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Transcript
June, 2010: Draft
I. INTRODUCTION
II. SITE & LANDSCAPING GUIDELINES
A.
B.
C.
D.
Site Considerations & Grading
Fences & Walls
Landscaping
Exterior Lighting
III. ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
Mass, Scale & Form
Garages
Porches
Roofs
Chimneys, Flues & Roof Vents
Gutters & Downspouts
Accessory Buildings
Colors, Materials & Trim
Skylights & Solar Panels
Energy Conservation

The Vision for Canyon Springs:

The vision for Canyon Springs is to create a custom lot subdivision of primary residential home sites and secondary
vacation home sites, generating building and investment opportunities. The design of Canyon Springs focuses on
minimal site disturbance, best habitat preservation practices, implementation of selective re-vegetation to restore
disturbed areas, incorporation of green building techniques and integration of a community trail system throughout
the property that will be utilized by Canyon Springs residents, Glenshire area residents and the general public. To
accomplish these goals, a clustered lot design is proposed with specified building envelopes contained within each
parcel which will preset the proposed building area for each home footprint thus avoiding impacts on open space and
the property's resources. Public utilities and roadway connections are already in place, Canyon Springs is perfectly
situated for future development. The Canyon Springs project is consistent with the future projected plans of the local
utility agencies and the Town's General Plan. The proposed project provides an opportunity to supply the required
housing needs for the expected population growth of Truckee. Because the Canyon Springs development is proposed
to be phased over an extended period of time, installation of infrastructure such as utilities, construction activity and
ultimate build-out will have minimal effects on adjacent properties. The foundation for the design of Canyon Springs
is influenced by numerous smart planning principles. The overall vision allows for a unique development on one of the
few remaining parcels eligible for development activity in the Truckee region.
Design Guidelines:
Canyon Springs Design Guidelines have been prepared to create specific site development standards that are
complimentary to the Town of Truckee Development Code which will ensure/create a consistent design theme with
special attention to architectural and site planning details. The illustrations in this document are intended to convey a
“concept” and are not intended to portray specific plans for construction.
Overall, designs of homes should take into consideration the natural topography, sunlight exposure and existing
vegetation in order to have the least impact on the site.
Note: The illustrations within this draft set of design guidelines are intended to convey a “concept” and are not
intended to portray specific plans for construction.
A.
Site Considerations & Grading

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The long axis of the home and principle building masses should be oriented parallel to
existing contours when possible.
Shading from tree canopies should be utilized (for east & west facing windows) to
incorporate natural cooling.
Southern exposure and use of south facing windows is encouraged for passive heating and
solar gain.
Homes built on sloping sites should utilize stepped foundations and fragmented roof forms
to mirror the flow of the natural topography. Building design shall adapt to the existing site
topography. Mass or pad grading shall be avoided.
Existing features such as rock outcroppings and trees should be protected when feasible and
integrated into the design of the home.
All cuts & fills should create smooth transitions at the top and bottom of slopes to appear as
extensions of the natural landform. Grading designs should protect and retain as many
existing trees and rock outcroppings as possible.
Slopes should generally not exceed 2:1. Slopes in excess of 2:1 may be considered provided
the stabilization treatment and design is consistent with the overall Guidelines of this
section.
Cut/fill slopes shall be re-vegetated with appropriate plantings and BMPs (Best
Management Practices).
B. Fences & Walls



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In order to maintain the visual quality of an open and natural wooded landscape, fences and
walls should be minimized. Their primary purpose is to enclose service areas, gardens,
courtyards, pets and/or pools.
Wood fences are to be designed in a manner that recalls the fences of rural areas and ranches,
such as post and rail, diagonal rail and vertical board fences. Wood should be left natural to
weather or should be treated and stained to match adjacent buildings.
Fences & gates should be constructed of high-quality, low maintenance materials.
Retaining walls in excess of 4 feet in height shall be designed by a professional engineer
registered in the state of California.
Tops of retaining walls are to blend with natural contours. Ends of walls should transition
naturally into existing landforms.
Natural materials are preferred such as natural stone, architectural steel, wood and/or timber.
C.
Landscaping

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Landscaping should function to enhance land use and user comfort. These functions include
wind deflection, moderation of heat and glare, muffling noise and reducing soil erosion.
Landscaping should be in scale with adjacent residences and be of appropriate size at maturity
to accomplish its intended purpose.
Cut/fill slopes shall be re-vegetated with appropriate plantings.
All efforts should be made to incorporate existing trees, other vegetation and natural features
into the fabric of the landscape setting.
Landscaping is encouraged to be used to soften, frame and enhance the visual quality of the
development.
The use of native, naturalized and adapted water conserving plants is highly encouraged to
conserve irrigation water.
Soil amendments and surface mulching of landscape areas shall be provided to increase water
retention capacity of native soil.
Large native boulders should be used when possible to add variation and contour.
Group plant materials according to their water consumption needs.
D. Exterior Lighting



The source, intensity and type of illumination should be
appropriate for the lighting needs.
Exterior lighting should be designed as part of the architectural
and site design of a project. Fixture style and location should be
compatible with a building’s architecture and landscaping.
All site lighting must be low-level illumination. All exterior
lighting shall be shielded so as not to create light spill or glare.
A.
Mass, Scale & Form



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Building Walls ~ Exterior wall height should not exceed two stories, except when topography
dictates. Wall elements shall be expressed through the use of materials, such as stone,
stucco, metal, wood or timber.
Foundation Walls ~ Wherever possible, foundations should be battered and banked into the
site’s topography to further blend the building with its setting. The intent is to obscure the
line of demarcation between man-made structures and natural features.
Building facades should be varied. A simple box form should be avoided.
A building’s apparent scale can be reduced through window patterns, structural bays, roof
overhangs, porches siding, awnings, moldings, fixtures and details.
Building massing should be broken up by using structural elements, landscape materials,
awnings, eaves, windows or other architectural ornamentation and using combinations of
complimentary colors.
B. Garages



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Strong consideration should be given to the location and orientation of the garage so that garage
doors avoid fronting directly onto the adjacent street as the foremost portion of the residence.
Garage location, access and automobile turning movements must consider existing trees in the site
layout.
Garages are to directly abutt residences or maintain a covered connection, which may be enclosed.
Side entry, detached, tandem or recessed garages are encouraged to de-emphasize the massing of
garages. The use of windows and other façade treatments is also encouraged to enhance the
appearance of garage doors. Cottage style doors should reflect a local flavor.
C.
Porches


Porches provide a personality and welcome invitation to the community, as well as an
extension of outdoor living in the Truckee area for many months during the year. Therefore,
it is encouraged that single-family designs incorporate at least one porch which fronts a
public area, pathway or street.
Individual expression that blends in with the natural surroundings is encouraged with the
design of porches, in terms of columns, railings, configuration and colors.
D. Roofs

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Roofs should convey a sense of shelter and protection for the home. They can also establish scale
and interest through a successful composition of varied pitches and forms. Dormers and Cupolas
should be used when feasible to add interest and help to break up massing.
Major roofs shall have a minimum pitch of 3:12 and a maximum pitch of 14:12. Secondary roofs such
as porches and dormers may have a lesser pitch.
Roof materials are to include a Class A fire rated material and utilize non-reflective, subdued colors.
Appropriate materials for roofing include unglazed tile, slate, metal or architectural-grade
composition shingles. Secondary roof materials may also include natural metals such as copper,
corten steel and terne metal. Metal roofs with high quality, factory-applied finishes that simulate
natural metals may be permitted.
Both practically and aesthetically it is important to keep roof forms simple and to strive to avoid
complex intersections at awkward pitches and angles.
Roof forms must consider rain and snow shedding to avoid property damage and should consider
landscape & site plans to avoid conflicts with drainage and safety.
Rooftop equipment and large vents are to be grouped and concealed in chimney-like structures that
are an integral part of the roof and/or wall designs.
E.
Chimneys, Flues & Roof Vents



Chimneys may be finished with stone or concrete to match or strongly relate to the same
material used on the foundation of the residence or they may be finished with wood siding,
shingles, stucco, shakes or metal.
Chimney caps shall be constructed of metal and compatible with the character of the
residence.
Large flues and vents are to be consolidated when feasible and enclosed within a chimneytype enclosure. Small flues, such as plumbing vents, may be exposed if painted to match the
adjacent roof and should be located toward the back of the house when possible.
F.
Gutters & Downspouts



While the overall design and strategic placement of roof forms should be the primary way to
effectively manage water run-off, additional gutters and/or downspouts may also be needed
to properly design the roof system for drainage and safety. These devices can be used to
divert water away from entries.
Gutters, downspouts and flashing materials are to be fabricated from steel and colored to
blend with the overall color scheme of the home.
Flashing, gutters and downspouts should be minimized in their appearance.
G.
Accessory Buildings


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Accessory buildings are to be incidental to and not alter the character of the home or site.
Accessory buildings shall be located to the rear of the lot ( or Building Envelope) with the
exception of gazebos that are integrated with the main residence.
Accessory buildings shall be architecturally compatible with the main structure.
H.
Colors, Materials & Trim



The primary color goal for these custom residences is to blend into the colors and texture of
the trees, soils and rocks of the native landscape.
Major wood wall materials, including siding, shingles, timbers and logs, should be treated or
stained in semi-transparent finishes to enhance the natural colors and qualities of the wood.
Where a cement type of board is used an opaque stain should be used.
The color of details and trim offers an opportunity to establish individual identity and
interest. The colors of small details can either be the same as the primary wall materials or
may be from a broad range of colors that are found on the site in soils and plant materials,
including flowers, sage and other foliage. However, these colors are to be subtle and are to
avoid bright, vivid or intense primary colors.
I.
Skylights & Solar Panels


Skylights and solar panels are encouraged because they offer energy savings through natural
daylight and solar heat gain. Layout, location, size and configuration of skylights and solar
panels are to fit with the design and proportions of the building and roof forms. They are to
be designed in a manner that avoids random patterns or interrupts the visual continuity of
the roof.
Skylights and solar panels shall be integrated into the design of the residences and be
located, detailed and/or screened so that reflections from their surfaces shall not be visible
from off-site when possible.
J.
Energy Conservation

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Consider pre-plumbing for solar water heating. Insulated copper pipes may be pre-installed
from the attic to a hot water closet or mechanical room for future solar installation. This
option allows the homeowner to install an active solar system at a later date. Provide southfacing roof area for collectors and access for piping to a mechanical room.
Consider radiant heating systems. Radiant heating is up to 30% more efficient than forced
air heating systems. Radiant heating may be installed in zones that allow residents to adjust
the temperature in various areas of the house based on usage and desired comfort level.
Installation of Energy Star Certified Appliances is greatly encouraged. These appliances are
significantly more efficient in their use of water and electricity. At a minimum, the following
appliances are recommended to be Energy Star rated: dishwashers, refrigerator & clothes
washers. Energy Star also certifies heating and cooling equipment such as air conditioners,
furnaces , boilers, heat-pumps and thermostats.
Energy Star labeled windows are twice as efficient as the average window produced just 10-12
years ago. These products are designed to reduce heat loss and solar gain to provide warmer
buildings in the winter and cooler buildings in the summer.