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Transcript
HAT Learning Outcomes and Personal Transferable Skills:
Level Two
Aims and Objectives: This module is designed to follow on from SSG280 Intro to Soc
Theory for Anthropology students and to introduce them to the place of theory in
anthropology, particularly to the history of theory in British anthropology from about
1850 to around 1960. It aims to equip students with a general understanding of the social
and historical contexts of fieldwork and theorising and to enable them to “place” texts
and their authors in their relevant intellectual setting. Knowledge of a particular topic,
person, or event from the first half of the module comes from the topic chosen for the
‘portfolio’ (presented on CD-ROM); understanding of the second half of the module is
tested by the examination.
Synopsis: Beginning with a brief survey of attempts to understand and explain “other
cultures”, the module introduces key figures, events and debates from a primarily British
anthropological perspective. Some of the topics covered include: Evolutionism, early
travellers and explorers, the first fieldwork expeditions, Structural-Functionalism and
reactions to it, links between British anthropology and American and European
developments.
Personal Transferable Skills: Development of recognition of different kinds of theoretical
approaches, and of their historical and social contexts. Opportunity to develop individual
research skills and technical scanning skills through collecting materials for a portfolio of
materials for Assessment, to be presented on a CD-ROM. Small group discussion skills
through seminars, ability to summarise detailed material for exam answers.
Excerpt from ‘Anthropology Programme Specifications’, September 2002:
Level 2: Students will have demonstrated critical understanding of the basic concepts and
principles of this subject, being able to apply the principles more widely. Students will
be able to use a range of established techniques to analyse information (recognising the
appropriateness of the techniques to the issue) and to propose solutions to problems. They
should be able to communicate effectively in a variety of forms, and will have the
qualities needed for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility
and decision-making.
HAT Learning Outcomes and Personal Transferable Skills:
Level Three
Aims and Objectives: This module is designed to follow on from SSG280, Introduction to Social
Theory, for Anthropology students and to place into context the knowledge of particular authors
and theories gained from other modules. There is a major, although not exclusive, emphasis on
British anthropology. Theoretical and methodological approaches from roughly 1850 to 1960 are
placed in their social and historical contexts. Assessed work, in the form of a ‘portfolio’,
presented on CD-ROM, enables a more detailed knowledge of a particular topic, person, or
event, from the first half of the module (up to the beginnings of Structural-Functionalism) to be
developed, while the exam covers general topics from the second half of the module.
Synopsis: Beginning with a brief survey of attempts to understand and explain “other
cultures”, the module introduces key figures, events and debates from a primarily British
anthropological perspective. Some of the topics covered include: Evolutionism, early
travellers and explorers, the first fieldwork expeditions, Structural-Functionalism and
reactions to it, links between British anthropology and American and European
developments.
Personal Transferable Skills:: The ability to recognize the characteristics of different kinds of
theoretical arguments and approaches and to be sensitive to their historical and social contexts.
Individual research skills and technical skills, such as the scanning of texts and images, the use
of hyperlinks, and the construction of a CD-ROM, are developed through library and web-based
compilation of a ‘portfolio of relevant materials’ to be presented on a CD-ROM. (Scanning
training is included in the module.) The seminars encourage presentational skills to help small
group discussion.
Excerpt from ‘Anthropology Programme Specifications’, September 2002:
Level 3: Students will have demonstrated a systematic understanding of detailed
knowledge, some of it at the current boundaries of a discipline. The student will be able
to evaluate evidence, propose solutions to problems, to carry out a project using
appropriate techniques, and will be able to comment on current research or practice
(using primary sources/scholarly reviews) while recognising the uncertainty and limits of
knowledge. Students should be able to manage their own learning, be able to undertake
further training. They should be able to communicate effectively in a variety of forms,
and will have the qualities needed for employment requiring the exercise of initiative,
personal responsibility and decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts.