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Transcript
Chapters 5 - 9
Unit II Review
Case Uses
 Nominative Subject (noun doing the action)
 Genitive Defined by the word ‘of”
Possession (the noun which possesses)
Equus agricolae – the horse of the farmer
Partitive – the ‘whole’ from which a part is taken
(copia aquae – a supply of water)
 Dative Indirect Object (noun to or for whom action done)
 Accusative Direct Object (receives the action of the verb)
 Ablative Various Uses - Most Prepositions (you know ablative of means)
NOTE – look at page 62 for a discussion of ways to make sense of –ae
endings!
Ablative of Means
 Used to express the means, or instrument,
by which something is done. (How did you
move all that loot? By means of carts!)
 In English, we almost always use the
prepositions by or with to express this, but in
Latin it is shown by putting an ablative case
ending on the noun (the object of the
preposition).
 A Preposition is a word showing the
relationship between 2 nouns.
VERBS – new information in this unit
 The future tense is formed by adding the
tense sign –bi- to the stem. The i is dropped
in the first person singular and becomes –uin the 3rd person plural.
 IMPERATIVE – if something is imperative, it
MUST be done! The imperative form is a
command or direction. Formed by using the
present stem of the verb for the singular.
The plural is formed by adding a –te ending.
The Genitive Case
 The Genitive Case is used to show
possession
 Genitive Endings (singular) are similar to
Nominative Endings (plural) for both
declensions.
– Use translation tips to possibly eliminate
nominative singular as a possibility
 Uses the keyword ‘OF’
The Dative Case
 The Indirect Object uses Dative Case
Endings
 Indirect Object – The noun TO or FOR
WHOM the action is done
 The keywords are TO or FOR
The Ablative Case
 The Ablative Case is used for most
prepositional phrases
 We have learned the ‘Ablative of Means’
– No Latin preposition is used
– We must add the keywords: by, with, or by
means of