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Transcript
Polyptoton
A. This figure is formed by the articular infinitive ho energon, “the One producing,” and the articular
infinitive which we are about to note to energein.
B. Polyptoton is the repetition of the same part of speech in different inflections.
C. It is from the Greek poluptoton (poluvtwton) which is composed of polus (poluvς), “many,” and ptosis
(ptwsiς), “a falling.”
D. In grammar, a case (from an assumed form ptovw, ptoo, “to fall.”
E. Hence, Polyptoton means with many cases, i.e., a repetition of the same noun in several cases, or of
the same verb in several moods or tenses.
F. With many inflections is a definition wihch covers both nouns and verbs.
G. It is also called metagoge (metagwghv) which is from meta, “a change,” and ago, “to lead.”
H. It means a change of course; a different arrangement of the same word, a leading of the same word
through different inflections.
I. In Latin is called casum varietas, “a variety of cases.”
J. This figure, therefore, is a repetition of the same word in the same sense, but not in the same form:
from the root, but in some other termination; as that of case, mood, tense, person, degree,
number, gender, etc.
K. Here we have the same verb but employed with a different grammatical function and case ending.
L. The articular participle was in the nominative case but here we now have the accusative case ending.
M. The 1st time the verb appeared it was used as an articular participle but now Paul employs it as an
articular infinitive.
N. The articular participle acted as the subject but here it is used as an infinitive as part of a double
accusative construction, specifically it is employed as an accusative of objective result.
O. The different forms of Polyptoton are as follows:
1. Verbs repeated in different moods and tenses.
2. Verbs with their imperatives, or participles (homogene).
a. In strong affirmation.
b. In strong negation.
3. Verbs with cognate noun.
4. Verbs with other parts of speech (combined polyptoton).
5. Nouns repeated in different cases.
6. Nouns repeated in different numbers.
a. In singular and plural.
b. In singular and dependent genitive plural.
7. Verbs repeated in different moods and tenses.
1