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Transcript
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Name _______________________________________________ Date ________________ Class______________
CHAPTER
2
REINFORCEMENT WORKSHEET
Atomic Timeline
Complete this worksheet after you have finished reading Chapter 2, Section 1.
The table below contains a number of statements connected to major
discoveries in the development of atomic theory.
1. In each box, write the name of the scientist(s) associated with the statement.
Choose from among the following scientists:
• Rutherford
• Dalton
• Schrödinger and Heisenberg
CHAPTER 2
• Democritus
• Thomson
• Bohr
▼
▼
▼
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
2. On a separate sheet of paper, construct a timeline, and label the following: 440 BCE,
1803, 1897, 1909, 1911, 1913, and the twentieth century. Cut out the boxes below
along the dotted lines, and tape or glue each box of information at the correct point
along your timeline.
There are small, negatively charged
particles inside an atom.
Electron paths cannot be predicted.
There is a small, dense, positively charged
nucleus.
Electrons travel in definite paths.
Most of an atom’s mass is in the nucleus.
Electrons move in the empty space of an
atom.
Electrons jump between levels from path
to path.
His theory of atomic structure led to the
“plum-pudding” model.
He conducted the cathode-ray tube
experiment.
Electrons are found in electron clouds,
not paths.
Atoms of different elements are different.
Atoms of the same element are exactly
alike.
Atoms contain mostly empty space.
Atoms constantly move.
Atoms are small, hard particles.
All substances are made of atoms.
He conducted experiments in combining
elements.
He conducted the gold foil experiment.
Atoms are “uncuttable.”
Elements combine in specific proportions.
TEXAS EDITION, GRADE 8, UNIT 1 RESOURCES
55
Menu
Lesson
Print
Name _______________________________________________ Date ________________ Class______________
CHAPTER
2
REINFORCEMENT WORKSHEET
Atomic Timeline
Complete this worksheet after you have finished reading Chapter 2, Section 1.
The table below contains a number of statements connected to major
discoveries in the development of atomic theory.
1. In each box, write the name of the scientist(s) associated with the statement.
Choose from among the following scientists:
CHAPTER 2
• Rutherford 1909 and 1911
• Dalton 1803
• Schrödinger and Heisenberg
twentieth century
2. On a separate sheet of paper, construct a timeline, and label the following: 440 BCE,
1803, 1897, 1909, 1911, 1913, and the twentieth century. Cut out the boxes below
along the dotted lines, and tape or glue each box of information at the correct point
along your timeline.
There are small, negatively charged
particles inside an atom. 1897 (Thomson)
There is a small, dense, positively charged
nucleus. 1911 (Rutherford)
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Most of an atom’s mass is in the nucleus.
Electron paths cannot be predicted.
twentieth century (Schrödinger and Heisenberg)
Electrons travel in definite paths. 1913
(Bohr)
1911 (Rutherford)
Electrons move in the empty space of an
atom. 1911 (Rutherford)
Electrons jump between levels from path
to path. 1913 (Bohr)
His theory of atomic structure led to the
“plum-pudding” model. 1897 (Thomson)
He conducted the cathode-ray tube
experiment. 1897 (Thomson)
Electrons are found in electron clouds,
not paths. twentieth century (Schrödinger and
Heisenberg)
Atoms of different elements are different.
1803 (Dalton)
Atoms of the same element are exactly
alike. 1803 (Dalton)
Atoms contain mostly empty space. 1911
Atoms constantly move. 440 BCE
(Rutherford)
(Democritus)
Atoms are small, hard particles. 440 BCE
All substances are made of atoms. 1803
(Democritus)
(Dalton)
He conducted experiments in combining
elements. 1803 (Dalton)
He conducted the gold foil experiment.
Atoms are “uncuttable.” 440 BCE
Elements combine in specific proportions.
(Democritus)
1909 (Rutherford)
1803 (Dalton)
TEXAS EDITION, GRADE 8, UNIT 1 RESOURCES
55
▼
▼
▼
• Democritus 440 BCE
• Thomson 1897
• Bohr 1913