Download Nutrition for Training & Competition

Survey
yes no Was this document useful for you?
   Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Document related concepts

Saturated fat and cardiovascular disease wikipedia, lookup

Nutrition wikipedia, lookup

Dieting wikipedia, lookup

Human nutrition wikipedia, lookup

Adipose tissue wikipedia, lookup

Fat acceptance movement wikipedia, lookup

Diet-induced obesity model wikipedia, lookup

Abdominal obesity wikipedia, lookup

Body fat percentage wikipedia, lookup

Obesogen wikipedia, lookup

Low-carbohydrate diet wikipedia, lookup

Transcript
Nutrition for
Training &
Competition
Tracy Bostock
Head Coach
RASCALS
Introduction
 Of
all the sciences, nutrition
may have more to offer the
athlete than any other.
 Choosing the appropriate
foods in suitable amounts and
the correct time will not
compensate for the lack of
ability or training.
 HOWEVER, there is equally
clear evidence that a poor diet
will affect an athletes potential.
Why do we need to
eat?

Development and growth



Physical activity



On average, 15–30% of total energy expenditure is
on physical ‘work’. other activities.
The exact amount expended will depend on how
vigorous the activity is and for how long it is
performed.
Supply of other nutrients


The body needs energy to grow, primarily during
childhood and adolescence
Tissues are constantly being replaced even if they
are not growing, and we need energy to fuel these
essential processes.
Nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals play a vital
role in converting other food sources into energy.
They are also essential in helping to keep the body
healthy and in good working order, aiding the
healing process by enabling damaged tissue to be
repaired quickly and effectively.
Body function

Even when we are at rest we still need a lot of
energy.
Factors to Consider

Training Details  Competition
Details
 Type





Duration
Intensity
Frequency
Timetable of
Training
sessions
Environmental
Issues





Duration
Intensity
Frequency
Environmental
Conditions
Travel
Frequency/
Requirements
Dietary Guidelines









Variety
Plenty of Breads and Cereals
Low in Fat
Balanced with expenditure
Limited alcohol
Moderate amounts of sugars
Low in salt
Calcium
Iron
Portion Sizes

Fruits & Vegetables



Carbohydrate Rich Foods



Size of your palm
5-11 portions
Protein Rich Foods



85-125g (tennis ball)
Minimum 5 portions
Deck of Cards
2-3 portions
Healthy Fats/ Essential Oils


2 table spoons
1-3 portions
Carbohydrates
High intensity exercise relies
predominately on glycogen
for fuel. When the stores are
depleted, your performance
suffers.
Carbohydrate
 When
digested carbohydrate
increases blood sugar levels
and provides energy through
chemical reactions.
 When the body is at rest,
carbohydrate travels via the
blood stream to liver & skeletal
muscle where it is stored &
used to fuel exercise at a later
date.
Athletes should maintain a
high carbohydrate diet






Bread
Cereal
Fruit
Pasta
Rice
Vegetables
Athletes who do not consume
enough carbohydrate may suffer
from fatigue during training and
matches and progressive fatigue
over the season
Protein
Used for growth and
repair but as an energy
source as a last resort

Quantity



2-3 servings a day
Aim for 2-3 portions of fish a week
Sources






Chicken
Fish
Lean Beef (iron, zinc, B Vitamins)
Peanut Butter
Canned Beans
Tofu
Fats
Provides the body with
energy and is also important
in terms of hormone
metabolism, tissue structure
& for protection
Fat
 Concentrated
energy source &
reserve
 Protection & Insulation
 Provides fat soluble vitamins
(A,D,E,K)
 Provides essential fatty acids
 Low fat diet can cause
malnutrition

Saturated Fat



Trans Fatty Acids


Treated the same as saturated fats
Unsaturated & Poly unsaturated
Fats



<10% Total Fat
Animal & Dairy Fats; Raise cholesterol
Olive oils, nuts & seeds
Can help reduce cholesterol
Essential Fatty Acids



Cannot be produced by the body
Crucial hormone like action as they
can regulate numerous body
functions.
Omega 3 & 6; Pumpkin Seeds,
Walnuts, Sardines & Salmon
• Increase aerobic energy and metabolism,
boost immune system, increase growth
hormone and have anti-inflammatory
properties.
Vitamins & Minerals
Prevent clinical deficiency &
deterioration in health, growth
& reproduction
Crucial in facilitating energy release
from food
(do not produce energy themselves)

Vitamins






Organic
Compounds
Fat Soluble
(A,D,E,K)
Water Soluble (B
Complex & C)
Many are involved
in energy
processes or antioxidant roles
B Vitamin Group
(Glycolysis)
C & E prevent
muscle damage

Minerals


Inorganic
Compounds
Involved in;
• Glycolysis
• Acid-base
equilibrium
• Heam synthesis
• Muscle
contraction
Water & Fluids
Effect of Fluid Loss on
Performance

Physical Effect



Reduction in
muscular
strength
Perception of
effort is
increased
Fatigue

Mental Effects



Reduced
Concentration
Reduction in
skill and
accuracy
Reduction in
decision
making ability
Signs of Dehydration





Thirst
Headache
Nausea/Vomiting
Dizziness
Irritability





Concentrated
Urine
Unusual
Fatigue
Loss of
Appetite
Poor
concentration
Cramps
All this leads to a decrease in performance in
both training and competition
Drinking Strategies

Before Exercise


During Exercise


Drink 200-500ml of fluid shortly before
exercise to reduce the risk of
dehydration
Try & Drink at regular intervals during
training to reduce dehydration
After Exercise

Fluid replacement should begin
immediately after exercise, try to drink
500ml as soon as possible, and try to
maintain the 2L of fluid per day as
recommended.
Tips for Drinking Better












Palatable
Drink well during warm-up & breaks
Practice drinking strategies in training
Does not cause stomach discomfort
Contains some carbohydrate
Contains some sodium
Cool
Not acidic or gassy
Always carried fluid
Try to never be thirsty
Use your own water bottle
Disinfect water bottles regularly
Sports Drinks

Contains carbohydrates, electrolytes and
fluids which help to;




Provide Energy
Maintain Hydration
Replace body salts lost in sweating
Sports Drinks re-hydrate the body faster
than water alone because;



Glucose & electrolytes increase the rate of
water absorption from the small intestine
Electrolytes present in sports drinks reduce
urine output and so help the body to retain
more of the absorbed fluid
They encourage drinking
Making your own sports
drink

Drink 1





Drink 2




40-80g sucrose
1L water
1-1.5g (1/4 tsp) salt
Sugar free squash
200ml fruit squash
800ml water
1-1.5g (1/4 tsp) salt
Drink 3



500ml fruit juice
500ml water
1-1.5 (1/4 tsp) salt
Fuelling your
training &
competition
Optimum Nutrition &
focussed training =
Optimum Performance
Pre- Event Meal
 Eat
largely for confidence&
comfort as well as re-fuelling &
re-hydration.
 Carbohydrate rich meal
 Low in fat and fibre
 Its aim;




Restore liver glycogen content
Ensure hydration
Prevent hunger
Confidence
Pre- Event Meals









Plain breakfast cereal & low fat milk
Porridge & low fat milk
Toast/ Muffins/ Crumpets with
honey/ jam
Baked beans on toast
Spaghetti with low fat bolognaise
sauce
Jacket Potato & beans
Low fat breakfast bar & banana
Roll/ Sandwich (low fat fillings)
Fresh fruit salad & low fat yoghurts
Nutrition after Exercise
 Priority
to replenish glycogen
stores
 ‘Open Window’
 Focus on carbohydrate rich
foods, high GI
 50-100 carbohydrate
immediately after exercise &
repeat every 2hrs until normal
meal patterns are resumed.
 Small frequent meals may be
easier
Glyceamic Index
High GI
Medium GI
Low GI
White Bread
Nutrigrain Bars
Cornflakes
Wheetabix
Potatoes
Raisins
Banana
Honey
Sports Drinks
Pasta
Porridge
Crisps
White Rice
Sweet corn
Oranges
Orange Juice
Chocolate
Apples/Pears
Cherries
Peaches
Apple Juice
All Bran
Baked Beans
Yoghurt
Milk
Peanuts
Post Exercise/ Training
Nutrition

Each of these contain 50g
Carbohydrate and athletes should
try to ain for 1-2 portions:









800-1L sports drink
800m cordial
2-3 medium pieces of fruit
Round of jam/honey sandwiches
3 muesli bars
1 large mars bar
2 cereal bars
Baked potato
Bowel breakfast cereal and low fat
milk
Any Questions
Please email me:
[email protected]
Thank you