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Transcript
 HAPPY THURSDAY 
Turn in your “Classification Trees” to the front table. Make sure all names are on the back.
Circle the name of the person who took it home.
Bellwork: Copy the question and your answer for the following 2 questions.
1. Which of the following changes to deer in a certain area is most likely the result of
genetic drift?
A. Two populations of deer, separated by geography, continue to remain a single species.
B. The overall genetic variation of the deer population increases over several generations.
C. Changes in the deer allow them to take advantage of a new food source introduced into their
habitat.
D. Climate change in a particular area causes many of the deer to die.
2. The process of natural selection can cause a population to change its traits over time.
With this in mind, what does the process of natural selection directly work on?
A.
B.
C.
D.
genotype
individual alleles
phenotype
the genome
 HAPPY THURSDAY 
Turn in your “Classification Trees” to the front table. Make sure all names are on the back.
Circle the name of the person who took it home.
Bellwork: Copy the question and your answer for the following 2 questions.
1. Which of the following changes to deer in a certain area is most likely the result of
genetic drift?
A. Two populations of deer, separated by geography, continue to remain a single species.
B. The overall genetic variation of the deer population increases over several generations.
C. Changes in the deer allow them to take advantage of a new food source introduced into their
habitat.
D. Climate change in a particular area causes many of the deer to die.
2. The process of natural selection can cause a population to change its traits over time.
With this in mind, what does the process of natural selection directly work on?
A.
B.
C.
D.
genotype
individual alleles
phenotype
the genome
 HAPPY THURSDAY 
Turn in your “Classification Trees” to the front table. Make sure all names are on the back.
Circle the name of the person who took it home.
Bellwork: Copy the question and your answer for the following 2 questions.
1. Which of the following changes to deer in a certain area is most likely the result of
genetic drift?
A. Two populations of deer, separated by geography, continue to remain a single species.
B. The overall genetic variation of the deer population increases over several generations.
C. Changes in the deer allow them to take advantage of a new food source introduced into their
habitat.
D. Climate change in a particular area causes many of the deer to die.
2. The process of natural selection can cause a population to change its traits over time.
With this in mind, what does the process of natural selection directly work on?
A.
B.
C.
D.
genotype
individual alleles
phenotype
the genome
Essential Question: Why
is taxonomy both
important and helpful to
the scientific community?
Standard: 8A – Define taxonomy and recognize
importance of taxonomic system.
I. Classification
Biologists have identified
and named about 1.5
million species so far.
They estimate that
between 2 and 100
million have yet to be
discovered.
Biologists use a classification system to name
organisms and group them in a logical manner.
A. Taxonomy: how scientists classify organisms and
assign each organism a universally accepted name.
Scientists don’t refer to organisms by their common names
because it is too confusing.
Because 18th-century scientists understood Latin and
Greek, they used those languages for scientific names.
Confusion in Using Different
Languages for Names
copyright cmassengale
8
Scientific Names are Understood
by all Taxonomists
copyright cmassengale
9
1. Scientists use a scientific name so they can be
certain that everyone is discussing the same
organism.
2. Organisms are placed
into groups based on how
similar they are to each
other.
3. Carolus Linnaeus: the scientist who developed a
two-word naming system for organisms.
a. It is called binomial nomenclature.
b. The first part of the scientific name is the
organism’s genus.
c. The second part of the scientific name is the
organism’s species.
d. How to write the scientific name:
1. First word is always capitalized
2. Second word is always lowercase
3. Both words are either underlined or
italicized.
Binomial Nomenclature
Which TWO are
closely related?
copyrightmore
cmassengale
15
B. Linnaeus’s hierarchical system of classification includes
eight levels. From largest to smallest they are:
Domain
Memorize This!!!
Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
• Does
• Katy
• Perry
• Come
• Over
• For
• Good
• Soup?
copyright cmassengale
17
1. Each of the levels is
called a taxon.
a. Species is the
smallest taxon.
b. Domain is the
largest taxon.
C. Phylogeny is the study of
evolutionary relationships
between organisms.
1. Biologists group
organisms into
categories that
represent lines of
evolutionary descent,
not just physical
similarities. This is
called evolutionary
classification.
All organisms use DNA or RNA to pass on information
and to control growth and development.
The genes of many organisms show important similarities at the
molecular level.
2. Similarities in DNA can be used to help determine classification and
evolutionary relationships.
3. The more similar the DNA sequences of two species:
a. the more recently they shared a common ancestor
b. the more closely they are related.
D. The six kingdoms
in the classification
system are:
1. Eubacteria
2. Archaebacteria
3. Protista
4. Fungi
5. Plantae
6. Animalia
Debrief