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Healthy You and Baby, Too
Your Developing Baby
First trimester (week 1-week 12)
At four weeks:
· Your baby's brain and spinal cord have begun to form.
· The heart begins to form.
· Arm and leg buds appear.
· Your baby is now an embryo and one-twenty-fifth inch long.
At eight weeks:
· All major organs and external body structures have begun to form.
· Your baby's heart beats with a regular rhythm.
· The arms and legs grow longer, and fingers and toes begin to form.
· The sex organs begin to form.
· The eyes have moved forward on the face and eyelids have formed.
· The umbilical cord is clearly visible.
· At the end of eight weeks, your baby is a fetus and looks more like a
human. Your baby is nearly 1 inch long and weighs less than one-eighth
ounce.
At 12 weeks:
· The nerves and muscles begin to work together. Baby can make a fist.
· The external sex organs show if your baby is a boy or girl. A woman who
has an ultrasound in the second trimester or later might be able to find
out the baby's sex.
· Eyelids close to protect the developing eyes. They will not open again
until the 28th week.
· Head growth has slowed, and your baby is much longer. Now, at about
3 inches long, your baby weighs almost an ounce.
Second trimester (week 13-week 28)
At 16 weeks:
· Muscle tissue and bone continue to form, creating a more complete
skeleton.
· Skin begins to form. You can nearly see through it.
· Meconium (mih-KOH-nee-uhm) develops in your baby's intestinal tract.
This will be your baby's first bowel movement.
· Your baby makes sucking motions with the mouth (sucking reflex).
· Your baby reaches a length of about 4 to 5 inches and weighs almost
3 ounces.
At 20 weeks:
· Your baby is more active. You might feel slight fluttering.
· Your baby is covered by fine, downy hair called lanugo (luh-NOO-goh)
and a waxy coating called vernix. This protects the forming skin
underneath.
· Eyebrows, eyelashes, fingernails, and toenails have formed. Your baby
can even scratch itself.
· Your baby can hear and swallow.
· Now halfway through your pregnancy, your baby is about 6 inches long
and weighs about 9 ounces.
At 24 weeks:
· Bone marrow begins to make blood cells.
· Taste buds form on your baby's tongue.
· Footprints and fingerprints have formed.
· Real hair begins to grow on your baby's head.
· The lungs are formed, but do not work.
· The hand and startle reflex develop.
· Your baby sleeps and wakes regularly.
· If your baby is a boy, his testicles begin to move from the abdomen into
the scrotum. If your baby is a girl, her uterus and ovaries are in place,
and a lifetime supply of eggs have formed in the ovaries.
· Your baby stores fat and has gained quite a bit of weight. Now at about
12 inches long, your baby weighs about 1½ pounds.
Third trimester (week 29-week 40)
At 32 weeks:
· Your baby's bones are fully formed, but still soft.
· Your baby's kicks and jabs are forceful.
· The eyes can open and close and sense changes in light.
· Lungs are not fully formed, but practice "breathing" movements occur.
· Your baby's body begins to store vital minerals, such as iron and calcium.
Lanugo begins to fall off.
· Your baby is gaining weight quickly, about one-half pound a week.
Now, your baby is about 15 to 17 inches long and weighs about 4 to 4½
pounds.
At 36 weeks:
· The protective waxy coating called vernix gets thicker.
· Body fat increases. Your baby is getting bigger and bigger and has less
space to move around. Movements are less forceful, but you will feel
stretches and wiggles.
· Your baby is about 16 to 19 inches long and weighs about 6 to 6½
pounds.
Weeks 37-40:
· By the end of 37 weeks, your baby is considered full term. Your baby's
organs are ready to function on their own.
· As you near your due date, your baby may turn into a head-down
position for birth. Most babies "present" head down.
· At birth, your baby may weigh somewhere between 6 pounds 2 ounces
and 9 pounds 2 ounces and be 19 to 21 inches long. Most full-term babies
fall within these ranges. But healthy babies come in many different sizes.
http://www.womenshealth.gov/pregnancy/you-are-pregnant/stages-of-pregnancy.cfm#first
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative
Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30,
Cooperating, John D. Floros, Director.
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP) through a contract awarded by the Kansas Department for Children and
Families. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and provider. SNAP provides
nutrition assistance to people with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more call
1-800-221-5689.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
All About Pregnancy: Your Growing Baby
Mother’s Weight Gain at 40 Weeks
Extra Blood 4-5 lbs.
Breast Tissue 1-4 lbs.
Extra Tissue Fluid 3-5 lbs.
Placenta 2-2.5 lbs.
Amniotic Fluid 2 lbs.
Fetus 7-8.5 lbs.
Extra Uterine Tissue 2 lbs.
Extra “Fat stores” 4-6 lbs.
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Issued in
furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, as amended.
Kansas State University, County Extension Councils, Extension Districts, and United States
Department of Agriculture Cooperating, John D. Floros, Director.
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program (SNAP) through a contract awarded by the
Kansas Department for Children and Families. USDA is an equal
opportunity employer and provider. SNAP provides nutrition
assistance to people with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out
more call 1-800-221-5689.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Your Changing Body: Where Does the Weight Go?
Strawberry Banana Parfait
Description:
Whether you are looking for a fruit-filled breakfast option or
a better-for-you dessert – enjoy the flavors of layered seasonal
fruit, crisp flakes and creamy yogurt in this delicious parfait.
Ingredients:
½ medium ripe banana, mashed
⅛ teaspoon vanilla
⅓ cup plain non-fat yogurt
½ cup sliced fresh strawberries
½ cup complete bran and wheat flakes ready-to-eat cereal
Directions:
1. Stir banana and vanilla into yogurt
2. In one 10-12 ounce glass, alternately layer the yogurt mixture, strawberries and cereal. Serve
immediately.
Makes 1 serving
Nutrition Facts
Nutrient
Calories
Saturated Fat
Sodium
Potassium
Calcium
Vitamin D
Dietary fiber
Value
190
0
200 mg
448 mg
200 mg
95 IU
(0.66 mcg)
7g
%DV
0%
8%
13%
20%
24%
28%
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Choose MyPlate for Pregnancy
Kansas State University Agricultural
Experiment Station and Cooperative
Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an
equal opportunity provider and
employer. Issued in furtherance of
Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May
8 and June 30, 1914, as amended. Kansas
State University, County Extension
Councils, Extension Districts, and United
States Department of Agriculture
Cooperating, John D. Floros, Director.
This material was funded by USDA’s
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP) through a contract awarded by the
Kansas Department for Children and
Families. USDA is an equal opportunity
employer and provider. SNAP provides
nutrition assistance to people with low
income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a
better diet. To find out more call
1-800-221-5689.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
MyPlate for Pregnancy
Low Birthweight Babies
What is the Risk?
In our mother’s day, doctors would often limit the amount of
pounds that a pregnant woman should gain by telling them to
diet or restrict their weight gain to less than 20 pounds. They
thought that small babies were easier to deliver. We now
know better. Babies born too small (less than 5½ pounds)
are related to 70 percent of infant deaths.
What is low Birthweight?
Any baby below 5½ pounds is considered low birthweight.
If the baby weighs less than 3 pounds 5 ounces it is very low birthweight.
There are usually two types of low birthweight:
♦ preterm births before the 38th week of pregnancy; and
♦ small-for-date babies are full-term but underweight
What Can Happen to a Low Birthweight Baby?
Low birthweight babies are more likely to have medical complications including:
♦ Have trouble breathing. The lungs may not be able to provide enough oxygen for its needs.
♦ Have brain damage due to not enough nutrients getting to the brain.
♦ Have brain damage due to severe jaundice from a liver not functioning properly.
♦ Be anemic (fewer red blood cells) because it did not have time to store the iron it needed to nourish these cells.
♦ Have a low body temperature because they do not have enough fat stores to stay warm. This can lead to chemical changes in the body and slow growth.
♦ Have bleeding in the brain. 40 to 50 percent of too small babies have brain damage or die due to this problem.
If the baby survives infancy, problems may still occur later in childhood.
What causes Low Birthweight?
The good news is that most reasons for too-small babies can be corrected easily by the mother. Medical problems of the
mother can lead to low birthweight, so these mothers need ongoing contact with their health care provider.
A mother’s life-style and nutrition habits can lead to too-small babies and with some help, CAN BE CHANGED. The main
ones are:
♦ Poor nutrition—the correct amount of weight gain during pregnancy and eating healthy foods nourish the fetus.
♦ Lack of early and regular prenatal care—many things can be corrected if caught early enough.
♦ Smoking, alcohol and drugs—smokers have smaller babies.
♦ Drug and alcohol can slow growth of the fetus.
Photo: http://drprem.com/parenting/escalating-number-of-premature-and-low-birth-weight-babies-in-calgary.html
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station
and Cooperative Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Issued in furtherance of
Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June
30, 1914, as amended. Kansas State University, County
Extension Councils, Extension Districts, and United
States Department of Agriculture Cooperating, John D.
Floros, Director.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program (SNAP) through a contract awarded by the
Kansas Department for Children and Families. USDA is an equal
opportunity employer and provider. SNAP provides nutrition
assistance to people with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out
more call 1-800-221-5689.
All About Pregnancy: Healthy Weight Gain
EATING SMART THROUGHOUT THE LIFECYCLE
Eat Smart and
Move More for a
Healthy Pregnancy
HEALTHY
WEIGHT GAIN
EAT SMART TIPS
Gaining the right amount
of weight is important
for you and your baby.
Discuss exactly how much
you should gain with your
doctor.
• Don’t go more than 12 hours without eating or drinking.
• Eat 3 meals and 2 small snacks and remember VARIETY.
• Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Use MyPlate as a tool to
build a healthy plate.
• Drink 6-8 glasses of fluid every day like low-fat or skim milk and water.
• Take care to avoid foodborne illness. Wash your hands and surfaces often.
Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Use a thermometer to ensure
that foods are cooked to proper temperatures.
Avoid a few “danger” foods.
MOVE MORE TIPS
Ask your doctor what type of activity would be okay
during your pregnancy. If your doctor approves:
• Aim for 30 minutes of moderate activity
each day, such as brisk walking.
• Take the stairs or park farther away to
add activity to your day.
• Plan a time each day to do some
physical activity.
PAD17-E / Rev 09/11
Pregnancy
ZESTY SPINACH
OMELET
Makes 1 serving
Ingredients
Serving Size: 1 omelet
• 2 eggs, beaten
• 2 tablespoon water
• 1/2 cup cooked
spinach
Tip: Serve with a glass of
orange juice to get even
more folate.
Omelets are a great way to
use leftover vegetables.
To reduce sodium even more,
replace salsa with sliced
tomatoes when in season.
• 1/4 cup cheese,
shredded
• dash cumin
• dash pepper
• 1/4 cup salsa
• non-stick cooking
spray
Directions
1.In medium bowl beat eggs, water, cumin, and pepper together
using fork.
2.Spray skillet with non-stick cooking spray.
3.Heat a large skillet (10”) to medium high heat.
4.Pour egg mixture into pan.
5.Lift edges of eggs and tip pan as needed to let uncooked mixture
flow underneath and cook.
6.Cook until almost set.
7.Spoon spinach and shredded cheese over 1/2 of the omelet.
8.Using spatula, fold other side of omelet over filling.
9.Top with salsa and serve.
Nutrition information Per Serving
Eat Smart
210 calories
Total Fat
Saturated Fat
Protein
8g
2.5 g
22 g
Total Carbohydrate 7 g
Dietary Fiber
1g
Sodium
520 mg
Excellent Source
of Vitamin A
Excellent Source
of Calcium
Good Source
Iron
of Iron
DO YOU SEE WHAT I SEE?
Go for a walk with your family and play the game
“Do you see what I see?” Pick an object that everyone
can see as you are walking, without telling anyone
what you are looking at, describe it and let everyone
guess what it is. Take turns being the one to choose
the object.
www.pedbikeimages.org/Dan Burden
Move More
Tips for PregnantMoms
Making healthy food choices along with regular physical activity will help fuel your baby’s growth
and keep you healthy during pregnancy.
What’s on Your Plate?
Before you eat, think about what and how much food goes on your plate or in your cup or bowl.
Over the day, include foods from all food groups: vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or
low-fat dairy products, and lean protein foods.
Making Healthy Food Choices
• Make half your plate fruits and vegetables. Choose a variety, including
dark-green and red and orange vegetables and beans and peas.
• Make at least half your grains whole. Choose whole grains in place
of refined grains.
• Switch to skim or 1% milk. Choose fat-free or low-fat milk and
milk products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese, or fortified soy beverages.
• Vary your protein food choices. Choose seafood, lean meat and
poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds.
• Use oils to replace solid fats where possible.
• Make choices that are low in “empty calories.”
What are “empty calories”?
• Candy
• Sweetened cereals
They are calories from added sugars and solid fats in foods. Some foods with empty calories:
• Desserts
• Fried foods
• Ice cream
• Sugar-sweetened
• Biscuits
• Hot dogs
• Soft drinks/soda
fruit drinks/tea
Visit Your Doctor Regularly — Doctors Recommend
• Pregnant women and women who may become pregnant should avoid alcohol, smoking,
and drug use.
• Take a prenatal vitamin and mineral supplement every day in addition to eating a healthy diet.
• Feed your baby only breast milk for the first 6 months.
How Much Weight Should I Gain?
The total amount of weight gained depends on your weight when you become pregnant.
If your weight was in the healthy range, you should gain between 25 and 35 pounds.
If you were overweight or underweight before becoming pregnant, the advice is different.
Check with your doctor to find the total amount that is right for you.
You should gain weight gradually—1 to 4 pounds total during the first 3 months and
2 to 4 pounds per month during the 4th to 9th months.
United States
Department of
Agriculture
Food and Nutrition Service
FNS-457
February 2013
USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
Daily Meal Plan
The Plan shows slightly more amounts of food during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters because you have
changing nutritional needs. This is a general Plan. You may need more or less than the Plan.*
Food Group
1st Trimester
2nd and 3rd
Trimesters
What counts as
1 cup or 1 ounce?
Eat this amount from each group daily.*
Vegetables
2½ cups
3 cups
1 cup raw or cooked vegetables or 100% juice
2 cups raw leafy vegetables
Fruits
2 cups
2 cups
1 cup fruit or 100% juice
½ cup dried fruit
Grains
6 ounces
8 ounces
Dairy
3 cups
Protein Foods
5½ ounces
1 slice bread
1 ounce ready-to-eat cereal
½ cup cooked pasta, rice, or cereal
1 cup milk
8 ounces yogurt
1½ ounces natural cheese
2 ounces processed cheese
3 cups
6½ ounces
1 ounce lean meat, poultry, or seafood
¼ cup cooked beans
½ ounce nuts or 1 egg
1 tablespoon peanut butter
* If you are not gaining weight or gaining too slowly, you may need to eat a little more from each food group. If you are gaining weight too fast, you may need
to cut back by decreasing the amount of “empty calories” you are eating.
Get a Daily Plan for Moms designed just for you.
Go to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for your Plan and more.
Click on “Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women.”
Being Physically Active
Unless your doctor advises you not to
be physically active, include 2½ hours each week of physical activity
such as brisk walking, dancing,
gardening, or swimming.
The activity should be done at least 10 minutes at a time, and
preferably spread throughout the week.
Avoid activities with a high risk of falling
or injury.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Seafood Can Be a Part of a Healthy Diet.
Omega-3 fats in seafood have important health benefits for
you and your unborn child. Salmon, sardines, and trout are
some choices higher in Omega-3 fats.
• Eat 8 to 12 ounces of seafood each week.
• Eat all types of tuna, but limit white (albacore) tuna to
6 ounces each week.
• Do not eat tilefish, shark, swordfish, and king mackerel
since they have high levels of mercury.
MyPlate Pregnancy Style
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Your Changing Body: Loving Your Pregnant Body
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Your Changing Body: Loving Your Pregnant Body
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Your Changing Body: Loving Your Pregnant Body
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Your Changing Body: Loving Your Pregnant Body
Ways to Love
Your Body
During
Pregnancy
Ways to Love
Your Body
During
Pregnancy
·
Eat a variety of healthy foods.
·
Eat a variety of healthy foods.
·
Drink plenty of water during the day.
·
Drink plenty of water during the day.
·
Enjoy an afternoon nap.
·
Enjoy an afternoon nap.
·
Try prenatal yoga (after consulting your healthcare
provider).
·
Try prenatal yoga (after consulting your healthcare
provider).
·
Practice self massage.
·
Practice self massage.
·
Talk to a supportive friend or family member about your
pregnancy.
·
Talk to a supportive friend or family member about your
pregnancy.
Information from the Office of Women’s Health, US Department of Health and Human
Services
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station
and Cooperative Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity
provider and employer. Issued in furtherance of
Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30,
1914, as amended. Kansas State University, County
Extension Councils, Extension Districts, and United States
Department of Agriculture Cooperating, John D. Floros,
Director.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) through a contract
awarded by the Kansas Department for Children and
Families. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and
provider. SNAP provides nutrition assistance to people
with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To
find out more call 1-800-221-5689.
Your Changing Body: Loving Your Pregnant Body
Information from the Office of Women’s Health, US Department of Health and Human
Services
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station
and Cooperative Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity
provider and employer. Issued in furtherance of
Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30,
1914, as amended. Kansas State University, County
Extension Councils, Extension Districts, and United States
Department of Agriculture Cooperating, John D. Floros,
Director.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) through a contract
awarded by the Kansas Department for Children and
Families. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and
provider. SNAP provides nutrition assistance to people
with low income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To
find out more call 1-800-221-5689.
Your Changing Body: Loving Your Pregnant Body
Healthy You and Healthy Baby, Too
Discomforts of Pregnancy
Fatigue or sleep problems
a regular sleep schedule,
using pillows, and lying on
your left side
Dizziness
regular eating and
standing up slowly
Nose problems
(including stuffiness and nosebleeds can occur)
drink plenty of water and blow your nose gently
Breast tenderness or even leaking
(third trimester)
wear a good maternity or support bra
Heartburn or indigestion
eat smaller meals, reduce
the amount of citrus and
spicy food you eat, and
drink fluids between meals
Morning sickness
eat dry toast before getting up, have
several small meals daily, and sit up
after meals
Constipation and Hemorrhoids
(due to a slowed digestive system)
drink plenty of water and eat fiber
rich foods
Swelling
(hands, ankles or your face)
drink plenty of water and
try resting or elevating
your feet
Leg cramps
(near the end of pregnancy)
exercise and elevate your legs
Be sure to visit with your healthcare provider about any discomfort you have
during pregnancy.
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension
Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Issued in
furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, as
amended. Kansas State University, County Extension Councils, Extension Districts, and
United States Department of Agriculture Cooperating, John D. Floros, Director.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) through
a contract awarded by the Kansas Department for Children and Families. USDA is an equal
opportunity employer and provider. SNAP provides nutrition assistance to people with low
income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more call 1-800-221-5689.
All About Pregnancy: Common Discomforts
Healthy You and Baby, Too
Discomforts of Pregnancy
Fatigue or sleep problems
a regular sleep schedule,
using pillows, and lying on
your left side
Dizziness
regular eating and
standing up slowly
Nose problems
(including stuffiness and nosebleeds can
occur) drink plenty of water and blow your
nose gently
Breast tenderness or even leaking
(third trimester)
wear a good maternity or support bra
Heartburn or indigestion
eat smaller meals, reduce
the amount of citrus and
spicy food you eat, and
drink fluids between meals
Morning sickness
eat dry toast before getting up, have
several small meals daily, and sit up
after meals
Constipation and Hemorrhoids
(due to a slowed digestive system)
drink plenty of water and eat fiber
rich foods
Swelling
(hands, ankles or your face)
drink plenty of water and
try resting or elevating
your feet
Leg cramps
(near the end of pregnancy)
exercise and elevate your legs
Be sure to visit with your healthcare provider about any discomfort you have
during pregnancy.
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service
K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Issued in
furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, as amended.
Kansas State University, County Extension Councils, Extension Districts, and United States
Department of Agriculture Cooperating, John D. Floros, Director.
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) through a
contract awarded by the Kansas Department for Children and Families. USDA is an equal
opportunity employer and provider. SNAP provides nutrition assistance to people with low
income.
It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more call 1-800-221-5689.
Healthy You and Baby, Too
All About Pregnancy: Common Discomforts
The average person consumes
about 3,500 milligrams of
sodium a day.
African-Americans, people 51 and older
and anyone with high blood pressure or
diabetes should have no more than 1,500
mg of sodium a day. The recommendation
for everyone else is less than 2,300 mg, or
about 1 teaspoon, of salt a day.
What can you do to avoid
excess salt?
u Check Nutrition Facts panels on
packages to find lower-sodium foods.
u Eat more fresh foods prepared from
scratch.
u Fill up on fruits, vegetables and cooked
dry beans.
u Keep salt off the dinner table and kitchen
counter.
u Look for foods labeled “low sodium”,
“reduced sodium” and “no salt added.”
u Rinse high sodium canned foods such as
beans, vegetables and tuna fish in a
colander under running water.
The sodium can be reduced by 40%.
u Omit salt in recipes such as soup, rice
dishes and casseroles.
The Main Sources of Sodium in Our Diet
Foods with less than 140 mg sodium per
serving can be labeled as low-sodium
foods. Check the daily value on the
Nutrition Facts panel. Try to find items
that have 5% or less of the daily value for
sodium.
u Don’t salt the water before cooking
potatoes, pasta or vegetables.
u Try lemon juice or lime juice on salads
instead of dressing.
Sodium in one meal adds up:
½ cup canned green beans
380 mg sodium
1 cup seasoned rice from box
760 mg
5 wheat crackers
160 mg
2 hot dogs1220 mg
2 tablespoons barbeque sauce 250 mg
2770 mg total
Foods High in Sodium
Instead, try ………….
Canned vegetables, soups, chili, and tomatoes
canned foods with no-salt added or use
fresh items
Boxed rice and pasta mixes
plain rice or pasta and add herbs and
spices
Onion or garlic salt
onion or garlic powder
Frozen dinners
frozen veggies with fresh meat and plain
rice
Salty chips
unsalted chips or scrape off the visible salt
Cured meats such as bacon, sausage, hot dogs and luncheon meats
fresh or canned chicken, fish or no-salt
added peanut butter
Bread, crackers and cereals
lower salt varieties or unsalted tops
Salad dressings, ketchup, mustard, relish
lemon juice, vinegar, zest or fresh herbs
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) through a contract awarded
by the Kansas Department for Children and Families. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and provider.
SNAP provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet.
To find out more call 1-800-221-5689.