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Transcript
EOCT Review Succession Guided Notes- ANSWER KEY
Predictable CHANGES of GROWTH that occur in a community over time in order to reach stability.
PIONEER SPECIES
ROCK
INTERMEDIATE
CLIMAX
LICHEN
PIONEER
SPECIES
NATURAL DISASTER
INTERMEDIATE
CLIMAX
Primary Succession
•
•
•
BREAKDOWN of rock must occur in order to
FORM SOIL.
Occurs on BARREN OR NEWLY formed land
Takes a LONGER TIME to reach a climax
community
Secondary Succession
•
Soil is ALREADY present
•
Occurs AFTER a NATURAL DISASTER or
CLEARING AWAY of already present land
Takes a SHORTER TIME to establish a climax
community
•
1- B- volcanic rock-lichen-mosses-sea grasses
In primary succession, an ecosystem must be created from scratch.
The lichens and mosses in this example, erode the rock and create soil that
the seagrasses can later grow in. Shrubs and coconut trees would not appear until much
later.
2- D- During ecological succession an increasing number of resources
and niches become available for animals. More and more plants move in,
creating more homes and more food for animals to follow.
3- C- Primary succession follows an event like a lava flow, an event that kills off all life
forms in an area
4- C- Climax communities are usually more rich in species biodiversity than
communities that are undergoing primary succession. Climax communities are a
mature ecosystem. Generally, they have had time to accumulate many species
that could not live during the early stages of the ecosystem, along with some
species that remain from earlier stages.