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Maryville Junior High School
Catalogue of Course Offerings
2014-2015
Phone
Office Fax
Guidance Office Fax
Website
(865) 983-2070
(865) 977-4089
(865) 977-9413
http://www.maryville-schools.org/mjhs
Maryville Junior High School and the Maryville City Schools reserve the right to add,
delete, or change requirements, course offerings, and services at any time without
prior notice.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Mission, Vision, and Beliefs…………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Required and Elective Courses……………………………………………………………...................... 4
Daily Schedule………………………………………………………………………….…………………………….. 5
8th Grade Placement Criteria…………………………………………………………….……………………..6
9th Grade Placement Criteria……………………………………………………………………………………7
Maryville High School Graduation Requirements…………..…………………………………….….8
Grading Practices and Scales……………………………………………………………………………………9
Framework of Standards for Honors Courses….……………………………………………………..11
MJHS Required Courses………………………………………………………………………………………….12
MJHS Elective Courses……………………………………………………………………………………………21
Special Education…………………………………………………………………………………………………..26
Tutoring…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………26
Homebound Instruction…………………………………………………………………........................26
Academic Study…………………………………………………………………………………………………….27
Promotion and Retention Policy……………………………………………………………………………29
Maryville High School Couse Sequence Guides….………………………………………………….30
Mission
“Building a bridge to success for every student through unified efforts”
Vision
In an every-changing and advancing technological society, we envision a school where
students are equipped to be leaders in a competitive environment. We envision a
school where students are self-disciplined and successful members of the community.
Our school’s curriculum is rigorous, and relevant, high expectations are held for all
students. The entire school community is committed to helping all students reach their
potential and realize academic success. Our dedicated staff pledges to support the
intellectual and emotional growth of our students in a positive, safe environment. We
strive to launch students to tenth grade and beyond with the confidence, discernment,
and skills to succeed as lifelong learners.
Beliefs
We Believe…
Our Students:
 require academic, social, and emotional support from our teachers to bridge the
way to high school and beyond;
 will cultivate good decision making skills, a sense of responsibility, and respect
for others in their path to maturity;
 Will be engaged in rigorous and relevant learning that focuses on higher order
thinking skills.
Our Teachers:
 will prepare and motivate all students to meet rigorous academic standards of
the next level and beyond;
 will provide a variety of research-based instructional strategies, activities, and
assessments;
 will promote the academic and social success of all students through
enrichment, remediation, and mentoring;
 Will provide a safe, non-threatening, disciplined learning environment.
Our Stakeholders:
 will support interdisciplinary teaming to help students develop skills needed for
academic and social success;
 will be involved and support activities that enhance student learning and growth;
 Will work with the School Leadership Team to solve problems and plan for
school improvement.
Eighth Grade Course Selection
REQUIRED COURSES
 English: Honors/Pre AP 82, College Prep 83 or 84
 Math: Algebra I – 81, College Prep 82 or 83
 Science: Honors 81, College Prep 82 or 83
 Social Studies: Honors 81 or College Prep 82
 Technology 80 – Embedded in Core Subjects
 Wellness 80
Freshmen Course Selection
REQUIRED COURSES
 English: Honors/Pre AP 92, College Prep 93 or 94
 Math: Algebra I – 92 or 93 or Geometry Honors or College Prep
 Science: Biology Honors 91, College Prep 92 or Environmental Science 93
 Human Geography (Advanced Placement)
 World History and Geography College Prep 92, 93
 Computer Applications 90 – Embedded in Core Subjects
 Wellness 90
ELECTIVE COURSES
The following is a list of 8th and 9th grade electives. Some require a teacher
recommendation, an application, a prerequisite, and/or grade specific. If not enough
student’s register for an elective course, it may not be offered.
*Requires a teacher recommendation and/or application
 *Academic Success
 *Academic Success Assistant
 *Academic Success – CDC Peer Tutoring
 Art (8th grade only)
 Art 1 (9th grade only)
 Band
 Chorus (8th grade only)
 Concert Choir (9th grade only)
 Construction Core (9th grade only)
 Drama (8th grade only)
 Drama 1 (9th grade only)
 *Drama 2: Intermediate – requires completion of Drama I
 Exploration in Organizational Leadership and Marketing (9th grade only)
 Family and Consumer Science (9th grade only)
 *French 1, 2
 Gateway to Technology STEM (8th grade only)
 Introduction to Engineering Design (9th grade only)
 *Latin 1, 2
 Orchestra
 *Peer Tutoring
 Shop (8th grade only)
 *Spanish 1, 2
 Teen Living (8th grade only)
 *Yearbook
Daily Schedule
Building Opens
7:30
Breakfast
7:50-8:10
Dismissal to Class
8:10
Tardy Bell
8:20
1st Period
8:20-9:34
2nd Period
9:39-10:53
3rd Period
10:58-12:42
A Lunch
10:58-11:28
B Lunch
11:35-12:05
C Lunch
12:12-12:42
4th Period
12:47-2:01
5th Period
2:06-3:20
First Bus
3:20
Second Bus/Cars/Walkers
3:25
A modified version of this schedule will be implemented every Wednesday to allow for
Olweus Bully Prevention class meetings.
8th Grade Placement Criteria
Language Arts
Course
ACT English Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
7th Grade DEA
Test B Number
Correct (Max 40)
82 Honors
80-99
24-36
30-40
83 CP
50-79
19-23
23-29
84 cp
1-49
1-18
0-22
Math
Course
ACT Math Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
7th Grade DEA
Test B Number
Correct (Max 31)
81 Algebra 1
80-99
23-36
23-31
82 CP
40-79
17-22
16-22
83 cp
1-39
1-16
0-15
Science
Course
ACT Science Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
81 Honors
79-99
23-36
82 CP
40-78
18-23
83 cp
1-39
1-17
Social Studies
Course
ACT Reading Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
81 Honors
79-99
24-36
82 CP
1-78
17-23
9th Grade Placement Criteria
Language Arts
Course
ACT English Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
Explore English
92 Honors
80-99
24-36
20-25
93 CP
50-79
19-23
16-19
94 cp
1-49
1-18
0-15
Math
Course
ACT Math Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
Explore Math
Geometry Honors
80-99
23-36
19-25
92 Algebra I CP
40-79
17-22
14-18
93 Algebra I CP
1-39
1-16
0-13
Geometry CP
Science
Course
ACT Science Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
Explore Science
91 Biology Honors
79-99
23-36
19-25
92 Biology CP
40-78
18-23
15-18
93 Env. Science cp
1-39
1-17
0-14
Social Studies
Course
ACT Reading Projections
State %tile
ACT Score
Explore Reading
AP Human Geography
85-99
26-36
22-25
92 CP
40-84
17-25
15-21
93 cp
1-39
1-16
0-14
MARYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Required Courses
Grade Taken
28 Required Credits
English 1, 2, 3, 4
Math
Science
Lifetime Wellness
World History and Geography
U.S. History
U.S. Government
Economics
Foreign Language
Fine Arts
Personal Finance
Physical Education
Computer Application
Elective Focus
9, 10, 11, 12
9, 10, 11, 12
9, 10, 11
9
9
11
12
12
9-12
9-12
10
9-12
9
9-12
4 Credits
4 Credits
3 Credits (+1)
1 Credit
1 Credit
1 Credit
½ Credit
½ Credit
2 Credits
1 Credit
½ Credit + ½ credit reading
½ Credit
1 Credit
3 Credits
Elective Focus Areas






CTE:










Fine Arts
Humanities
Math and Science
Advanced Placement
Exercise and Safety
Pathway/Engineering
Architecture and Construction
Art and Communications
Finance
Human Services
Health Science
Law Enforcement Services
Information Technology
Marketing
Business Management and Administration
STEM
Grading Practices and Scales
MJHS uses letter grades (A, B, C, D, F, and P) to report student progress. Plus/minus
may be added to the letter grade as an incentive/warning. The plus/minus will appear
on the student’s record, but will have no quality point value when computing the GPA.
Grades reflect the level of mastery on course specific curriculum standards.
Grading Scales
Letter
College
Grade
Prep (CP)
Quality
Points
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
0
100
94
93
92
86
85
84
76
75
74
71
70
0-69
Honors Quality Advanced
(H)
Points Placement
(AP)
100
4.5
100
91
4.5
89
90
4.5
88
89
3.5
87
83
3.5
81
82
3.5
80
81
2.5
79
73
2.5
71
72
2.5
70
71
1.5
69
68
1.5
66
67
1.5
65
0-66
0
0-64
Quality
Points
5
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
0
To calculate the Grade Point Average (GPA) add up all of the quality points for the
courses taken and divide by the total number of credits that have been earned.
State Assessments and Grade Calculation
First semester exams will compose (15%) eighth grade and (25%) ninth grade of the first
semester average. Per the State of Tennessee and MCS Board Policy, the Tennessee
Comprehensive Assessment Program will compose 15% of second semester (spring)
grades in the subject areas of mathematics, reading/language arts, science, and social
studies for Maryville City School students in grades three through eight. Per the State of
Tennessee, state issued End-of-Course (EOC) exams will compose 25% of second
semester grades in the subject areas of English I, Algebra I, and Biology. Courses without
state mandated assessments may issue course generated EOC exams that will compose
15% of eighth grade second semester grades and 25% of ninth grade second semester
grades.
Course specific benchmark assessments will be given to assess student academic growth
over the course of the school year.
For students missing the TCAP
If a student is absent and misses a TCAP sub-test (Language Arts/Reading, Math,
Science, Social Studies) and the absence is unexcused, a zero (0) will be averaged as 15%
of the 2nd semester average. If the absence is excused (documented medical, death in
family, court ordered juvenile court appearance to name some examples) and the
opportunity was not available for the student to make the test up during the mandated
testing window following the initial issuance of the missed TCAP subtest, the teacher
will issue a comprehensive exam. The grade earned from the comprehensive exam will
account for the 15% of the 2nd semester average. The administration will not issue
excused absences for prior approval requests during state mandated testing. Vacations,
going out-of-town and such are not considered excused absences during mandated
standardized testing.
For students missing a state mandated EOC
If a student misses an EOC, he/she will receive an incomplete (I) for the exam and an
incomplete (I) for the course.
Items to Consider:
• The Master Schedule is made on the basis of student course
recommendations and requests received during annual registration.
• Normally, scheduling all student course requests is possible. Should
unavoidable conflicts arise, students will be given an alternative request.
• Schedules will be adjusted within the first ten (10) days of the fall semester
for students who are misplaced in a course. A schedule change request form
will be available in the school counseling office and online.
• Changes in level can only take place prior to the end of the first quarter (first
nine weeks) of the term through a collaborative process to include the
student, parent, and teacher. After that time, level changes will only take
place through a collaborative process with administrative approval following
a student/parent/teacher/school counselor conference.
• Withdrawal from a course after the first quarter (first nine weeks) of the
term will result in a grade of “F”.
Framework of Standards for Honors Courses
Honors courses will substantially exceed the content standards, learning
Expectations, and performance indicators approved by the State Board of
Education. Teachers of honors courses will model instructional approaches that
Facilitate maximum interchange of ideas among students: independent study,
Self-directed research and learning, and appropriate use of technology. All
Honors courses must include multiple assessments exemplifying coursework
(Such as short answer, constructed-response prompts, performance-based
tasks, open-ended questions, essays, original or creative interpretations,
authentic products, portfolios, and analytical writing). Additionally, an honors
course shall include a minimum of five of the following components:
(i) Extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum.
(ii) Research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course
Curriculum.
(iii) Projects that apply course curriculum to relevant or real-world situations.
These may include oral or PowerPoint presentations or other modes of
Sharing findings. Connection of the project to the community is
Encouraged.
(iv) Open-ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and
designs the research.
(v) Writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes, and
styles.
(I) Examples of mode include narrative, descriptive, persuasive,
expository, and expressive.
(II) Examples of purpose include to inform, entertain, and persuade.
(III) Examples of style include formal, informal, literary, analytical, and
technical.
(vi) Integration of appropriate technology into the course of study.
(vii) Deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline.
(viii) Extensive opportunities for problem-solving experiences through
imagination, critical analysis, and application.
(ix) Job shadowing experiences with presentations which connect class study
to the world of work.
All course types which meet the above framework will be classified as honors.
MJHS REQUIRED COURSES
8th Grade English
The 8th grade English courses develop skills, which include the following Common Core
Standards: language, reading: informational text, reading: literature, writing, and
speaking and listening.





Language instruction includes grammar, usage, mechanics, and a variety of
sentence structures, vocabulary, figurative language, word relationships, and
nuances in word meanings.
Reading: informational text standards require skills in citing evidence and
analysis; drawing inferences, determining the central idea and point of view;
understanding connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas,
or events; determining meanings of words as they are used in text; analyzing the
structure of a paragraph; determining the point of view; analyzing conflicting
evidence and viewpoints; evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of using
different mediums; delineating and evaluating arguments; and reading and
comprehending complex text.
Reading: literature necessitates citing textual evidence, drawing conclusions,
determining theme, analyze the dialogue and incidents in a story or drama;
determining the meaning of words; compare and contrast the structure of two
or more texts; analyze the point of view; compare and contrast a film to its
original writing; and compare modern works to older works such as the Bible.
Writing includes writing arguments, informative/explanatory, and narrative texts
that are clear, coherent, developed, organized, and appropriate to the task,
purpose, and audience. Guidance should come from peers and adults with the
use of technology, for conducting research projects (research, reflection,
revision).
Speaking and listening require students to engage effectively in collaborative
discussions which require students to come prepared, follow rules for collegial
discussions, pose questions, and acknowledge new information expressed by
others. Students will analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse
media formats, delineate a speaker’s arguments and claims, present claims and
findings and integrate multimedia and visual displays, and adapt speech to a
variety of contexts and tasks demonstrating command of formal English when
indicated or appropriate.
Eighth Grade English Honors/Pre AP 82 – LA820
Students participating in this course prepare multi-paragraph compositions based on a
variety of purposes and audiences, complete book reports, make oral presentations,
prepare interdisciplinary research projects, and analyze written works. Students in this
course must have solid grammar and writing skills, strong reading comprehension, and
the ability to work independently. This course is more comprehensive and moves at a
faster pace than English CP. An expectation for Honors English 8I is the completion of
two assigned summer reading books.
Eighth Grade English College Prep 83 – LA830
Students participating in this course prepare multi-paragraph compositions based on a
variety of purposes and audiences, focus on grammar, complete book reports, make
oral presentations, prepare interdisciplinary research projects, and analyze written
works. Students in this course will continue to improve grammar and writing
skills, reading comprehension, and their abilities to work independently. This course is
more comprehensive and moves at a faster pace than English 83. An expectation for
College Preparatory English 82 is the completion of one assigned summer reading
book.
Eighth Grade English College Prep 84 – LA840
Student instruction in this course emphasizes writing, reading, research skills,
vocabulary, and grammar. Reading instruction includes exploring, analyzing, and
responding to various genres of writing. This course uses cooperative learning and
higher level thinking skills for varied instruction. Students are challenged to meet
individual expectations as they work towards mastery of Common Core State Standards.
Active parental involvement is encouraged to enhance student success. An
expectation for college preparatory English 83 is the completion of two summer
reading articles.
9th Grade English
English I Honors/Pre AP 92 – LA920
This course provides a challenging, enriched curriculum for college-bound students
functioning well above grade level on reading and language skills. Emphasis will be
placed on the development of timed essay writing and research techniques in
preparation for Advanced Placement Language. The course will focus on developing
strong analytical thinking and writing skills and will address the learning indicators
needed for Common Core. Topics covered will include literary terminology and
approaches to literary criticism, including diction, tone, syntax, point of view, and
archetypes. Classroom activities will include grammar development, Socratic seminars,
and speeches, class presentations with technology components, timed writings, weekly
vocabulary study, ACT practice, and major out-of-class writings, including researchbased, expository, narrative, and persuasive responses. The Honors English student will
complete the majority of reading and writing outside of class. An expectation for
Honors English I is the completion of two assigned summer reading books.
English I College Prep 93 – LA930
This course, which provides a challenging curriculum for college-bound students
functioning at grade level on reading and language skills, focuses on challenging
students with nonfiction passages, literary genres, and enhanced writing expectations.
Students will work to improve their analytical thinking and writing skills, understanding
of the basic principles of grammar and usage, and vocabulary skills. The course will also
address the learning indicators needed for Common Core. Text analysis will center on
examining the structure, purpose, and central ideas of a passage, and writing
assignments will emphasize constructing various types of strong sentences and
improving organization, content, and style in written work. Students will write
argumentative, expository, and narrative essays with a focus on textual evidence; in
addition, they will complete a variety of assignments integrating research. Students will
also prepare for ACT and Common Core testing. An expectation for College
Preparatory English I is the completion of one assigned summer reading book.
English I College Prep 94 – LA940
This course provides a challenging curriculum for students functioning below grade level
on reading and language skills. It focuses on developing college or career readiness
skills in reading comprehension, grammar and language usage, vocabulary acquisition,
study skills, research, and literature. The course will also focus on developing analytical
thinking and writing skills and will address the learning indicators needed for Common
Core and ACT testing. An expectation for college preparatory English I is the
completion of one summer reading assignment.
8th Grade Mathematics
Eighth Grade Mathematics Algebra I 81 – MA810
Algebra I is a rigorous high school Algebra I course for high school credit. It will focus
on the Common Core Math Standards for Algebra I. The state mandated End of Course
exam will be given in the spring.
Note: Students who pass a course taken for high school credit prior to grade nine will
advance to the next course in sequence and the transcript will indicate that the course
was passed. The course will appear on the transcript, but will not be included in the
calculation of the GPA. With approval from the principal, a student may repeat the
course. In that case, there will be no record of the course taken prior to grade nine on
their transcript. See ninth grade calculator requirements
Eighth Grade Mathematics College Prep 82 – MA820
Math 82 is a comprehensive college preparatory pre-algebra course, and students are
expected to master the middle school general math objectives as listed in the 8th Grade
Common Core Math Standards.
Eighth Grade Mathematics College Prep 83 – MA830
Math 83 works toward mastery of the 8th grade objectives tested on the Common Core
PARCC Assessment.
9th Grade Mathematics
*Calculator Requirements
Calculators are an important component of mathematics instruction, practice, assessment, and
application at every level. Each mathematics class at the Algebra 1 level and above will use a
graphing calculator for at least a portion of the class. Thus, each student is requested to provide
his/her own graphing calculator. While many such calculators are available and acceptable, the
MJHS Mathematics Department uses the Texas Instruments model TI-84 Plus Silver Edition
and will base instruction on this model. This expectation aligns with graphing calculator
requirements at Maryville High School. For certain topics in each class, use of graphing
calculators will not be allowed. At such times, the teacher will furnish students an appropriate
4-function or scientific calculator to use during classroom instruction and testing.
Algebra I College Prep 92 – MAA20
Students in this course will be challenged to use problem situations, physical models,
and appropriate technology to extend algebraic thinking and engage student reasoning
through the Common Core Standards of Mathematical Practice. Problem-solving
situations will provide all students an environment that promotes communication and
fosters connections within mathematics to other disciplines and to the real world. The
concepts emphasized in the course include functions, solving equations, slope as rates
of change, and proportionality. In accordance with the Tennessee Department of
Education Curriculum Standards, Algebra students will understand computational
results and operations involving real numbers in multiple representations; understand
properties of and relationships between subsets and elements of the real number
system; understand and apply algebraic properties in order to perform operations with;
evaluate, simplify, and factor expressions and polynomials; solve linear equations, linear
inequalities, linear systems, and quadratic equations; use the Pythagorean Theorem,
distance formula, and midpoint formula; describe and interpret quantitative
information; use statistical methods to draw conclusions and make predictions; and
understand basic counting procedures and concepts of probability. This course moves at
a faster pace with extended assignments, higher expectations, and deeper exploration
of certain performance indicators approved by the State Board of Education. Placement
is based upon prior student performance and standardized test results.
Algebra I College Prep 93 – MAA30
Students in this course will use problem situations, physical models, and appropriate
technology to extend algebraic thinking and engage student reasoning through the
Common Core Standards of Mathematical Practice. Problem-solving situations will
provide all students an environment that promotes communication and fosters
connections within mathematics to other disciplines and to the real world. The concepts
emphasized in the course include functions, solving equations, slope as rates of change,
and proportionality. In accordance with the Tennessee Department of Education
Curriculum Standards, Algebra students will understand computational results and
operations involving real numbers in multiple representations; understand properties of
and relationships between subsets and elements of the real number system; understand
and apply algebraic properties in order to perform operations with; evaluate, simplify,
and factor expressions and polynomials; solve linear equations, linear inequalities, linear
systems, and quadratic equations; use the Pythagorean Theorem, distance formula, and
midpoint formula; describe and interpret quantitative information; use statistical
methods to draw conclusions and make predictions; and understand basic counting
procedures and concepts of probability. Placement is based upon prior student
performance and standardized test results.
Geometry Honors – MAG10 or Geometry College Prep – MAG20
Geometry emphasizes inductive and deductive reasoning to independently make and
evaluate mathematical arguments and construct appropriate proofs of the fundamental
theorems of Euclidean geometry. Students will move seamlessly between multiple
representations (verbal, iconic/pictorial, graphical, tabular, and symbolic) to solve
problems; model mathematical ideas; communicate solution strategies; use
technologies appropriately to develop understanding of abstract mathematical ideas;
facilitate problem-solving; and produce accurate and reliable models. Students will
receive an introduction to non-Euclidean geometries. Two levels of Geometry
instruction are offered. Placement is based upon prior student performance and
standardized test results. Honors Geometry moves at a faster pace with extended
assignments and deeper exploration that exceed the content standards, learning
expectations, and performance indicators approved by the State Board of Education.
In addition, Honors students will have an opportunity to participate in a state-wide
math competition.
8th Grade Science
The study of science at MJHS offers an investigation of selected topics of physical, life,
and earth sciences. Exploratory skills and objectives are taught through application of
text materials, technology, laboratory exercises, and interdisciplinary activities.
Cooperative learning skills are developed using hands-on, investigative science lab
modules, such as forensic science, scientific measurement, electromagnetism,
chemistry, and other personal science lab activities in the formal science lab.
Eighth Grade Science Honors 81 – SC810
Students enrolled in this honors level course will be required to complete either an
individual science fair or a research proposal project (as approved by the teacher).
Instruction will include use of a basal text, computer software, hands-on science
modules (FOSS), and classroom activities. There will be more accelerated learning in
chemistry and physical science. Student note taking will be stressed.
Eighth Grade Science College Prep 82 – SC820
Students enrolled in this college preparatory course will have an option of completing a
science fair project (as approved by the teacher.) Instruction will include use of a basal
text, computer software, hands-on science modules (FOSS), and classroom activities.
Student note taking will be stressed by using teacher-assisted notes. This course is more
rigorous, comprehensive, and moves at a faster pace that 83.
Eighth Science College Prep 83 – SC830
Students enrolled in this college prep class will have an option to do an out of class
science fair project. Instruction will include use of a basal text, computer software,
hands-on science modules (FOSS), and classroom activities. Student note taking will be
stressed by using teacher-assisted notes.
9th Grade Science
Biology Honors 91 – SCB10
This course will study the nature of science, cell biology, genetics, photosynthesis and
respiration, ecology, diversity of organisms, and evolution. Laboratory investigations
will be stressed and used to supplement the academic information. Students will be
required to complete an independent project. Honors Biology students will be expected
to continue with additional advanced science classes such as Chemistry 1 Honors and
Physics 1 Honors.
Biology College Prep 92 – SCB20
This college preparatory course will study the nature of sciences, diversity of life,
ecology, cells and cell energy, biological evolution, and genetics. Laboratory
investigations will be used to supplement the course.
Environmental Science 93 – SCE30
This course is designed to increase knowledge and skills of all areas of science through
the use of inquiry and real-world applications. Students will investigate fundamental
environmental principles, Earth’s systems and natural resources, energy sources and
their use, population dynamics, and human interactions with the environment. The
second half of this course will primarily deal with Biology objectives to prepare students
to proceed to take Biology in preparation to take the state mandated EOC exam. The
combination of Environmental Science then Biology will cover all the state Biology
objectives and the courses should be taken consecutively. After completion of Biology,
students should proceed to Physical Science then Chemistry.
8th Grade Social Studies
Eighth Grade Social Studies Honors 81 – SS810
this course will focus on American and Tennessee history. Subtopics include: culture,
economics, geography, governance and civics, and history. Students will be expected
to complete independent projects, assignments, and readings. This course will cover
topics beyond basic 8th grade social studies skills.
Eighth Grade Social Studies College Prep 82 – SS820
This course will focus on American and Tennessee history. Subtopics include: culture,
economics, geography, governance and civics, and history. Students will be expected
to complete some independent assignments and readings.
9th Grade Social Studies
Human Geography Advanced Placement (AP) – SSHG0
AP Human Geography is the study of human understanding, use, and alteration of the
earth’s surface through analysis of patterns and processes. Students will learn the
impact humans have, not only on the Earth, but also on each other. Emphasis is placed
upon human social organization and the methods/tools geographers use. The course
will be divided into seven units covering geographic tools, population, culture, political
organization of space, rural land use, industrialization and economics, and cities and
urban land use. A student must have a score of 22 or higher on the reading portion of
the Explore to qualify for this course.
AP Human Geography Requirements:
Course
Name
Essential Skills
Reading
Required
Study Hours
per course
Major Tests,
Essays, and
Papers
Major Projects
(including
summer
assignments)
AP Human
Reading
30-60
4-6 hours per
Unit exams
Two required
Geography comprehension, minutes
week in
approx. every
textbooks, at
(SSHGOPS)
analytical
per night addition to
2 weeks,
least two
analysis, and
the reading comprehensive
required
critical thinking
requirements mid-term and novels/academic
final exam,
books, at least
and several
two major
free-response
essays based
question
upon readings,
essays
and periodic
throughout the
independent
class
research topics
World History and Geography College Prep 92 – SSG92
Students will study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the
economic and political roots of the modern world. They will examine the origins and
consequences of the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth century political reform in
Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain
the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past
century, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the Russian
and Chinese Revolutions. The course has a chronological framework of 1750 to the
present, with a major emphasis on 20th century geopolitical conflict. Additionally,
students will study aspects of technical geography such as GPS and GIS, and how these
innovations continuously impact geopolitics in the contemporary world. Students will
be asked to perform analytical skills based on historical readings and writings from
primary documents. Outside research will be an integral part of the course.
World History and Geography College Prep 93 – SSG93
Students will study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and
the economic and political roots of the modern world. They will examine the origins and
consequences of the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth century political reform in
Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain
the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past
century, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the Russian
and Chinese Revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the
continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the
world. Relevant Tennessee connections will be part of the curriculum, as well as
appropriate primary source documents. Students will explore geographic influences on
history, with attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of
nations from 1750 to the present and the subsequent human geographic issues that
dominate the global community. Additionally, students will study aspects of technical
geography such as GPS and GIS, and how these innovations continuously impact
geopolitics in the contemporary world.
Technology
Technology 80 - CTT80
This class emphasizes the use of computer technology as a tool for learning, developing
life-long job skills, and supporting the core curriculum. Students work with word
processing, presentation, spreadsheet, and various multimedia software while also
exploring computer ethics and online safety. Technology is embedded within the core
subject areas, which provides students the ability to develop projects based on
interdisciplinary content.
Computer Applications 90 – SACA0
This course is designed to develop computer technology skills and is embedded in the
core subjects. Students will use a variety of computer software to produce word
processing documents, spreadsheets, databases, and multimedia presentations.
Students will explore the historical, social, and ethical issues of using computer
technology. Students will develop skills that will assist them in using operating systems,
researching legal responsibilities, applying layouts, design, and composition concepts,
and examining new and emerging technologies.
Wellness
Wellness 80 – PEWE0
Eighth grade wellness classes are divided into two categories, physical education and
classroom instruction. Physical Education curriculum is designed to meet the various
interests and needs of our students. The five primary components of our program are
fitness, team sports, lifetime sports and physical activities, creative games, and Project
Adventure teambuilding challenges. This course provides opportunities for students to
acquire knowledge regarding personal fitness, participate in various skills practices and
activities, and develop positive attitudes toward living healthy lifestyles. Classroom
instruction stresses the continuation of individual growth in assuming responsibility
toward personal wellness. The primary goal of the course is for students to understand
and apply the principles of: good physical, mental, and emotional health, avoidance of
substance use and abuse, character development, disease control, nutrition, fitness,
emergency care management (including CPR), consumer health, environmental health,
family life, prevention of illness and disease through lifestyle changes, prevention of
bullying, teasing, gossiping, and sexual harassment, management of depression, selfconcept, body image, and the body systems.
Wellness 90 – PEW90
Ninth grade wellness is divided into two categories, physical education and classroom
instruction. Wellness a lifelong process of positive lifestyle management that seeks to
integrate the emotional, social, intellectual, and physical dimensions of self for a longer,
more productive, and higher quality life. During the course students will be exposed to
the Seven Strands of Wellness. Classroom instruction will be reinforced by activities in
the gymnasium.
The additional ½ credit in physical education may be met by completing a physical
education course (Team Sports, Strength and Conditioning, Fit 'n' Fun) or by
substituting a documented and equivalent time (minimum of 65 hours) of physical
activity in school-sponsored activities such as marching band, cheerleading,
interscholastic athletics, and other areas pre-approved by the school board. The credit
can only be earned during the term when the sport/activity is taking place and prior to
the season’s end. This ½ P.E. credit can only be earned one time.
MJHS ELECTIVES
Academic Success
This course is offered for students who fall below the 10th percentile on the math and
reading subtest of the TCAP and/or Discovery Education Assessment and need skill
practice in both subjects. A recommendation is required.
Academic Success Assistant – SATA0, SATA1
Both 8th and 9th grade students can submit an application for office or library assistant.
Students are expected to demonstrate integrity, responsibility, and maturity, and it is a
privilege to serve in this role. Office assistants can be assigned to the main office or the
assistant principal’s office. A recommendation is required and students must submit an
application.
Academic Success CDC Peer-Tutoring – SAPT0, SAPT1
This course is offered to students who want to assist in the Special Education
Department. An understanding of various disabilities and trends/contemporary issues
dealing with these disabilities will be gained. This course is suggested for students
considering entering a career involving teaching and working with adults and children
who have disabilities. Peer tutors may be required to accompany and assist students
with disabilities in general education classes or work with students in a Special
Education classroom. Weekly reflections required. This course is open to students in
grades 8 and 9. Students MUST gain approval from the course instructor and will be
required to submit an application.
Art 80 – FAAT0, Art 1 – FAA10
These courses each offer a multitude of art experiences in fine/visual arts, crafts, art
history/culture, and art appreciation, stressing the importance of the art “process,” not
simply just the end product. Students will review the visual elements of art and
compositional principles of design. Students will be exposed to projects/forms of
expression, including: drawing (still life, human figure, realism), shading
techniques/skills/methods, mask making, painting (watercolor, acrylic), posters,
banners, sculpture creations, weaving, printmaking, and much more. The goals of this
art education curriculum are to teach students the possibilities of communicating a
variety of ideas and emotions via many diverse ways, to foster students’ confidence in
their creativity/creative intelligence, and to promote the development of higher-order
thinking skills. Students will work with a variety of materials and will be introduced to
art history through correlation of artists with assigned projects. Art I is for high school
credit.
Band – FAB80, FAB90
This course requires playing at an intermediate or advanced level. Emphasis is placed
on building a musical foundation that will help students succeed in individual and group
performance. Special attention is focused on the skills required for Jr. Clinic. Ninth
grade students will have the opportunity to participate in marching band. Performance
and scheduled rehearsals are required.
Chorus – FACH0, Concert Choir – FACC0
This course introduces the fundamentals of vocal technique and performance and music
reading skills. Students will sing a varied repertoire of music and perform at least two
major concerts each year (one in the fall and one in the spring) as well as possible
additional performances. Participation in concerts, festivals, and other performances is
required.
Construction Core – CTCC0 (9th grade only)
This course introduces students to basic skills and knowledge applicable to all
construction trades. Students learn competencies pertaining to safety, construction
drawings, site layout, hand and power tools, linear and angular measurements, and
application of algebraic and geometric principles to construction problems.
Drama – FADR0, Drama 1 – FAD10
This course allows students the opportunity to practice many aspects of acting and
dramatic expression, including the development of self-confidence and the ability to
work with others. Activities include monologues, scenes, improvisation, pantomime,
research, and practice with writing and interpersonal communications. Students will
learn vocalization, characterization, script evaluation, improvisation, staging skills, set
and costume design, prop selection, and stage positioning. Students gain these skills
through classroom instruction, reading, writing, participating in small group activities,
and conducting individual and group performances. Instructional time is divided
between on and off-stage activities. This course is open to all students.
Drama 2: Intermediate – FAD20 (9th grade only)
this course is open to 9th graders who have successfully completed Drama I. Students
will perform and participate in a variety of theatre experiences to expand upon what
was learned in Drama I with an emphasis on movement, voice production and
articulation, character analysis and development, and technical theatre.
Prerequisite: One credit in Drama I (B or better). A recommendation is required and
students must submit an application to the instructor. Students may pick up an
application from Ms. Capozzoli beginning February 17.
Exploration in Organizational Leadership and Marketing – CTMK0 (9th grade only)
This course is designed to introduce and provide an overview of marketing and
organizational leadership, as well as employment opportunities available in these fields.
Students will explore important marketing concepts, personality traits, and
communication skills. Students will also develop skills in teamwork, conflict resolution,
and group problem-solving techniques used in business.
Family and Consumer Science – CTCS0 (9th grade only)
In this course, students can learn to make decisions and set priorities, understand
physical and emotional development during adolescence, cope with pressures, manage
personal resources, use consumer information, develop positive interpersonal
relationships, establish a satisfying living environment, plan for a healthy lifestyle, meet
clothing needs, and explore career options. Practical laboratory work is emphasized. A
laboratory fee is charged to defray the cost of materials.
French 1 FLFR0, FLF10
French 1 stresses the skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in order to
develop a basic understanding of the language. Emphasis is placed on pronunciation,
vocabulary building, and conversational patterns. Cultural studies will focus on the
history of the French language, Paris and its monuments, and the geography of the
French-speaking world. A recommendation is required for 8th grade students.
French 2 – FLF20
French 2 continues the development of the four language skills and includes more
complex grammatical structures. Students will study aspects of French life and culture,
including sports, cultural pastimes, the body and healthcare, train and airplane travel,
everyday technology and routines. More spoken French will be heard in the classroom.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 1
Gateway to Technology STEM – CTST0 (8th grade only)
The Project Lead the Way (GTT) program features a project-based curriculum designed
to challenge and engage the natural curiosity and imagination of middle school
students. There are two foundational units in GTT: Automation and Robotics (AR) and
Design and Modeling (DM). In AR, students will trace the history, development, and
influence of automation and robotics. They will learn about mechanical systems, energy
transfer, machine automation, and computer control systems. Students will use a robust
robotics platform to design, build, and program a solution to solve an existing problem.
In DM, students will begin to recognize the value of an engineering notebook to
document and capture their ideas. They will be introduced to and use the design
process to solve problems and understand the influence that creative and innovative
design has on our lives. Students will use industry standard 3D modeling software to
create a virtual image of their designs and produce a portfolio to showcase their
creative solutions.
Introduction to Engineering Design – CTST9 (9th grade only)
The Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathway to Engineering (PTE) program is a sequence
of courses, which follows a proven hands-on, real-world problem-solving approach to
learning. The first course in this sequence is called Introduction to Engineering Design
(IED). The Major focus is the design process and its application. Through hands-on
projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Student use
industry standard tools and practices, including: using 3D modeling software to help
them design solutions to solve proposed problems, documenting their work using an
engineer’s notebook, and communicating solutions to peers and members of the
professional community.
Latin 1 – FLLT0, FLL10
The Latin I curriculum will address the Tennessee State Classical Language standards at
a beginning level. These include: 1: Communicate in a Classical Language (i.e. read and
write simple Latin sentences); 2: Gain Knowledge and Understanding of Greco-Roman
Culture (i.e. Roman history, daily life, and mythology); 3: Connect with Other Disciplines
and Expand Knowledge (i.e. recognize and use Latin in an interdisciplinary way); 4:
Develop Insight into One’s Own Language and Culture (i.e. derivatives, loan words,
Latin phrases & mottoes, and basic language patterns of English grammar); and 5:
Participate in Wider Communities of Language and Culture (i.e. use of technology to
research classical topics and use of Latin in professions). A recommendation is
required for 8th grade students
Latin 2 – FLL20
The Latin 2 curriculum will address the Tennessee State Classical Language standards at
a beginning/emerging level. These include: 1: Communicate in a Classical Language
(i.e. read and understand long and more difficult passages of Latin); 2: Gain Knowledge
and Understanding of Greco-Roman Culture (i.e. Roman history, daily life, and
geography); 3: Connect with Other Disciplines and Expand Knowledge (i.e. recognize
and use Latin in an interdisciplinary way); 4: Develop Insight into One’s Own Language
and Culture (i.e. derivatives, loan words, Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes, basic
language patterns of English grammar, and the influence of epic poetry/Greek and
Roman heroes on modern literature); and 5: Participate in Wider Communities of
Language and Culture (i.e. use of technology to research classical topics and use of Latin
in professions).
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 1
Orchestra – FAO80, FA090
This course requires playing at an intermediate or advanced level. Emphasis is placed
on building a musical foundation that will help the student succeed in individual and
group performance. Special attention is focused on the skills required for Jr. Clinic.
Shop – CTSH0 (8th grade only)
This course is offered as an elective and includes woodworking and entry-level
computer-aided drawing. Students will learn the proper use of hand and machine tools.
Emphasis will be on safety and proper use and care of tools and machines. Each student
will design and build a project or projects during the semester. Students will also work
with design software, which will be used for 2D and 3D drawings and bridge designs.
They will also work with programs on the computer, which are designed to help with
computer maintenance and upgrading.
Spanish 1 – FLSP0, FLS10
Spanish 1 uses a combination of oral and written work to develop the four skills of
listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the fundamentals
of grammar and are given an overview of culture from all Spanish-speaking countries. A
recommendation is required for 8th grade students.
Spanish 2 – FLS20
Spanish 2 continues the development of the listening, speaking, reading, and writing
skills introduced in Spanish 1. Basic grammar is expanded to allow students to enhance
their ability to communicate. Students will also continue a more in-depth study of
culture.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1
Teen Living – PETL0 (80)
Teen Living addresses issues adolescents face and their relationships involving family,
school, and community. The emphasis of this course is to build on skills in the areas of
personal development, relationships, human and family development, clothing,
resource management, personal living space, nutrition and wellness, food preparation,
and career choices and leadership skills. This course focuses on the student’s role and
responsibility as a teen participating in the family, school, and community. Practical
laboratory work is emphasized.
Yearbook – SAY80, SAY90
This course is offered to students in both 8th and 9th grade. Students will learn how a
yearbook is created using page layouts, journalism, interviewing and proofreading skills,
editing, and photography. This is a very important job because students are creating a
high quality product for the entire school that serves as our school history book.
Students are required to sell page sponsors. Creativity, meeting deadlines, and writing
skills are extremely important. A recommendation and application is required.
9th graders will earn credit by completing all course credit
bearing requirements.
Special Education
Maryville Junior School offers a wide spectrum of programming for students with special
needs. Services are offered on a continuum from the least restrictive to the most
restrictive environment that include general education classes with modifications
and/or inclusion support as needed, comprehension development classes, behavior
management classes, counseling and social skills training, speech, language, hearing,
vision, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and homebound instruction. Students
who are educationally, physically, and/or emotionally disabled may be enrolled in one
or more special education instructional programs. Gifted students are offered
placement in accelerated levels of English, mathematics, science, and social studies.
Tutoring
Tutoring is available for students needing help with assignments or homework. The
tutoring schedule is published during the first nine weeks of the current school year. If
you have further questions, please call the counseling office at 983-2070.
Homebound Instruction
Students who are unable to attend school for more that ten days because of an accident
or illness are eligible for the homebound program. The application for “Services for
Children with Crippling and Special Health Conditions” should be requested by a parent
or guardian as soon as an extended absence is apparent. This form requires the
physician to state the type of homebound educational service necessary and the
duration. Upon approval of the Director of Schools, a teacher will be assigned to
instruct the eligible student at home. The homebound program enables students to
continue their education at the end of their convalescence. Parents should call Mrs.
Susan Williamson at 982-6345 for an application and other information regarding these
services.
Academic Study
Introduction and Purpose:
Academic Study is a valuable part of a child’s education and preparation for the rigorous
and relevant standards-based curriculum of high school. It provides an opportunity to
fulfill class and individual needs. Academic study is an extension of what was learned in
the classroom and is assigned to reinforce the lesson or provide a creative application of
what has been learned. Success is our goal for every student, and that success depends
on the effort applied to each assignment. Students have the right to receive help when
needed and the responsibility to ask for it.
Amount of Academic Study (AS):
There is no perfect formula for determining the proper amount of academic study for
each student. It is not unreasonable, however, to expect a MJHS student to routinely
have a moderate amount of academic study required each night and some weekends to
ensure content mastery. Occasionally, such as when completing projects, preparing for
examinations, etc., and the amount of academic study may become significant for brief
periods. The time required for completion of AS will vary with student ability, class
schedule, and proper budgeting of time. When students are appropriately placed in core
subjects, they can expect to spend two hours on average each night of the five (5) day
school week. Students in advanced classes may experience an increased workload.
Deadlines for accepting late work will be determined by the individual teacher.
General Expectations:
Teachers:
1. Assign academic study with the awareness that, while it is one essential
component of a broad education for our students, other important elements
including extra- and co-curricular activities and social development must also
be allowed. Adequate time must be allotted for each aspect of student life.
2. Academic study should be assigned with awareness and consideration of
general expectations of colleagues in other subject areas and with
consideration for other aspects of student life.
3. Keep assignments up-to-date on PlanetHS to aid students in planning and
budgeting time.
Students:
1. Maintain a planner, which lists current and future assignments in each class.
This will aid in the scheduling and management of academic study time.
2. Allot time on a regular basis for long-term assignments.
3. Place academic study high on a list of priorities.
Parents:
There must be a close and supportive relationship between home and school for a
student to achieve maximum academic success. Parents foster this relationship when
they do the following:
1. Realistically assess your child’s abilities prior to selection of classes.
(Consultation with teachers and counselors during the process of class
selection is recommended.)
2. Encourage your child to complete all assignments in an accurate and timely
manner.
3. Provide your child with an atmosphere conductive to study (preferably late
afternoon or early evening).
4. Inquire frequently about your child’s academic study, thus emphasizing its
importance and providing impetus for its completion.
5. Ensure that your child’s extra-curricular activities do not interfere with
academic activities.
Conclusion:
Academic study is an integral part of a successful academic experience for every
student. Only when each participant fulfills defined expectations will the student
achieve his or her own level of academic excellence.
**Students who consistently spend more than the average time on academic study
should contact the individual teacher or counseling office for tips or suggestions on how
to maximize study habits, organization, and time management.
MCS Promotion and Retention Policy
Junior High Promotion and Retention Policy (8th Grade)
Promotion/retention is made on the basis of the subjects passed as follows:
 A student will exhibit mastery of 70% of the skills taught for the grade level
in the core curriculum areas of mathematics, reading/language arts, science, social
studies and the majority of other subjects taken. A student failing to master 70% of
the skills in mathematics, reading/language arts, science, and social studies will be
retained in the same grade for the following year. However, if the student attends a
promotion recovery summer school program and achieves mastery of 70% of the skills
in the area(s) failed, then the student may be promoted to the next grade.
 The principal after consultation with the teacher(s) may administratively
place a student in an advanced grade level when it is deemed in the best interest of the
student.
 The following will be considered in scheduling classes for a retained student:
teacher recommendations, test results, attendance at summer school, reason for failure
(lack of academic progress, or lack of attendance), and other available information.
Junior High and High School Promotion and Retention Policy (9th Grade)
 Promotion will be determined by the accumulation of credits required for
graduation by the State of Tennessee. Parents will be notified when the student is
retained.
Attendance Regulations
 To receive credit for passing any grade or course students must attend 90% of
class time. Days present for transfer students will include those obtained in Maryville
and all other schools for the year or semester.
 A student’s school-approved change of course schedule shall not result in any
penalty for failure to meet minimum requirements for class attendance.
 Each school principal shall develop an attendance program that actively
promotes school attendance, but also provides policies, procedures and conditions for
granting credit to students whose absences exceed the ten percent standard.
Maryville High School Course Sequence Guides
ENGLISH
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Required for graduation- 4 English courses (one per year)
English 2 Honors
ENG10HS
English 2 CP
ENG10SS
English 3 AP
ENG11PA
English 3 Honors- Combined
Studies
ENG11HA
English 4 AP
ENG12PS
English 4 CP
ENG12SS
English 4 DE- English 1010
ENC10DS
English 2 CP
ENG10CS
English 3 CP
ENG11CS
English 4 CP
ENG12CS
English 2 CP
ENS10CS
English 3 CP
ENS11CS
English 4 CP
ENS11CS
MATH
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Required for graduation- 4 math courses with at least 1 beyond Algebra 2
Geometry H
MAGEOHS
Geometry CP
MAGEOSS
Algebra 1 CP
MAAG1SS
Algebra 1 CP
MAAG1SS
Algebra 2H
MAAL2HS
Algebra 2A CP
MAA2ASS
Algebra 2A CP/Algebra
2H*
MAA2ASS/MAAL2HS
Geom CP/Alg 2A CP
MAGEOSS/ MAA2ASS
Geometry CP
MAGEOCS
Pre-Calc H
MAPRCHS
Pre-Calc AB
MAPCAAS
Pre-Calc BC
MAPRCAS
AP Statistics
MASTAAS
AP Calculus AB
MACABPS
AP Calc AB/BC
MABCCPS
Calculus
MACALSS
Algebra 2B CP
Algebra 3/Trig CP
MAA2BSS
MAAL3SS
Algebra 2B CP/PrePre-Calc H
Calc H*
MAPRCHS
MAA2BSS/MAPRCHS
Algebra 2B CP
MAA2BSS
Algebra 3/Trig
MAAL3SS
Algebra 2 CP
MAAL2CS
Bridge Math
MABRMSS
* Move to Honors track upon successful completion and teacher
recommendation
SCIENCE
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Required for graduation- Biology, Chemistry or Physics, 2 additional lab sciences (at least 1 per year)
AP Physics 1
SCPHYPS
Biology 1 H
Chemistry 1 H
SCCH1HS
Chemistry 1 CP
SCCH1SS
Biology 1 CP
SCBI1CS
Physical Science CP
SCPSCSS
Environmental
Science
Biology 1 CP
SCBI1CS
AP Biology
SCBIAPS
Biology DE
SCBI1DS
Chem 2H/AP Chem
SCCH2AS/SCCHAPS
(No Algebra 2 Credit)
AP Biology
SCBIAPS
Biology DE
SCBI1DS
AP Environmental Science
SCESCAS
Physics 1 CP
SCPHYSS
Human Anatomy/Phys
SCAPCS
Biology DE
SCBI1DS
Ecology
SCECOSS
Oceanography
SCEOCSS
Crime Scene Inv
SCCCSSS
Chemistry 1 CP
SCCH1SS
Physical Science CP
SCPSCCS
Chemistry 1 CP
SCCH1CS
AP Biology
SCBIAPS
Biology DE
SCBI1DS
Chem 2H/AP Chem
SCCH2AS/SCCHAPS
AP Physics 1
SCPHYPS
Physics 2 H
SCPH2HS
AP Environmental Science
SCESCAS
Physics 1 CP
SCPHYSS
Human Anatomy/Phys
SCAPCS
Biology DE
SCBI1DS
Ecology
SCECOSS
Oceanography
SCEOCSS
Crime Scene Inv
SCCCSSS
Physics 1 CP
SCPHYSS
Human Anatomy/Phys
SCAPCS
Biology DE
SCBI1DS
Ecology
SCECOSS
Oceanography
SCEOCSS
Crime Scene Inv
SCCCSSS
Chemistry 1 CP
SCCH1CS
Physics CP
SCPHYCS
Ecology
SCECOSS
SOCIAL STUDIES
* Denotes a required course for graduation
All honors students have the opportunity to move into the AP track at any time. All CP
students have the opportunity to move into the Honors track at any time. Discussion
with the instructors is strongly advised before making any of these moves.
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Required for graduation- World Geography, Economics, US History, Government, Finance
Class of 2015
AP Government*
SSGOVPB
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP Students
Class of 2015
AP European History
SSEURAS
AP Psychology
SSPSYPS
AP Economics
SSECOPS
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
Honors Students
Class of 2015
CP Students
Class of 2015
Government CP*
SSGOVSB
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
Honors Contemporary
Issues
SSCOIHB
Government CP*
SSGOVSB
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
World History
SSWHISS
Social Studies
* Denotes a required course for graduation
All honors students have the opportunity to move into the AP track at any time. All CP
students have the opportunity to move into the Honors track at any time. Discussion
with the instructors is strongly advised before making any of these moves.
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Required for graduation- World Geography, Economics, US History, Government, Finance
Class of 2016-2017
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP Students
Class of 2016-2017
Honors Students
Class of 2016-2017
CP Students
Class of 2016-2017
AP European History
SSEURAS
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
(Honors) Contemporary
Issues (2016/2017)
SSCOIHB- SSCOISB
Ancient World History
SSANHSS
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
World History
SSWHISS
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP European History
SSEURAS
AP US History*
SSUSHPA
(Honors) Contemporary
Issues (2016/2017)
SSCOIHB- SSCOISB
Ancient World History
SSANHSS
Honors US History*Combined Studies
SSUSHHA
US History*
SSUSHSS
World History
SSWHISS
AP Government*
SSGOVPB
AP Economics*
SSECOPS
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP European History
SSEURAS
AP Psychology
SSPSYPS
Economics*
SSECOSB
Government*
SSGOVSB
(Honors) Contemporary
Issues (2016/2017)
SSCOIHB- SSCOISB
Ancient World History
SSANHSS
Government*
SSGOVSB
Economics*
SSECOSB
World History
SSWHISS
Social Studies
* Denotes a required course for graduation
** Only offered if needed to fulfill a graduation requirement.
All honors students have the opportunity to move into the AP track at any time. All CP
students have the opportunity to move into the Honors track at any time. Discussion
with the instructors is strongly advised before making any of these moves.
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Required for graduation- World Geography, Economics, US History, Government, Finance
Class of 2018 and beyond
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP Students
Class of 2018
Honors Students
Class of 2018
CP Students
Class of 2018
AP European History
SSEURAS
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
Contemporary Issues
SSCOISB
Ancient World History
SSANHSS
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
Personal Finance*
SSFINSB
World Geography
SSWGECS
World History**
SSWHISS
(special placement only)
Contemporary Issues
SSCOISB
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP European History
SSEURAS
AP US History*
SSUSHPA
Contemporary Issues
SSCOISB
Ancient World History
SSANHSS
Honors US History*Combined Studies
SSUSHHA
US History*
SSUSHSS
World Geography
SSWGECS
Contemporary Issues
SSCOISB
AP Government*
SSGOVPB
AP Economics*
SSECOPS
AP Human Geography
SSHGOPS
AP European History
SSEURAS
AP Psychology
SSPSYPS
Economics*
SSECOSB
Government*
SSGOVSB
Contemporary Issues
SSCOISB
Ancient World History
SSANHSS
Government*
SSGOVSB
Economics*
SSECOSB
World Geography
SSWGECS
Contemporary Issues
SSCOISB
WORLD LANGUAGES
Required for graduation- 2 years of foreign language
Spanish 1
FLSP1SS
French 1
FLFR1SS
Latin1
FLLT1SS
LATIN
•
•
Spanish 3 H
FLSP3HS
Spanish 4 H
FLSP4HS
AP Spanish
FLSPAPS
Spanish 2
FLSP2SS
Spanish 3 H
FLSP3HS
Spanish 4 H
FLSP4HS
Spanish 1/2
FLSP2CS
Spanish 1/2
FLSP2CS
French 3H
FLFR3HS
French 4H
FLFR4HS
AP French
FLFREPS
French 1
FLFR1SS
French 2
FLFR2SS
French 3H
FLFR3HS
French 4H
FLFR4HS
Latin 2
FLLT2SS
Latin 3H
FLLT3HS
Latin 4H
FLLT4HS
AP Latin
FLLATPS
Latin 1
FLLT1SS
Latin 2
FLLT2SS
Latin 3H
FLLT3HS
Latin 4H
FLLT4HS
Spanish 1
FLSP1SS
SPANISH
FRENCH
Spanish 2
FLSP2SS
French 2
FLFR2SS
*With teacher’s approval, students can double up if the master schedule permits
*Students may start a World Language in grades 9-11