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ORGANIZING AND DESIGN PRINCIPLES FOR VIDEO
MyGraphicsLab Adobe Premiere Pro CS6
ACA Certification Preparation for Video Communication
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
OBJECTIVES
This presentation covers the following ACA Exam objectives:
 2.1 Demonstrate knowledge of how to organize and plan a video
sequence.
 2.2 Identify general principles for video shooting.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: ORGANIZING AND PLANNING A VIDEO SEQUENCE
 To be fully prepared before
shooting begins, your
preproduction planning will
include the following:


A storyboard: a visual “map”
that all crew, actors, directors,
and camera operators can refer
to.
A script: the plot of the film
including dialogue and stage
directions for actors and crew.
 The BBC Writers Room website
has a wide range of useful
screenwriting information:
www.bbc.co.uk/writersroom/writin
g/tips.shtml
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: STORYBOARD
 A storyboard will include drawings, instructions, and dialogue to be used
as a visual reference when planning shots.
 Your storyboard can describe the type of shot required in a scene, for
example a close-up, a pan, or a dolly shot.
 It can also include instructions to the filming crew about which
equipment to use.
 It will give the director, and your actors, visual information on how to act
out the scene.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: SCRIPT
 A script is essential to any film
shoot.
 It contains all the dialogue for the
actors, as well as directions
relating to the plot for the director
to follow.
 Every member of the cast and
crew must have the same
version, which can be updated
as filming progresses.
 Your script must include these
elements:




Plot
Dialogue
Directions for actors
Notes to director
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCRIPTS (1 OF 2)
 There are many forms of video
filmmaking.
 These range from feature-length
films for cinema or television to
one-minute shorts for websites or
online use.
 Long-form video typically contains
a plot and actors and will be
anywhere from 60 to 90 minutes
long.
 Scripts for TV programs can range
from hour-length documentaries to
20-minute comedy.
 Short-form video is typically
anywhere from one to ten minutes
long and is a favorite for film
competitions.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCRIPTS (2 OF 2)
 Regardless of the length or budget of your film, your main source of
reference for all your actors, your crew, and your director is the script.
 Even a short, one-minute film needs to be planned with precision for
maximum impact.
 When creating your script, it is commonplace to work with other
individuals.
 Many TV shows and films have a scriptwriting team, which results in a
well-rounded story.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES FOR A SEQUENCE OF CLIPS
 A story arc follows an established
format, regardless of length of
film.
 This is typically as follows:




Introduction
Middle
Climax
Resolution
 Your script will identify which
scenes are given over to each of
these sections.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PREPRODUCTION: ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES FOR A SEQUENCE OF CLIPS
 Introduction: Your setting and
your characters are introduced at
the beginning, including
backstory (if required).
 Middle: The story and the
characters develop here, often
with parallel plots and side
stories.
 Climax: One or some of your
characters will experience
pressure, danger, or
transformation, leading to the
resolution.
 Resolution: The arc of the story
is completed. Plot threads and
parallel story lines are resolved.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
PRODUCTION: FILMMAKING TERMINOLOGY
 Ingest: This is the process of
capturing, transferring, or
importing your media into your
chosen editing program.
 Dailies: These are also known as
rushes, the footage seen at the
end of the day by the director
and other crew.
 Rough cut (sometimes known as
first cut): This is an early version
of the film, with the shots in
sequential order but without any
special effects.
 Picture lock: This is when all the
shots have been approved, the
timeline is locked, with no further
edits allowed.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
POSTPRODUCTION: FILMMAKING TERMINOLOGY
 Send to post house: The
production is complete, and the
film is now in the postproduction
stage. A post house is a person
or company who will perform
color correction, color grading,
sound mixing, audio sweetening,
titles, and graphics.
 Director’s cut: This is a version
of the film that is closest to the
director’s original vision.
 Final cut: This is the final, edited
version of a movie, ready for
distribution.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education
POSTPRODUCTION: COMPLETED VIDEO SEQUENCE
 Your completed video sequence
will include the following:




Titles (with graphics):
Traditionally, your film will open
with a title sequence that often
includes graphics and music.
Clips: These are your edited
shots, which form the story of
your film.
Credits: Each and every person
who has worked on the film,
including producers, crew,
locations, and music, will be
mentioned in this section.
Fading audio: The perceived
quality of the final sequence is
greatly improved by adding
smooth transitions between
audio sequences.
Copyright © 2013 MyGraphicsLab / Pearson Education