Download ch._14-4

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Sound wikipedia, lookup

Tinnitus wikipedia, lookup

Auditory processing disorder wikipedia, lookup

Hearing loss wikipedia, lookup

Olivocochlear system wikipedia, lookup

Noise-induced hearing loss wikipedia, lookup

Audiology and hearing health professionals in developed and developing countries wikipedia, lookup

Sensorineural hearing loss wikipedia, lookup

Sound localization wikipedia, lookup

Earplug wikipedia, lookup

Auditory system wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Lesson 4
Ears and Hearing Protection
Your ears and brain work together.
They allow you to hear and interpret sounds and form a
response, such as turning your head when you hear a friend
calling your name.
Lesson 4
Lesson Objectives
In this lesson, you’ll learn to:
Identify the parts of the ear.
Examine the effects of health behaviors on the ears and
hearing.
Describe some problems of the ear.
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
Three Main Sections of the Ear
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
The Outer Ear
The outer ear begins with
the visible part of the ear,
the auricle.
The auricle helps channel
sound waves into the
external auditory canal.
The eardrum acts as a
barrier between the outer
and middle ear.
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
The Middle Ear
Directly behind the eardrum
are the auditory ossicles.
The middle ear is connected
to the throat by the
eustachian tube.
The eustachian tube allows
pressure to be equalized on
either side of the eardrum
when you swallow or yawn.
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
The Inner Ear
The labyrinth consists of a
network of curved and spiral
passages with three main
parts.
The cochlea is the area of
hearing in the inner ear.
The vestibule and semicircular
canals are where balance is
controlled.
Lesson 4
Hearing and Balance
How You Hear
When receptors in your inner ear are stimulated by a sound
wave, a nerve impulse is sent to your brain.
Your brain interprets the impulse as a sound.
Sound waves enter the external auditory canal and cause the
eardrum to vibrate.
The vibrations cause fluid in the cochlea to move, which
stimulates receptor cells to send a nerve impulse to the brain
where sounds are interpreted.
Lesson 4
Hearing and Balance
Maintaining Balance
Receptor cells in the vestibule and the semicircular canals
send messages to the brain about your sense of balance.
Tiny hairs located in the ear sense movement and send nerve
impulses to the brain.
The brain then signals muscles to make adjustments to
maintain balance.
Lesson 4
Hearing and Balance
Ear Structure and Function
Click image to view movie.
Lesson 4
Health Behaviors for Healthy Ears
Tips for Healthy Ears
Clean ears regularly
and always protect the
outer ear from injury
and extreme cold.
Wear protective gear
such as helmets and
hats.
Keep foreign objects
out of the ear.
Have your ears
examined and your
hearing tested to
detect any problems.
Lesson 4
Problems of the Ear
Hearing Loss
Conductive
Hearing
Loss
Sensorineural
Hearing Loss
Sound waves are not
passed from the outer
to the inner ear,
usually because of a
blockage or injury to
the inner ear.
Persistent buildup of
fluid within the middle
ear, often caused by
infection, is most
common in children.
Lesson 4
Quick Review
Choose the appropriate option.
Q. The inner ear is also known as the
_________.
1. labyrinth
2. external auditory
canal
3. auricle
4. eardrum
Lesson 4
Quick Review - Answer
A. The inner ear is also known as the labyrinth.
Click Next to attempt another question.
Lesson 4
Quick Review
Provide a short answer to the question given below.
Q. Identify the three main parts of the ear and the structures
that can be found in each part.
Click Next to view the answer.
Lesson 4
Quick Review - Answer
A. The three main parts of the ear are as follows:
1. Outer ear: It contains the auricle, external auditory
canal, and eardrum.
2. Middle ear: It contains the auditory ossicles and the
oval window.
3. Inner ear: It contains the cochlea, vestibule,
and the semicircular canals.
Click Next to attempt another question.
Lesson 4
Quick Review
Provide a short answer to the question given below.
Q. Define the term tinnitus.
Click Next to view the answer.
Lesson 4
Quick Review - Answer
A. Tinnitus is a condition in which a ringing, buzzing,
whistling, roaring, hissing, or other sound is heard in the
ear in the absence of external sound.
Click Next to attempt another question.
Lesson 4
Quick Review
Analyze the following question.
What activities might cause the inner ear to send mixed
messages to the brain and result in dizziness and nausea?
Lesson 4
Quick Review - Answer
A. Correct! The inner ear is also known as the labyrinth.
Click Next to attempt another question.
Lesson 4
Quick Review - Answer
You have answered the question incorrectly. Go back to try again,
or click Next to view the correct answer.
Lesson 4
Problems of the Ear
Hearing Loss
Conductive
Hearing
Loss
Sensorineural
Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing
loss results from
damage to the
cochlea, the auditory
nerve, or the brain.
Tinnitus can occur as
a result of natural
aging, health
conditions, or
overexposure to loud
noise.
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
The Outer Ear
The outer ear begins with
the visible part of the ear,
the auricle.
The external
The auricle helps channel
auditory canal is a
sound waves into the
passageway about one
external auditory canal.
inch long that leads to
the remaining portion
The eardrum acts as a
barrier between the outer of the outer ear, the
eardrum.
and middle ear.
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
The Middle Ear
Directly behind the eardrum
are the auditory ossicles.
The middle ear is connected
to the throat
by the
The auditory
eustachian
tube.
ossicles are
three
small bones linked
The
eustachian
together
that tube allows
pressure
be eardrum
equalized on
connecttothe
either
side
of the
to the
inner
ear.eardrum
when you swallow or yawn.
Lesson 4
Parts of the Ear
The Inner Ear
The labyrinth consists of a
network of curved and spiral
passages with three main
parts.
The
labyrinth is the
The cochlea
is the
inner
ear.area of
hearing in the inner ear.
The vestibule and semicircular
canals are where balance is
controlled.
Lesson 4
Problems of the Ear
Hearing Loss
Conductive
Hearing Tinnitus is a
Loss
condition in which a
ringing, buzzing,
whistling, roaring,
hissing, or other sound is
heard in the ear in the
Sensorineural
absence
Hearing
Loss of external
sound.
Sensorineural hearing
loss results from
damage to the
cochlea, the auditory
nerve, or the brain.
Tinnitus can occur as
a result of natural
aging, health
conditions, or
overexposure to loud
noise.