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He is one of the great tragic figures of history: Gnaeus Pompeius Maximus.
A protégé of Lucius Cornelius Sulla, young Pompey quelled the rebellions of
the followers of Sulla’s rival, Gaius Marius. He went on to finish of the
rebellion of Spartacus and the wars with Mithradates VI of Pontus. When
pirates overran the Mediterranean, it was Pompey who defeated them and
secured the Sea for Rome. As a triumphant general, Pompey joined forces
with unlikely allies Gaius Julius Caesar and Marcus Licinius Crassus. When
this unofficial “First Triumvirate” fell apart, Rome was plunged into civil
war, leading to the creation of the Empire.
Use Gnaeus Pompeius Maximus, the brash & brilliant Triumvir, to finish off
any opponent who comes your way in the Anachronism arena!
ANACHRONISM
• Aeizanas of Axum
• Dahiyah al-Kahina
• Kedeke Amanirenas
• Memnon
• Shaka Zulu
• Ethelfleda
• Henry V
• King Edward
• Uther Pendragon
• William the Conqueror
• Hamilcar Barca
• Hannibal Barca
• Hasdrubal
• Himilco
• Xanthippus
Set 8
GNAEUS POMPEIUS MAXIMUS
• ACHILLEA
• FABIUS MAXIMUS
• GNAEUS POMPEIUS MAXIMUS
• HORATIUS COCLES
• PUBLIUS SCIPIO AFRICANUS
Vital Stats
Name: Gnaeus Pompeius Maximus
a.k.a.: Pompey the Great,
Pompey the Triumvir
GNAEUS POMPEIUS MAXIMUS
FIRST TRIUMVIRATE
Culture: Roman
Lived: Sept. 29, 106—Sept. 28, 48 BCE
Title: Consul of Rome
Served: 70, 55, 52 BCE
Anachronism Connections:
Fought Julius Caesar, Spartacus, and
Mithradates VI the Great
Roman • Inspiration • Quest
Roman • Warrior • Male
Battles & Wars:
the Marian revolts
Third Servile War
War against Mediterranean Pirates
Third Mithradatic War (& War in Judea)
Civil war vs. Julius Caesar
Ostendo: When you break a tie with an opponent,
use your initiative for the current round instead of
your experience to break the tie.
Victum: Once each round, when you make an attack,
if you have any support cards in play that share a
culture with any of the defender’s cards, the attack
deals +1 damage.
“O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome,
Knew you not Pompey?” —Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
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Concordia: Before you take damage from an attack, if
your defense roll gained a bonus from a Roman card
ability, reduce the damage by 1, to a minimum of 1.
Gaius Julius Caesar. Marcus Licinius Crassus. Gnaeus Pompeius
Maximus. The unofficial alliance of these three men gave them
dominance over Roman politics. When it fell apart, Caesar
crossed the Rubicon, plunging Rome into civil war.
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GLADIUS POMPEIUS
CALIGA
THIRD MITHRADATIC WAR
Roman • Weapon • Sword (1 Hand)
Ictus—Action: Once each round, choose an opponent
that is adjacent to you. If the total initiative of your
support cards in play is greater than the chosen
opponent’s, and you have less life than that warrior, deal
2 damage to them.
At the end of the gladius’ evolution, the sword lost its curves,
shortened its tip, and lengthened its blade. By the 3rd century AD,
the spatha had replaced it as the sword of the Roman legions.
Roman • Armor • Leg
Proficiscor ut Pugna: When you make a defense roll,
the roll gains +1 for each time you moved during the
last round. Your defense rolls cannot gain bonuses that
total greater than +4.
When the young son of Germanicus accompanied his father to
war, he wore a kid-sized Legionnaire’s uniform – complete with a
small pair of sandals. The troops nicknamed the boy after his
outfit’s “little boots” – Caligula.
Roman • Persian • Special • Quest • Ability
Praemium Commodum: After you use an action
ability that dealt damage to an opponent, at the start of
your next turn, gain 1 speed. You may have 2 special
cards in play.
“...and Pompey told them of Mithridates’ death.... Upon this news,
the whole army expressing their joy fell to sacrificing to the gods,
and feasting, as if in the person of Mithridates alone there had
died many thousands of their enemies.” —Plutarch
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ILLUSTRATION: PUBLIC DOMAIN • TM & © 2007 AETN, TM & © 2007 TRIKING GAMES
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ILLUSTRATION: ALFRED J. CHURCH • TM & © 2007 AETN, TM & © 2007 TRIKING GAMES
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