences.
Original design decisions for this project began with more than 30 SAA
PEC members who identified topics of concern that the PEC regularly
considers and responds to (Heritage tourists, site descendants, metal
detectorists, legislators, school educators, avocationalists, land owners,
journalists and bottle hunters, etc.) In some cases, there existed valuable
information on SAAWeb and elsewhere for some of these previously
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identified audiences. Rather than redevelop and reinvent the wheel
(wasting precious resources) this project has imported these existing
resources making pre- and non-web-based materials web-based, and
linking to extant content in other locations so as to maximize (further
extend the reach of) the resources of others. This strategy serves to
expand the offerings of the SAA public web pages without increasing SAA
web server volume or Web Page Working Group management duties.
As a result, Archaeology for the public functions as a vital clearing-house,
or major portal, for individuals in search of information, including
archaeologists. In doing so, the SAA continues to support the Goals and
Objectives for Coordinating Archaeology and Education set in place in
1991 in partnership with the Society for Historical Archaeology and the
American Anthropological Association (Education and Archaeology Work
Group 1991).
2.
Content Topics
The page content posted at Archaeology for the public is organized
under 33 headings and subheadings. (See the Site Map in Appendix II.)
Information is provided about, among other topics, advocacy
organizations, local and regional avocational societies, field schools,
archaeology education coordinators [contacts] in each state, archaeology
in books, movies and television, and video games, recent news and
events, laws and ethics, metal detecting, and much more. Selected
(public-friendly) Archaeology Web Sites of Interest are indexed
geographically and by historical topic. There are also more than 20
brochures, fliers, and fact sheets posted in pdf format for easy
downloading.
Selective links lead to many existing archaeology web resources hosted
elsewhere in cyberspace such as archeology blogs, pod casts, and
streaming video. Each such link is reviewed for public-friendliness and is
annotated: Archaeology for the public is not merely a ‘list of links’.
One example of off-site linking is State Archaeology Month/Week
program information which constitutes the longest running and most
widely organized outreach undertaking with 30+ states highlighting their
archaeological resources. After more than a decade based at NPS, the
clearing-house for State Archaeology Week/Month information has now
moved to the SAA Archaeology for the public web pages. Off-site linking
and original content (contributed by SAA PEC and SHA PEIC members)
provides direct links to State-by-State Archaeology Month/Week web
14
pages and provides professional archaeologists and archaeology educators
with background information and suggestions for undertaking Archaeology
Week/Month endeavors such as Archaeology Month Activities and Tips on
Poster production -- How is a poster created? Funded?, Designed? and
Distributed? (http://www.saa.org/public/resources/StateArchMonth.html). A
major element of this program, also the most costly, is the beautiful and
informative Archaeology Month poster, thousands of which are sent to
schools, libraries, museums, and government offices in each participating
state. These past state posters, which are year-specific and hence ‘expire’,
are being given a second life illustrating page content at Archaeology for
the public. This includes archaeology travel destinations in a heritage
tourism section (see Figure 2).
Figure 2: Archaeology Month Poster reprised to illustrate a portion of the web
pages detailing Archaeological Web Sites of Interest and Heritage Tourism
Destinations (<http://www.saa.org/public/links/PAWebSitesSoUS.html>).
Elsewhere at these web pages, cross-linking with other extant content
helps the professional archaeology community promote videos, web
pages, and walking tours developed as part of cultural resource
mitigation. In doing this, these web pages help ensure that creative
mitigation products do not end up sitting in repositories like the grey
literature they are meant to replace.
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A major area of page content is directed at K-12th grade educators
(http://www.saa.org/public/resources/foredu.html). This includes a major
unit (being posted now as part of Phase II content) that is designed by the
SAA Manager of Public Education and Outreach and Staff at the
Smithsonian Institution Anthropology Outreach Office. This new resource
uses archaeology content and critical thinking skills to help
captivate, galvanize and reinforce student interest in reading, writing,
research, analysis, public speaking and advanced technology skills.
All posted education content at Archaeology for the public involves input
from K-12th grade educators (on the content that is designed for them
and their students). Just as archaeologists do not wish to see educators
digging sites, educators are not interested in lesson plans written by noneducators and typically archaeologists do take on this task with little
background in educational epistemology. To redress this imbalance,
educators contribute lesson plans and help index the pages for search
engines (i.e., Google) using non-archaeological frames of reference. This
is desirable as non-archaeologists will not necessarily use the same
search terms archaeologists would when looking for information they
need. (For a sample of Feedback comments from educators, see
Appendix IV.)
US DOI BOR grant funds have been applied for scanning existing lesson
plan resources for use at the education-focused section of these web
pages. This action involves utilizing character recognition software to
reproduce lesson plans (with their original formatting) in the educatorfriendly, downloadable format (as ftp, or formal transfer protocol files).
A vast amount of information for assisting insider professional audiences
in their outreach efforts is posted under the “For Archaeologists” section
at Archaeology for the public. Among many other helpful resources are
Guidelines for Organizing a Public Session, tips for writing for the public,
examples of CRM reports in narrative form for public consumption, media
press release templates, links to on-line Interpretation courses, evaluation
rubrics, and information on an available traveling SAA exhibit
(http://www.saa.org/public/forArchaeologists/outreach_to_public.html;
http://www.saa.org/public/forArchaeologists/outreach_to_media.html; and
http://www.saa.org/public/forArchaeologists/Elected.html). There is also
an evolving and exponentially growing area dedicated to resources
related to scholarly research on, and professional development in Public
Archaeology – e.g., a historiography, annotated bibliographies, course
syllabis (<http://www.saa.org/public/forArchaeologists/
outreach_to_public.html#3>).
16
3.
Oversight: Ensuring Ethical, Peer-Reviewed, Public-Friendly
and Field-Tested Web Pages
All page content posted at Archaeology for the public is gathered and
coordinated by the SAA PEC Web Pages Working Group, all of whose
members conduct scholarly research and are engaged in practice within
the subfield of Public Archaeology and who are arguably leading scholars
in this area the archaeology discipline. (See the preparatory biographical
information for Working Group members and the SAA Manager of Public
Education and Outreach at http://www.saa.org/public/about/webbios.html.
Content contributions to date (as of May 2007) have come from 177
publicly-active archaeologists and archaeologically interested members of
the public (http://www.saa.org/public/about/contributors.html). (See
Appendix 1 for a list of content contributors). Importantly, the hypertext
nature of cyberspace dictates the development of these web pages
(indeed all web page): The contributed content to Archaeology for the
public is not SAA content and is therefore not viable for traditional SAA
print publication editorial review protocols. As part of the hypertext
environment, this contributed content is pre-existing, ‘completed product’
that SAA merely accesses by linking to the material (mainly) at its original
place of origin (i.e., extant content published/posted elsewhere).
Editorial oversight exists in the hypertext environment but it is keyed to,
determined by, and restricted to, page theme choices (the topics
presented) and the selection process for determining the supporting page
content, only. The texts (themselves) that are accessed to support the
SAA Archaeology for the public web pages themes are already edited
per the guidelines of their creating entities. This already-existing content
is either imported and posted in its original state as a fully referenced
portable document format (pdf) file or, more commonly, is content linked
to, as it already exists, at its live location.
As with any other SAA publication academic freedom standards apply: In
the selection of the ‘linked to’ content there is inclusiveness of differences
of opinion. Likewise, ethical standards remain always as the baseline
criteria for acceptance.
Important note: In cyberspace there is no way, legal or otherwise, to
preclude unwanted entities from linking to an existing web page.
However, for the purpose of archaeology education and outreach, this
web pages project welcomes, indeed hopes for, archaeology’s foes to link
to Archaeology for the public — so that they receive clear, unequivocal,
authoritative, explanations about cultural resource loss due to looting, so
that they gain an awareness of state and national preservation laws, and
so that they can learn archaeologically recommended ways of
participating responsibly in the study of the past.
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Copyright standards as well as intellectual property rights and protocols
are established for cyberspace and the Archaeology for the public web
pages project complies both with these legally recognized structures and
with more informal, common courtesies of the cyber-community. At no
time is SAA legally responsible for content that is merely linked to from
Archaeology for the public. At no time is SAA ethically or legally
responsible for entities who choose to link to Archaeology for the public.
Indeed, this latter can not be monitored nor marshaled and, as explained
above, preclusion is not desirable given the educational outreach mission
of this project.
SAA is ethically responsible for the themes presented on these web
pages (which represent informed PEC decisions) and SAA is ethically
responsible for the selection of the links to already existing content -- but
SAA is neither ethically nor legally responsible for the linked to content
itself. Link decisions are evaluated by the PEC Web Pages Working
Group whose members are both highly and uniquely qualified to evaluate
‘best examples’ of linked to content. (See preparatory biographical
information for the Web Pages Working Group and the SAA Manager of
Public Education and Outreach at http://www.saa.org/public/about/
webbios.html).
Before going live, all contributed, prospective, web page content is
reviewed thoughtfully by several people. Members of the PEC Web
Pages Working Group and the SAA Manager of Education and Outreach
coordinate and review all page content, and, on a case-by-case basis,
may send some proposed content to additional reviewers. For example,
people who do historical archaeology outreach might be asked to look at
content about historical archaeology outreach, and so on. For more
sensitive proposed content—the specifics of which are unpredictable, but
it is assumed that sensitive issues are likely to arise— the PEC chair and,
if appropriate, the PEC Board Liaison and then the Ethics Committee will
be asked to review content per the oversight procedures created and
active (in place) for this project. The assumption is that sensitive issues
could arise within any content area—whether the content is creative,
factual, or both.
Rigorous peer review to date includes what has turned out to be one of
the most important sections of these public web pages, Frequently Asked
Questions. This content, informed by literally thousands of letters, phone
calls, and emails (to the SAA Manager of Public Education and
Outreach), is interesting for what it has revealed about archaeology and
archaeologists: Notably, review feedback by colleagues about this portion
of these web pages has indicated that the archaeologist’s and
archaeological educator’s perception of what the public wants to know
about archaeology overlaps with, but does not fully correlate with, the
18
requests for information that the society receives; this is one of several
areas in which data is being gathered for analysis as a research
component of this project.
An important part of the content gathering and review stage involves
getting input from formally trained educators on the content elements
designed for teachers and their students. One of our primary assumptions
is that educational agendas are different from archaeological ones—not
mutually exclusive by any means, but not the same. Therefore content
developed for and with educators must meet educational needs
(curricula, pedagogical concepts, age-appropriateness, language, etc.),
not just archaeological ones (discouraging looting, encouraging
stewardship, etc.). One high priority is making educator-directed
information accessible —and, more importantly, printable, with original
formatting — as Adobe PDF files.
All aspects of these web pages designed by the Web Pages Working
Group —navigation/link hierarchy, template design, main and secondary
index page text, etc. — has been (and continues to be) peer-reviewed
and also field-tested to assess for public-friendliness. (See related
material in Appendix IV). Submitted (coordinated) content is likewise
assessed for public-friendliness (by the Web Page Working Group
members) before being posted. (See notes on evaluation issues for these
pages in Appendix IV.)
Visitors to these web pages are encouraged to comment and submit
queries and or content. We welcome ideas and ask everyone and anyone
to forward their suggestions and contributions for making this a more
successful public resource.
Lastly, the hyperspace context allows for proactive, engaged, assessment
and evaluation as part of responsible scholarship. This opportunity has
two merging dimensions. First, for a long while, outreach to the public has
been relegated to a secondary concern to “real” archaeology occurring as
an afterthought or add-on to primary archaeological research but this is
now changing. Recently, a convergence of theory, legislation, and an
increase in the level of archaeological site destruction, has begun to
relocate public archaeology from the margins of practice to the center. As
a result Public Archaeology is now seen to be an applied undertaking
which is relevant as research and, at the same time, it is increasingly
recognized that research on outreach is itself needed. As this has been
happening, assessment and evaluation have become more
commonplace, but are still launched from within bureaucratic and
economic frameworks, many of which are alien to, and insufficient for the
needs of, needed scholarly research (for developing outreach).
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Meanwhile, in cutting-edge cyberspace development, Dilbert-like
corporate models of assessment are being replaced with agile
development methodologies that value continuous collaboration and
welcome change. This web pages project, taking place as it does in
cyberspace, implements agile methodologies in place of older models of
long-term projected outcomes. Short-term development sequences and
rapidly shifting content requirements are seen as part of an evolving and
intensifying collaboration with our multiple publics, and with each other. In
this evaluative strategy, the state of the adaptive development process
itself forms the primary measure of progress. This strategy incorporates
forefronts inductive and deductive research as part of the assessment
program via an engaged hermeneutic-driven process.
D. Launching the Web Pages: Announcement Strategy
1. Page Optimization
An educational strategy to promote this resource was developed by the
Web Pages Working Group and the SAA Manager of Public Education
and Outreach and was initiated during the Go Live in August of 2007. As
part of this strategy, US DOI BOR grant funds were applied toward
outsourced consulting expertise in Search Engine Optimization. This
involved the application of skills and methods for optimizing search
engine placement of the Archaeology for the Public web pages. In
specific, implemented key words/terms and or common search word
phrases that will enhance the position and rank of the SAA PEC web
page content in organic search results were applied so that archaeology’s
publics can more easily find SAA PEC information. As part of this
optimization phase, the Web Page Working Group was trained in how to
optimize created oages so as to pre-position future assets posted at
Archaeology for the Public.
2. Press Release to Media Targets
Beyond page optimization, upon go live at SAAWeb, a press release was
developed, with the assistance of the SAA Executive and Publications
Manager, for sending (as hard copy) to media targets (http://www.saa.org/
PUBREL/Archaeology%20for%20the%20Public.pdf). A follow up press
release for these targets is in preparation. This announcement, based on
the 2007 SAA Presidential Recognition Award presented to the Web
Page Working Group, aims to again highlight the Archaeology for the
Public project.
20
3. A Grass Roots Education Email Campaign
A grass roots education campaign was been devised to ‘get the word out’
to archaeologists about this new Public Archaeology resource so that
they could, in turn, spread the word about the resource through their
individual personal and professional networks. Multiple thousands of
individuals and dozens of electronic listservs received a 6 line, emailed
posting with a request asking colleagues that they, in turn, forward to their
personal and professional networks. (See sample in Appendix V.) Many
SAA Committees and Networks helped in this effort to spread the word.
4. Scholarly Outreach to Peers
The announcing plan included poster session presentations at scholarly
conferences (Jeppson et. al., 2006; McDavid et. al., 2007). This was done
for the SAA membership at the 2006 conference and to archaeologists in
sister-societies in the Society for Historical Archaeology (at their 2007
conference) and the American Anthropological Association (at their 2006
conference. This latter was at the suggestions of the AAA Archaeology
Division. A notice of the new resource was requested to be added to the
SAA conference program boiler plate (this latter has not yet materialized
[for 2006 or 2007] but was beyond the Web Page Working Group control).
The web pages have been present (on disk with a laptop) in the SAA
conference bookroom at both the 2006 and 2007 conference, and
promotional materials about the project (bookmarks and signage) have
been present at the comp-ed SAA table in the bookrooms at the Society
for Historical Archaeology (2007) and the American Anthropological
Association (2006) conferences.
Publications explaining the intention and workings of these web pages
have and continue to be undertaken. The web page design plan was
initially published in the SAA Archaeological Record with a solicitation for
member review and evaluation (Jeppson et. al., 2003). After the go live,
at the suggestion of the Archaeology Division President at AAA, the Web
Pages Working Group submitted a piece for the Knowledge Exchange
column in the AAA Anthropology News in an issue dedicated to the theme
of Anthropology goes Digital. This shared the new resource with
colleagues in the mother discipline. Notice of the public web pages go live
at SAAweb was published in the SHA Newsletter in the Public Education
and Interpretation Column in the Fall of 2006, and in the AAA
Anthropology News Archaeology Division column (April 2007).
A publication strategy has been outlined by the Web Pages Working
Group for introducing individual areas of the web pages to the SAA
members. This will be attempted though short, topic specific,
contributions to the SAA Archaeological Record. An article is in
preparation that will present the web pages project in a proposed,
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Community Archaeology in North America-themed issue of the World
Archaeological Congress journal, Archaeologies. Archaeology for the
Public is now included as part of the SAA Press catalog boiler plate. This
catalog is mailed as hard copy to the SAA membership. One
announcement of the resource has been featured to date in the SAA
Archaeological Record and notices will continue in that publication.
Requests for a notice to be included in American Antiquity and Latin
Antiquity were denied.
Since going live, regular monthly updates about web page content
additions have been emailed to the SAA Public Archaeology GroupListserv and to the PEC-Business Listserv. This monthly mailing is being
expanded, in response to direct suggestions and or requests, to include
the list of State Network Coordinators, the Chairs of the various SAA
committees, and the listserv of the State Archaeologists/Historic
Preservation Officers.
5. Off-Site Outreach to Archaeology’s Publics
One on-going objective in this announcement strategy is that these public
web pages will be actively marketed to non-archaeologist groups—
particularly educators. This is being accomplished in a number of ways,
including emails and announcements to education gateway sites, email
announcements to educator listservs, registration with various search
engines and hierarchical directories, and the thoughtful use of hidden
metatags in the html code for our pages. An advertising piece and an
article about the web pages are planned for use in Social Studies, the
journal of the National Council for the Social Studies.
Off-Site Outreach has included bringing this resource (on disk on a
laptop) to venues with archaeologically interested publics convene. To
date, this has included the SAA PEC exhibit space at the National Council
for the Social Studies conference in 2006 (Washington D.C.) and the SAA
booth at the Public Sessions at the 2006 and 2007 Society for Historical
Archaeology conference.
Archaeology for the Public lends itself easily for use as part of an Archaeology Month program,
a school visit, an Archaeology Fair, or Public Session:
· Downloadable Flier providing information about the web pages)
(pdf format: 4.83 MB) http://www.saa.org/public/primaryDocuments/forarchaeologistsflier.pdf
· Downloadable Bookmark Template with the URL for these web pages
http://www.saa.org/public/primaryDocuments/bookmarksarchmonth.pdf
· Web Pages can be exhibited on a lap top as a display item
(browser pointed to www.saa.org/public)
22
IV. What’s Next?: The Future of ‘Archaeology for the public’
A. Management Issues
1. Ensuring A Sustainability Resource
Archaeology for the public is only in its infancy and where
evolving technologies and improved electronic social networks will
take it remains unknown. To ensure its viability, suitability, and its
leadership role for the Society and the profession, upcoming
scholars representative of future Public Archaeology professionals
are being recruited now to work on portions of this project. This is
being done with an eye to position these individuals to take over
management of this resource (just as any committee of the SAA
recruits leaders from within so as to insure known leadership
capabilities, benefited by institutional memory).
Public Archaeology is now a formal subfield of scholarly research
with classes on the subject, graduate programs specializing on the
topic, Ph.D. and MA thesis focusing on the topic, several book
series dedicated to the subject, and an international, peerreviewed journal. The upcoming generation of scholars, the first to
be both formally trained in Public Archaeology and which are from
the cultural cohort raised in the digital age, will take this resource
where it can and needs to go. Only this future generation of
scholars can do the project the justice needed, and the individuals
tapped to date are eager to be mentored by the Web Page
Working Group (an older generation of Public Archaeologists) just
as they, in turn, are eager to be advised.
This program of sustainability was laid out and initiated by Patrice
L. Jeppson, upon her assumption of duties as Lead Coordinator of
this project at the Go Live in August of 2006, replacing (previous)
Lead Coordinator (Development Phase Leader) Carol McDavid
(2002-August 2006).
At this time, the Web Pages Working Group and the SAA
Manager of Public Education and Outreach who assists and helps
guide this project are currently investigating grants that might help
support the web pages maintenance.
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2. Going Forward: Content Updating
As already mentioned, Archaeology for the public will necessarily grow in
an organic fashion, expanding as Public Archaeology as a field of practice
expands and evolves — as new ideas arise, as new ‘best examples’
emerge, as new controversies grip archaeology, and as new publics are
identified. Therefore these SAA public web pages never can and never
will be ‘completely finished’. Content updates and management
developments are expected to evolve and emerge long term. Most
notable on the more immediate horizon is implementation of, among other
items, a ‘Search’ feature. With the already completed page optimization,
the 280+ pages of content (including 78 pdfs) are searchable in
cyberspace using any of the search engines. However no search feature
is yet operative within these SAA public pages (for example, if entering
through SAAWeb). In the [volunteered] development of this resource
priorities needed to be made and search engine needs were prioritized
above within-site searching. The other main, immediate management
task involves aesthetic improvements of the look of these web pages.
This can only be done once content is available (Phase I). This has
begun as part of Phase II development of the pages.
Ideally, these public pages will need to be accessible to differently-abled
people, and this aspect of the site's design is also being addressed by the
technical consultant. Likewise, some content will be optionally made
available in Spanish and, perhaps, French, keeping in mind our many
colleagues who work in Canada.
B. Learning from ‘Archaeology for the public’
In developing this project, insight has been gained into public
archaeology as an area of outreach practice. There is also a
clearer picture about what archaeology’s publics do with
archaeology, and what they need and want from professionals.
Much is being learned about the current state of Public
Archaeology through this project. For example:
▪
Outreach aims and goals are found to vary among regional
archaeology traditions. U.S. outreach practice often reflects the
processual archaeology tradition. Archaeological methods and
methodology form the focus of a significant portion of outreach which
is promoted in terms of a science orientation.
24
▪
As part of federal agency mandates, many materials and programs
have been geared toward meeting archaeology’s stewardship needs
(namely, preservation of sites). At the same time, much recent Public
Archaeology attempts to address the public’s needs – for example,
archaeology for the needs of K-12th grade education and or for
specific descendant communities.
▪
Historical archaeology (which deals with the recent past, broader
American History issues, and descendant communities) produces
(proportionately) the majority of U.S. archaeology outreach resources.
▪
Many public outreach efforts are created as one-off’s (non-enduring)
efforts. A significant amount of public outreach is undertaken by
avocationalists or non-archaeologists who contribute substantively but
do not excavate their own sites and thus don’t have data readily
accessible to transform into a public resource.
▪
Public Archaeology now forms a sub-specialty of theoretical academic
practice with Ph.D. dissertations and MA theses, several book series,
an international peer reviewed journal, professional conference
themes and symposia, special journal issues, and college/university
courses and programs.
▪
There is an increase in hybrid professionals and an increase in
collaborative practice as Public Archaeology matures.
The application possibilities of new technologies are being actively
explored and embraced.
▪
More and more often, public outreach is required or offered as a
creative mitigation option in legislated environmental compliance.
▪
Assessment and evaluation are becoming more commonplace. At the
same time, agile methodologies flourish in this realm of applied
practice: Shifting requirements are welcomed as part of an evolving
and intensifying collaboration, whereby the adaptive development
process itself forms the primary measure of progress.
The Web Pages Working Group are researchers involved
professionally in the study and application of Public Archaeology.
They are being reflexive in their actions involved in the
development of these pages and have conscientiously reported on
their observations and findings as part of ethical scholarship. This
online resource is being reported on as an on-going research
project, in that it is helping to understand how archaeological
practice is being informed and transformed by hyperspace.
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C.
Recommendations
Careful and thoughtful planning about the design and implementation has
positioned Archaeology for the public with the flexibility necessary for the
evolution of technologies expected in the medium of cyberspace, the
evolution of expectations in theory and practice within the emerging subdiscipline of archaeology, and the evolution of desires and needs of
archaeology’s many publics. With Archaeology for the public, SAA, with
partial assistance from the US DOI BOR, has created a platform where
members of archaeology’s publics and members of the profession can
come together as a community. This community bridge-building, which
serves the society’s ethical principles, the profession’s practice, and the
public’s wants, should guide (inductively) the evolution of this resource.
As new web-based technologies for achieving this become commonplace
in our culture, these pages (though not their purpose) should be expected
to transform. Such developments should be welcomed and supported if
this educational outreach resource is to remain viable and sustainable.
26
References Cited
The Agile Alliance
2001 Manifesto for Agile Software Development, accessed April 2007,
<http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html>.
2001 Principles Behind the Agile Manifesto, accessed April 2007,
<http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html>.
Earthscan: James and James Publishers
[2002] Web page for Public Archaeology, the international, peer-reviewed
journal, accessed April 2007
<http://www.earthscan.co.uk/news/article/mps/uan/302/v/6/sp/l>.
Education and Archaeology Work Group [SAA, SHA, AAA]
1991 Goals and Objectives
1991 Table of Action Items
1991 Education Resource Forum, accessed April, 2007,
<http://www.saa.org/public/resources/outhist_EducArchWorkGroup.htm
Florida Public Archaeology Network
2007 Web Page of the Florida Public Archaeology Network, Pensacola
Coordinating Center. Accessed April 2007,
<http://www.flpublicarchaeology.org/cc/>.
Jeppson, Patrice L., Mary L. Kwas, Maureen Malloy, and Carol McDavid
2003
Archaeology For The Public: A New Addition to the SAA Web Site. SAA
Archaeological Record 3(5):8-10.
Jeppson, Patrice L., Carol McDavid, Mary Kwas, and Maureen Malloy
2007
Building Digital Bridges. Knoweledge Exchange Commentary in
Anthropology News (Developing Online Resources in Anthropology issue).
American Anthropological Association. Arlington, Virginia.
2006 Poster: The 'Archaeology for the Public' Web Pages: Applying resources
for the needs of others. Presented at the American Anthropological Association
annual meeting, San Jose, CA, November.
Lerner, Shereen
2001 Report of the SAA Public Education Committee Retreat Prepared by
Shereen Lerner, PEC Chair.
Lynott, Mark J., and Alison Wylie
2000 Ethics in American Archaeology, 2nd Revised Edition. Society for
American Archaeology Press. Washington, DC.
McDavid, Carol
2002
From Real Space to Cyberspace: The Internet and Public
Archaeological Practice. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, England.
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..
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McDavid, Carol, Patrice L. Jeppson and Mary Kwas; and Maureen Malloy
2007
Avocationalists, Colleagues, and Clients--‘Lend us your ears!' (and direct
your cursors!) Society for American Archaeology (PEC) Web Pages Working
Group: Poster presented at the Society for Historical and Underwater Archaeology.
Williamsburg, Virginia.
McDavid, Carol, Mary L. Kwas, Patrice L. Jeppson and Jeanne Fenter
2002 Design Plan for PEC Pages of SAA Web Site. Report prepared for the
Public Education Committee, funded by the Bureau of Reclamation. On file:
Society for American Archaeology, Washington, D.C.
Society for American Archaeology (SAA)
SAA Excellence in Public Education Award Committee [Patrice L. Jeppson]
2005a Updated Award Description and Criteria in Committee Report to the
Board by Chair, SAA Excellence in Public Education Award Committee. Society
for American Archaeology. Washington, DC.
SAA Public Education Committee (SAA PEC)
2005b CRM EXPO Handout, Careers in Public Archaeology. Accessed April
2007, <http://www.saa.org/public/primaryDocuments/Careers_Handout2.pdf>.
1995 Principles of Archaeological Ethics web page. Accessed April 2007,
<http://www.saa.org/ABOUTSAA/COMMITTEES/ethics/principles.html>.
28
Appendix: I
Content Contributors To Date
(May 2007)
Arizona Archaeological Council • Lynn Alex • Sherene Baugher • Caryn Berg • Erik Blinman
• Steve Branting • George Brauer • Clifford T. Brown • Lyle E. Browning• Dave Burns •
David Bush • John Carman • Bill Celander • Mary Casey • Lloyd Chapman • Beverly
Chiarulli • Kim Christensen • David T. Clark • Joelle G. Clark • Anita Cohen-Williams • Chip
Colwell-Chanthaphonh • Emma Lee Compton • Eve Compton • Pamela J. Cressey • Allen
Dart • Hester Davis • Dee DeRoche • Linda Derry • Kelly J. Dixon • Keith Doms • Amy
Douglass • Susan Dixon Renoe • Susan Edwards• Carol Ellick • Mike Elliot • Rita F. Elliott •
Mathew Emerson • Phoebe Eskenazi • Jason (Jay) Fancher • Larry Feldman • Christopher
Fennell • Joan Few • Directors of the Florida Anthropological Society and the Florida
Archaeology Month Committee and the Division of Historical Resources, Florida Department
of State • Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists • Daniel R. Haas • Valerie Haskins
• Maurice Harris • Nancy Hawkins • Margaret Heath • A. Gwynn Henderson • Marc Henshaw
• Sue Henry Renaud • Sarah Herr • Julie Hollowell • Andrew Hornak • K. Kris Hirst • Laura
Howard • Charles Irvine • John Jameson • Meta F. Janowitz • John Jeppson • Patrice L.
Jeppson • Sarah Jeppson • Amy L. Johnson • Randy Jones • Alice Kehoe • Marcel Kornfeld •
Mary L. Kwas • Julie King • Amy L. Johnson • P. Ann Kaupp • Mitchell "Mitch" L. Kolbe •
Bill LaMunyan • Jed Levin • Erika Laanela • Shereen Lerner • Barbara Little • Karen Lind
Brauer • Tom Lincoln • Hope E. Luhman • Douglas Mackey • Maureen Malloy • Robert
Marcom • Patricia Martz • Derrick J. Marcucci • Tim Maxwell • Kim McBride • Carol
McDavid • Dru McGill • Theresa McReynolds • Patrica A. Mercado-Allinger • Tanisha
Mercado • William Moss • Teresa Moyer • Becky Nelson • Susan Nelson • Janet Pape • John
Parker • Giovanna Peebles • Richard Pettigrew • Mike Polk • Stephen Potter • Adrian
Praetzellis • Mary Praetzellis • Claire Rogers (Education Director, Fort Bend Museum) •
Susan Dixon Renoe • Bob Russell • Richard Savino • Shirley J Schermer • George Schneider
• Katie Schurr • Ruth Selig • Betsy Shirk• Terrance Simpson • Daniel Sivlich • Michael Shott
• Katie Schurr • KC Smith • Society for Historical Archaeology Public Education and
Interpretation Committee • Southern Illinois University-Evansville • Megan Springate • Darby
Stapp • Martin Stein • Kristen Stevens • Skip Stewart-Abernathy • Nancy Stone Bernard •
Michael Sullivan • Edward W. Tennant • Van Thompson • Steve Tull • Kirsti Uunila, • Thad
Van Buren • Anitta Waghorn • Joe Watkins • Garry Wheeler Stone • Mark Wilde-Ramsing •
Martha Williams • Guven Witteveen • Renata Wolynec• Brian Thomas • Barbara Voss •
Cameron Walker • Phil Weagraff • Paul Webb • Priscilla Wegars • Doug Wescott • Virginia
Wulfkuhle • Lisa Young
..
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Appendix: II
Site Map (as of April 25, 2007)
30
SITE MAP for Archaeology for the public on April 16, 2007 [Xenu link search web analysis]
•
Archaeology for the Public - From the Society for American Archaeology
o Archaeology News and Events - Conferences, Workshops and Opportunities from the Society for American Archaeology for the Public
News Briefs in Archaeology - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Here's What's New in Archaeology Streaming Video and Film... - Archaeology Fun - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Richard Pettigrew wins the 2006 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selection Criteria - SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence In Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
George Brauer wins 2001 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award (Educator Category) - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology
for the Public
AnthroNotes Wins Public Education Award - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Jeanne Moe won the 2003 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Pam Wheat Receives the 2004 SAA Award for Excellence In Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Office of Archaeological Studies, Museum of New Mexico Receives 2005 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA
Archaeology for the Public
Nomination Process - SAA Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA's Award for Excellence in Public Education - Committee Members Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
George Brauer wins 2001 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award (Educator Category) - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology
for the Public
Carol McDavid wins 2007 SHA John L. Cotter Award in Historical Archaeology
Heritage Tourism News
Sources for Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Press Releases - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Upcoming Conferences - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Workshops - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Field Opportunities - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Field School Announcements - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Tips For The Field - SAA Archaeology for the Public
State Archaeology Month Information - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Education Awards - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Archaeology Awards Bestowed by Archaeology Concerns - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Awards in Archaeology Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Awards in Archaeology Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
o Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Resources for Archaeologists - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Evaluating Public Outreach - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Announcing Field Trips - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
..
..
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Cultural Resources Reporting for Public Consumption - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Lesson Plans - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Educational Resources in the United States and Canada - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Laws - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Principles of Archaeological Ethics - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
The Harris Poll on Archaeology - Public Perceptions - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Collaborations and Partnerships - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Helping Preserve Our Archaeological Heritage - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Heritage Tourism - Visit Archaeology - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Heritage Site Protection - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Helping Preserve Our Archaeological Heritage - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Other Useful Resources - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Glossaries - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Spanish Language Archaeology Glossaries - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Fun for All Ages - Archaeology for the Public
Books and Book Reviews - Archaeology Fun for All Ages
Recommended Archaeology Non-Fiction for Middle and High School - Archaeology Fun for All Ages - Archaeology for the Public
Excavating the Donner Party - Archaeology Books - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Recommended Books for Children Suggested by Susan Dixon Renoe - Archaeology Fun for All Ages - Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology in Movies and Television - Archaeology Fun for All Ages - Archaeology for the Public
Here's What's New in Archaeology Streaming Video and Film... - Archaeology Fun - SAA Archaeology for the Public
The Indiana Jones Movies - Reviews by Jay Fancher - Archaeology for the Public
The Mummy Movies - Reviews by Jay Fancher - Archaeology for the Public
Movie Review: Out for a Kill - Archaeology Fun for All Ages - Archaeology for the Public
Suggested Archaeology Movies - Archaeology Fun for All Ages - Archaeology for the Public
CDRom Games and Other Diversions - Archaeology Fun for All Ages - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Boy Scouts Archaeology Merit Badge - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Diaries - Archaeology for the Public
Frequently Asked Questions about Archaeology and Archaeologists - The Society for American Archaeology's Archaeology for the Public
FAQs for Students of Archaeology - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Archaeology - Course Material - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Ask an Archaeologist - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Site and Artifact Identification - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Getting Involved in Archaeology - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology as a Career - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Preparing for a Hobby or Career in Archaeology - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Miscellaneous FAQs - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Ask an Archaeologist - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Site Etiquette - SAA Archaeology for the Public
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Archaeology FAQs - Do Archaeologists Dig Dinosaur Bones? SAA Archaeology for the Public
About the Society for American Archaeology's Program Archaeology for the Public
Mission Statement - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Contributors to the Society for American Archaeology's Archaeology for the Public Webpages
SAA PEC Public Web Pages Working Group - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Richard Pettigrew wins the 2006 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selection Criteria - SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence In Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
George Brauer wins 2001 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award (Educator Category) - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology
for the Public
AnthroNotes Wins Public Education Award - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Jeanne Moe won the 2003 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Pam Wheat Receives the 2004 SAA Award for Excellence In Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Office of Archaeological Studies, Museum of New Mexico Receives 2005 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA
Archaeology for the Public
Nomination Process - SAA Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA's Award for Excellence in Public Education - Committee Members Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
George Brauer wins 2001 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award (Educator Category) - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology
for the Public
Educational Resources in the United States and Canada - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Education Committee Members - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA PEC Biographies - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Lynn Alex, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Caryn M. Berg, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Jo묬e Clark, PEC Chair-Elect- SAA Archaeology for the Public
Allen Dart, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Linda Derry, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Amy A. Douglass, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Carol J. Ellick, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Stephanie Ford, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Julia K. Green, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
A. Gwynn Henderson, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Laura Howard, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Bonnie L. Jancik, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Patrice L. Jeppson, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Eleanor M. King, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Mary L. Kwas, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Hope E. Luhman, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
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Robert Marcom, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Andrea P. Murray, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Stephen C. Saraydar, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Shirley J. Schermer, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Claire Smith, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Cameron Jean Walker, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Renata B. Wolynec, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Interactive Digs - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selected Archaeology Projects in the Southern US - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
MidAtlantic United States - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selected Archaeology Projects in the Mid-West US - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Western USA - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selected Archaeology Projects in the North Eastern United States - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
North West United States - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
African Archaeology Projects - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Projects in Australia - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selected Archaeology Projects in Europe - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selected Archaeology Projects in Southeast Asia - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Contact Period Archaeology Sites - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
African American and African Diaspora - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Spanish Colonial Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Russian Colonial America - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Mound Earthworks - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Urban Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Cemetery Archaeology Projects - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Neolithic Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Web Sites Designed for Classroom Use - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Asian Diaspora Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Underwater Shipwreck Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeoacoustics - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Metal Detecting Technology and Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Law & Ethics - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Metal Detecting In Archaeology - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Metal Detecting, Archaeology Sites, and the Law - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Metal Detecting, Archaeology Sites, and the Law - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Metal Detecting, Archaeology Sites, and the Law - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Military History Archaeological Projects - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
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Aviation Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
3D and Virtual Tours - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Cultural Resources Reporting for Public Consumption - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Kids and Archaeology - Web Site Recommendations - SAA Archaeology for the Public
For Public Archaeologists: Communicating with the Public - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Communicating with the Public - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Evaluating Public Outreach - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Announcing Field Trips - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Cultural Resources Reporting for Public Consumption - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeologists Using Metal Detection and Dectorists in Site Research - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
A Bibliography of Kansas Archaeology Projects Assisted by Volunteers Using Metal Detectors - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for
the Public
Metal Detectorists Participating in Archaeology Research - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Continuing Education and Professional Development in Public Archaeology - Public Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Archaeology is... - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Bibliography of Scholarly Public Archaeology - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Kim Christensen's Public Archaeology Bibliography 2006 - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
History of Public Education and Outreach in Archaeology - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Relations Committee of the Society for American Archeology (1985-1991) - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for
the Public
Reach America Panel Discussion - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Network of State and Provincial Archaeology Education Coordinators - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
State Resources - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Session Tips - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
ArchaeologyLand! - Public Session Tips - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Fliers for Educational Events - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Tips for Successful Outreach - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Interpreting Archaeology to the Public - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Heritage Tourism - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Heritage Tourism - References to Articles in SAA Archaeological Record
Outreach to the Media - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Outreach Materials for Media Contact - Press Releases - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Sample Calendar of Events - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Sample Newspaper Press Release - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Sample Media Press Release - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Sample Press Release - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Why are there two different spellings of archaeology and archeology? - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Building Bridges to Local, State, and Elected Officials - SAA Archaeology for the Public
How to Communicate with U.S. Senators, Representatives, and Staff - Tips from David Lindsay - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
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Lobbying Locally - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Feedback - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Resources for Educators - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Lesson Plans by George Schneider - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology in Schools - K-12th grade archaeology - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Resources for Educators - Archaeology Lesson Plans
Lesson Plans & Activities - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Lesson Plans & Activities - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
ArchaeologyLand! - Public Session Tips - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
K-12 Archaeology Programs Developed by Educators - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Teacher Training & Fieldwork Opportunities - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Field School Announcements - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Professional Archaeology Contacts - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Ask an Archaeologist - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Career Information - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Artifact Study Kits & Reproductions - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Recommended Archaeology Publications - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Classroom Digs - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Online Archaeological Experiences - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Student Projects Using Archaeology - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Student Projects Using Archaeology - Archaeology and the Law, by Becky Nelson - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
What is Archaeology Week/Month? - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
State Archaeology Month Information - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Month Winnning Poster Archives
Archaeology Week/Month - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Week/Month Programs - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Georgia's Archaeology Month Operations - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Sample Archaeology Week/Month Activities - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Fort Bend Archaeology Week Poster - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Tips for Successful Outreach to the Public - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Week/Month Posters - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
What is the Archaeology Week/Month Poster All About? - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Making an Archaeology Week Poster - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Georgia's Archaeology Month Operations - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Archaeology Week/Month Posters - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Fort Bend Archaeology Week Poster - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Links to Archaeology Week/Month Posters: Poster Archive - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Suggestions for Archaeology Week/Month Posters - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Archaeology for the Public - A History of the Project
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Mission Statement - SAA Archaeology for the Public
History and Mission of the Public Education Committee of the Society for American Archaeology - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA PEC Biographies - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Lynn Alex, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Caryn M. Berg, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Jo묬e Clark, PEC Chair-Elect- SAA Archaeology for the Public
Allen Dart, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Linda Derry, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Amy A. Douglass, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Carol J. Ellick, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Stephanie Ford, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Julia K. Green, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
A. Gwynn Henderson, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Laura Howard, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Bonnie L. Jancik, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Patrice L. Jeppson, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Eleanor M. King, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Mary L. Kwas, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Hope E. Luhman, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Robert Marcom, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Andrea P. Murray, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Stephen C. Saraydar, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Shirley J. Schermer, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Claire Smith, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Cameron Jean Walker, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Renata B. Wolynec, PEC Member - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Public Education Committee Task Groups - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Boy Scouts Archeology Merit Badge - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Educational Materials - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
The Public Education Committee of the Society for American Archaeology: An Historical and Comparative Perspective - SAA Archaeology for the Public,
by Ruth O. Selig
Education and Archaeology Work Group - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Formal Education Subcommittee of the Public Education Committee of the Society for American Archaeology - Archaeology Resources - SAA
Archaeology for the Public
Contributors to the Society for American Archaeology's Archaeology for the Public Webpages
SAA PEC Public Web Pages Working Group - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Richard Pettigrew wins the 2006 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Selection Criteria - SAA Award for Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
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SAA Award for Excellence In Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
George Brauer wins 2001 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award (Educator Category) - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology
for the Public
AnthroNotes Wins Public Education Award - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Jeanne Moe won the 2003 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Pam Wheat Receives the 2004 SAA Award for Excellence In Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Office of Archaeological Studies, Museum of New Mexico Receives 2005 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award - SAA
Archaeology for the Public
Nomination Process - SAA Excellence in Public Education - SAA Archaeology for the Public
SAA's Award for Excellence in Public Education - Committee Members Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology for the Public
George Brauer wins 2001 SAA Excellence in Public Education Award (Educator Category) - Archaeology News - SAA Archaeology
for the Public
Archaeology Brochures for the Public - Archaeology Resources - SAA Archaeology for the Public
Legal Notice - SAA Archaeology for the Public
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Appendix: III
Announcement Campaign Mechanics
Targeted Audience: Archaeologists
Archaeologists looking for resources and information helpful for conducting their
own outreach; archaeologists with public archaeology resources to share with their
colleagues and archaeology’s public
A. SAA Press Release
http://www.saa.org/PUBREL/Archaeology%20for%20the%20Public.pdf
B. Email Announcement (below)
C. Sample of email campaign (one individual effort in the grass roots campaign)
where an archaeologist forwarded the announcement about these new web
pages to their personal and private networks [List of email addresses and names
masked for privacy] (below)
D. Target List (below)
E. Outreach to Peers (below)
Scholarly Presented Announcements (to date)
Scholarly Published Announcements (to date)
Displays Directed at Colleagues (to date)
Other Announcements Within SAA (to date)
F. Targeted Audiences: General Public and Educators (below)
On-site Outreach/Usage (to date)
B. Email Announcement (sample)
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Subject:
[good] SAA public webpage
To: <[email protected]>
The Society for American Archaeology Public Education Committee is pleased to
announce the NEW Archaeology for the Public webpage. Please share this
information with your colleagues, educators with whom you work, and any other
possible interested individuals or groups. The SAA webpage group is tracking
distribution of this information, so please consider sending Patti Jeppson a list of
individuals or groups or include her in a blind copy ([email protected]).
Thanks.
This announcement is offered with the usual apologies for cross posting!
Archaeology for the public is now live at www.saa.org/public
A useful resource for your next outreach activity, public session, archaeology
month event, and college course!
To learn more...
-- read about these web pages
(http://www.saa.org/public/about/history_webpagesummary.html)
-- read the SAA press release
(http://www.saa.org/PUBREL/Archaeology%20for%20the%20Public.pdf)
-- read the "For Archaeologists" information flier [*LARGE FILE: 4.83 MB pdf]
(http://www.saa.org/public/primarydocuments/ForArchaeologistFlier.pdf)
Spread the word...
.... through your professional and personal email networks
.... in local, regional, and avocational newsletters
.... to your students, clients, family, and colleagues
(** Please blind-Cc (Bcc) us at [email protected] so that we can track the announcement's
progress to limit cross postings.)
Web Pages designed for members of the public who want to know more
about archaeology...
...as well as for archaeologists, educators, and interpreters who share
archaeology with the public.
Archaeology for the public is a project of the Public Education Committee of
the Society for American Archaeology.
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C. Sample of email campaign (one individual effort in the grass roots campaign)
where an archaeologist forwarded the announcement about these new web
pages to their personal and private networks [List of email addresses and names
masked for privacy.]
Date: 11 Aug 2006 09:22:21 -0700
From: Ανν Ηοωαρδ <αηοωαρδ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>
Subject: Announcing new Archaeology for the Public Webpage
To: Βριαν Κεννψ <β.ω.κεννψ≅γµαιλ.χοµ>, ϑιµ ΜχΠηερσον <ϕµχπηερσον≅φλινν.οργ>,
ΣΩ Αρχη Τοδαψ Λιστσερϖε <ΣΑΤ−Εδιτορ≅χδαρχ.οργ>,
ριχκ ανδυζε <ραανδυζε≅σρπνετ.χοµ>,
βαρβαρα γρονεµανν <σλσινχ≅αζτεχ.αζτεχφρεενετ.οργ>,
βρενδα πουλοσ <βρενδαπουλοσ≅ψαηοο.χοµ>, χατηψ ϕοηνσον <χβϕοηνσον1≅χοξ.νετ>,
δαρλενε λιζαρργα <δαρλενε≅υ.αριζονα.εδυ>,
∆οννα Ρυιζ ψ Χοστελλο <λαρδον≅ωορλδνετ.αττ.νετ>,
∆υτχη ∆υερινγ <δυερινγ≅στοχκµορεηουσε.χοµ>,
ελλα πιερποιντ <επιερποιντ≅ψαηοο.χοµ>, ϕοην κεανε <ϕλκεανε≅σρπνετ.χοµ>,
κιµβερλψ σπυρρ <κιµβερλψ.σπυρρ≅ναυ.εδυ>, Λινδα Πιερχε <λπιερχε≅χδαρχ.οργ>,
∀Ρεβα Ωελλσ−Γρανδρυδ∀ <ργρανδρυδ≅χοξ.νετ>,
Ροψ Σιµπσον <Ροψ_Σιµπσον≅νπσ.γοϖ>, Σταχεψ Ραψ <σταχεψ.ραψ≅πηοενιξ.γοϖ>,
ταµαρα στεωαρτ <ταχσω≅νµ.νετ>, ϖιχκι ερηαρτ <ϖιχκιερηαρτ≅χοξ.νετ>,
Βαρναβψ Λεωισ <βϖλεωισ≅γιλαριϖερ.χοµ>,
Χηρισ Ρολλ <Χηρισ.ρολλ≅χο.πιναλ.αζ.υσ>,
χηυχκ αδαµσ <εχαδαµσ≅εµαιλ.αριζονα.εδυ>, γαρψ ψανχψ <γαρψψανχψ≅χοξ.νετ>,
ϕεφφ αλτσχηυλ <ϕηαλτσχηυλ≅σριχρµ.χοµ>, ϕον σηυµακερ <ϕον.σηυµακερ≅απσ.χοµ>,
µιχηαελ βαρτον <µιχηαελ.Βαρτον≅ασυ.εδυ>,
Μιχηαελ Συλλιϖαν <µσυλλιϖαν≅φσ.φεδ.υσ>, πατριχκ λψονσ <πλψονσ≅χδαρχ.οργ>,
ϖερνελδα γραντ <απαχηεϖερν≅ψαηοο.χοµ>, δοννα βενγε <∆ονναΒενγε≅αολ.χοµ>,
ελλεν βιλβρεψ <εβιλβρεψ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>, ριχη λανγε <λανγερ≅υ.αριζονα.εδυ>,
παµ ϕονεσ <αζηεριταγε≅αριζοναηεριταγεαλλιανχε.οργ>,
ρογερ λιδµαν <ρογερ.λιδµαν≅πηοενιξ.γοϖ>, Μαρψ Εστεσ <µεστεσ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
Μαρψ Αλιχε ∆αενζερ <µαδαενζερ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
Μαρτι Μυρπηψ <µµυρπηψ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
Μαρλο Βυχηµανν <µβυχηµανν≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
Μια ΛαΒαρβαρα <µλαβαρβαρα≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
Μιχηαελ Φρεισινγερ <µφρεισινγερ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
Χαρολ Γριφφιτη <χγριφφιτη≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
ϑαµεσ Γαρρισον <ϕγαρρισον≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ>,
ελλεν µαρτιν <ε13µαρτιν≅ηοτµαιλ.χοµ>,
ϕιλλ µχχορµιχκ <ϕιλλµαχκραχκιτ≅ψαηοο.χοµ>,
ϕιµ βριττον <ϕβριττον1≅χαβλεαζ.χοµ>, κιµ σαϖαγε <κιµ.σαϖαγε≅ασυ.εδυ>,
αλ δαρτ <αδαρτ≅ολδπυεβλο.οργ>, ΜΑΡΙΕ ΒΡΙΤΤΟΝ <µβριτ≅χαβλεαζ.χοµ>,
Αλαν Γαρλινγτον <αλανγαρλινγτον≅εαρτηλινκ.νετ>,
∆υανε Λιδµαν <παρτψοφ5λιδσ≅αολ.χοµ>, ϑερρψ Ηοωαρδ <ϕβρηοωαρδ≅αολ.χοµ>,
µαρϕοριε γρεεν <µγρεεν≅αχστεµπε.χοµ>, Ανν Ρασορ <ανν_ρασορ≅νπσ.γοϖ>,
αδριαννε ρανκιν <αδριαννε.ρανκιν2≅λυκε.αφ.µιλ>,
χηερψλ βλανχηαρδ <Χηερψλ_Βλανχηαρδ≅βλµ.γοϖ>,
χοννιε στονε <Χοννιε_Στονε≅βλµ.γοϖ>, δαϖιδ δοψελ <δαϖιδ.δοψελ≅λυκε.αφ.µιλ>,
χαρολ ηεατηινγτον <χαρολ.ηεατηινγτον≅λυκε.αφ.µιλ>,
∆αϖιδ Λαρσεν <δαϖιδ.λαρσεν≅αζδεµα.γοϖ>,
δυανε ηυββαρδ <δυανε_ηυββαρδ≅νπσ.γοϖ>, Εδ Ηυβερ <εηυβερ≅σριχρµ.χοµ>,
ελαινε ζαµορα <εζαµορα≅φσ.φεδ.υσ>, γαρψ στυµπφ <Γαρψ_Στυµπφ≅βλµ.γοϖ>,
ηελεν φαιρλεψ <ηφαιρλεψ≅υσγσ.γοϖ>,
∀ϑ. Βραντλεψ ϑαχκσον∀ <ϕοην.βραντλεψ≅ψυµα.αρµψ.µιλ>,
ϕαν βαλσοµ <ϕαν_βαλσοµ≅νπσ.γοϖ>,
∀ϑανε Πικε−Χηιλδρεσσ∀ <ϑανε.Πικε−Χηιλδρεσσ≅βλµ.γοϖ>,
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ϕαν λαωσον <ϕαν.λαωσον≅υσµχ.µιλ>, ϕερεµψ ηαινεσ <ϕηαινεσ≅φσ.φεδ.υσ>,
ϕεροµε ηεσσε <ϕηεσσε≅σωχα.χοµ>, ϕιµ µχκιε <ϕµχκιε≅φσ.φεδ.υσ>,
ϕοην ηανσον <ϕαηανσον≅φσ.φεδ.υσ>, ϕοην µαδσεν <ϕµαδσεν≅υ.αριζονα.εδυ>,
ϕοην ραϖεσλοοτ <ϕχραϖεσλ≅γιλαριϖερ.χοµ>,
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Κατηψ Πεδριχκ <Κατηψ_Πεδριχκ≅βλµ.γοϖ>,
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λινδα µαψρο <Λινδα.Μαψρο≅πω.πιµα.γοϖ>, Λισα Λεαπ <Λισα_Λεαπ≅νπσ.γοϖ>,
λορεττα ϕαχκσον <λορϕαχ≅φροντιερνετ.νετ>,
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Dear Friends of Archaeology and Public Education: The Society for American Archaeology
and the Arizona SHPO would like to announce the posting of the new Archaeology for the
Public Webpage at www.saa.org/public. This webpage is a useful resource for your next
outreach activity, public session, archaeology month event, and college course!
To learn more...
-- read about these web pages
(http://www.saa.org/public/about/history_webpagesummary.html)
-- read the SAA press release
(http://www.saa.org/PUBREL/Archaeology%20for%20the%20Public.pdf)
-- read the "For Archaeologists" information flier [*LARGE FILE: 4.83 MB pdf]
(http://www.saa.org/public/primarydocuments/ForArchaeologistFlier.pdf)
Spread the word...
.... through your professional and personal email networks
.... in local, regional, and avocational newsletters
.... to your students, clients, family, and colleagues
These web pages are designed for members of the public who want to know more about
archaeology...
...as well as for archaeologists, educators, and interpreters who share archaeology with the
public.
(Archaeology for the public is a project of the Public Education Committee of the Society for
American Archaeology.)
-Ανν ςαλδο Ηοωαρδ
Public Archaeology Programs Manager/
Αρχηαεολογιχαλ Χοµπλιανχε Σπεχιαλιστ
Αριζονα Στατε Ηιστοριχ Πρεσερϖατιον Οφφιχε
Αριζονα Στατε Παρκσ
4
1300 Ω. Ωασηινγτον
Phoenix, AZ 85007
602/542−7138
602/542−4180(ΦΑΞ)
αηοωαρδ≅πρ.στατε.αζ.υσ
D.
Go Live
Target
List for
Archaeol
ogy for
the
public
at
SAAWeb
(
indicates
targeting
is in
Progress
*Hard Copy
of Approved
Press
Release sent
to:
Tom Lincoln,
BOR
National Trust
for Historic
Preservation
Advisory
Council for
Historic
Preservation
(chairman, J.
Nau, and
Julie King
ACHP Arch
Task Group)
NPS Frank
Manamon
Editor, Public
Archaeology
Editor,
Archaeology
Magazine
SHA Editor
Rebecca Allen
and SHA
Webmaster
Kelly Dixon
Anita Cohen
(webmaster
Histarch)
The
Archaeological
Conservancy
..
..
..
..
..
Head of NAI
and assistant
(will also
sendemail)
MMalloy-SHA
Rebecca Allen
hard copy
MM-SHA
Kelly Dixon
hard copy
MM-AAA AD
pres and pres
elect
MM-AIA Pres,
pres elect and
3 educ folks
MM-SHA
pres, pres
elect
MM-SHA
PEIC Chair
[*Neikirk list
of targets
All others
EMAILed
with a
‘spread the
word’ blurb,
a thank you,
and or a
‘contribute
request’
MM - SAA
Officials
(Board
members, At
large
members,
past and
future)
MM- SAA
office staff
MM - SHA
Board
members who
are also SAA
members
- SAA
Committee
Chairs **with
note referring
to what they
might
contribute
- SHA PEIC
members
—State
Coordinators
MM -- Frank
Manahan
(again in
digital form)
MM—Carol
Shull (Chief
heritage educ.
Service NPS)
--Public
Archaeology
Editorial
Board
- AAA
Archaeology
Division
Officers
Society
outlets,
agencies,
and portals:
--WAC: World
Archaeologica
l Congress eNewsletter
--SHA
webmaster
Kelly Dixon
--AIA listservs
(as many as
relevant)
-- EAA
--Indust Arch
--Barbara
Little for
inhouse NPS
arch listserv)
-- About.com
(Kris Hirst)
--The
Archaeology
Channel
*--AAA Arch
and Educ K12 listserv
Fieldwork.com
--Asor educ
folks
FAMSI
BOR folks on
the ground
(requesting
they further
circulate in the
agency)
USFS folks on
the ground “ “
BLM folks on
the ground “ “
NCRS folks
on the ground
““
– Community
Archaeology
—Indust Arch
--NAI
listserves
-- SAA Public
Interest
Archaeology
listserv
—PEC listserv
--Project
Archaeology
listserv
--Project
Archaeology
Federal
Advisory
Group listserv
--AfricanAmerican
Archaeology
listserv
-- Arch Film
Festival
organizers:
[email protected]
uni-kiel.de,
[email protected]
adoo.fr
--AIA
Education
Folks:
state arch
societies:
COAS +
49 State
Societies
Selected
publicly
active
foreign
archaeologis
ts that we
know of:
Teacher
Advisor lists
for individual
projects,
PEIC, and
SAA
All those that
came before:
Past PEC
Past SHA
PEIC
members
Listservs
– Histarch
– ArchL
– Public
History
6
Alice Kehoe
snail mail
Archaeologist
s we
personally
know are
active in
Public
Archaeology
All content
coordinators
to the page to
date
John
Neikirk’s
Hard
Copy List
Glen O’Neal
USA Today
7950 Jones
Branch Dr.
McLean, VA
22108
Elyse Tanouye
Wall Street
Journal
200 Liberty St.
9th floor
New York, NY
10281
Managing
Editor
Birmingham
Post-Herald
POB 2553
Birmingham,
AL
Managing
Editor
Huntsville
Times
POB 1487
Huntsville, AL
35801
Managing
Editor
Mobile Register
POB 2488
Mobile, AL
35502
Managing
Editor
Montgomery
Advertiser
POB 1000
Montgomery,
AL 36101
Managing
Editor
Arizona Daily
Star
POB 25807
Tucson, AZ 85726
Managing
Editor
Tucson Citizen
POB 25757
Tucson, AZ 85714
Managing
Editor
Bakersfield
Californian
POB440
Bakersfield,
CA 93302
Managing
Editor
North County
Times
207 E
Pennsylvania
Ave.
Escondido, CA
92025
Managing
Editor
Press Telegram
POB 230
Long Beach,
CA 90844
Managing
Editor
La Opinion
411 W. 5th St.
Los Angeles,
CA 90013
Managing
Editor
Modesto Bee
POB 5256
Modesto, CA 95354
Managing
Editor
The Sun
399 N D St.
San
Bernardino, CA
92401
Managing
Editor
San Jose
Mercury
750 Ridder
Park Dr.
San Jose, CA
95190
Managing
Editor
Press Democrat
POB 910
Santa Rosa, CA
95401
Managing
Editor
The Record
POB 900
Stockton, CA
95201
Managing
Editor
The Daily
Breeze
POB 2982
Torrance, CA
90509
Managing
Editor
Ventura County
Star
POB 6711
Ventura, CA
93003
Managing
Editor
Oakland
Tribune
POB 28884
Oakland, CA
94604
Managing
Editor
Contra Costa
Times
POB 8099
Walnut Creek,
CA 94596
Managing
Editor
Inland Valley
Daily Bulletin
POB 4000
Ontario, CA
91761
Managing
Editor
San Gabrielle
Valley Tribune
POB 1259
Covina, CA
91722
Managing
Editor
Press Enterprise
POB 792
Riverside, CA 92501
Managing
Editor
Pueblo
Chieftain
POB 4040
Pueblo, CO
81003
Managing
Editor
Connecticut
Post
410 State St.
Bridgeport, CT
06604
Managing
Editor
Waterbury
Republican
American
POB 2090
Waterbury, CT
06722
Managing
Editor
Washington
Post
1150 15th St
NW
Washington,
DC 20071
Managing
Editor
News Journal
POB 2831
Daytona Beach,
FL 32120
Managing
Editor
Sun Sentinel
200 E. Las Olas
Blvd
Fort
Lauderdale, FL
33301
Managing
Editor
News Press
POB 10
Fort Myers, FL
33902
Managing
Editor
Florida Times
Union
POB 1949
Jacksonville,
FL 32231
Managing
Editor
The Ledger
POB 408
Lakeland, FL
33815
Managing
Editor
Diario Las
Americas
POB 592698
Miami, FL
33159
Managing
Editor
El Nuevo
Herald
1 Herald Plaza
Miami, FL
33132
Managing
Editor
Naples Daily
News
1075 Central
Ave.
Naples, FL
34102
Managing
Editor
Pensacola
News Journal
POB 12710
Pensacola FL
32501
Managing
Editor
St. Petersburg
Times
POB 1121
Saint
Petersburg, FL
33731
Managing
Editor
Sarasota Herald
Tribune
POB 1719
Sarasota, FL
34230
Managing
Editor
Palm Beach
Post
POB 24700
West Palm
Beach FL
33416
Managing
Editor
Gwinnett Daily
Post
POB 603
..
..
..
..
..
Lawrenceville,
GA 30045
Fort Wayne, IN
46801
Portland, ME
04104
Managing
Editor
Macon
Telegram
POB 4167
Macon, GA
31208
Managing
Editor
Post Tribune
1433 E 83rd
Ave.
Merrikville, IN
46410
Managing
Editor
Cape Cod
Times
319 Main St
Hyannis, MA
02601
Managing
Editor
Savannah
Morning News
POB 1088
Savannah, GA
31402
Managing
Editor
Times
601 45th St.
Munster, IN
46321
Managing
Editor
Eagle Tribune
POB 100
Lawrence, MA
01845
Managing
Editor
South Bend
Tribune
225 W. Colfax
Ave
South Bend, IN
46626
Managing
Editor
Patriot Ledger
POB 699159
Quincy, MA
02269
Managing
Editor
Honolulu StarBulletin
500 Ala Moana
Blvd Ste 7-210
Honolulu HI
96813
Managing
Editor
Journal Star
1 News Plaza
Peoria, IL
61643
Managing
Editor
Rockford
Register Star
99 E. State St.
Rockford, IL
61104
Managing
Editor
Stae JournalRegister
POB 219
Springfield, IL
62705
Managing
Editor
Evansville
Courier & Press
POB 268
Evansville IN
47702
Managing
Editor
Journal Gazette
POB 88
Managing
Editor
Wisconsin State
Journal
POB 8058
Madison, WI
53708
Managing
Editor
The Gazette
POB 511
Cedar Rapids,
IA 52406
Managing
Editor
Ann Arbor
News
POB 1147
Ann Arbor, MI
48106
Managing
Editor
Quad City
Times
POB 3828
Davenport, IA
52808
Managing
Editor
Oakland Press
PPOB 436009
Pontiac, MI
48342
Managing
Editor
Topeka Capital
Journal
616 SE
Jefferson St.
Topeka KS
66607-1120
Managing
Editor
Duluth NewsTribune
424 W. 1st St.
Duluth, MN
55802
Managing
Editor
Advocate
POB 588
Baton Rouge,
LA 70821
Managing
Editor
Clarion Ledger
POB 40
Jackson, MS
39201
Managing
Editor
Portland Press
Herald
POB 1460
8
Managing
Editor
Winston Salem
Journal
POB 3159
Winston-Salem,
NC 27102
Managing
Editor
News Ledger
POB 798
Springfield,
MO 65801
Chattanooga
Times & Free
Press
POB 1447
Chattanooga,
TN 37403
Managing
Editor
Lincoln Journal
Star
POB 81689
Lincoln, NE
68508
Managing
Editor
The Repository
POB 9901
Canton, OH
44711
Managing
Editor
Corpus Christi
Caller Times
POB 9136
Corpus Christi,
TX 78469
Managing
Editor
Reno Gazette
Journal
POB 22000
Reno, NV
89520
Managing
Editor
Plain Dealer
1801 Superior
Ave. E
Cleveland OH
44114
Managing
Editor
Houston
Chronicle
POB 4260
Houston, TX
77210
Managing
Editor
Courier Post
POB 5300
Cherry Hill, NJ
08002
Managing
Editor
The Vindicator
Managing
Editor Lubbock
Avalanche
Journal
POB 491
Lubbock, TX
79408
Managing
Editor
Press of
Atlantic City
11 Devins Ln
Pleasantville,
NJ 08232
Managing
Editor
Rochester
Democrat &
Chronicle
55 Exchange
Blvd
Rochester, NY
14614
Managing
Editor
Post Standard
POB 4915
Syracuse, NY
13221
Managing
Editor
Fayetteville
Observer
POB 849
Fayetteville,
NC 28302
Managing
Editor
News & Record
POB 20848
Greensboro,
NC 27420
POB 780 \
Youngstown,
OH 44501
Managing
Editor
Tulsa World
POB 1770
Tulsa, OK
74102
Managing
Editor
Register=Guard
POB 10188
Eugene, OR
10188
Managing
Editor
Morning Call
POB 1260
Allentown, PA
18105
Managing
Editor
Erie TimesNews
205 W 12th St.
Erie, PA 16534
Managing
Editor
Philadelphia
Inquirer
POB 8263
Philadelphia,
PA 19101
Managing
Editor
Managing
Editor\
Standard
Examiner
POB 12790
Ogden, UT
84412
Ghita Levine
Director,
Communication
s
American
Anthropologica
l Association
2200 Wilson
Blvd
Suite 600
Arlington, VA
22201
Bill Hall
Lewiston
Morning
Tribune
P.O. Box 957
Lewiston, ID
83501
Kathy Hedberg
Lewiston
Morning
Tribune
P.O. Box 957
Lewiston, ID
83501
Jim Fisher
Lewiston
Morning
Tribune
P.O. Box 957
Lewiston, ID
83501
Managing
Editor
Deseret
Morning News
POB 1257
Salt Lake City,
UT 84110
Michael
Costello
Lewiston
Morning
Tribune
P.O. Box 957
Lewiston, ID
83501
Managing
Editor
Salt Lake City
Tribune
POB 867
Salt Lake City,
UT 84110
S. Renee
Mitchell
The Oregonian
1320 S.W.
Broadway
Portland, OR
97201
Managing
Editor
Express
1515 N Court
House Rd
Arlington, VA
22201
Richard L. Hill
The Oregonian
1320 S.W.
Broadway
Portland, OR
97201
Managing
Editor
Richmond
Times Dispatch
POB 85333
Richmond, VA
23293
Joe
Rojas-Burke
The Oregonian
1320 S.W.
Broadway
Portland, OR
97201
David Fisher
Seattle PostIntelligencer
P.O. Box 1909
Seattle WA
98111-1909
Tom Paulson
Seattle PostIntelligencer
P.O. Box 1909
Seattle WA
98111-1909
Solveig Torvik
Seattle PostIntelligencer
P.O. Box 1909
Seattle WA
98111-1909
M. L. Lyke
Seattle PostIntelligencer
P.O. Box 1909
Seattle WA
98111-1909
Carol Smith
Seattle PostIntelligencer
P.O. Box 1909
Seattle WA
98111-1909
Brian Shors
Seattle Times
PO Box 70
Seattle, WA
98111
Eric Sorenson
Seattle Times
PO Box 70
Seattle, WA
98111
Morgan Lee
Albuquerque
Journal
7777 Jefferson
Street NE
Albuquerque,
N.M., 871094360
John Fleck
Albuquerque
Journal
7777 Jefferson
Street NE
Albuquerque,
..
..
..
..
..
N.M., 871094360
Michael
Coleman
Albuquerque
Journal
7777 Jefferson
Street NE
Albuquerque,
N.M., 871094360
Roger Downey
Seattle Weekly
1008 Western
Ave., Suite 300
Seattle, WA
98104
Brian Miller
Seattle Weekly
1008 Western
Ave., Suite 300
Seattle, WA
98104
Denise Kusel
Santa Fe New
Mexican
202 E. Marcy
St.
Santa Fe, NM
87501
Barbara Ferry
Santa Fe New
Mexican
202 E. Marcy
St.
Santa Fe, NM
87501
Kim Murphy
Los Angeles
Times
Times-Mirror
Square
Los Angeles,
CA 90053
Susan English
Spokane - Main
Office
999 West
Riverside
Avenue
Spokane WA
99201
Kerry FehrSnyder
Arizona
Republic
200. East Van
Buren St.
Phoenix, AZ
85004
100 Gene
Amole Way
Denver,
Colorado 80204
Guy Gugliotta
The
Washington
Post
1150 15th
Street, N.W.
Washington,
D.C. 20071
Rob Carson
The News
Tribune
1950 South
State Street
Tacoma, WA
98405
William
Claiborne
The
Washington
Post
1150 15th
Street, N.W.
Washington,
D.C. 20071
Mike Lee
Tri-City Herald
107 N. Cascade
St.
Kennewick,
Washington
99336
Mark Moreno
Tri-City Herald
107 N. Cascade
St.
Kennewick,
Washington
99336
Kelly Patrick
O’Meara
Insight on the
News
Editorial Office
3600 New York
Ave., NE
Washington,
DC 20002
Elizabeth
Greespan
Arizona
Republic
200. East Van
Buren St.
Phoenix, AZ
85004
John Elvin
Insight on the
News
Editorial Office
3600 New York
Ave., NE
Washington,
DC 20002
Shaman Kiddle
Arizona
Republic
200. East Van
Buren St.
Phoenix, AZ
85004
J. Pinkerton
Cook
Arkansas
DemocratGazette, Inc.
121 East
Capitol Avenue
Little Rock,
Arkansas,
72201
Michael
Bawaya
Editor,
American
Archaeologist
Archaeological
Conservancy
5301 Central
Ave.
Suite 402
Albuequerque,
NM 87403
Frank Roylance
The Baltimore
Sun
501 N. Calvert
Street
P.0. Box 1377
Baltimore,
Maryland
21278
J. B. Verrengia
10
John Noble
Wilford
Science
Correspondent
The New York
Times
229 West 43rd
St.
New York, NY
10036
Timothy Egan
The New York
Times
229 West 43rd
St.
New York, NY
10036
Scott L.
Malcomson
The New York
Times
Magazine
229 West 43rd
St.
New York, NY
10036
Philip Terzian
The Providence
Journal
75 Fountain St.
Providence, RI
02902
Thomas W.
Haines
35 Morrissey
Boulevard
P.O. Box 2378
Dorchester,
MA 021072378
Sharon Begley
The Wall Street
Journal
4300 N. Route
1
South
Brunswick, NJ
08852
Bruce Bower
Behavioral
Sciences Editor
Science News
Paul Recer
Associated
Press
Mike Toner
Atlanta
Constitution
Dick Stanley
Austin American-Statesman
PO Box 670
Austin, TX 78767
1719 N Street
NW
Washington,
DC 20036
Andrea
Dorfman
Senior Reporter
Time Magazine
1271 Ave. of
the Americas
New York, NY
10020
Jim Erickson
Rocky
Mountain News
400 W. Colfax
Ave.
Denver, CO
80204
Evan
Hadingham
Senior Science
Editor
NOVA, WGBH
125 Western
Ave.
Boston, MA
02134
Dietra
Henderson
Science
Reporter
Denver Post
1560 Broadway
Denver, CO
80202
Thomas
Maugh, II
Medical Writer
Los Angeles
Times
Times-Mirror
Square
Los Angeles,
CA 90053
Rosie Mestel
New Scientist
2154 E. Orange
Grove Blvd.
Pasadena, CA
91104
Chip Minty
Staff Writer
The Oklahoman
PO Box 25125
Oklahoma City,
OK
73125-0125
Brock Read
The Chronicle
of Higher
Education
1255 23rd St.
NW
Washington,
DC 20037
Bryn Nelson
Health and
Science Writer
Newsday
235 Pinelawn
Road
Melville, NY
11747
Peter N. Spotts
Science and
Technology
Correspondent
The Christian
Science
Monitor
One Norway St.
Boston, MA
02115
Alexandra
Witze
Associate
Editor
Dallas Morning
News
PO Box 655237
Dallas, TX
75265
Jim Erickson
Arizona Daily
Star
4850 S. Park
Ave.
Tucson, AZ
85714
2021 K St NW,
Suite 606
Gary Ghioto
Arizona Daily
Sun
Washington,
DC 20006-1082
72 Marietta St
NW
Atlanta, GA
30303-2804
1751 S.
Thompson
Flagstaff,
Arizona 86001
Catherine Clabby
Science Reporter
News & Observer
215 S. McDowell Street
Raleigh, NC 27602
Donna Kemp
Spangler
The Deseret
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E. Outreach to Peers
Scholarly Presented Announcements (to date)
2007. Avocationalists, Colleagues, and Clients--‘Lend us your ears!' (and direct your cursors!) Society for American
Archaeology (PEC) Web Pages Working Group: Carol McDavid, Patrice L. Jeppson and Mary Kwas; and Maureen
Malloy, SAA Manager of Education and Outreach. Poster presented at the Society for Historical and Underwater
Archaeology. Williamsburg, Virginia.
2006a. Poster. The 'Archaeology for the Public' Web Pages: Applying resources for the needs of others. (Patrice L.
Jeppson, Maureen Malloy, Carol McDavid and Mary Kwas). Presented at the American Anthropological Association
annual meeting,
San Jose, CA, November.
2006b. Attention SAA Members! -- Archaeology for the Public is live on the Internet! (Patrice L. Jeppson, Maureen
Malloy, Carol McDavid and Mary Kwas). Poster session presented at the Society for American Archaeology, Puerto
Rico. April.
Scholarly Published Announcements (to date)
2007 (In-Preparation) Outreach to Faceless Communities: The 'Archaeology for the Public' Web Pages Project
(Patrice L. Jeppson, Maureen Malloy, Mary Kwas, and Carol McDavid). In proposed issue of
Archaeologies (the journal of the World Archaeological Congress) carrying the theme: Archaeology
for Community Heritage in North America, of Archaeologies, edited by David A. Gadsby and
Beatrix Arendt.
2007 (In-Preparation) Colleagues --‘Lend us your ears!' (and direct your cursors!) (Patrice L. Jeppson, Carol
McDavid, Mary Kwas, and Maureen Malloy, SAA Manager of Education and Outreach. SAA
Archaeological Record. Society for American Archaeology. Washington, DC.
2007 Building Digital Bridges (Patrice L. Jeppson, Carol McDavid, Mary Kwas, and Maureen Malloy). Commentary
in Anthropology News (Knowledge Exchange Column, Issue on Developing Online Resources in
Anthropology) 48(4) 31-32. American Anthropological Association. Arlington, Virginia.
2003b. Archaeology For The Public: A New Addition to the SAA Web Site (Patrice L. Jeppson, Mary L. Kwas,
Maureen Malloy, and Carol McDavid). SAA Archaeological Record 3(5):8-10.
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Displays Directed at Colleagues (to date)
2007a SAA booth, Book Room, Society for American Archaeology, Austin, Texas. April. (Web pages on
disk on laptop, bookmarks, poster.)
2007b. SAA booth (comp), Book Room, Society for Historical and Underwater Archaeology.
Williamsburg, Virginia, January. (poster, bookmarks.)
2006a. SAA booth (comp), Book Room, American Anthropological Association annual meeting, San
Jose, CA, November. (poster, bookmarks.)
2006b. SAA booth, Book Room, Society for American Archaeology, Puerto Rico, April. (web pages on
disk on laptop, bookmarks.)
Other Announcements Within SAA (to date)
SAA Conference Program advertisement, 2006 (requested as part of announcement campaign but effort
did not come to fruition)
SAA Press Catalogue inclusion (successful effort, 2006)
SAA Archaeological Record advertisement (successful effort, Summer 2006, will continue in future
issues)
SAA American Antiquity and Latin American Antiquity (*Request denied)
SAA PEC Buisness Listserv. (PEC L [email protected]) Regular postings for content requests and
new content announcement (2005-present).
SAA Public Archaeology Interest Group Listserv.
(PAIG-L [email protected]) Regular posting of content requests and new
announcements (2006), Monthly updates began in January 2007.
Listserv of State Historic Preservation Officers (*Regular Updates Requested 5/07, commencing 6/07)
Network of State Education Coordinators (*Regular Updates Requested 5/07, commencing 6/07)
SAA Committee Chairs and Members (*Monthly updates commencing 6/07 in response to suggestion by
Media Relations Committee members)
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F. Targeted Audiences: General Public and Educators
Individuals with an interest in archaeology; educators
seeking background information and or resources useful
classroom instruction; Social Studies Decision Makers
(for social studies content taught in schools and school
districts).
On-site Outreach/Usage (to date)
2007. Public Session, Society for Historical and
Underwater Archaeology, Williamsburg, Virginia. Booth
with live web pages on lap top, plus a poster.
2006a. Exhibit Room, National Council for the Social
Studies. Washington, DC. Web pages on disk on a laptop
at the Project Archaeology/SAA booth.
2006b. “Archaeology Roadshow”, Public Session, Society
for Historical and Underwater Archaeology Public Session,
Sacramento, California. (Pilot Testing) Web pages on disk
on a laptop at the SAA booth. Event Attendance: 1500.
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Appendix: IV
Teacher Suggestions For Web Pages
(Selected Comments)
I would say is to keep it kid friendly and clutter free.
You remember the old saying KISS? Keep it
stupidly simple or something like that, at least the kid portion.
Use lots of pictures. It needs to be very visual the younger the audience.
Also you want to make it so that even ELD students (English learners) will benefit.
Keep the reading level low so that kids get the content and aren't' working
so hard to decode that they don't "get it."
The reading level should be at least one grade level below the target age,
two would be even better. You don't want to frustrate them.
This is a major problem with most science and
social studies text books that have been put on the market. Although the
newest ones are better, they still are a bit above the reading level of the
students reading them. We end up reading it to them and pray they are
listening which is usually not the case since social sciences almost always
come in the afternoon.
Larger print the younger you go is also something to
consider. Kids freak when the page is overwhelmed with text, especially an
RSP kid.
For teacher section, include DOABLE lesson plans which means short simple
things that can be done in 30-45 blocks of time.
If they are geared to states such a California,
you might want to site the standard which is ties to, a BIG must here since
we can't teach anything that is not tied to a state standard.
Many texts have a page strictly for "California Standards"
Also,
if you have lessons plans that suggest a project, SHOW a picture of one a
student actually made.
Use tested lesson plans tested on average students not GATE kids.
Also teacher's LOVE books especially picture books which deal with the
subjects being taught. So provide a reading list. Any time we can connect
something to language arts and say that we are using "thematic" teaching it
looks good.
And thanks for asking.
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add links to other sites for the students who need or want to go that
little extra push.
often there are students who would like more
info but aren't sure where to go to get it.
how about something that explored what archeologists in the future might find
out about the culture of the students today if they excavated their
garbage/backyards/ schools etc...
reviews by and for teachers on material and books sound like a good idea
maybe some testimonials of teachers who were successful at integrating
archaeology into their curriculum.
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Appendix: V
Peer Review Request
November 7, 2005
Dear XXX,
This is a targeted appeal to archaeologists known to have particular expertise about and interest in Public
Archaeology, or who have oversight responsibilities for publicly-directed SAA efforts. This request comes from
the Internet Working Group, a task group of the SAA's Public Education Committee. In specific, we are
solitciting comments and input from archaeological peers on Phase I of ‘Archaeology for the Public’ which is a
set of publicly-directed web pages to be hosted on the main SAA web site.
Would you be willing to look at these pages – as many as you have time for – and comment on them? Your
comments can address style, images, content, ease of use, or anything else. We are still in the process of copyediting to correct typos and the like, but if you do find things we've missed, that sort of feedback would be useful
as well.
Evaluation Details
▪ This evaluation involves the first 150+ linked web pages of public-friendly, archaeology information.
▪ These pages are designed to provide a useful source of information for both diverse publics and
archaeologists who wish to communicate with them.
▪ These new web pages can be expanded and updated. Indeed, there are approximately 300 additional
pages waiting to be uploaded after Phase I editing and writing are completed and, after that, the site will
continue to evolve and
change.
The Archaeology for the Public web pages reflect the combined knowledge and practice of the
archaeological profession as represented by SAA members. As such, archaeologists (not administrators, web
design consultants, or other non-archaeology professionals) should be the final arbiters of what appears on these
pages. The PEC Committee members who have been assembling and editing these pages are archaeologists with
long experience in public outreach and education, and, as with any professional archaeology publication, a peerreview process is vital and necessary. Evalaution from non-archaeologists is also being sought. We hope you will
agree to assist us in this effort.
Please let us know by return email if you are willing to participate: [email protected]
The temporary URL for Archaeology for the Public is http://saa.heartstone.com/home/home.html.
This URL will change when the site goes live and is incorporated into the main SAA web site.
With thanks,
SAA PEC Internet Working Group
Carol McDavid
Patrice Jeppson
Mary Kwas (Editor, SAA Archaeology and Public Education e-Newsletter)
(Maureen Malloy, SAA Manager of Public Education)
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Appendix VI:
Feedback Needs To
Enable Qualitative and
Quantitative Analysis:
Some Notes
Kinds of desired feedback on the web page includes, at base (but is not limited
to):
.
.
an understanding of which content is used by the public (specifically, what is used
by which publics and why). (This will help us give our publics what they need.)
favorites vs. undesirable/not particularly useful (and thus clogging/competing
information. (This could feed into better organization of our offerings.)
Feedback can be qualitative and/or quantitative and can be achieved in a
number of ways including:
Qualitative feedback
.
solicited suggestions from a button (e.g., Send Us Your Suggestions!)
We may need to also solicit directly why the public wanted particular data: Why
did you visit our site today? Were we able to help you? What more can we do to
help you today?
.
comments gleaned from on-line chat sessions
.
responses of surveys/mini-quiz’s (e.g. Test Your Archaeology
Knowledge!, or
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So You want to be an Archaeologist?! –
Take our quick mini-survey/quiz
Quantitative feedback
.
a web-server file analyzer program (digests and summarizes server logs)
This option provides:
Etic categories of thought:
This software will allow us to examine our ‘audiences’ anthropologically. How they surf
(categories they use) will reflect how ‘they see the world’ (and hence, their needs). We
can then use their terms (categories/world view) to organize our content for them.
We can learn about how people are searching to find us because the software lists
the referring search engines and search strings. We could use this information to
tell us where we need to be indexed (linked from).
Note: program features are not perfect. We can’t track to specific individuals
because tally’s include hits from proxy (remote) and multiple users at one address
will not be identifiable (such as at a school address). Plus, not all IP addresses are
static (unique) leading to possible inflated hit tallies, etc. Likewise, a hit count
does not tell you how long the individual spent with the content nor what they
came away with from it. But the tally’s can show where someone links from and
what they link to giving an idea of successful typologies/categories of information
and priorities of the public. A search engine crawling for indexing (a good thing)
can also look like a hit inflating the tally.
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