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Transcript
Wysong
Clinical
Veterinary Nutrition
Technical Monograph & Product Details
Philosophy
Design
Mechanisms of Action
Indications
Research
For every disease there is a cause.
For every cause there is a cure.
R.L. Wysong, D.V.M.
©Wysong Corporation, 2003
1880 North Eastman • Midland, MI 48642 • www.wysong.net • 989-631-0009
Introduction
Philosophical Underpinnings
Nutrition is perhaps the most intimate and important of individual biological experiences. It provides the substrate
from which all anatomy and physiology is derived and is a critical communication between environment and soma.
When food is consumed, the external environment is literally internalized.
In our age of bounty, convenience, and self-indulgence, food is viewed more as recreation than a necessity to life
and health. Most significantly, the intrusion of technology into feeding would lead us to believe that eating is complex
beyond the capabilities of all but credentialed experts.
Nevertheless, this fact remains: With the exception of that infinitesimally small portion occupied by modern humans,
all biota finds nutrition to be no mystery. Life itself would not exist if this were not true. All life, including the most
erudite and technically sophisticated nutritionist, lives because eons of forbearers lived and had health eating what
nature provided without alteration.
So yes, nutrition is important. But no, it is not complicated. (Although what follows may seem to belie this, a
technical explanation is the only means to convince the technically sophisticated that something is, in actual fact, simple.)
All answers to all questions come from nature. Our sciences merely attempt to reveal what is already there. None
of our knowledge is true innovation or creation, it is mere discovery. The answer to the question of what is the
appropriate diet to create and maintain health therefore must lie within nature itself.
Nature reveals three characteristics of proper diet. First, it is archetypal – it is that food to which the organism is
adapted in the wild setting. Second, it is optimal – its quantity and quality are sufficient to meet the biochemical
individuality of the entire diverse population. Third, it is alive – food is by nature comprised of other living elements,
both plant and animal.
The novel nutritional approach embodied in Wysong Rx culminates over 25 years of research to capture these
essential food qualities in a packaged product.
The Archetypal Holistic Paradigm
Health is an emergent holistic quality, a gestalt of genetics and environment. Environmental factors impacting wellbeing include everything from temperature, light, air, altitude and humidity, to symbiotic, parasitic and pathogenic
relationships, to social setting and food.
The genome, on the other hand, determines whether these environmental factors enhance or detract from health. A
fish underwater thrives because water is what the fish genome expects. A human will not survive these same aqueous
circumstances. The converse is true for each if the environment is changed from water to air. The genome does not
adapt to dramatic environmental stress, it succumbs.
In an age where artificiality abounds, it is easy to forget these principles. Humans survive in hostile environs (from
the genome’s perspective) such as space and deep ocean with the aid of wondrous technology. We also survive
deadly northern latitudes in the artificial environments created in dwellings. Animals taken from the wild likewise
survive domestication and caging, something their genomes
did not expect. These apparent triumphs of technology
over genetic constraints lead to the belief that genetic
determinants are ambiguous, that anything is possible given
enough technology. Of course this is not so. Although
environment can modify genetic expression, this only
occurs within defined limits. The more aberrant the
environment, (from the specific genome’s perspective), the
more likely dysfunction and disease.
just like a fish out of water or a human submerged. All that
may appear well at the moment is not really so.
With these principles as a backdrop, one can look at
the health-disease-food-genetic linkage and make rational
judgments. What is the proper food context for a given
genome? The answer: what the creature would eat and
digest in the wild. For a cow it is clearly pasture. For the
lion and wolf (cat and dog), prey and a few vegetable
incidentals. For humans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and other
Survival is not synonymous with health. Looking at a creatures. This is apparent, logical and intuitive.
fish in the first few seconds after being pulled from the
water, all appears well. It’s alive, robust and healthy. Same
The food context phylogenetically determines the
for the human submersed. One could conclude from these
genome. The resultant genome in turn dictates the
superficial and brief observations that air is a proper
appropriate food. The creature cannot predate its food.
environment for fish, and water for humans. But let either
Yet modern synthetic foods demand the illogic of all
of these circumstances persist and disease (dis-ease)
creatures predating their diets. (See Figure 1.)
becomes apparent – followed by death. The long-range
view makes it clear that to remove a creature from its
expected genetic context spells disaster.
Mere immediate survival, however, makes
Which Came First, the Chicken or Its Food?
it too easy to overlook subtle, hidden (for
the moment) damage and stress, precedent
to disease.
Survival under adverse environmental
conditions is only a reflection of limited
resiliency and adaptability. Teenagers
exemplify this dramatically. They can
subsist on fries and Twinkies rinsed down
with pop, stay up all hours and endure the
peer-pressured school and dating years,
yet appear to flourish. If they become ill
or are injured physically, they usually heal
rapidly and completely. Eating and lifestyle
apparently have no impact.
Food First?
or
Chicken First?
Figure 1. Food is that which nourishes and sustains life. Food, by definition,
must preexist the life forms which depend upon it. Which came first, the
chicken or its food (a new version of an old conundrum)? The food had to
have been there first or life would not have been possible. Natural food fits
this definition. New forms of “synthetic” foods are new arrivals from a
geobiologic perspective and thus do not fit the definition of food.
Wysong RL. The Truth About Pet Foods. Inquiry Press. 2002. p.92
But that’s the short view. Research has shown that
wrong living in youth sets the stage for a variety of serious
degenerative conditions that only emerge in later adulthood.
Cancer, adult onset diabetes, atherosclerosis, obesity,
arthritis, autoimmunities and dental diseases can have
latency periods of decades. The smoldering fire within is
merely masked by the ephemeral vitality of youth.
The modern era, wherein new synthetic processed
foods have become the mainstay, represents but a speck
of biological time on this earth. If the modern, industrial,
processed food era dating back two hundred years is
represented by an inch, the time during which all life
consumed foods exactly as they were found in nature would
be at least 276 miles! (See Figure 2.)
Youth not experiencing its proper genetic context (food
Remove bran from rice and the resultant thiaminbeing an especially important element of that context) is deficient white rice causes beriberi. Put people on ships
Wysong RX – 3
without access to fruit, and vitamin C deficiency (scurvy) dangerous about the processed pet food experiment is
results. Feed pets processed foods – in spite of meeting that such foods are foisted on the public as “100%
Complete and Balanced.” Not only do
pet owners feed foods an animal would
TIME & ADAPTATION
never find in the wild, they do so
exclusively, every day at every meal.
NATURAL WORLD
INDUSTRIAL WORLD
Now
276 Miles
Time during which
life has adapted to
the natural environment.
(276 miles)
Time since the Industrial
Revolution, about 200 years.
(1 inch)
The classical nutritional paradigm of
treating all members of a species as
genetically identical, and establishing
requirements as reducible to a few tested
nutrients, is outmoded and insidiously
dangerous.
Figure 2. One inch represents the time during which we have forced
our genes to adapt to a modern synthetic world. 276 miles represents the time our genes were incubated and shaped by the natural
world. We must return to our genetic roots to achieve optimal health.
In spite of the imprimatur of
regulators, “100% complete” foods have
been proven to cause serious disease and
countless deaths. How could it be
otherwise? A processed food cannot
NRC guidelines and passing AAFCO feeding trials – and be known to be 100% complete, because 100% is not
taurine deficient-induced dilated cardiomyopathy results. known about nutrition any more than 100% is known about
Every nutritional deficiency ever described reduces to a genetics, physics, chemistry, electronics, engineering, math
common theme: depart from the natural order and health and the like. It is a logical absurdity and pets and their
owners pay the price. (See Figure 3.)
is jeopardized.
Although it is clear that the proper
food context is that of the 276 miles, not
the one inch, this is also overwhelmingly
evident from the explicit and implicit
conclusions of essentially all good
science.
Research from the past proves
environmental context must match
genetic expectation if health is to prevail.
Current research discoveries unveil the
same self-evident theme. The future can
only reveal more of the same. We are
what we are and until scientists in the lab
create genomes designed for foods from
the lab, archetypal nutritional patterns
must be respected.
The pet food industry is guilty of
tagging right along behind the failed
human nutritional experiment. Processed
pet foods are just another version of Fruit
Loop technology. But what is more
4 – Wysong RX
What’s wrong with this picture?
Mrs. Jones goes to the Pediatrician
Is he nuts?
No way am I not going
to give my child variety
and fresh foods.
Be sure to feed your
child exclusively this
scientifically completely
balanced food every meal
for its whole life.
Later....
Mrs. Jones goes to the Veterinarian
Isn’t science wonderful?
It’s such a relief to know I
can feed just this one food
and my pet will have the
very best health.
Be sure to feed your
pet exclusively this
scientifically completely
balanced food every
meal for its whole life.
Figure 3. The same common sense people apply to themselves and their children
must be applied to pets. Pet nutrition is not a special case situation regarding the
intervention of food processors or nutritionalists.
Wysong RL. The Truth About Pet Foods. Inquiry Press. 2002. p. 88
Addressing this nutritional crisis should be a paramount
The true 100% complete food is only that food which
the creature is genetically adapted to, food as it is found in concern in medical practice. Surely preventing such
conditions is far superior to palliative symptomatic care,
the wild, without manipulation.
which is the only present option.
“100% completeness” emerges really only as a point
of concern since the food supply has become synthetic
and fractionated. Yes, retorters, extruders, ovens,
dehydrators, freezers, synthetic vitamins and the like are
wondrous inventions. But their necessity is linked primarily
to commercial – not health – interests. They enable the
conversion of indigestible and toxic foods (such as raw
grains and legumes) into edible preparations with increased
shelf life, enabling profitable food distribution. Since such
foods are really experimental, and always accompanied
by continuing nutritional consequences, a huge scientific
industry has become necessary to analyze and test products
in an attempt to fortify them back to their original value.
Nutrigenomic Optimal Nutrition
Scientific advance has confirmed that the relationship
between genotype (health potential) and phenotype (health
realization) is intromitted with critical environmental
modifiers. With respect to the modifier – food – a new
science – nutrigenomics – has emerged. This science
studies the impact single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs
– pronounced snips) and multiple SNPs (Haplotypes) have
on diet, and conversely how diet can modify genetic
expression.
Genetic research has reached a state of precision where
single genes have been identified for production of
But the emergent, holistic, healthy value of natural nutritionally important enzymes and other proteins, transport
foods cannot be reductionistically understood nor regained molecules which ferry nutrients and cofactors, and
by analysis and reassembly of parts, any more than the numerous other molecules responsible for digestion,
emergent holistic qualities of water can be predicted or metabolism, utilization and control of both macronutrients
understood by analysis of the quantum properties of and micronutrients. (See Figure 4.)
hydrogen and oxygen. No scientist has a clue why, when
hydrogen and oxygen combine, a liquid is created that is
“wet” and expands when frozen. Likewise there is not a
clue within the millions of chemical nutrients within food
that would predict holistic qualities such as immune
resistance, longevity, mood or strength.
A thorough analysis of the scientific literature over the
past 25 years has proven these assertions to be
unassailable. Time will only confirm further that to the
degree we remove a creature from its proper environmental
context, including its food, health will be lost proportionately.
It is therefore totally predictable, and increasingly confirmed
in clinical trials and metanalyses, that essentially every health
condition is impacted by nutrition. What’s more, some of
the more enigmatic idiopathic conditions such as
atherosclerosis, cancer, obesity, adult onset diabetes,
digestive disturbances, allergies, autoimmunities, dermal
conditions, pancreatitis and dental disease may not be so
mysterious after all. We need look no further than the
food plate or bowl to find the disease vector in the form of
synthetic and fractionated food components fed
monotonously and relentlessly. All of these degenerative
conditions are nothing more than pleomorphic
manifestations of the same underlying etiology-genetic
discordancy.
Figure 4.
Well over a thousand human disease genes have been
characterized and many of these are monogenic. Examples
include sickle cell anemia (a single amino acid that reduces
hemoglobin’s affinity for oxygen), phenylketonuria (a
mutation in phenylalanine hydroxylase leading to toxic levels
of phenylalanine), hypertension (a variant of the
angiotensinogen gene), cardiovascular disease (AG to A
transition in the HDL promoter APOA1 gene as well as
genetically controlled C–reactive protein, homocysteine
Wysong RX – 5
and vitamin C synthesis, among others), cancer (C667T
polymorphism and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase
gene relation to folate, vitamin B12, B6, and methionine),
and diabetes (Pro 12A1a polymorphism in the peroxisome
proliferator activator receptor). Parallels exist in animals.
This is not to say disease is inevitable, but rather there is a
susceptibility that will only be manifest if the diet is not
matched properly to the genome.
recommendations or “100% complete” standards. A
biochemical flux through a metabolic or signal transduction
pathway is not the same for all. This explains the bell
curve phenomenon and biochemical individuality in
nutrition: why a single defined diet may exceed the needs
of some and be insufficient for others. (See Figure 6.)
On the other hand, dietary factors can directly bind to
receptors and modify gene expression/enzyme synthesis.
Altering the concentration of enzymes (encoded by SNPs)
alters the flux in pathways that in turn impacts physiology.
In other words, genes affect the response to diet, and
diet affects the expression of genes. The system is myriad
feedback loops and holistic – not linear or reductionistic.
(See Figure 5.)
Figure 6. Wysong RL. Rationale for Animal Nutrition. Inquiry Press. 1998. p.18
Biochemical individuality is best addressed by
optimizing the diet. This is a different set point than in
common nutritional practice where isolated nutrients are
tested to determine the levels necessary to prevent overt
deficiency or toxicity. Chronic undernutrition can create
idiosyncratic manifestations far removed in time from that
of a short-term feeding trial. Virtually every modern
chronic degenerative disease has a nutritional etiology,
yet this causation remains totally undiscovered by shortterm, feeding-trial, classical, nutritional research. (See
Figure 7.)
Will optimal nutrition therefore come from further
genetic mapping and nutrigenomic discovery? Such
Figure 5.
technology will certainly help define disease caused by
mutational idiosyncrasy. But for the majority of the
If all were known about such nutrigenomic interactions, population, SNPs and all, the holistic bounty of the natural
a food could be properly constructed from parts. But all archetypal diet is the best assurance of optimal nutrition.
is not known for even one individual, let alone all others Optimal nutrition is the best assurance of optimal health.
with their individual SNP personalities. Our knowledge is If health is lost, optimal diet is the best hope of restoration.
Wysong R X (WR X) is a veterinary-exclusive line
a drop – our ignorance a sea.
specifically designed to mimic the archetypal holistic
qualities characteristic of true natural food.
Although a species may be 99.9% genetically identical,
the remaining 0.1% polymorphisms make a tremendous
difference in phenotypical health. Polymorphism is yet Food Is Alive By Definition
another proof that one nutritional size does not fit everyone.
Long ago when biological science was in its infancy,
Nutritional research has demonstrated the same proof, but debate raged as to whether life spontaneously emerged
the tails of the bell curve are ignored in setting official dietary from nonliving matter. But spontaneous generation was
6 – Wysong RX
life can come from
non-life, it has never
been found to have
exception. That is
what makes it a law as
sure as the laws of
gravity and motion.
A corollary of this
law (defined by
Wysong in the early
1980s) is the Law of
Nutribiogenesis. Using
the principle of Biogenesis it argues that
life in its optimal
healthy state can only
come from living food.
Life be-gets life. The
proof of this law is in
its logic and the
empiricism that follows
it without fail. (See
Figure 8.)
If dead or inorganic matter cannot spontane-ous-ly
generate life, how
could such lifeless
matter form or sustain
the health of life?
There is a transition
between non-life and
life that is not bridged
spontaneously.
Figure 7.
Virtually every
modern disease is
incited or aggravated
by the consumption of
.
lifeless food fractions.
All of the nutritional
discovery linking diet
soon disproven. In its place emerged the Law of to health is ultimately reducible to violation of the Law of
Biogenesis. Simply, this law states that life only comes Nutri-biogenesis. Why is free radical pathology now
from preexisting life. Although this law has been ignored thought to underlie virtually all disease? Insufficient
by modern scientific endeavor that still seeks to prove antioxidant nutriture, and increased oxidant consumption
Wysong RX – 7
Figure 8.
Organic material exposed to bacteria, fly eggs, fungal spores,
etc., may generate populations of life. Superficially it appears
as though life is coming from the matter itself. However, as shown
by Redi, Pasteur and Spallanzani, if matter is sterilized and then
sealed from possible biological contamination, no life arises.
Thus, there is no spontaneous generation, only biological reproduction according to kind – biogenesis.
Wysong RL. The Creation-Evolution Controversy. Inquiry Press. 2003. p.181
THE DANGEROUS MIDDLE
THIS LOOKS GOOD
from dead devitalized foods nutrient
stripped and oxidized in processing is the
answer. Why are omega-3 fatty acids
linked to a host of immune-related diseases
as well as most other degenerative
diseases? Dead, devitalized, nutrientstripped, archetypically inappropriate and
oxidized foods is the answer. Why do
carnitine, taurine, folate, mineral and
other vitaminic and amino acid deficiencies
occur? The killing and nutrient stripping of
modern foods is the answer.
To be living, it is understood that a food
must be in its holistic state and not heated
much above body temperature (not more
than 118° F). It thus retains its inherent
enzymes intact. A raw apple is better than
pasteurized apple cider. Raw milk is better
than pasteurized homogenized milk. Raw
meat is better than its fried counterpart.
(See Figure 9.)
Life is almost infinitely complex, it is
the epitome of the ordered state. But fire is
the enemy of order. Fire turns a simple
structure such as a home into random
ashes. Fire even more completely
decimates life and its characteristic order.
This occurs in keeping with another
important law in science, The Second Law
of Thermodynamics. (See Figure 10.)
8 – Wysong RX
THIS IS WHAT
WE DON’T SEE
Processing
(Food Torturing)
Drying
Storing
Milling
Heating
Baking
Dehydration
Extruding
Freezing
Refining
Artificial Color
Artificial Flavor
Artificial Texture
Artificial Preservatives
Prolonged Storage
THIS LOOKS GOOD
Processing Degradations
Racemized Amino Acids
Isomerized Fatty Acids
Dehydroascorbic Acid
Cis-Isomerized Vitamin A
Pyridoxyl Lysine
N-Glucosyl amines of
Lysine and Methionine
Desulfurized Amino Acids
Quinone Pigments
Metalloproteins
Cholesterol Oxides:
- Hydroxycholesterol
- Alpha and Beta Epoxides
- Cholestane Triol
- Trienic and Dienic Fatty Acids
Heat Destruction Products of
Vitamins A, B1, B3, and C
Succinylation & Acetylation of:
- Lysine
- Threonine
- Cysteine
- Tyrosine
- Histidine
Altered Physiochemical State
Lysoalanine & Lanthionines
Nitrosamines & Nitropyrenes
PREMIUM
PET FOOD
Ingredients:
Corn, Chicken,
Oats, Fat
100% Complete
All Natural
Scientifically
Tested
Figure 9. What happens between the farmer’s field and the commercial package
significantly vitiates healthful nutrition. Unfortunately, this dangerous middle
is by and large ignored. Wysong RL. The Truth About Pet Foods. Inquiry Press. 2002. p.21
premise, unlike that of industry convention, is that any
formulated processed food is inferior to the natural raw
diet regardless of fortification, analyses or short-term
feeding trials. The manufacturing goal should therefore be
to stretch toward the ideal natural diet rather than rest on
the laurel of “100% completeness.”
Figure 10. Wysong RL. The Creation-Evolution Controversy.
Inquiry Press. 2003. p. 243
Fire accelerates the inevitable increase of entropy, the
loss of order and increase in randomness. How then can
we expect food – that has in essence been turned to ashes
– to create the low entropic ordered state of health?
(Arguments about open and closed systems could be made
by physicists, but for the purpose of this brief, polemic
principles are being highlighted.) Would we not expect a
better result from foods that have retained the low entropy
of their living state and can hope to pass such order on to
the eater? Would we not expect a better result from foods
that have not been rushed along by processing, toward
their lifeless entropic end?
The vitiation of nutritional quality as a result of high
heat processing is only matched by the abundance of toxins
produced. Although high heat processing enables the
creation of an endless variety of food trinkets, permits stable
shelf life, freedom from pathogens, easy distribution and
higher profits for producers, it violates the Law of
Nutribiogenesis. Profits go to the producers, disease goes
to the consumers.
Wysong RX is a significant advance toward the ideal
and incorporates a variety of new technologies to achieve
highly palatable natural nutrition while providing specific
nutraceuticals with proven metabolic effects. The Wysong RX
objective is to reintroduce a pet to its real food, the panoply
of nutrients the genome expects, and shift the balance from
disease and immunological weakness, to robust optimal
health. Innovations include non-heat processing, bacterial
and parasitic control, probiotic, prebiotic (synbiotic) and
enzymatic augmentation, immune enhancement, natural
antioxidant protection and nutraceutical bioactivation.
Meat-Organ-Bone Base
The natural archetypical food of the carnivore is meat,
organs and bones.
This is the predominant base (devoid of grains,
common to virtually all processed pet foods) in Wysong
RX and cannot be surpassed in terms of the essential amino
acid profile and other inherent macronutrient and
micronutrient merits. The unusual palatability speaks to
the animal’s innate sense of nutritional value.
The true challenge in modern food production, if health
is the goal, is fresh untainted food that does not violate the
Law of Nutribiogenesis. That challenge has been met
successfully with Wysong RX.
Wysong RX Technology
For many years Wysong has understood the
seriousness of these fundamental feeding/health issues and
formulated foods based upon the above principles.
Considerable effort has also been expended to educate
pet owners about archetypal feeding concepts and how
they can improve nutritional conditions with fresh foods,
supplements and varied feeding.
Important advances in processing and formulation can
bring foods as close as possible to what the animal’s
genome expects and can thrive on. The Wysong beginning
Figure 11.
Wysong RX – 9
Non-Thermal Processing
Through flash freezing and dehydration, Wysong RX
retains all of the raw natural attributes while remaining
exceptionally shelf stable. There is no better way known at
present to preserve natural nutritional value. (See Figure 11.)
On the other hand, the toxic burdens presented by
singular feeding of heat degraded processed foods may
tip the scales in the wrong direction for the ill or immunecompromised animal, and thwart recovery.
Pathogen control
Figure 13. Typical first-line defense at epithelial surfaces.
Specific natural ingredients in Wysong RX and special
low temperature processes help to inhibit potential foodborne pathogens without sacrificing nutritional quality or
introducing synthetic antimicrobials. Pathogen-active
ingredients include lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase, special
fruit components, and antiparasitic phytoplankton mineral
matrices.
• Lactoferrin
Lactoferrin (LF), particularly concentrated in plasma
and dairy whey, is a bilobular glycoprotein containing Nacetyl D glucosamine, N-acetyllactosamine, galactose,
fucose, mannose, neuraminic acid, and a polypeptide chain
of 689 amino acids configured into 25 helices, 32 sheets
and 58 turns with two binding sites for ferric ions (Fe3+)
and bicarbonate. It is closely related in structure to the
plasma ion transport protein, transferrin. If the molecule is
not saturated with iron it is apolactoferrin, if saturated it is
hololactoferrin. (See Figures 12, 13 and 14.)
Figure 12. Iron-binding mechanism of lactoferrin.
LF is found in all epithelial exocrine secretions bathing
mucous membranes and is present in saliva and tears,
bronchial, nasal, bile and pancreatic secretions, milk,
colostrum, semen, cervical mucus, urine, and is also
synthesized by neutrophils. It is a first line of defense.
10 – Wysong RX
Figure 14. Bilobed lactoferrin molecule
containing two binding sites for Fe3+
LF can sequester iron from bacterial pathogens
resulting in a bacteriostatic effect. Its highly positively
charged N-terminus region can also bind to
lipopolysaccharides on bacterial cell walls, increasing
permeability and resulting in a bacteriocidal action.
Additionally, LF can bind to viral envelope protein,
preventing fusion to cells by shielding the binding domain.
LF immunomediator activity includes:
Ø Release of neutrophil-activating interleukin 8
Ø Production of other interleukins
Ø Antibody synthesis
Ø Lymphocyte proliferation
Ø Complement activation
Ø T-cell proliferation
Ø Protective function over macrophages
and lymphocytes
Ø Activation of natural killer cells
Ø Induction of colony-stimulating activity
at specific receptor cells in the colon where it is readily
absorbed. As both a scavenger and iron donor, LF helps
regulate iron nutrition, contributing or removing iron as
cellular circumstances dictate. (See Figure 16.)
Figure 15. Oral feeding with bovine Lactoferrin protects germfree piglets against endotoxins (i.v. LPS) (Lee W.L. et al. 1998. The
protective effects of lactoferrin feeding against endotoxin lethal shock in
germfree piglet, Infect & Immun 66 (4), 14. 1421-1426)
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Activation of leukocytes and monocytes
Potentiation of macrophage cytotoxicity
Maturation of splenic B cells
Upregulation of CD4 lymphocytes and NK
cell activity
Protection of lymphocytes against free iron
Secondary granule activity in polymorphonuclear
leukocytes
Regulation of myelopoiesis
Inhibition of granulopoiesis
Production and release of cytokines such as
TNF-a, IL-1b, NO, and GM-CSF
Figure 16. Iron (Fe3+) binding activity of lactoferrin (DVM
International, 1996).
• Lactoperoxidase
Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is an abundant enzyme in milk,
whey fractions and other exocrine secretions such as tears
and saliva. LPO is a complex glycoprotein containing an
iron-bound heme and a chelated calcium ion. It, like LF,
serves as a first line of defense.
LPO is both bacteriostatic and bactericidal. Gram
negative, catalase positive organisms are more readily
LF is probiotic by inhibiting pathogens and stimulating inhibited by LPO than are gram positive, catalase negative
beneficial gut flora. (Surprisingly, LF is pathogen-selective, bacteria. Gram negative, catalase positive organisms,
leaving beneficial flora intact.) Clinical data have (coliforms, salmonella, etc.) are not only inhibited, but are
demonstrated a protective effect against Haemophilus killed if sufficient hydrogen peroxide is provided –
influenza, chronic hepatitis C, Helicobacter pylori (cancer- chemically, enzymatically or by hydrogen peroxideand ulcer-inducing bacterium), fungal infections such as producing microorganisms. On the other hand, the action
Candida and Tinea pedis, E. coli, Salmonella, of lactoperoxidase against gram-positive organisms is
generally bacteriostatic and not lethal.
Staphylococcus, and Listeria.
LF also seems to work in synergy with antibiotics.
One study showed that E. coli toxin challenge resulted in
74% mortality in controls and 17% in LF subjects. In
another study, kidney infections were reduced by 40-60%
and bacterial counts 5-12 fold.
As a free iron scavenger, apo-lactoferrin helps prevent
oxidation and free radical formation. (Iron is a strong
oxidizer.) As such, DNA repair mechanisms are protected,
thus enhancing health, slowing the aging process and serving
to combat neoplasia. LF can transport iron and release it
Figure 17.
Wysong RX – 11
disrupt outer cuticle membranes resulting in their
desiccation and death.
Figure 18. Bacterial effect LP-system on enteropathogenic E. coli in a milk product (DVM International,
1966).
LPO exerts its antimicrobial action by catalyzing the
oxidation of thiocyanate ions (SCN-) to hypothiocyanate
(OSCN-) an anion in equilibrium with hypothocyanous
(HOSCN) acid. HOSCN is the mediator in bacterial
killing, being cell permeable and capable of oxidizing
sulfhydral groups in enzymes, thus inhibiting glycolysis as
well as NADH/NADPH dependent reactions. The
sulfhydral groups in bacterial cytoplasmic membranes are
also oxidized, resulting in the loss of the ability to transport
glucose and leaking of potassium ions, amino acids and
peptides. Remarkably these cytotoxic effects occur
without damage to host cells. It is theorized that some
disease states characterized by chronic bacterial infection
may be due to a breakdown of this lactoperoxidase system
at mucosal interfaces. (See Figure 17.)
• Fruit Extracts
Certain fruits have remarkable antioxidant and
antimicrobial activity without attendant toxicities
characteristic of synthetic additives. WRX fruit extract
contains malic acid, sorbitol, phenolic antioxidants such
as chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids and an array of
other nutritionally beneficial components.
Incorporation of this ingredient in WRX provides
excellent product protection and nutraceutical benefits.
(See Figures 20, 21 and 22.)
LPO acts synergistically with LF and secretory
immunoglobulins in Wysong RX formulations to stabilize
shelf life and exert in vivo antibacterial effects.
• Natural Mineral Matrix
A special Wysong R X
composition of desiccated sea
plankton exoskeleton matrices
contributes both nutritional and
antiparasitic activity.
Two grams of these 5-20
micron porous particles have
a surface area equal to a
football field. By separating
nutrients it also increases
enzymatic efficiency. When in
contact with parasites it can Figure 19.
Desiccated Sea Plankton
12 – Wysong RX
Figure 20.
Figure 21.
Figure 22.
Synbiotics (Prebiotics and Probiotics)
Enzymes
Prebiotics are saccharide food components not
digested by the host but which proceed intact to provide a
food substrate for the selective growth of probiotic
organisms. Garlic, yeast culture and other oligosaccharides
in WRX are prebiotic. Probiotics are host- friendly bacteria
that exert a multitude of immune stimulating, digestive,
nutritional and antipathogenic effects. Active WRX
probiotic cultures mimic the probiotic-rich viscera of the
prey animal. (See Figure 23.)
Natural foods not heated above approximately 118ºF
contain enzymes that can aid in the digestion of food. WRX
contain these natural food enzymes and supplemental
enzymes as well. This spares digestive and pancreatic
exertion. Since digestion is one of the most strenuous
metabolic acts, easing this stress is particularly beneficial
to the compromised animal. (See Figure 24.)
Wysong RX – 13
Beneficial Effects of Enterococcus faecium:
1. Fermentation of carbohydrate to lactic acid, thus lowering gastrointestinal pH and
discouraging pathogenic growth.
2. An increase in palatability of the food it is found in and growth stimulation.
3. Production of antitoxins, which help to neutralize enterotoxins from E. coli.
4. Production of hydrogen peroxide, which has a bacteriocidal effect on anaerobic
microorganisms.
5. Production of a metabolite that has specific activity against E. coli.
6. Production of antibiotics and bacteriocins, such as acidophylin, acidolin, lactalin, and
nisin. These act against a variety of pathogenic species such as S. proteus, P. aeruginosa,
B. subtilus, Salmonella, Shigella, and Clostridium.
7. Change in the re-dox (oxidation-reduction) potential, thus creating an unsuitable
environment for the aerobic pathogenic microorganism.
8. Crowding out of the other microorganisms by implanting on the mucous surfaces and villi,
thus decreasing the coliform count.
9. A low sensitivity to most common antibiotics. May be used safely in combination with:
Aureomycin, Oxytetracycline, Bacitracin, Lincomycin, ASP-250, Furacin, Carbodox
(Mecadox), and Virginiamycin. Proven to be sensitive to: Ampicillin, Tetracycline,
Spectinomycin, Novabiacin, and Gentacin.
10. Inhibition of bacteria that degrade intestinal protein to non-utilizable forms.
Figure 23.
Pancreatic Size
Species
Pancreas Weight
as a Percentage of Body Weight
Wild Mice
Mice on a Processed Diet
Rats on a Raw Diet
Rats on a Processed Diet
0.32
0.84
0.32
0.84
Figure 24. Enzyme-devoid processed foods cause enlargement Probiotics 5
(disease) of the Pancreas
*This experiment was designed to determine the pancreatic weight differences between various species of mice.
Antioxidation
Free radical pathology underlies most disease.
Oxidation of food components can significantly contribute
to the body’s free radical load, a load that is already
excessive in disease states. Additionally, valuable fatty
acids such as omega 3, 6, and 9 can be damaged – creating
eicosanoid deficiency, imbalance and toxic end products.
WRX contain several natural antioxidants such as vitamins
C and E, carotenoids and flavanoids, organic acids to
14 – Wysong RX
chelate prooxidant metals, and plant phytochemicals. In
addition, fats are micropurged of oxygen by special nitrogen
injection. (See Figures 25 and 26.)
WRX is designed to provide metabolic antioxidant
protection as well as protection of nutrients within the
package. (See Figure 27.)
Figure 25.
Figure 26.
Nutraceuticals
Nutraceuticals are active foods, or components of
natural foods, with specific beneficial metabolic effects.
Unlike pharmaceuticals, their contraindications are
practically nil if used within reason. This is due to the fact
that natural substances are part of biological experience
(as opposed to synthetics) and metabolic pathways are in
place to both utilize their benefits and detoxify noxious
elements. Although nutraceutical effects are not as
immediately dramatic as pharmaceuticals, they help address
underlying causes and work with the body’s own healing
mechanisms rather than merely masking symptoms.
The special combination of the non-thermally processed
meat-organ-bone base, combined with specific scientifically
validated nutraceuticals and other micronutrients provides
the clinician an excellent and readily (even eagerly) accepted
treatment option as an adjuvant to conventional therapy.
Figure 27.
Wysong RX – 15
The following, in brief, describes the biochemical activity of specific nutraceuticals with substantiated effects. For
further investigation and details of proofs, see the references listed in each of the individual RX formulations. (see pp 29
- 63)
These compounds may be found in a variety of natural ingredients and thus are not listed as individual compounds on
RX labels.
Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALC) – is an amino acid important to cellular energy
production and is the form of L-Carnitine capable of crossing the blood-brain
barrier. ALC is vital to nerve/muscle communication, learning, alertness and
problem solving. ALC promotes synthesis of acetylcholine (ACh) by donating
acetyl groups and by activating the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT)
responsible for producing acetylcholine. Benefits of ALC
supplementation include improvement in general metabolism
of the nervous system, improvement in mental function by
enhancing membrane stability, energy production, nerve
transmission and enhanced membrane, nucleic acid and
metabolic stability through decreasing free radical activity.
Actein, cimicifugoside and formononetin – are triterpene glycosides and isoflavones found in the roots of black
cohosh. These phytoestrogen compounds were tested in a randomized, double-blind study comparing their effects to
those of estrogen and placebo. Study participants improved equally on phytoestrogens and estrogen while there was
no improvement in the placebo control group.
Adrenal glandular (peptide hormone precursors, enzymes, natural lipids factors, soluble proteins, vitamins
and minerals) – provides hormonal precursors and other nutrients. Adrenal exhaustion contributes to fatigue, immune
dysfunction, hypoglycemia, allergies and arthritis. The biologically active components in adrenal glandular have
immunomodulatory effects and anti-inflammatory properties, increase resistance to allergic reactions and infections,
and provide adrenal strength for stress, allergies, muscle tone, blood-sugar balance, endurance, energy, blood circulation
and sodium/water balance.
Alkaloids and flavonols – are effective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents promoting immunomodulation and
lymphocytosis.
Allicin – has anti-inflammatory properties, inhibits the release of histamine and
inhibits Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Brucella, and Vibrio species,
as well as Candida albicans. Allicin blocks oxidation-caused injury to
pulmonary arterial cells, mainly by sparing the levels of intracellular glutathione,
free radical scavenging, and by elimination of toxins.
Alpha-lipoic acid – lowers blood glucose levels by increasing its utilization in
muscle and increasing insulin sensitivity. Alpha-lipoic acid also increases
levels of reducing agents and regenerates other antioxidants in brain and
nerves thereby providing antioxidant effects. Many clinical studies show
promising effects in preventing nerve damage and polyneuropathy.
16 – Wysong RX
Anthocyanosides – strengthen collagen in blood vessel walls, decrease intraocular pressure, improve capillary
blood flow, prevent capillary fragility, stimulate the release of vasodilators, and decrease collagen breakdown.
Anthocyanosides work with the intricate microcirculation in the eye to help prevent restricted blood flow and aid the
flow of nutrients into, and metabolic wastes out of, ocular tissue.
Anthraquinone saccharides – help heal and prevent gastric ulcers by inactivating pepsin and by binding to parietal
cells, thus interfering with hydrochloric acid release. These compounds also act as demulcents preventing irritants
from reaching stomach lesions.
Antioxidants – are essential in both cancer prevention and treatment because of their ability to scavenge free
radicals, reduce inflammation, assist in detoxification, regulate the immune system, and promote healing. Antioxidants
aid in reducing stress-induced free radicals. Natural source beta-carotene and other flavonoids, Vitamin C, Vitamin E
and alpha-lipoic acid have potent antioxidant activity.
Apigenin – is a flavonoid which binds to the same GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)
receptors which have an affinity for benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Apigenin competitively
inhibits the binding of flunitrazepam, a benzodiazepine. Apigenin has anxiolytic activity without
incidence of sedation or muscle relax-ation effects at doses similar to those used for classical
benzo-diazepines.
Apple polyphenols – prevent the attachment of S. sobrinus to tooth surfaces, thus inhibiting its production of
glucans and other cariogenic factors. This antibacterial function prevents both tooth demineralization and dental
caries. Polyphenols have also been shown in clinical studies to be effective in eliminating bad breath by inhibiting
bacterial production of methyl-marcaptan by up to 80 percent.
Arbutin – a glycoside, has antiseptic and diuretic activity. It is metabolized to an antibacterial hydroquinone in the
intestines, then linked to a hydrophilic molecule in the liver and carried via the blood to the kidney. There, the
hydroquinone is released from its carrier and provides analgesia as well as antisepsis throughout the urinary tract.
Ascorbic acid – is the major dietary form of vitamin C. Vitamin C is a hexose derivative, similar in
structure to glucose (high dietary sugars inhibit vitamin C activity by competing for binding sites).
Vitamin C can scavenge tissue damaging reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Ascorbic acid is an
excellent reducing agent, acts as a cofactor in many biochemical reactions, inhibits lipid peroxidation
and oxidative DNA and protein damage.
Biochanin, formononetin, diadzein and genistein – are isoflavones that have a high affinity for beta estrogen
receptors predominant in heart, vascular, bone and bladder tissue. Some effects include protection against endocrine
related cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, improved bladder sphincter tone and improvement in postmenopausal symptoms related to estrogen deficiency.
Bitter orange – is a thermogenic phytonutrient that increases metabolic rate utilizing adipose energy reserves and
sparing lean muscle tissue.
Blood plasma – consists of approximately 50% albumin, 25% immunoglobulins (including alpha, beta, and gamma
globulins), 5% fibrin, and 20% other proteins including haptoglobolin, transferrin, and growth factors. More than
15% of the immunoglobulins present are Immunoglobulin G (IgG), which when consumed orally can increase the
beneficial intestinal level of IgGs. An increase in intestinal IgG enhances enteropathogenic immunity resulting in elevated
pathogen resistance. Ingestion of plasma also enhances enteric immunity, which prevents over stimulation of the
systemic immune system.
Wysong RX – 17
Branched chain amino acids – including leucine, valine, and isoleucine regulate blood glucose levels and are also
necessary for growth and repair of muscle tissue. They serve as building blocks for tissue proteins and as carbon
precursors for the synthesis of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, ketone bodies, and fat. They also provide carbon
and nitrogen precursors for synthesis of other amino acids, such as alanine, glutamate, and glutamine for tissue repair.
Natural calcium sources – contain over 70 different major and trace minerals, many of which are chelated for
optimal assimilation. Calcium can bind with oxalate in the intestine before it enters the bloodstream or urinary tract.
Calcium exists in bone primarily in the form of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2). Calcium concentration of dental
plaque is an important determinant of the balance between enamel demineralization and remineralization. The rate of
dissolution of hydroxyapatite is determined mostly by the level of saturation with calcium and phosphate ions in the
tooth environment. Increasing calcium concentration disfavors demineralization and favors remineralization.
Co-enzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) – is a lipophilic, water-insoluble nutrient involved in electron transport and energy
production in mitochondrial membranes. CoQ10
is of fundamental importance to cells with high
metabolic demands. As with other antioxidant
nutrients, CoQ10 is subject to increased turnover
as a result of stress or increased free radical load.
Immune
cells, cardiac
and skeletal
muscle cells
have a high
metabolic
rate and can
easily ex-haust co-enzyme Q10 reserves.
Colostrum – provides immune factors, such as Immunoglobulin G (IgG), which has anti-viral activity and helps to
repair nucleic acids. Colostrum is also rich in casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, insulin-like
growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1 and IGF-2), transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) and epidermal growth factor
(EFG).
Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) – decreases white and brown adipose tissue, and helps regulate energy metabolism
of skeletal muscle to promote lean body mass. CLA is thought to reduce body fat composition by inhibiting heparinreleasable lipoprotein lipase, which affects glucose metabolism in adipocytes causing less fat to be stored.
Curcuminoids – are polyphenolic compounds that have antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties.
Curcuminoid antioxidant activity includes its ability to increase
glutathione perxoidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate
dehydrogenase and catalase. The surmised anticarcinogenic activity
of curcuminoids is thought to be its ability to inhibit angiogenesis,
upregulate apoptosis, and interfere with specific signal transduction
pathways that are necessary for tumor cell proliferation. Curcumin
also assists in detoxification of drugs and chemicals by increasing
phase II-metabolizing enzymes in the kidney and liver.
Capsaicin – relieves pain associated with arthritis by acting on sensory neurotransmitters leading to their depletion.
VR1, the capsaicin receptor, is a sensory neuron-specific ion channel that serves as a detector of pain-producing
18 – Wysong RX
chemicals and physical stimuli. The response of VR1 to capsaicin is
dynamically potentiated by extracellular protons within a pH range
encountered during tissue acidosis associated with arthritis. Capsaicin
has analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions and also acts as an antioxidant
and an inhibitor of platelet adhesion.
Carotenoids – such as lycopene are associated with a lower risk of lung cancer. The mechanism of this anticarcinogenic
activity is not well understood, but may be due in part to antioxidant activity. Lycopene has the highest antioxidant
activity of all the carotenoids. It has the ability to trap peroxyl radicals, inhibit the oxidation of DNA,
quench singlet oxygen, and inhibit lipid peroxidation. Lycopene may also stimulate gap junction communication between
cells, suppress carcinogen-induced phosphorylation of regulatory proteins such as p53 and Rb antioncogenes, reduce
cellular proliferation due to insulin-like growth factors, and stop cell division at the G0-G1 cell cycle phase.
Cetyl myrisoleate – is a fatty acid ester comprised of the 16 carbon alcohol, cetyl alcohol, and the 14 carbon
monounsaturated fatty acid cis-9 tetradecenoic acid (also known as myristoleic acid). Recent research has found that
at least 87% of arthritic patients given cetyl myristoleate saw significant improvement in pain and mobility.
Certain cheeses – have unique properties which help prevent tooth decay. Cheese alkalinity buffers the acidity
which predisposes to plaque. Also, cheese is a good gustatory stimulant of salivary flow which dilutes and clears sugars
from the oral cavity. Cheese proteins inhibit demineralization and aid in remineralization, resulting in retained or
regained enamel hardness.
Chlorophyll – is an effective natural tissue cleansing and detoxifying agent. Nutritional stress caused by poor diet, as
well as environmental pollutants, leads to toxic buildup and improper adrenal function. Chlorophyll increases peristaltic
action and cell growth, supports the immune system, modulates blood sugar and insulin secretion and thus decreases
the need for production of adrenal stress hormones.
Collagen – is a protein made up of triple helix chains of amino acids (predominantly proline, glycine and lysine)
interlaced with negatively charged proteoglycans. Consuming preformed collagen and proteoglycans provides complex
subunits that can be directly incorporated into tissue proteoglycans and greatly augment and stimulate their manufacture.
Collagen may also induce oral tolerance leading to a state of systemic hyporeponsiveness whereby autoantibodies
destructive to joint tissue are not formed.
Diadzein and genistein – are estrogenic isoflavones. These
phytoestrogen compounds have a structure similar to estrogen
and provide estrogenic activity by binding to receptors.
Phytoestrogens create a weak estrogenic effect and are not
associated with the contraindications characteristic of estradiol
and diethylstilbesterol.
DL-methionine – is a powerful antioxidant and urinary acidifier. Sulfates derived
from methionine help create an acidic urine, which has been shown to prevent struvite
formation and also decrease the ability of some bacteria to proliferate in the urinary
tract.
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) – a long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid, is incorporated into the phospholipid
structure of all cell membranes, and is found in the highest concentration in gray matter and retinal tissue. DHA is
necessary for proper elongation and formation of synapses essential for brain development and maintenance. If adequate
supplies of DHA are present, the placenta preferentially absorbs it during fetal development in lieu of other available
fatty acids. Due to cellular developmental needs of DHA, adequate supplementation helps to maintain optimum gestation
periods, which lead to fully developed offspring. DHA is also beneficial for maternal skin and coat maintenance.
Wysong RX – 19
Dried pancreas and adrenal gland extracts – contain cell determinates of these glandular tissues which supply the
genetic framework for formation of new glandular cells. Nutrients contained within specific tissues stimulate the
corresponding tissue when consumed.
Enzymes such as amylase, protease, lipase, and cellulase- in non-thermally degraded ingredients and from
supplementation, enhance digestive breakdown of ingested materials and spare exocrine pancreatic load.
Eudesmanolide along with germacranolide, taraxol, taraxerol, taraxasterol, stigmasterol, beta-stiosterol,
and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid – exert various nutraceutical effects including detoxification and diuresis. Studies
have also shown inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by inhibiting interleukin-1 production.
These compounds also exhibit free radical scavenging activity and reduction in the breakage of supercoiled DNA
strands induced by non-site-specific and site-specific hydroxyl radicals.
Fatty acids – such as the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), modulate high
levels of interleukin 1 (IL-1), a proinflammatory cytokine. Fatty acids also act as agonists for peroxisome proliferatoractive receptors (PPARs) by binding to and transactivating PPARs. This leads to reduced gene expression, and thus
reduced tumor growth.
Flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, terpenes, and flavoglycosides – enhance energy production, inhibit platelet
aggregation, improve the transmission of nerve signals, improve free radical scavenging activity and increase circulation
to the optic nerve.
Flavonoligans including silybin, isosilybin, dilydianin and silychristin – are antihepatotoxic and have antioxidant
and membrane stabilizing properties. These compounds also inhibit the production of, and damage caused by, TNFalpha and cause increases in transforming growth factor beta 1 and c-myc in hepatic tissue.
Galactomannan – is a highly viscous, soluble, dietary fiber found in the seeds of fenugreek. Galactomannan forms a
gel in the stomach, slowing gastric emptying and thickening intestinal contents. This delays the absorption of glucose
preventing spikes in postprandial blood sugar. Fenugreek seeds also contain the amino acid, 4 Hydroxyisoleucine,
which may stimulate insulin secretion. Human studies have shown that fenugreek can help lower cholesterol and blood
sugar levels in persons with moderate atherosclerosis and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Double-blind trials have
found that fenugreek helps improve blood sugar control in patients with insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent
diabetes.
Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) – is an 18 carbon, omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid with three unsaturations. GLA
is converted to dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), a precursor to the 1-series prostaglandins, including PGE1.
PGE1 suppresses the dermatologic inflammatory response by increasing intracellular cyclic AMP, which in turn reduces
the release of lysosomal enzymes and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis and adherence to the
endothelium. DGLA is also metabolized to 15-hydroxyl DGLA which blocks the conversion of arachidonic acid to
proinflammatory leukotrienes. GLA is also anti-pruritic, restoring serum IFN-gamma levels.
Gingerols – are components of a mix of volatile oils and phenolic compounds. The ameliorative and anti-inflammatory
effect is by inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene biosynthesis.
Ginosenosides – are active saponins. These compounds have a powerful hypoglycemic effect, possibly by slowing
G/I transit time.. The fraction, DPG-3-2, has been found to stimulate insulin release from the pancreas of experimental
animals. In health and in diabetes, ginosenosides lower the glycemic response after carbohydrate consumption. One
controlled study with diabetic subjects demonstrated that ginosenosides lowered blood sugar 20% more than placebo
pills.
Glucans – stimulate macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils, NK (natural killer) cells and LAK (lymphokine-activated
killer) cells. This massive stimulation of immune cells induces the production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in
20 – Wysong RX
macrophages, which are thought to result in antimicrobial and tumoricidal activity. Glucans also stimulate gut-associated
lymphoid tissue (GALT), promoting cell migration to damaged tissue.
Glucosamine – is a component of virtually all tissues as a building block of connective tissue.
Glucosamine is the foundation for cartilage proteoglycans and O-linked and N-linked
glycosaminoglycans (GAGS). Glucosamine has several mechanisms of action including: enhancing
production of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, slowing the progression of cartilage lesions,
reducing the generation of oxygen-free radicals by macrophages, inhibiting lysosomal enzymes,
stabilizing cell membranes, and inhibiting interleukin-1-induced nitric oxide activity.
Glucosides – improve learning and memory by stimulating nitric oxide synthesis. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator and thus
enhances the delivery of blood and oxygen to tissues and facilitates the removal of toxins.
Glycoproteins – enhance production of T-cells in peripheral lymph nodes, protect against gamma-radiation and assist
in detoxification of drugs and toxic chemicals, processes which are weakened with age.
Glycyrrihizan, flavanoids, triterpenoids, phytosterols, and coumarins – are anti-inflammatory and inhibit thrombin.
Flavanoids encourage cellular differentiation, as well as mucus formation and secretion protecting the digestive tract.
Green-lipped mussel (GLM) – contains natural protein, vitamins, minerals, mucopolysaccharides, omega-3 fatty
acids, and glycosaminoglycans. Several studies have shown green-lipped mussel inhibits inflammation. Although the
precise mechanism of its anti-inflammatory actions are unknown, GLM contains a unique omega-3 fatty acid,
eicosatetraenoic acid (ETA). ETA acts as a dual inhibitor of arachidonic acid oxygenation by both the lipoxygenase
and cyclooxygenase pathways. Arachidonic acid metabolites perform a major role in the inflammatory sequence.
Also, glycosaminoglycans are components of synovial fluid and cartilage matrix. Glycosaminoglycans may help inhibit
degradative enzyme activity in cartilage, stimulate cartilage matrix production and help prevent thrombus, plaque and
fibrin formation in the synovial and subchondral blood vessels. GLM does not affect platelet aggregation and is
nongastrotoxic.
Gymnemic acids – have been shown to reduce hyperglycemia in both animal and human studies. Two animal studies
in diabetic subjects revealed Gymnema extracts doubled the number of insulin secreting beta cells and returned blood
glucose levels to almost normal. Gymnema also increases the activity of enzymes responsible for glucose uptake and
utilization. Extracts have been found to inhibit epinephrine-induced hyperglycemia. In a controlled study, a standardized
Gymnema extract was given as an adjunct to insulin to twenty-seven type 1 diabetics daily for 6-30 months. Thirtyseven others continued on insulin therapy alone and were tracked for 10-12 months. Insulin requirements were decreased
by almost 50% and the average blood glucose decreased from 232 mg/dl to 152 mg/dl in the Gymnema group. The
control group showed no significant decreases in blood glucose or insulin requirements over the length of the study.
Twenty-two type 2 diabetics
were administered Gymnema
extract daily for 18-20 months
in addition to their oral
hypoglycemic medications. This
group experienced significant
decreases in average blood
sugar and glycosylated
hemoglobin (HbA1c), and an
increase in pancreatic release of
insulin. Medication dosages
were decreased and five were
able to discontinue oral
hypoglycemic agents entirely.
Wysong RX – 21
Harpagoside – has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Harpagoside
inhibits both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase arachidonic acid metabolic
pathways.
Holothurin – is a sulfated triterpenoidal oligoglycoside, a bioflavonoid-like
molecule. Holothurin helps block afferent sensory nerve conduction to reduce
pain and contains high amounts of mucopolysaccharides and chondrocyte
substance providing substrate for connective tissue. Several animal and human
studies have shown a positive effect on arthritis (both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis) including reduction in
inflammation, pain symptomatology and an increase in joint flexibility.
Hypericin – is used eight to one over standard antidepressants in Germany. Hypericin and pseudohypericin, dianthyrone
derivatives, act by inhibiting the uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine.
Immunoglobulins such as Immunoglobulin G (IgG) – from milk and plasma fractions, have anti-viral activity, and
help repair damaged nuclear and mitochondrial nucleic acids.
Lactoglobulins – including beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactoglobulin from whey have glutathione antioxidant activity
and exert antimicrobial and immunodulatory effects.
Lactones – improve concentration, memory and reaction time and produce physical and mental relaxation, a feeling of
well being, sedation and sleep enhancement.
Lentinin – stimulates maturation and differentiation of immune system cells. More than 300 studies and dozens of
long-term clinical trials establish the effectiveness in immune stimulation and modulation.
L-Glutamine – is a precursor for protein synthesis and an intermediate in a large number of metabolic pathways. As
the amino acid with the highest concentration in the blood stream, L-glutamine serves as a nitrogen transporter between
various tissues, creating natural anabolic nitrogen balance.
Ligans – provide high gum mucilage that soothes, moistens, and protects the intestinal mucosa, buffers excess acid,
and helps to prevent flatulence and stool odor.
Liver – contains elements responsible for the development and maturation of hepatic tissue. Nutrients contained
within specific tissues stimulate the corresponding tissue when consumed by providing immunomodulatory effects,
adrogenic/estrogenic properties, as well as other rejuvenating factors.
L-Arginine – promotes the release of growth hormones. It also regulates glucose utilization by stimulating the release
of glucagons and insulin. L-Arginine enhances the immune system by increasing the number of neutrophils and IgG
antibody levels.
L-Carnitine – is part of the enzyme carnitine acyltransferase I, which converts long chain fatty acyl-CoA derivatives
into O-acylcarnitine for transportation across mitochondria. Once inside the mitochondria, L-carnitine is released
allowing the fatty acyl-CoA derivatives to be used in beta-oxidation reactions that burn excess fat, and prevents it from
being stored as adipose tissue. L-carnitine is also a building block of lean muscle tissue.
L-Leucine – is a branched-chain amino acid that assists in regulating blood glucose levels because it is purely ketogenic.
Upon degradation, neither of its derivatives acetyl-CoA nor acetoacetate are convertible to glucose. L-leucine is also
necessary for growth and repair of muscle tissue.
22 – Wysong RX
L-Taurine- is an important dietary non-protein amino acid produced as the end-product of L-cysteine metabolism. It
is found free-roaming in intracellular cytoplasm, and is necessary for proper development of the brain and retina in the
fetus. Adequate taurine levels in the mother also increase prolactin, necessary for milk production.
Lutein (C40H56O2) – is a member of the xanthophyll class of
carotenoids, which are fat-soluble yellowish pigments found in some
plants, algae and photosynthetic bacteria. It is a polyisoprenoid
containing 40 carbon atoms and cyclic structures at each end of its
conjugated chains. Although not synthesized in situ, lutein is found in
the macula of the retina as well as the crystalline lens. Lutein acts as an antioxidant, protecting cell membrane lipids
from the damaging effects of free radicals.
Magnesium – inhibits the formation of calcium-oxalate crystals in urine by competing with calcium for oxalate.
Mannose – is a carbohydrate that adheres to bacterial receptors on the bladder lining, inhibiting bacterial adhesion.
Medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) – decrease adipose tissue and increase fat oxidation, while having a sparing
effect on fat-free tissue mass, thus encouraging muscle tissue growth and repair. MCTs are rapidly and directly absorbed
in the large intestine for energy use, thus preventing direct deposition into adipose tissue. MCTs also increase calorie
consuming thermogenesis.
Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) – a metabolite of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), is one of the most abundant
biochemicals in tissue. Analgesic effects of MSM are due to vasodilation, an increase in blood supply, reductions in
inflammation and muscle spasm, increased cell membrane permeability, softening of scar tissue, and inhibition of neural
pain impulses. MSM may also help the repair and maintenance of cartilage.
Methylated cellulose – forms a non-fermentable mucilaginous mass which absorbs water to create bulk, causing
stimulation of digestive motility.
N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) – is the N-acetyl derivative of the amino acid L-cysteine. NAC is an excellent source of
sulfhydryl (SH) groups and is converted into metabolites capable of stimulating glutathione synthesis, thus promoting
detoxification and free radical scavenging. The acteyl-substituted amino group makes the molecule more stable against
oxidation and serves as a particularly effective antioxidant.
Omega-3 fatty acids – play critical roles in cell and organelle membrane structure and in a wide array of physiological
processes through eicosanoid modulation. As structural membrane components and precursors to signaling molecules
such as prostaglandins, omega-3 fatty acids can, in effect, control health. Omega-3s improve blood lipid and fatty acid
profiles, lower plasma triacyglycerol concentrations and LDL cholesterol levels, and block excessive and erratic sodium
and calcium currents in the heart. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the primary building block of the brain where high
concentrations of DHA are found in the cerebral cortex. DHA plays a significant role in cerebral development and is
required for maintenance of normal brain function in adults. Adequate levels of DHA are necessary for proper
neurotransmissions.
Phosphatidylcholine – is a functional and structural element present in all biological membranes, a precursor to
acetylcholine, and plays a rate-limiting role in the activation of numerous membrane-located enzymes, such as superoxidase
dismutase and glutathione, which are antioxidants protecting cell membranes from damage by reactive oxygen species.
Proanthocyanidins – prevent adherence of both antibiotic-resistant and sensitive E. coli strains to the bladder lining,
allowing bacteria to be flushed from the bladder upon urination and preventing establishment of urinary tract infection.
Proanthocyanidins prevent the pilli on the outside of the bacteria from forming properly, resulting in their inability to
adhere to the bladder lining.
Wysong RX – 23
Quercetin – is a flavanoid that prevents the release of histamine by inhibiting
degranulation of mast cells, basophils and neutrophils through cell membrane stabilization.
It also decreases leukotrine formation and lipid peroxidation.
Thymic substance – increases neutrophilic, CD3 and CD4 cellular functions and
salivary IgA levels. Thymic substance also normalizes the function and quantity of Tcells. Nutrients contained within specific tissues stimulate the corresponding tissue
when eaten. Therefore, consumption of thymic substance aids in thymic cell growth,
function and repair, aiding immune response.
Triterpenoids – promote relaxation, enhance and improve memory and treat mental and physical fatigue with mild
tranquilizing, anti-stress and antianxiety actions via the enhancement of cholinergic mechanisms.
Thiosulphonates – are organo-sulphur compounds. Thiosulphonates, such as allicin, ajoene, diallyl sulfide (DAS),
diallyl disulfide (DADS), S-allylmercapto cysteine and S-methylmercapto cysteine provide beneficial pancreatic activities.
Thiosulphonates are believed to augment detoxification through free-radical scavenging as well as combine with thiamine
to promote insulin secretion.
Trona mineral salts – have antibacterial properties and are highly effective natural agents in removing dental plaque.
Trona alkaline minerals are known to inhibit the oral pathogen, Streptococcus sobrinus by 68 percent.
Valepotriates and valeric acid – weakly bind the same receptors in the brain as benzodiazepines, and in vitro they
displace benzodiazepines at receptor sites.
Vanadyl sulphate –
improves glucose control in
non-insulin-dependent
diabetes mellitus primarily
by augmentation of
peripheral
glucose
utilization. Studies have
shown oral doses of
vanadyl sulfate do not alter
insulin sensitivity in nondiabetics but improve both
hepatic and skeletal muscle
insulin sensitivity in noninsulin-dependent diabetics.
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) – is a cofactor in the conversion of
glyoxalate, a precursor of oxalate, to glycine, thus reducing oxalate
formation. Vitamin B6 is used to treat hyperoxaluria when dietary
reduction of oxalate and calcium supplementation are not effective
in the prevention of calcium oxalate calculi.
Whey proteins – contain the amino acids cysteine, glutamate
and glycine, which are nutritional precursors to glutathione.
Glutathione is an important intracellular antioxidant, particularly
within immune cells. The ability of lymphocytes to regenerate
glutathione has a direct effect on their ability to respond to
antigenic stimuli.
24 – Wysong RX
Xylan – is a hydrophilic polysaccharide that absorbs water in the large intestine, increasing stool bulk and stimulating
peristalsis to enhance defecation.
Xylitol –is the only known cariostatic (cavity-inhibiting) sugar. It is a unique, natural carbohydrate containing five
carbon atoms instead of the six contained in sweeteners or sugars (such as fructose and glucose) and thus oral bacteria
are unable to metabolize it. For example, Streptococcus mutans adsorbs on the surface of the teeth. When the pH of
this bacteria’s plaque milieu falls below 5.5, calcium and phosphate salts start to dissolve from the surface of the
enamel. Dental caries begin to form and the tooth weakens. Birch bark sugars impede this pathogenesis with the
density of acid-producing lactobacilli and streptococci falling as much as 90 percent.
Nutrition-First
Packaging
Oxygen and light are the
enemy of fragile nutrients.
Auto-oxidation and photooxidation “corrode” nutrients
and also convert them to free
radicals, which in an
escalating chain reaction turn
healthful food into a potpourri
of toxins. (See Figure 28.)
Nutritional Importance of Packaging
The Best
Food Package
• Whole Ingredients
• Processed Food
• Processed Food
• Natural
Antioxidants
• Food Fractions
• Food Fractions
• Oxygen
Atmosphere
• Oxygen
Atmosphere
• Synthetic
Antioxidants
• “No Preservatives”
(No Antioxidants)
• Oxygen-Free
Atmosphere
• Careful
Processing
WRX incorporates stateof-the-art packaging technology including oxygen- and
light-barrier film and vacuum
evacuation.
The Worst Choice
A Poorer Choice
O2
light
O2
light
Whole Grain
This is accomplished by
Figure 28. Second to the best package of all (the natural food product as found in the
a synergistic proprietary
field), the Nutri-Pak design addresses critical factors, such as the exclusion of oxygen and
light from the packaging.
formulation of natural vitamins, enzymes, phytoextracts, flavanoids, phenolics, and organic acid chelators. inherent increased value of non-heat-degraded natural
Independent testing has shown antioxidant activity ingredients.
exceeding that of synthetics such as BHA, BHT, TBHQ
As such, WRX can be fed exclusively (stipulations
and propyl gallate without attendant toxicities.
follow) in the same sense as any other commercially
balanced pet food.
Method Of Use
WRX are first of all highly nutritious, bioavailable,
archetypal, natural foods. Aside from therapeutic benefits, How To Feed
WRX are a highly concentrated food and should be
patients will experience relief from the burden of food
processing toxins, and the ongoing metabolization of foods introduced slowly. Crumble a small amount on top of
they are not genetically adapted to. It is like a “nutritional regular food to begin. WRX can be fed as is, or mixed
homecoming” with the “joy” manifest in the exceptional with warm water (below 110°F) to rehydrate. Let stand
for 10-15 minutes if rehydrating. Dry or moistened, WRX
palatability and health results.
can be fed as singular meals or mixed or top-dressed on
WRX are completely balanced according to NRC other foods.
standards but go far beyond these minimums due to the
If problems arise, discontinue for a day and reintroduce
at lower levels. Once tolerated, increase the portion
Wysong RX – 25
incrementally over a two-week period until the following
dosage is achieved.
Dosage
Cachexia
Recommended feeding levels can be doubled if weight
gain is desired. The amino acid profile in WRX base
ingredients is strongly anabolic.
Unlike pharmaceuticals that are very dose-sensitive
and fraught with potential complications, WRX are Other Foods
extremely safe.
Wysong Diets (dry, canned, frozen, non-heat
degraded) are excellent alternative meals to WRX, or base
Use 1/3 cup per 10 lbs. body weight per day, combined foods to which WRX can be supplemented. Variety is
with 1/2 recommended daily feedings of high quality meat- important to any feeding regimen if optimal health is the
based maintenance foods such as Wysong dry, canned or goal. (See Adjunct Nutrition.)
frozen.
Supplements
Continue at this level for 3-4 weeks for best effect.
Although WRX are as nutritionally concentrated as
Then the WRX may be occasionally offered as above, or possible, additional specific supplementation can bring
as a solo meal (1/3 cup/10 lbs) or top-dressed as a added benefits. The accompanying chart indicates the
supplement in lesser amounts.
encapsulated Nutraceutical formulation matching each
WRX. To increase nutraceutical effects, coat the capsules
Client budgetary considerations will perhaps dictate in butter and force, or place in the center of a moistened
use in larger animals. The principle to remember is that a bolus of WRX or Wysong Peanut Butter Plus™.
precise “dose” is not the key element. Even small amounts
of WRX as treats and top-dressing will bring benefits. More
The following supplements are particularly beneficial
is better, but inability to feed at recommended dosage as nutritional boosters to heat processed dry and canned
levels should not preclude the feeding of lesser amounts. foods. They are designed to invigorate such foods with
raw natural food elements.
Anorexia
Biotics ™ – micronutrient, enzyme, probiotic
The high palatability of WRX may solve anorexia if
enhancement.
offered free choice. If not, rehydrate as above into a
Pet Inoculant™ – concentrated probiotics
“paste” consistency and spoon onto palate. For enteric
EFA™ – antioxidant protected omega 3, 6, 9 fatty acids
feeding, blend the selected WRX with water and Wysong
PDG™ (predigested nutrition) to the desired consistency.
Adjunct Nutrition for WRX
WRX Diet
Adivase™
Adjunct Diets
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Adrevar™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Allercin™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Immulyn™
Anacline™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Growth dry and
canned diets
Anaplex, PDG™ Biotic
Supplement
Cardiril™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Senior dry and
canned (for canines), Geriatrx™ dry
and canned (for felines)
Carvasol™, Wysong EFA™
Supplements
Dentacet™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Dentatreat™, Mega C™
Dermutec™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Synorgon™ dry
(for canines), Vitality™ dry (for felines)
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Immulyn™, Spectrox™
26 – Wysong RX
Adjunct Nutraceuticals
Anaplex™
Adjunct Nutrition for WRX (cont’d)
WRX Diet
Adjunct Diets
Diabid™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Carboprin™, Panzyme™,
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Wysong Biotic™ Supplements
Digesome™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Pepzhac™, Panzyme™,
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Pet Inoculant™, Wysong
Biotic™ Supplements
Estroxil™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Estrolog™, Menstruphen™,
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Wysong Biotic™ Supplements
Gerodyne™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Senior dry and
canned (for canines), Geriatrx™ dry
and canned (for felines)
Carvasol™, Spectrox™,
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
PDG™
Gestain™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Growth dry and
canned (for canines), Nurture™ dry (for felines)
Pet Inoculant™, Mother’s
Milk™, Wysong EFA™
Supplements
Heparone™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Hepticene™, Spectrox™,
Wysong Biotic™ Supplements
Immuncef™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Synorgon™ dry
(for canines), Vitality™ dry (for felines)
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Pet Inoculant™, Immulyn™,
Spectrox™, Pancidrim™
Lithonel™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Fiber-Min EFA™, Wysong
Biotic™ Supplements
Neomentin™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Synorgon™ dry
(for canines), Vitality™ dry (for felines)
Pet Inoculant™, Wysong EFA™
Supplements, Immulyn™,
Spectrox™, Salad™
Nephreon™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Senior dry and
canned (for canines), Geriatrx™ dry
and canned (for felines)
Nephurol™, Wysong EFA™
Supplements
Neuropril™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Neuridone™, Spectrox™,
Wysong EFA™ Supplements
Ocusone™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Opthid™, Spectrox™,
Wysong EFA™ Supplements
Osseron™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Arthegic™, Glucosamine
Complex™, Contifin™, Wysong
EFA™ Supplements
Oxylase™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Wysong Biotic pH+™
Panadime™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Panzyme™, Wysong
Biotic™ Supplements
Pathovert™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Synorgon™ dry (for
canines), Vitality™ dry (for felines)
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Growth dry (for
canines), Nurture™ dry (for felines)
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Immulyn™, Spectrox™,
Pancidrim™
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Pet Incoculant™, Mother’s
Milk™, PDG™
Pedivax™
Adjunct Nutraceuticals
Wysong RX – 27
Adjunct Nutrition for WRX (cont’d)
WRX Diet
Adjunct Diets
Adjunct Nutraceuticals
Respityl™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Synorgon™ dry
For canines), Vitality™ dry (for felines)
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Immulyn™, Spectrox™,
Pancidrim™
Sedadul™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Somniquil™, Wysong EFA™
Supplements
Streseper™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Growth dry
(for canines), Nurture™ dry (for felines)
Wysong EFA™ Supplements,
Pet Inoculant™, Mother’s
Milk™, PDG™, Anaplex™
Struvatrol™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets, Growth dry (for
canines), Uretic™ dry (for felines)
Biotic pH-™
Uratrar™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets
Nephurol™
Vermiden™
Archetype™ Diets, All Meat™ Diets,
Tundra™ Diets Pancidrim™
Biotic supplements™,
Pet Inoculant™, Colex™,
Pancidrim™
General Cautions
Safe Handling
Any food, natural or not, can potentially trigger allergic
reaction. If slowly introducing WRX as a top-dress to
normal feeding results in digestive or other disturbances,
withdraw for several days and reintroduce. If concomitant
signs reappear, the client should be instructed to discontinue
and seek alternative approaches by consulting with the
veterinarian or Wysong technical staff.
Wash working surfaces, utensils, and hands after
feeding. Excess food should be refrigerated for the next
feeding or discarded. Keep inner bag sealed once opened.
Although WRX are quite stable at room temperature, store
in refrigerator or freezer to retain maximum nutraceutical
value. Keep from direct heat or sunlight.
References:
Best D. Solution Near on E. coli Crisis. Prepared Foods. 1993.; Bjorck L. Antibacterial Effect of lactoperoxidase system of sychrotrophic bacteria in milk. J Dairy Res. 45:109. 1978.; Bjork L, et al. The antibacterial activity
of lactoperoxidase system in milk against Psendomonads and other gram negative bacteria. Applied Microbiol. 30:195. 1975.; Bowles BL, et al. Inhibition of foodborne bacterial pathogens by naturally occurring food additives.
J Food Sci. 18(1998)101-112. 1998.; Branen AL, et al. Phenolic Compounds. 2 nd ed. Antimicrobials in Foods. Marcel Dekker, Inc. New York. 37-74. 1993.; Buchanan RL, et al. Foodborne disease significance of Escherichia
coli O157:H7 and other enterohemorrhagic E. coli. Food Technol. 51(10):69-75. 1997.; Bullen JJ, et al. Iron-binding proteins in milk and resistance to Escherichia coli infection in infants. Br. Med. J. 1:69. 1972.; Ceylan E,
et al. Thermal inactivities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef patties in the presence of garlic. Food Safety Consortium Meeting, Afton, OK. Oct. 17-19. pp. 148-157. 1999a.; Dobrin RS, et al. The antibacterial activity
of lactoferrin. Fed. Proc. 34:1044. 1975.; Donovan JL, et al. Phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of prunes and prune juice (Prunus domestica). J Agric Food Chem, 46:1247-1252. 1998.; Doyle JD, et al. Escherichia
coli O157:H7. Food Microbiology Fundamentals and Frontiers. ASM Press, Washington, D.C., pp. 171-191. 1997.; Doyle MP, et al. Staphylococcus aureus. Food Microbiology Fundamentals and Frontiers. ASM Press,
Washington, D.C. pp 353-375. 1997.; Doyle MP, et al. Salmonella Species. Food Microbiology Fundamentals and Frontiers. ASM Press, Washington, D.C., 129-152. 1997.; Duffy G, et al. The effect of a competitive microflora,
pH and temperature in the growth kinetics of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Food Microbiology. 16:299-307.; Gerson C, et al. The lactoperoxidase system functions in bacterial clearance of airways. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 22:665671. 2000.; Jay MJ, Modern Food Microbiology, 3rd ed. Von Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, pp.353-375. 1986.; Korhonen H. Antimicrobial factors in bovine colostrums. Science and Agric Soc. 49:34. 1977.; Lindsay
RC, Food Additives. In. Fennema, O.R. ed Food Chemistry. 3rd ed. Marcel Dekker, Inc. New York, 78-81. 1996.; Martinez RJ, et al. Sequential metabolic expression of the lethal process in human serum treated E. coli: rate of lysozyme.
Infect Immun. 28:735. 1980.; Nakatani N, et al. Identification, quantitative determination, and antioxidative activities of chlorogenic acid isomers in prune (Prunus domestica L.) J Agric Food Chem. 48(11):5512-5516. 2000.;
Paul KG, et al. The isolation and some liganding properties of lactoperoxidase. FEBS Lett. 110:200. 1980.; Petrides PE. Molecular genetics of peroxidase deficiency. J Mol Med. 76:688-698. 1998.; Raccach M. The antimicrobial
activity of phenolic antioxidants in foods: a review. J Food Safety, 6:141-170. 1984.; Rahman MS, et al. Natural antimicrobials for food preservation. Handbook of Food Preservation. Marcel Dekker, Inc. New York. pp. 285308. 1993.; Reiter B. Review of nonspecific antimicrobial factors in colostrum. Ann Rec Vet. 9:205. 1978.; Rice-Evans CA, et al. Antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds. Trends in Plant Science 2(4):152-159. 1997.;
Spik G, et al. Bacteriostatis of a milk-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli by immunoglobulins and iron binding proteins in association. Immunology. 35:663.; Taubman MA. Immunoglobulins of human dental plaque. Arch Oral
Biol. 19:439. 1974.; Tenovuo J. Formation of the bacterial inhibitor, hypothiocyanite ion, by cell-bound lactoperoxidase. Caries Res. 13:137. 1979.; Tenovuo J, et al. Antibacterial activity of lactoperoxidase adsorbed by human
salivary sediment and hydroxyapatite. Caries Res. 11:257. 1977.; Tenovuo J, et al. Immobilized lactoperoxidase as a biologically active and stable form of an antimicrobial enzyme. Arch Oral Biol. 26:309. 1981.; Tenovuo
J, et al. Inhibition of dental plaque acid production by the salivary lactoperoxidase antimicrobial system. Infect Immun. 34:208. 1981.
28 – Wysong RX
Adivase™
Description:
Adivase™ restores natural nutrigenomic balances by encouraging the metabolism of fat.
Indications: Obesity
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Chicken, Chicken Liver, Lamb, Lamb Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Linoleic Acid, Lecithin,
L-Carnitine, Milk Calcium, Barley Grass Powder, Wheat Grass Powder, Dried Seaweed Meal, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus
faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae
Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage,
Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese
Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin
Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Anthony JC, et al. Signaling pathways involved in translational control of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by leucine. J Nutr. 131:856S-860S. 2001.; Baba N, et al. Enhanced thermogenesis and diminished deposition of fat in
response to overfeeding with diet containing medium chain triglyceride. Am J Clin Nutr. 35:678-682. 1982.; Babayan VK. Medium chain triglycerides. In Dietary Fat Requirements in Health and Development. (J. Beare-Rogers, ed.).
AOCS Press, Illinois. Pp. 73-86. 1988.; Bach AC, et al. Medium chain triglycerides: an update. Am J Clin Nutr. 36:950-962. 1982.; Belury MA, et al. The conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer, t10c12-CLA, is inversely associated
with changes in body weight and serum leptin in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Nutr. 133(1): 257-260S. 2003.; Bennet PH, et al. Diabetes Mellitus. Elsevier Science Publishing Company, New York. 1990.; Bezard J, et al.
Absorption of glycerides containing short and long chain fatty acids. In Fat Absorption. (A Kuksis, ed.). CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. Pp 119-158.; Biolo G, et al. An abundant supply of amino acids enhances the metabolic effect of
exercise on muscle protein. Am J Physiol. 273:E122-E129. 1997.; Blundell JE, et al. Fat as a risk factor for overconsumption: satiation, satiety, and patterns of eating. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 97(7): S63-S69. 1997.;
Blundell JE, et al. Satiation, satiety, and the action of fiber on food intake. Int J Obesity. 11 (suppl 1):9-25. 1987.; Born AT, et al. Differential metabolic effects of energy restriction in dogs using varying fat and fiber content. Obes Res.
4:337-345. 1996.; Bray GA, et al. Weight gain of rats fed medium chain triglycerides is less than rats fed long chain triglycerides. Int J of Obesity. 4:27-32. 1980.; Burger IH. Energy needs of companion animals: Matching food intakes
to requirements throughout the life cycle. J Nutr. 124:2584S-2593S. 1994.; Burkholder WJ, et al. Foods and techniques for managing obesity in companion animals. 212:658-662. 1998.; Carroll MC, et al. Carnitine: a review.
Compendium. 23(1): 45-52. 2001.; Center SA. Therapeutic uses of L-carnitine in cats. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference. Pp. 513-514. 1997.; Center SA, et al. Metabolic influence of oral L-carnitine during a rapid
18-week weight loss program in obese cats. Proceedings of the ACVIM forum Abst. 57. 1997.; Chanez M. et al. Metabolic effects in rats of a diet with a moderate level of medium-chain triglycerides. J Nutr. 121:585-594. 1991.; Cotter
R, et al. A metabolic comparison of pure long chain triglyceride lipid emulsion (LCT) and various medium chain triglycerides (MCT)-LCT combination emulsions in dogs. Am J Clin Nutr. 45:927-939. 1987.; Crozier G, et al. Metabolic
effects induced by long-term feeding of medium-chain triglycerides in the rat. Metabolism. 36:807-814. 1987.; Davies MK, et al. Calcium intake and body weight. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 85(12): 46354638. 2000.; Decombaz J, et al. Energy metabolism of medium-chain triglycerdes versus carbohydrates during exercise. Eur J Appl Physiol. 52:9-14. 1983.; European Congress of Obesity. Helsinki, Finland. June 4, 2003.; Flatt JP.
Use and storage of carbohydrate and fat. Am J Clin Nutr. 61:952S-959S. 1995.; Foster GD, et al. A randomized trial of low-carbohydrate diet for obesity. NEJM. 348:2082-2090. 2003.; Freund G, et al. Standardized ketosis in man following
medium chain triglyceride ingestion. Metabolism. 15:980-991. 1966.; Furuse M, et al. Effect of dietary medium chain triglyceride on protein and energy utilization in growing chicks. Brit Poul Sci. 33:49-57. 1992.; Fushiki R, et al.
Swimming endurance capacity of mice is increased by chronic consumption of medium-chain triglycerides. Am Inst of Nutr. 125:531-539. 1994.; Geliebter A, Et al. Overfeeding with medium-chain triglyceride diets results in diminished
deposition of fat. Am J Clin Nutr. 37:1-4. 1983.; Hashim SA, et al. Medium chain triglyceride in early life. Effects on growth of adipose tissue. Lipids. 22:429-434. 1987.; Heaney RP. Normalizing calcium intake: projected population
effects for body weight. The American Society for Nutritional Sciences Journal of Nutrition. 133:268S-270S. 2003.; Heaney RP, et al. Calcium and weight: clinical studies. J of the American College of Nutrition. 21(2): 152S-155S.
2002.; Hoenig M, et al. Effects of obesity on lipid profiles in neutered male and female cats. AJVR. 64(3): 299-303. 2003.; Hill JO, et al. Thermogenesis in humans during overfeeding with medium-chain triglycerides. Metabolism. 38:641648. 1989.; Ingle DL, et al. Dietary energy value of medium-chain triglycerides. Journal of Food Science. 64(6): 960-963. 1999.; Johnson RC, et al. Metabolism of medium chain triglyceride lipid emulsion. Nutr. Internat. 2:150-158.
1986.; Johnson, T, et al. The healthy side of saturated fats. Townsend Letter for Patients and Doctors. February/March 2003, 68-70.; Kaunitz H, et al. Nutritional properties of triglycerides of saturated fatty acids of medium chain-length.
J Am Oil Chem Assoc. 35:10-13. 1958.; Kleiber M. Calorigenic effects of food. In The Fire of Life. RE Kreiger Publishing Co. New York. 1975. ; Krotkiewski M. Value of VLCD supplementation with medium chain triglycerides. Int
J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 25(9): 1393-1400. 2001.; Laflamme DP, et al. Evaluation of weight loss protocols in dogs. J Am An Hosp Assoc. 33:253-259. 1997.; Lavau MM, et al. Effect of medium chain triglycerides on lipogenesis
and body fat in the rat. J Nutr. 108:613-621. 1978.; Layman DK, et al. Increased dietary protein modifies glucose and insulin homeostasis in adult women during weight loss. The American Society for Nutritional Sciences J. Nutr.
133:405-410. 2003.; Layman DK, et al. A reduced ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein improves body composition and blood lipid profiles during weight loss in adult women. J Nutr. 133:411-417. 2003.; Layman DK. Role of
leucine in protein metabolism during exercise and recovery. Can J Appl Physiol. 27:592-608. 2002.; Long SJ, et al. Effect of habitual dietary-protein intake on appetite and satiety. Appetite. 35(1): 79-88. 2000.; Lowe, JA. Anti-obesity
nutrients. PetFood Industry. Pp 6-8. May 2002. ; Mabayo RT, et al. Energy utilization of medium chain triglycerides in comparison with long chain triglycerides in growing chicks. Brit Poul Sci. 33:883-887. 1992.; Markwell PJ, et
al. Clinical Studies in the management of obesity in dogs. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 18:S39-S43. 1994.; Mok KT, et al. Structured medium-chain and long-chain triglycerides emulsions are superior to physical mixtures in sparing
body protein in the burned rat. Metabolism. 33:910-915. 1984.; Ntambi JM, et al. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on immune responses, body composition and stearoyl-CoA destaturase. Can J Appl Physiol. 27(6): 617-628.
2002.; Root MV, et al. Effect of prepuberal gonadectomy on heat production measured, indirect calorimetry in male and female domestic cats. Am J Vet Res. 57:371-374.; Salmeri KR. Gonadectomy in immature dogs: effects on skeletal,
physical and behavioral development. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 198:1193-1203. 1991.; Samaha FF, et al. A low-carbohydrate as compared with a low-fat diet in severe obesity. NEJM. 348:2074-2081. 2003.; Scarlet JM, et al. Overweight
cats: Prevalence and risk factors. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 18:S22-28. 1994.; Seaton TB, et al. Thermic effect of medium chain and long chain triglcyerides in man. Am J Clin Nutr. 44:630-634. 1986.; Senior JR, ed. Medium Chain
Triglycerides. University of Pennsylvania, Press, Philadelphia, PA. Pp. 3-7. 1968.; Simon, et al. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids on body composition and protein metabolism in overweight rats. J Physiol Biochem. 56(4): 337-346.
2000.; Steinhart C. Conjugated linoleic acid the good news about animal fat. J Chem Educ. 73:A302. 1996.; St-Onge MP, et al. Medium-chain triglycerides increase energy expenditure and decrease adiposity in overweight men. Obes
Res. 11(3): 395-402. 2003.; St-Onge, et al. Medium-versus long-chain triglycerides for 27 days increases fat oxidation and energy expenditure without resulting in changes in body composition in overweight women. Int J Obesity Relat
Metab Disord. 27(1): 95-102. 2003.; Szabo J, et al. Effect of dietary protein quality and essential fatty acids on fatty acid composition in the liver and adipose tissue after rapid weight loss in overweight cats. AJVR. 64(3): 310-315.
2003.; Taggart K. Calcium intake linked to fat loss. Science News. 37(37). 2001.; Takahashi Y, et al. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reduces body fat mass and affects gene expression of proteins regulating energy metabolism in mice.
Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 133(3): 395-404. 2002.; Takeuchi H, et al. Effect of triacylglycerols containing medium- and long-chain fatty acids on serum triacylglycerol levels and body fat in college athletes. J Nutr
Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 48(2) 109-114. 2002.; Teegarden D. Calcium intake and reduction in weight or fat mass. The American Society for Nutritional Sciences Journal of Nutrition. 133:249S-251S. 2003.; Tischler ME, et al. Does
leucine, lecyl-tRNA, or some metabolite of leucine regulate protein synthesis in degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscle? J Biol Chem. 257:1613-1621. 1982.; Tsuji H, et al. Dietary medium-chain triacylglycerols suppress accumulation
of body fat in a double-blind, controlled, trial in healthy men and women. J Nutr. 131(11) 2853-2859. 2001.; Vandewater K. et al. Higher-protein foods produce greater sensory-specific satiety. Physiology and Behavior. 59(3): 579583. 1996.; West DB, et al, Dietary fat, genetic predisposition and obesity: Lessons from animal models. Am J Clin Nutr. 67:505S-512S. 1998.; Xu X, et al. Short-term intake of conjugated linoleic acid inhibits lipoprotein lipase and
glucose metabolism but does not enhance lipolysis in mouse adipose tissue. J Nutr. 133(3): 663-667. 2003.; Yamasaki M, et al. Modulation of body fat and serum leptin levels by dietary conjugated linoleic acid in Sprague-Dawley
rats fed various fat-level diets. Nutrition. 19(1): 30-35. 2003.; Zemel MB. Regulation of adiposity and obesity risk by dietary calcium: mechanisms and implications. J of the American College of Nutrition. 21(2): 146S-151S. 2002.;
Zemel MB. Calcium modulations of hypertension and obesity: mechanisms and implications. J of the American College of Nutrition. 20:428S-435S. 2001.
Adrevar™
Description:
Adrevar™ is designed to provide nutritional support to the adrenal gland through archetypal nutritional balances, biochemically
rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Adrenal
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Wysong RX – 29
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Lecithin, Adrenal Gland Powder, Chlorella, Coenzyme Q10, Milk
Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus faecium
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger
Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate,
Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine
Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin,
Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arlt W, Allolio B. Adrenal Insufficiency. Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1881-93. Cosin Aguilar J, et al. Neurohormonal factors in heart failure. Rev Esp Cardiol. 1996 Jun;49(6):405-22. Digiesi V, et al. Coenzyme Q10 in essential
hypertension. Mol Aspects Med. 1994;15 Suppl:s257-6. Drucker Mark, M.D. CHLORELLA: The Key to Health, Vitality and Longevity. Health and Happiness Publishing, Inc. Greenville, SC. 2002. Lozovaya N, Miller AD. Chemical
Neuroimmunology: Health in a nutshell bidirectional communication between immune and stress (LHPA) systems. Chembiochem. 2003: June 6;4(6):466-84. McCarty MF. Coenzyme Q versus hypertension: Does CoQ decrease endothelial
superoxide generation? Med Hypothesis. 1999 Oct;53(4):300. Packer M. Evolution of the neurohormonal hypothesis to explain the progression of chronic heart failure. Eur Heart J. 1995 Jul;16 Suppl F:4-6.
Allercin™
Description:
Allercin™ is designed to aid in control of allergy-related conditions through archetypal nutritional balances, biochemically
rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Allergy
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use in pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Lecithin, Methylated Sulfur, Quercitin, Coenzyme Q10, Milk Calcium,
Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus faecium
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger
Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate,
Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine
Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin,
Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Adam O. Polyenoic fatty acid metabolism and effects on prostaglandin biosynthesis in adults and aged persons. In: Lands WEM, ed. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and eicosanoids. Champaign, Ill: American Oil Chemists Society, 1983;215–
219. Barrager E, et al. 2002. A multicentered, open-label trial on the safety and efficacy of methylsulfonylmethane in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. J Altern Complement Med. 2002 Apr; 8(2): 167-73. Bauer JE. The potential
for dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in domestic animals. Aust Vet J 1994;71:342–345. Bliznakov, E., et al. Coenzymes Q: stimulants of the phagocytic activity in rats and immune response in mice. Experientia. 26:953-954, 1970.
Folkers, K., et al. Research on coenzyme Q10 in clinical medicine and in immunomodulation. Drugs Exp Clin Res. 11:539-545, 1985. Dahlgren UI, Hanson LA, Telemo E. Maturation of immunocompetence in breast-fed vs. formula fed
infants. In: Woodward B, Draper HH, eds. Advances in nutritional research. Volume 10. Immunological properties of milk. New York: Klewer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2001;311–325. deWeck AL, et al. Genetics and regulation of
the IgE response leading to experimentally induced atopic-like dermatitis in beagle dogs, in Proceedings. 13th Annu Meet Am Assoc Vet Dermatol Am Coll Vet Dermatol, 1997;76–77. Ermel RW, et al. The atopic dog: a model for food
allergy. Lab Anim Sci 1997;47:40–49. Folkers, K., et al. Increase in levels of IgG in serum of patients treated with Coenzyme Q10. Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol. 38:335, 1982. Foreman JC. Mast cells and the actions of flavonoids.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 1984 Jun; 73(6):769-74 Hall EJ. Dietary sensitivity. In: Bonagura JD, ed. Kirk’s current veterinary therapy XIII. Small animal practice. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 2000;632–637. Halliwell R. Dietary
hypersensitivity in the dog: a monograph. Vernon, Calif: Kal Kan Foods Inc, 1992. Hertog MG. Epidemiological evidence on potential health properties of flavonoids. Proc Nutr Soc. 1996 Mar;55(1B):385-397. Hertog MG, et al. Potential
health effects of the dietary flavonol quercetin. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 Feb;50(2):63-71. Middleton E Jr, et al. Quercitin: an inhibitor of antigen-induced basophil histamine release. J Immunol 1981 Aug; 127(2):546-50 Jeffers JG, et al.
Diagnostic testing of dogs for food hypersensitivity. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1991;198:245–250. Kunkle G, et al. Validity of skin testing for diagnosis of food allergy in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1992;200:677–680. Lachmann G, et.al.
The pharmacokinetics of S35 labeled garlic consituents alliin, allicin, and vinyldithiine, Arzneimittelforschung 1994; 44(6): 734-743. Lin XP, et al. Local allergic reaction in food-hypersensitive adults despite a lack of systemic foodspecific IgE. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2002;109:879–887. Logas D. Systemic nonsteroidal therapy for pruritus: the North American experience, in Proceedings. 19th Waltham Ohio State Univ Symp Dermatol 1995;32–36. Nagae S, et.al.,
Pharmacokinetics of the garlic compound S-allylcysteine, Planta Medica 1994; 60(3): 214-217. Paterson S. Food hypersensitivity in 20 dogs with skin and gastrointestinal signs. J Small Anim Pract 1995;36:529–534. Rees CA, et
al. Effects of dietary flaxseed and sunflower seed supplementation on skin and hair coat clinical scores in normal dogs. Vet Dermatol 2001;12:111–117. Rosser EJ Jr. Diagnosis of food allergy in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1993;203:259–
262. Roudebush P. Hypoallergenic diets for dogs. In: Bonagura JD, ed. Kirk’s current veterinary therapy XIII. Small animal practice. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 2000;530–535. Rutgers HC, et al. Intestinal permeability testing in
dogs with diet-responsive intestinal disease. J Small Animal Pract 1995;36:295–301. Sampson HA. Food allergy. Part 1: immunopathogenesis and clinical disorders. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;103:717–728. Waldron MK, et al. Role
of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the development of the nervous system of dogs and cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:619–622. Watson TD. Diet and skin disease in dogs and cats. J Nutr 1998;128:2783S–2789S.
Werfel T. Skin manifestations in food allergy. Allergy 2001;56(suppl 67):98–101. Wertz PW, et al. Glycolipids in mammalian epidermis: structure and function of the water barrier. Science 1982;217:1261–1262. White SD. Food allergy
in dogs. Compend Contin Educ Pract Vet 1998;20:261–268. Zhang LP, et.al. Analysis of the major constituents of garlic essential oil, Chinese Traditional Patent Medicine 1989; 11(5): 35. Zhang Y, et al. 1997. Ch. 13. In: Nutraceuticals:
Designer Foods III Garlic, Soy and Licorice. Paul P. Lanchance (ed.). Food & Nutrition Press, Trumbell, CT , pp. 117-129.
30 – Wysong RX
Anacline™
Description:
Anacline™ is specifically designed to provide the appropriate foundational archetypal balances to encourage optimal health.
Indications: Anabolism
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Citrus Aurantium, L-glutamine, L-Carnitine, Valine, Leucine, Isoleucine,
Octacosanol, Dried Plasma, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton,
Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural
Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement,
Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin AAcetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Astrup A, et al. Pharmacology of thermogenic drugs. Am J Clin Nutr. 55:2465-2485. 1992.; Bach A, et al. Medium chain triglycerides – an update. Am J Clin Nutr. 36:950-962. 1982.; Borg BS, et al. Evaluation of the chemical and
biological characteristics of spray-dried plasma protein collected from various locations around the world. Proceedings of the American Association of Swine Vet. 2002.; Borg BS, et al. Effects of a water-soluble plasma protein product
on weanling pig performance and health with and without Escherichia coli challenge. Proceedings of the Allen D. Leman Swine Conf. 26:23-24. 1999.; Bosi PI, et al. Effect of different spray-dried plasmas on growth, ileal digestibility,
nutrient deposition, and immunity and health of early-weaned pigs challenged with E. coli K88. Asian-Aus. J Anim Sci. 14:1138-1143. 2001.; Broaca C, et al. Mitochondria-derived glutamate at the interplay between branched-chain amino
acid and glucose-induced insulin secretion. FEBS Lett. 545(2-3):167-172. 2003.; Bulus N, et al. Physiologic importance of glutamine. Metabolism. 38(Suppl 1):1-5. 1989.; Clarkson P. Nutritional ergogenic aids: carnitine. Intl J Sports
Nutr. 2:185-190. 1992.; Coffey, et al. The impact of environment and antimicrobial agents on the growth response of early-weaned pigs to spray-dried porcine plasma. J Anim Sci. 73:2532-2539. 1995.; Cureton T, et al. Effects of an octasonal
dietary supplement upon the total vertical jump reaction time. Physical Fitness Research Laboratory. Univ. of Illinois. 1965.; Fogelholm M. Dairy products, meat, and sports performance. Sports Med. 33(8):615-631. 2003.; Furukawa
S, et al. Supplemental glutamine augments phagocytosis and reactive oxygen intermediate production by neutrophils and monocytes from postoperative patients in vitro. Nutrition. 16:323-329. 2000.; Gatnau RJ, et al. Plasma (Appetein®)
as an alternative to antimicrobial usage in weaning pigs. Proceedings of the EAAP 51st Annual Meeting (The Hague). Paper P5.5, p 343.; Hamosh M, et al. Gastric lipolysis and fat absorption in preterm infant: Effect of medium-chain triglycerides
or long-chain triglyceride-containing formulas. Pediatrics. 83(1):86-92. 1989.; Hedrei P, et al. Thermogenic effect of beta-sympothicomimetic compounds extracted from citrus aurantium, in humans. Springborn Laboratories, Inc. Spencerville,
OH. 1997.; Houdijk APJ, et al. Randomized trial of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on infectious morbidity in patients with multiple trauma. Lancet. 352:772-776. 1998.; Huertas R, et al. Respiratory chain enzymes in muscle of endurance
athletes: effect of L-carnitine. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 188:102-106. 1992.; Illinois Dairy Report. “Antimicrobial Proteins in Milk.” 1996.; Jepson M, et al. Relationships between glutamine concentration
and protein synthesis in rat skeletal muscle. Am J Phyusiol. 255:E166. 1988.; Kadowaki M, et al. Amino acids as regulators of proteolysis. J Nutr. 133(6):2052S-2046S. 2003.; Kitajima H, et al. Effect of dietary amino acids on behavior
and serum levels of amino acids in stress loaded rats. J Nutr Sci Vitmainol (Tokyo). 48(3):194-200. 2002.; Layman DK. Role of leucine in protein metabolism during exercise and recovery. Can J Appl Physiol. 27(6):646-663. 2002.;
Luts W. The carbohydrate theory. Wien Med Wochenschr. 144(16):387-392. 1994.; Jiang RX, et al. Dietary plasma protein reduces small intestinal growth and lamina propria cell density in early-weaned pigs. J Nutr. 130:21-26. 2000.;
MacLennon P, et al. A positive relationship between protein synthetic rate and intracellular glutamine concentration in perfused rat skeletal muscle. FEBS Lett. 215:187. 1987.; Meister A. Metabolism of glutamine. Physiol Rev. 36:103.
1956.; Morrill JL, et al. Plasma proteins and a probiotic as ingredients in milk replacer. J Dairy Sci. 78:902-907. 1995.; Nollet, et al. Protection of just weaned pigs against infection with F18+ Escherichia coli by non-immune plasma
powder. Vet Microbiol. 65:37-45. 1999.; Nollett H, et al. The use on non-immune plasma powder in the prophylaxis of neonatal Escherichia coli diarrhea in calves. J Vet Med. 46:185-196. 1999.; Park KGM, et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte
natural cytoxicity by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645-646. 1991.; Pellati F, et al. Determination of adrenergic agonists from extracts and herbal products of Citrus aurantium L. var amara by LC. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 29(6):1113-1119. 2002.;
Pilla C, et al. Effect of leucine administration on creatine kinase acitivity in rat brain. Metab Brain Dis. 18(1):17-25. 2003.; Quigley JD, et al. Effects of spray-dried plasma in the diets of companion animals. Presented at the 2002 Pet Food
Forum, Chicago, IL.; Quigley JD, et al. Effects of oral antibiotics of IgG on survival, health and growth in dairy calves challenged with Escherichia coli. Food Ag Immunol. 12:311-318. 2000.; Quigley JD, et al. Milk replacers with or
without animal plasma for dairy calves. J Dairy Sci. 79:1881-1884. 1996.; Russell LE. Effect of plasma source and processing method of growth performance of young pigs. J Anim Sci. 72(Suppl 1):156.; Russell LE. Blood and BSE:
Reasons that blood products are safe. Feed Management. 52(3)25-28. 2001.; Sacks GS. Glutamine supplementation in catabolic patients. Ann Pharmacother. 33:348-354. 1999.; Sahlin K, et al. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates
in human muscle tissue during prolonged exercise. Am J Physiol. 259:C834-C841. 1990.; Stein TP, et al. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during bed rest: effect on recovery. J Appl Physiol. 94(4):1345-1352. 2002.;
Torrallardona D, et al. Effect of spray dried animal plasma and colistin on performance, structure of small intestine and ileal and caecal microbiology of weanling pigs experimentally infected with Escherichia coli K99. Anim Feed Sci Tech.
2002.; Touchette KJ, et al. Effect of spray-dried plasma and lipopolysaccharide exposure on weaned pigs: I. Effects on the immune axis of weaned pigs. J Anim Sci. 80:494-501. 2002.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. The effect of spraydried porcine in diets with different protein sources on the performance of weanling piglets. Report P1.137. Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1995.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. Spray dried porcine
and bovine plasma and animal and plant protein in diets of weaned piglets. Report P1.185. Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1997.; Van Dijk A, et al. Growth performance of weanling pigs fed spray-dried
animal plasma: a review. Livest Prod Sci. 68:263-274. 2001.; Vierck JL, et al. The effects of ergogenic compounds on myogenic satellite cells. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 35(5):769-776. 2003.; Van Dijk A, et al. Small intestinal morphology
in weaned piglets fed a diet containing spray porcine plasma. Res Vet Sci. 71:17-22. 2001.; Wagenmakers AJ, et al. Carbohydrate supplementation, glycogen depletion, and amino acid metabolism during exercise. Am J Pysiol. 260:E883.
1991.; Wang XY, et al. The effects of the formula of amino acids enriched BCAA on nutritional support in traumatic patients. World J Gastroenterol. 9(3):599-602. 2003.; Windmueller HG, et al. Identification of ketone bodies and glutamine
as the major respiratory fuels in vivo for postabsorptive rat small intestine. J Biol Chem. 253:69-76. 1978.; Zhi-Qian HE, et al. Body weight reduction in adolescents by a combination of measures including using L-carnitine. Acta Nutrimenta
Sinica. 19:2. 1997.
Cardiril™
Description:
Cardiril™ is designed to provide nutritional support to the cardiovascular system through archetypal nutritional balances,
biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Cardiovascular
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use in pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Chicken, Chicken Liver, Turkey, Ground Beef and Chicken Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Bilberry,
Cayenne Pepper, Hawthorne Berry, Garlic, Ginkgo biloba, L-Proline, L-Arginine, L-Cysteine, L-Carnitine, Coenzyme Q10,
Inositol, Milk Calcium, Lecithin, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried
Wysong RX – 31
Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic
Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium
Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin AAcetate,
Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arivazhagan S, et al. Modulatory effects of garlic and neem leaf extracts on N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidin (MNNG)-induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats. Cell Biochem funct. 18(1):17-21. 2000. Bell David. Red berry extracts good
for heart health. Food Industry Report. 2002. Dirsch VM, et al. Effect of allicin and ajoene, two compounds of garlic, on inducible nitric oxide synthase. Atherosclerosis. 139(2):333-9. 1998. Francesca Rasetti M, Caruso D, Galli G,
et al. Extracts of Ginkgo biloba L. leaves and Vaccinium myrtillus L. fruits prevent photo induced oxidation of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Phytomedicine. 3:335–8. 1997. FB Hu, et al. Optimal diets for prevention of coronary
heart disease. J Am Med Assoc. 288(20):2569-2578. 2002. Ide N & Lau BH. Aged garlic extract attenuates intracellular oxidative stress. Phytomedicine. 6(2):125-131. 1999. Kannel WB. Blood pressure as a cardiovascular risk factor.
JAMA. 275:1571-1576. 1996. Sakono M, et al. Combined effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid and sesamin on triacylglycerol and ketone body production in rat liver. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol. 48(5):405-409. 2002. Zehender M, et
al. Antiarrhythmic effects of increasing the daily intake of magnesium and potassium in patients with frequent ventricular arrhythmias. Magnesium in Cardiac Arrhythmias (MAGICA) Investigators. J Am Coll Cardiol. 29(5):1028-34. 1997.
Dentacet™
Description:
Dentacet™ is designed to aid in maintaining pet oral health through archetypal nutritional balances, biochemically rich
ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Dental
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Dental-Active Cheeses, Trona Minerals, Calcium Lactate, Potassium Citrate,
Milk Calcium, Apple Polyphenols, Fructooligosaccharides, Mannanoligosaccharides, Lecithin, Coconut Oil, Plums, Lactoferrin,
Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product,
Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase,
Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E
Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate,
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin
D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Almarza de Ortega D. Xylitol: a sugar to reduce tooth decay. Invest Clin. 30(3):125-7. 1989.; Amaechi BT, et al. Caries inhibiting and remineraling effect of xylitol in vitro. J Oral Sci. 41(2):71-6. 1999.; Bar A. Caries prevention
with xylitol. Wld Rev Nutr Diet. 55:182. 1988.; Beiraghi S, et al. Effect of calcium lactate in erosion and S. mutans in rats when added to Coca-Cola™. Pediatr Dent. 11(4):312-5. 1989.; Bliznakov EG, et al. The Miracle Nutrient
Coenzyme Q10. Bantam Books. 1986. ; Brudevold F, et al. Effects of some salts of calcium, sodium, potassium and strontium on intraoral enamel demineralization. J Dent Res. 64:24. 1985.; Crane FL, et al. The essential functions
of coenzyme Q. Clin Investig. 71(Suppl):S55-S59. 1993.; Eisner ER. Periodontal disease in pets: the pathogenesis of a preventable problem. Veterinary Medicine. 97-104. 1989.; Featherstone JD, et al. An in situ model for simultaneous
assessment of inhibition of demineralization and enhancement of remineralization. J Dent Res. 71(HD):804-10. 1992.; Folkers K, et al. The biochemical and clinical aspects of coenzyme Q. Clin Investig. 71(Suppl):S51-S178. 1993.;
Gedalia I, et al. Tooth enamel softening with a cola type drink and rehardening with hard cheese stimulated saliva in situ. J Oral Rehabil. 18(6):501-6. 1991.; Geddes DA. Teeth for the future. Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 373:537. 1991.; Hanioka T, et al. Effect of topical application of coenzyme Q10 on adult periodontitis. Molec Aspects Med. 15(Suppl):S241-S248. 1994.; Hefferren JJ, et al. Foods, Nutrition and Dental Health, Volume 1. Pathotox Publishers,
Inc. Park Forest South, IL. 1981.; Herod EL. The effect of cheese on dental caries: a review of the literature. Aust Dent J. 36(2)120-5. 1991.; Jenkins GN, et al. Effect of eating cheese on Ca and P concentration of whole mouth saliva
and pH. Caries Res. 23(3):159-64. 1989.; Jensen ME, et al. Effects of processed cheese on human plaque pH and demineralization and remineralization. Amer J Dent. 3(5):217-23. 1990.; Jensen ME. Diet and dental caries. Dent
Clin North Am. 43(4):615-33. 1999.; Kandelman D, et al. Clinical results after 12 months from a study of the incidence and progression of dental caries in relation to consumption of chewing gum containing xylitol in school preventative
programs. J Dent Res. 55:1407. 1987.; Kashket S, et al. Effectiveness of calcium lactate added to food in reducing intraoral demineralization of enamel. Carie Res. 31(6):429-33. 1997.; Levine J, et al. Diet, chew toys and the health
of the oral cavity. Vet Forum. 1994.; Lewinstein I, et al. Enamel rehardening by soft cheeses. Am J Dent. 6(1):46-8. 1993.; Moynihan PJ, et al. The cariostatic potential of cheese: cooked cheese-containing meals increase plaque calcium
concentration. British Dental J. 187(12):664. 1999.; Navia JM. Carbohydrates and dental health. Am J Clin Nutr. 59(Suppl):719-27S. 1994.; Papas AS, et al. Dietary models for root caries. Amer J Clin Nutr. 61(2):418S. 1995.;
Rapoport L, et al. Treatment of oral ulceration with Lactobacillus tablets. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology. 20:591-593. 1965.; Rosen S, et al. Effect of cheese, with and without sucrose, on dental caries and recovery
of Streptococcus mutans in rats. J Dent Res. 63(6):894-5. 1984.; Sands DC, et al. Fortification of foods by fermentation with lysine-excreting mutants of Lactobacilli. J Ag Food Chem. 24-6:1104. 1967.; Schaeken MJ, et al. Control
of calculus formation by a dentifrice containing calcium lactate. Carie Res. 27(4):277-9. 1993.; Scheinin A, et al. Xylitol-induced changes of enamel hardness in the human mouth. J Dent Res. 60(Suppl A):514. 1981.; Scheinin A, et al.
Xylitol and caries: the collaborative WHO oral disease preventive programme in Hungary. Int Dent J. 35(1):50-7. 1985.; Schneider HG, et al. Reduction of dental plaque by apples and chewing gum. Nahrung. 30(9):907-12. 1986.; Sela
M, et al. Enamel rehardening with cheese in irradiated patients. Am J Dent. 7(3):134-6. 1994.; Shrestha B, et al. Preliminary studies on calcium lactate as an anticaries food additive. Caries Res. 16:12. 1982.; Silva, et al. Effects of watersoluble components of cheese on experimental caries in humans. J Dent Res. 66(1):38-41. 1987.; Silva, et al. Effects of cheese extract and its fractions on enamel demineralization in vitro and in vivo in humans. J Dent Res. 66(10):1527. 1987.; Soderling E, et al. Long-term xylitol consumption and mutans streptococci in plaque and saliva. Caries Res. 25(2):153-7. 1991.; Steinman RR. Nutrition of the teeth and dental caries. J Appl Nutr. 39(1):42-45. 1987.; Tanzer
JM. Xylitol chewing gum and dental caries. Int Dental J. 54(1 Suppl):65-76. 1995.; Vincent JG, et al. Antibacterial activity associated with Lactobacillus acidophilus. J Bact. 78:477-484. 1959.; Watts TLP. Coenzyme Q10 and periodontal
treatment: is there any beneficial effect? Br Dent J. 178:209-213. 1995.; Wysong RL. “Dentatreat.” Midland, MI. 2003.; Wysong RL. “Probiotics and Enzymes.” Midland, MI. 2003.; Wysong RL. The Truth About Pet Foods. Midland,
MI. 2002.
32 – Wysong RX
Dermutec™
Description:
Dermutec™ is designed to provide nutritional support for the integument and hair through archetypal nutritional balances,
biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Skin and coat
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Evening Primrose Oil, Lecithin, Glucosamine, Beta-Carotene, Milk
Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase,
Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis
Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride,
Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium
Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate,
Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Barham JB, et al. Addition of eicosapentaenoic acid to gamma-linolenic acid-supplemented diets prevents serum arachidonic acid accumulation in humans. J Nutr. 130(8):1925-31. 2000.; Barre DE. Potential of evening primrose, borage,
black currant, and fungal oils in human health. Ann Nutr Metab. 45(2):47-57. 2001.; Bates CJ. Vitamin A. Lancet. 345:31-5. 1995.; Belch JJ, et al. Evening primrose oil and borage oil in rheumatologic conditions. Am J Clin Nutr.
71(1 Suppl):352S-6S. 2000.; Berth-Jones J, et al. Placebo-controlled trial of essential fatty acid supplementation in atopic dermatitis. Lancet. 341:1557-60. 1993.; Calder PC, et al. Fatty acids and atopic disease. Pediatr Allergy Immunol.
13(11 Suppl):29-36. 2000.; Collins MD, et al. Teratology of retinoids. Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol. 39:399-430. 1999.; Fan YY, et al. Importance of dietary gamma-linolenic acid in human health and nutrition. J Nutr. 128(9):14114. 1998.; Furse RK, et al. Gammalinolenic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid with anti-inflammatory properties, blocks amplification of IL-1 beta production by human monocytes. J Immunol. 167(1):490-6. 2001.; Futoryan T, et al. Retinoids
and the skin. Nutr Rev. 52:299-310. 1994.; Hederos CA, et al. Epogam evening primrose oil treatment in atopic dermatitis and asthma. Arch Dis Child. 75(6):494-7. 1996.; Henz BM, et al. Double-blind, multicentre analysis of the
efficacy of borage oil in patients with atopic eczema. Br J Dermatol. 149:685-88. 1999.; Holman RT. Essential fatty acid deficiency. Prog Chem Fats Lipids. 9:275-348. 1970.; Horrobin DF, et al. Evening primrose oil and atopic
eczema. Lancet. 345:260-1. 1995.; Huang Y-S, et al. Gamma-linolenic acid: metabolism and its role in nutrition. Champaign, IL: American Oil Chemists Society Press. 1996.; Kinsella JE. Food lipids and fatty acids; importance in
food quality, nutrition, and health. Food Technology. 42:124-45. 1988.; Kruger MC, et al. Calcium metabolism, osteoporosis and essential fatty acids: a review. Prog Lipid Res. 36:131-51. 1997.; Mertin J. Omega-6 and omega3 polyunsaturates and the immune system. Br J Clin Pract. 31:111-4. 1985.; Morse PF, et al. Meta-analysis of placebo-controlled studies of the efficacy of Epogram in the treatment of atopic eczema: relationship between plasma essential
fatty changes and treatment response. Br J Dermatol. 121(1):95-90.; Pryor WA, et al. Beta carotene: from biochemistry to clinical trials. Nutr Rev. 58:39-53. 2000.; Redgrave TG. Lipids in enteral nutrition. Curr Opin Nutr Metab
Care. 2(2):147-52. 1999.; Russell RM. The vitamin A spectrum: from deficiency to toxicity. Am J Clin Nutr. 71:878-84. 2000.; Setnikar I, et al. Pharmacokinetics of glucosamine in the dog and in man. Arzneimittelfors. 36:72935. 1986.; Simopoulos AP. Essential fatty acids in health and chronic disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 70(3 Suppl):560S-569S. 1999.; Tahara S, et al. Age-related changes in oxidative damage to lipids and DNA in rat skin. Mech Ageing
Dev. 122(4):415-26. 2001.; Varani J, et al. Vitamin A antagonized decreased cell growth and elevated collagen-degrading matrix metallo-proteinases and stimulates collagen accumulation in naturally aged human skin. J Invest Dermatol.
114:480-6. 2000.; Wolf G. A history of vitamin A and retinoids. FASEB J. 10:1102-7. 1996.; Worm M. Novel unconventional therapeutic approaches to atopic eczema. Dermatology. 201(3):191-5. 2000.; Wysong RL. Lipid nutrition:
understanding fats and oils in health and disease. Midland, MI. 1990.; Yoon S, et al. The therapeutic effect of evening primrose oil in atopic dermatitis patients with dry scaly skin lesions is associated with the normalization of serum
gamma-interferon levels. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol. 15(1):20-5. 2002.
Diabid™
Description:
Diabid™ is a high protein and low carbohydrate diet designed to provide nutritional support to meet the needs of the type I
and II diabetic through archetypal nutritional balances, biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Pancreatic Endocrine/Blood Glucose
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Initially monitor animals receiving
Diabid™ along with insulin closely for signs of hypoglycemia. Adjust insulin dosage and frequency as required. Diabid™
should not be used with concurrent administration of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs or during pregnancy and lactation.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Fenugreek Seeds, Panax Ginseng, Gymnema Sylvestre Leaves,
Bilberry, Vanadyl Sulfate, Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Dried Pancreas, Garlic, Dried Adrenal Gland, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin,
Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus
faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product,
Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus
niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc
Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate,
Wysong RX – 33
Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic
Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Baskaran K, et al. Antidiabetic effect of a leaf extract from Gymnema sylvestre in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients. J Ethno pharmacol 1990;30:295-305. Bierhaus A, et al. Advanced glycation end product-induced activation
of NF-kappaB is suppressed by alpha-lipoic acid in cultured endothelial cells. Diabetes 1997 Sep;46(9):1481-90. Biewenga GP, et al. The pharmacology of the antioxidant lipoic acid Gen Pharmacol 1997 Sep;29(3):315-31. Boden
G, et al. Effects of vanadyl sulfate on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Metab Clin Exp 1996;45(9):1130–35. Ceriello a. The postprandial state and cardiovascular disease: relevance
to diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2000; 16:125-32. Cohen N, et al. Oral vanadyl sulfate improves hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. J Clin Invest 1995; 95:25019. DeFronzo RA, et al. Pathogenesis of NIDDM: A balanced overview. Diabetes Care 15:318-368, 1992. Feldman EC, et al. Diabetes mellitus,in Feldman EC, Nelson RW (eds): Canine and Feline Endocrinology and Reproduction, ed
2. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1996, pp 339-391. Foster S. Herbs for Health. Loveland, CO: Interweave Press, 1996, 48–9. Gupta SS. Inhibitory effect of Gymnema sylvestre (Gurmar) on adrenaline induced hyperglycemia in rats.
Indian J Med Sci 1961;15:883-887. Halberstam M, et al. Oral vanadyl sulfate improves insulin sensitivity in NIDDM but not in obese non-diabetic subjects. Diabetes 1996; 45:659-66. Jacob, S. et al., Enhancement of Glucose Disposal
in Patients with Type 2 diabetes by Alpha Lipoic Acid. Arzeim Forsch 45,872-874,1995. Kapoor LD. Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton, FL:CRC Press, Inc; 1990:200-201. Kirk CA, et al. Diagnosis of naturally
occurring type-I and type-II diabetes mellitus in cats. AM J Vet Res 54:463-467, 1993. Madar Z, et al. Glucose-Lowering Effect of Fenugreek in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetics. Eur J of Clin Nutr. 1988; 42:51-54. Molham Al-Habori,
et al. Antidiabetic and Hypocholesteremic Effects of Fenugreek. Phytotherapy Res. 1998; 12:233-242. Murray MT. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus). American Journal of Natural Medicine 1997; 4(1):18-22. Nelson RW, et al. Transient
clinical diabetes mellitus in cats: 10 Cases (1989-1991). J Vet Inter Med 13:28-35, 1999. Ng TB, et al. Hypoglycemic constituents of Panax ginseng. Gen Pharmacol 1985; 16:549-52. Ohaeri OC. Effect of garlic oil on the levels of various
enzymes in the serum and tissue of streptozotocin diabetic rats. Biosci Rep 2001, 21:19-24 Okabayashi Y, et al. Effect of Gymnema sylvestre, R.Br. on glucose homeostasis in rats. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1990;9:143-148. Packer, L.
Antioxidant Properties of Lipoic Acid and its Therapeutic Effects in Prevention of Diabetes Complications and Cataracts. Annals NY Acad Sci 738, 257-264, 1994. Pimenta W, et al. Pancreatic B-cell dysfunction as the primary genetic
lesion in NIDDM. JAMA 273:1855-1861, 1995. Prakash AO, et al. Effect of feeding Gymnema sylvestre leaves on blood glucose in beryllium nitrate treated rats. J Ethnopharmacol 1986;18:143-146. Raghuram TC. Effect of fenugreek
seeds on intravenous glucose disposition in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients. Phytother Res 1994;8:83–6. Ramanadham S, et al. Enhanced in vivo sensitivity of vanadyl-treated diabetic rats to insulin. Can J Physiol Pharmacol
1990; 68:486-91. Ribes G, et al. Antidiabetic effects of subfractions from fenugreek seeds in diabetic dogs. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1986;182:159–66. Shanmugasundaram ER, et al. Possible regeneration of the islets of Langerhans in
streptozotocin-diabetic rats given Gymnema sylvestre leaf extracts. J Ethnopharmacol 1990;30:265-279. Shanmugasundaram ER, et al. Use of Gymnema sylvestre leaf in the control of blood glucose in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
J Ethnopharmacol 1990;30:281-294. Shanmugasundaram KR, et al. Enzyme changes and glucose utilization in diabetic rabbits: the effect of Gymnema sylvestre, R.Br. J Ethnopharmacol 1983;7:205-234. Sharma RD, et al. Effect of
Fenugreek Seeds in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetic Subjects. Nutr Res. 1990; 10:731-739. Sharma RD, et al. Effect of Fenugreek Seeds on Blood Glucose and Serum Lipids in Type I Diabetes. Eur J of Clin Nutr. 1990; 44:301-306.
Sharma RD, et al. Toxicological Evaluation of Fenugreek Seeds : a Long Term Feeding Experiment in Diabetic Patients. Phytother Res. 1996; 10:519-520. Sheela CG,et al. Antidiabetic effects of S-allyl cysteine sulphoxide isolated from
garlic Allium sativum Linn Indian J Exp Biol, 30:523-526, 1992. Srivasta Y, et al. Hypoglycemic and life-prolonging properties of Gymnema sylvestre leaf extract in diabetic rats. Isr J Med Sci 1985;21:540-542. Swanston-Flatt SK,et
al. Traditional plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice. Diabetologia 1990, 33:462-464. Udayasekhara Rao P, et al. Short Term Nutritional and Safety Evaluation of Fenugreek. Nutr Res. 1996;
16:1495-1505. Venkatakrishna-Bhatt H, et al. Effect of Gymnema sylvestre, R.Br. leaves on blood sugar and longevity of alloxan diabetic rats. Indian J Pharmacol 1981;13:99. Verma S, et al. Nutritional factors that can favorably influence
the glucose/insulin system : Vanadium. J Am Coll Nutr 1998; 17:11-8. Vuksan V, et al. American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) reduces postprandial glycemia in nondiabetic subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Arch
Intern Med 2000;160:1009–13. Vuksan V, et al. Similar postprandial glycemic reductions with escalation of dose and administration time of American ginseng in type II diabetes. Diabetes Care 2000; 23:1221-6. Waki I, et al. Effects
of a hypoglycemic component of ginseng radix on insulin biosynthesis in normal and diabetic animals. J Pharm Dyn 1982; 5:3547-54. Yokozawa T, et al. Improving effects of diabetic symptoms by ginsenoside Rb2 in streptozoticin
diabetic rats. Wakan Iyaaku Gakkaishi 1985; 372:2.
Digesome™
Description:
Digesome™ supports the nutritional needs of dogs and cats by supplying an archetypal balance of meat proteins, fats,
vitamins, minerals, antibodies, and other micronutrients.
Indications: Digestive
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Chlorella, Licorice, Ginger, Plantain, Aloe, Glutamine, Dried Plasma,
Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease,
Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product,
Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline
Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate,
Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin
A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arthington JD, et al. Effect of dietary IgG source (colostrum, serum, or milk-derived supplement) on the efficiency of IgG absorption in newborn Holstein calves. J Dairy Science. 83:1463-1467. 2000.; Artjomgton JD, et al. Passive
immunoglobulin transfer in newborn calves fed colostrum or spray-dried serum protein alone or as a supplement to colostrum of varying quality. J Dairy Science. 83: 2834-2838. 2000.; Balakrishnan V, et al. Deglycyrrhizinated liquorice
at the treatment of chronic duodenal ulcer. J Asso Phus Ind. 26:811-814. 1978.; Borg BS, et al. Evaluation of the chemical and biological characteristics of spray-dried plasma protein collected from various locations around the world.
Proceedings of the American Association of Swine Vet. 2002.; Borg BS, et al. Effects of a water-soluble plasma protein product on weanling pig performance and health with and without Escherichia coli challenge. Proceedings of the
Allen D. Leman Swine Conf. 26:23-24. 1999.; Bosi PI, et al. Effect of different spray-dried plasmas on growth, ileal digestibility, nutrient deposition, and immunity and health of early-weaned pigs challenged with E. coli K88. AsianAus. J Anim Sci. 14:1138-1143. 2001.; Bjerve KS, et al. Omega 3 fatty acids: Essential fatty acids with important biological effects, and serum phospholipid fatty acids as marker so dietary omega 3 fatty acid intake. Am J Clin Nutr. 57:801S805S. 1993.; Coffey, et al. The impact of environment and antimicrobial agents on the growth response of early-weaned pigs to spray-dried porcine plasma. J Anim Sci. 73:2532-2539. 1995.; Collins MD, et al. Probiotics, prebiotics,
and symbiotics: Approaches for modulating the microbial ecology of the gut. Am J Clin Nutr. 69(5):1052S-1057S. 1999.; Dai D, et al. Role of bacterial colonization in neonatal necrotizing entercolitis and its prevention. Chung Hua
Min Kuo Hsiao I Hsueh Hui Tsa Chih. 36(6):357-365. 1988; DeWit JN. Marschall Rone-Poulenc Award Lecture. Nutritional and functional characteristics of whey proteins in food products. J Dairy Sci. 81(3):597-608. 1998.; Gatnau
RJ, et al. Plasma (Appetein®) as an alternative to antimicrobial usage in weaning pigs. Proceedings of the EAAP 51st Annual Meeting (The Hague). Paper P5.5, p 343.; Erasmus U. Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill. Alive Books, Burnaby,
BC Canada. 1993.; Fox PF. Advanced Dairy Chemistry. Elsevier Applied Science, London. 1992.; Illinois Dairy Report. “Antimicrobial Proteins in Milk.” 1996.; Innis SM, et al. Development of visual acuity in relation to plasma and
erythrocyte omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids in health term gestation infants. Am J Clin Nutr. 60:347-352. 1994.; Jiang RX, et al. Dietary plasma protein reduces small intestinal growth and lamina propria cell density in early-weaned
pigs. J Nutr. 130:21-26. 2000.; Huang Q, et al. The effect of ginger on serotonin induced hypothermia and diarrhea. Yakugaku Zasshi. 110(12):936-942. 1990.; Knowles RP, et al. Clinical impressions of the use of an enzyme additive
in large and small animals. VM/SAC. 74(12):1733. 1979.; Langhendries JP, et al. Intestinal flora in the neonate: Impact on morbidity and therapeutic perspectives. Arch Pediatr. 5(6):644-653. 1998.; Majamaa H, et al. Probiotics: A novel
approach in the management of food allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 99(2):179-185. 1997.; Mepham TB. Biochemistry of Lactation. Elsevier, London. 1983.; Morrill JL, et al. Plasma proteins and a probiotic as ingredients in milk replacer.
J Dairy Sci. 78:902-907. 1995.; Nollet, et al. Protection of just weaned pigs against infection with F18+ Escherichia coli by non-immune plasma powder. Vet Microbiol. 65:37-45. 1999.; Nollett H, et al. The use on non-immune plasma
powder in the prophylaxis of neonatal Escherichia coli diarrhea in calves. J Vet Med. 46:185-196. 1999.; Pathak S, et al. Active components of ginger exhibiting anti-serotonergic action. Phytother Res. 17(2):55-59. 1989.; Park KGM,
et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte natural cytoxicity by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645-646. 1991.; PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Medical Economics, In. Montavale, NJ 2001.; Qian DS, et al. Pharmacologic studies of antimotion sickness
actions of ginger. Chung Juo Chung His I Chieh Ho Tsa Chih. 12(2):95-98. 1992.; Quigley JD, et al. Effects of spray-dried plasma in the diets of companion animals. Presented at the 2002 Pet Food Forum, Chicago, IL.; Quigley JD,
et al. Effects of oral antibiotics of IgG on survival, health and growth in dairy calves challenged with Escherichia coli. Food Ag Immunol. 12:311-318. 2000.; Quigley JD, et al. Milk replacers with or without animal plasma for dairy calves.
J Dairy Sci. 79:1881-1884. 1996.; Russell LE. Effect of plasma source and processing method of growth performance of young pigs. J Anim Sci. 72(Suppl 1):156.; Russell LE. Blood and BSE: Reasons that blood products are safe. Feed
Management. 52(3)25-28. 2001.; Snodgrass DR, et al. The immunoprophylaxis of rotavirus infections in lambs. Vet Red. 102:146-148. 1978.; Torrallardona D, et al. Effect of spray dried animal plasma and colistin on performance, structure
34 – Wysong RX
of small intestine and ileal and caecal microbiology of weanling pigs experimentally infected with Escherichia coli K99. Anim Feed Sci Tech. 2002.; Touchette KJ, et al. Effect of spray-dried plasma and lipopolysaccharide exposure on
weaned pigs: I. Effects on the immune axis of weaned pigs. J Anim Sci. 80:494-501. 2002.; Tyrell D. The Immunology of Infant Feeding. Plenum Press, NY. 1980.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. The effect of spray-dried porcine in
diets with different protein sources on the performance of weanling piglets. Report P1.137. Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1995.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. Spray dried porcine and bovine plasma
and animal and plant protein in diets of weaned piglets. Report P1.185. Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1997.; Van Dijk A, et al. Growth performance of weanling pigs fed spray-dried animal plasma: a
review. Livest Prod Sci. 68:263-274. 2001.; Van Dijk A, et al. Small intestinal morphology in weaned piglets fed a diet containing spray porcine plasma. Res Vet Sci. 71:17-22. 2001.; Walstra P, et al. Dairy Chemistry and Physics. Johns
Wiley & Sons, New York. 1984.; Welsh JK, et al. Anti-infective properties of breast milk. J Pediatr. 94:1-9. 1979.; Wysong RL. Lipid Nutrition: Understanding Fats and Oils in Health & Disease. Inquiry Press. Midland, MI 1990.; Wysong
RL. Probiotics for animals. Wysong Companion Animal Health Letter. 96(5):4. 1996.; Wysong RL. Probiotics for allergies. Wysong Health Letter. 98(11):42-3 1998.
Estroxil™
Description:
Estroxil™ is useful in the nutritional support of female dogs following ovariohysterectomy through archetypal nutritional
balances, biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Female Reproductive
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use Estroxil™ in males, nonspayed females, or animals with bleeding problems or taking anticoagulant medication.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Red Clover, Black Cohosh, Soy Sprouts, Soybeans (source of
isoflavones), Chaste Tree Berries, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton,
Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural
Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement,
Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Adam NR.1995. Detection of the effects of phytoestrogens on sheep and cattle. J.Anim.Sci.73:1509-1515. Adlercreutz H, et al. Inhibition of human aromatase by mammalian lignans and isoflavonoid phytoestrogens. J Steroid Biochem
Molec Biol. 1993;44(2):147-153. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: Use of botanicals for management of menopausal symptoms. ACOG Practice Bulletin 28: 1-11, 2001. Baber R, et al. The effect of an Isoflavone
dietary supplement (P-081) on serum lipids, forearm bone density & endometrial thickness in post menopausal women [abstract]. Menopause. 1999a;6:326. Baber RJ, et al. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of an isoflavone supplement
and menopausal symptoms in women. Climacteric. 1999b;2(2):85-92. Blumenthal Mark, et al. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. American Botanical Council, 2000. Blumenthal Mark, et al. The Complete German
Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council, 1998. Bournemouth, UK: British Herbal Medicine Association; 1992:183-184. Bown D. Encyclopedia of Herbs & Their Uses. New York,
NY: DK Publishing Inc; 1995.Cassady JM, et al. Use of a mammalian cell culture benzo(a)pyrene metabolism assay for the detection of potential anticarcinogens from natural products: Inhibition of metabolism by biochanin A, an isoflavone
from Trifolium pratense L. Cancer Res. 1988;48:6257-6261. Chen S-N, et al. Isolation, structure elucidation, and absolute configuration of 26-deoxyactein from Cimicifuga racemosa and clarification of nomenclature associated with 27deoxyactein. Journal of Natural Products 65: 601-605, 2001. DerMarderosian A, et al, eds. Red clover monograph, a monograph in the series The Review of Natural Products. St. Louis, Mo: Facts and Comparisons; 2000. Dixon-Shanies
D, et al. Growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells by herbs and phytoestrogens. Oncology Reports 6: 1383-1387, 1999. Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press, Inc.; 1985:488-489. Duke
JA. Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2001: 120-121. Duke JA. Handbook of Phytochemical Constituents of GRAS Herbs and Other Economic Plants. Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press; 1992:603-605. Duker
EM, et al. Effects of extracts from Cimicifuga racemosa on gonadotropin release in menopausal women and ovariectomized rats. Planta Med 1991 Oct;57(5):420-4. Einer-Jensen N, et al. Cimicifuga and Melbrosia lack oestrogenic effects
in mice and rats. Maturitas 25: 149-153, 1996. Eldridge A.C. 1982. High performance liquid chromatography separation of soybean isoflavones and their glucosides. J. Chromatogr. 234:494-496. Erdman, J.W.1995.Control of serum
lipids with soy protein. New England J. Med. 333:313-315.Fetrow CW, et al. Professional’s Handbook of Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Springhouse, Pa: Springhouse Corp; 1999. Foster S. Black cohosh: Cimicifuga
racemosa: a literature review. HerbalGram 45: 35-49, 1999. Freudenstein J, et al. Lack of promotion of estrogen-dependent mammary gland tumors in vivo by an isopropanolic Cimicifuga racemosa extract. Cancer Research 62: 34483452, 2002. Gruenwald J. Standardized black cohosh (Cimicifuga) extract clinical monograph. Quarterly Review of Natural Medicine Summer: 117-125, 1998. Gruenwald Joerg, et al. PDR for Herbal Medicines. Medical Economics Company,
1998. Harnischfeger, G. and H. Stolze. Black Cohosh. Notabene Medici 1980, 10:446-50. Heck AM, et al. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2000;57(13):1221-1227. Hoffman
D. The New Holistic Herbal. Boston, Mass: Element Books Limited; 1990:227. Howes JB, et al. The effects of dietary supplementation with isoflavones from red clover on the lipoprotein profiles of postmenopausal women with mild to
moderate hypercholesterolemia. Atherosclerosis. 2000;152(1):143-147. Husband A. Red clover isoflavone supplements: safety and pharmacokinetics. Journal of the British Menopause Society. 2001;Supplement S1:4-7. Jacobson JS,
et al. Randomized trial of black cohosh for the treatment of hot flashes among women with a history of breast cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology 19: 2739-2745, 2001. Jarry H, et al. Studies on the endocrine effects of the contents
of Cimicifuga racemosa: 1. Influence on the serum concentration of pituitary hormones in Ovariectomized rats. Planta Medica. 1985, 51(1): 46-49. Korn W.D. Six-Month Oral Toxicity Study with Remifemin-Granulate in Rats Followed
by an 8-Week Recovery Period (Hannover, Germany: International Bioresearch, 1991). Kruse SO, et al. Fukiic and piscidic acid esters from the rhizome of Cimicifuga racemosa and the in vitro estrogenic activity of fukinolic acid. Planta
Medica 65: 763-764, 1999. Lehmann-Willenbrock E, et al. Clinical and endocrinologic studies of the treatment of ovarian insufficiency manifestations following hysterectomy with intact adnexa [in German; English abstract]. Zentralbl
Gynakol. 1988;110: 611-618. Lieberman S. A review of the effectiveness of Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) for the symptoms of menopause. J Womens Health 1998 Jun;7(5):525-9. Liske E, et al. Physiological investigation of
a unique extract of black cohosh (Cimicifugae racemosae rhizoma): a 6-month clinical study demonstrates no systemic estrogenic effect. Journal of Women’s Health & Gender-Based Medicine 11: 163-174, 2002. Liske E. Therapeutic efficacy
and safety of Cimicifuga racemosa for gynecologic disorders. AdvTher. 1998;15:45-53. Liu J, et al. 2001. Evaluation of Estrogenic Activity of Plant Extracts for the Potential Treatment of Menopausal Symptoms. J Agric Food Chem 2001
May 21; 49(5): 2472-2479. Lloyd J.U, et al. Drugs and Medicines of North America. 2 vols. Cincinnati: J.U. & C.G. Lloyd, 1884-85. MacLennan A, et al. Oral estrogen replacement therapy versus placebo for hot flushes: a systematic
review. Climacteric. 2001;4:58-74. McGuffin M, et al. Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press LLC; 1997: 117. Medical Economics. PDR for Herbal Medicines. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 1998. Messing
M, et al.1991.The role of soy products in reducing risk of cancer.J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 83:541-546. Mills S, et al. Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2000: 303-309. Murray Michael, et al. Encyclopedia
of Natural Medicine, second ed. Prima Publishing, Rocklin. 1999. Nachtigall LE. Isoflavones in the management of menopause. Journal of the British Menopause Society. 2001;Supplement S1:8-12. Nesselhut, T, et al. “Influence of
Cimicifuga Racemosa Extracts with Estrogen-like Activity on the in Vitro Proliferation of Mamma Carcinoma Cells,” Arch Gynecol Obstet 254 (1993): 817-8. Scambia G, et al. Clinical effects of a standardized soy extract in postmenopausal
women: a pilot study. Menopause. 2000; 7: 105–111. Schulz V, et al. Rational Phytotherapy: A Physicians’ Guide to Herbal Medicine. 3rd ed. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag; 1998:246. Seidlova-Wuttke D, et al. Effects of Cimicifuga
racemosa on estrogen-dependent tissues [abstract]. Phytomedicine. 2000;7(suppl 2):11-12. Seidlova-Wuttke D, et al. Selective estrogen receptor modulator activity of Cimicifuga racemosa extract: clinical data [abstract]. Phytomedicine.
2000;7(suppl 2):11. Stephens FO. 1997b. Phytoestrogens and prostate cancer: possible preventive role. Med J Aust 167 (3): 138-140. Stoll W. Phytotherapeutic agent affects atrophic vaginal epithelium. Double-blind study: Cimicifuga
vs. an estrogen preparation [translated from German]. Therapeutikon. 1987;1:23-31. Stoll W. Phytotherapy influences atrophic vaginal epithelium: Double-blind study of Cimicifuga vs. estrogenic substances (in German). Therapeutikon
1: 23-31, 1987. Stoll, W. Phytopharmacon Influences Atrophic Vaginal Epithelium. Double-blind Study-Cimicifuga vs. Estrogenic Substances. Therapeuticum. 1987, 1:23-31. Stolze H. An alternative to treat menopausal complaints
[translated from German]. Gyne. 1982;1:14-16. Upton R, ed. Black Cohosh Rhizome Actaea racemosa L. syn. Cimicifuga racemosa (L.) Nutt. Standards of analysis, quality control, and therapeutics. American Herbal Pharmacopoeia and
Therapeutic Compendium. Santa Cruz, CA. American Herbal Pharmacopoeia, 2002: 1-38. Wahlquist ML, et al. 1997. Phytoestrogens: emerging multifaceted plant compounds. Med J Aust 167 (3): 199-120. Warnecke G. Influencing
menopausal symptoms with a phytotherapeutic agent [in German]. Med Welt. 1985;36:871-874. Whitten P.L, et al. 1994. Influence of phytoestrogen diets on estradiol action in the rat uterus. Steroids 59:443-449. Wilcox G, et al. Oestrogenic
effects of plant foods in postmenopausal women. BMJ. 1990;301:905-906. Wuttke W, et al. Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) activity of the Cimicifuga racemosa extract BNO 1055: pharmacology and mechanisms of action
[abstract]. Phytomedicine. 2000;7(suppl 2):12. Zava DT, et al. Estrogen and progestin bioactivity of foods, herbs, and spices. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1998;217(3):369-378. Zierau O, et al. Antiestrogenic activities of Cimicifuga racemosa
extracts. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 80: 125-130, 2002.
Gerodyne™
Description:
Gerodyne™ is designed to nutritionally support specific cellular processes known to decline with age through archetypal
nutritional balances, biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Wysong RX – 35
Indications: Gerontology
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do use for pregnant or nursing animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Lecithin, Chlorella, Coenzyme Q10, Methylated Sulfur, Grapeseed Extract, Garlic,
Coconut Oil, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried
Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic
Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium
Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate,
Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Bagchi D, et al. Protective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidins and selected antioxidants against TPA-induced hepatic and brain lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation, and peritoneal macrophage activation in mice. Gen Pharmacol.
30:771-6. 1998.; Bergossi AM, et al. Exogenous CoQ10 supplementation prevents plasma ubiquone reduction induced by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. Mol Aspects Med. 15(Suppl):187-93. 1994.; Childs SJ. Dimethyl sulfone
(DMSO2) in the treatment of interstitial cystitis. Urol Clin North Am. 21:85-98. 1994.; Crane FL, et al. The essential functions of coenzyme Q. Clin Investig. 71(Suppl):S55-S59. 1993.; Folkers K, et al. Biochemical rationale and
myocardial tissue data on the protective therapy of cardiomyopathy with coenzyme Q10. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 82:901-4. 1985.; Folkers K, et al. The biochemical and clinical aspects of coenzyme Q10. Clin Investig. 71(Suppl):S51S178. 1993.; Folkers K. Critique of 30 years of research on hematopoietic and immunological activities of coenzyme Q10 and potentiality for therapy of AIDS and cancer. Med Chem Res. 2:48-60. 1992.; Gabetta B, et al. Characterization
of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds. Fitoterapia. 71:162-75. 2000.; Henriksen JE, et al. Impact of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10) treatment on glycaemic control, insulin requirement and well-being in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Diabet Med. 16:312-8. 1999.; Hofman-Bang C, et al. Coenzyme Q10 as an adjunctive in the treatment of chronic congestive heart failure. The Q10 study group. J Card Fail. 1:101-7. 1995.; Jacob S, et al. The miracle of MSM. New
York: Berkeley Books. 1999.; Kocsis JJ, et al. Biological effects of the metabolites of dimethyl sulfoxide. Ann NY Acad Sci. 243:104-9. 1975.; Lass A, et al. Effect of coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol content of mitochondria on
the production of superoxide anion radicals. FASEB J. 14:87-94. 2000.; Lawrence R. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM): a double-blind study of its use in degenerative arthritis. Int J Anti-Aging Med. 1:50. 1998.; Lawson LD, et al.
Characterization of the formation of allicin and other thiosulfinates from garlic. Planta Medica. 58:345-50. 1992.; Layman DL. Growth inhibitory effects of dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl sulfone on vascular smooth muscle and endothelial
cells in vitro. In Vitro Cell Dev Biol. 23:433-8. 1987.; Lun ZR, et al. Antiparasitic activity of diallyl trisulfide (dasuansu) on human and animal pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma sp., Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia)
in vitro. Ann Soc Belge Med Trop. 74:51-9. 1994.; Matthews RT, et al. Coenzyme Q10 administration increases mitochondrial concentrations and exerts neuroprotective effects. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 95:8892-7. 1998.; Moore RD,
et al. Diminished inflammatory joint disease in MRL/lpr mice ingesting dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or methylsulfonylmethane (MSM). Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, 69th Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA. 692.
April 1985.; Morisco C, et al. Effect of coenzyme Q10 therapy in patients with congestive heart failure: a long-term multi-center randomized study. Clinic Investig. 71(Suppl):S134-S136. 1993.; Morton J, et al. Effects of oral dimethyl
sulfoxide and dimethyl sulfone on murine autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 183:227-30. 1986.; Sato M, et al. Cardioprotective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidins against ischemic reperfusion injury.
J Mol Cell Cardiol. 31:1289-97. 1999.; Seidman MD, et al. Influence of lecithin on mitochondrial DNA and age-related hearing loss. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 127(3):138-44. 2002.; Shea TB, et al. Efficacy of vitamin E, phosphatidyl
choline, and pyruvate on buffering neuronal degeneration and oxidative stress in cultured cortical neurons and in central nervous tissue of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Free Radic Biol Med. 33(2):276-82. 2002.; Singh KV, et al.
Activity on multiple resistant bacteria of garlic (Allium sativum) extract. Fitoterapia. LV(5):313-5. 1984.; Stocker R, et al. Ubiquinol-10 protects human low-density lipoprotein more efficiently against lipid peroxidation than does alphatocopherol. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 88:1646-50. 1991.; Swenson CD, et al. The effect of aging on the immune response: influence of phosphatidylcholine-containing lipid on IgD-receptor expression and antibody formation. Mech
Aging Dev. 95(3):167-86. 1997.; Tomasetti M, et al. Coenzyme Q10 enrichment decreases oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Free Rad Biol Med. 27:1027-32. 1999.; Weber ND, et al. In vitro virucidal effects of Allium
sativum (garlic) extract and compounds. Planta Medica. 58:417-23. 1992.; Yamakoshi J, et al. Proanthocyanidin-rich extract from grape seed attenuates the development of aortic atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Atherosclerosis.
142:139-49. 1999.; Ye X, et al. The cytotoxic effects of a novel IH636 grape seed proanthocyanidin extract on cultured human cancer cells. Mol Cell Biochem. 196:99-108. 1999.; Yen CL, et al. Choline deficiency induces apoptosis
in primary cultures of fetal neurons. FASEB J. 15(10):1704-10. 2001.; Zhao J, et al. Anti-tumor-promoting activity of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seed in the mouse skin two-stage initiation-promotion protocol and
identification of prcyanidin B5-3’ –gallate as the most effective antioxidant constituent. Carcinogenesis. 20:1737-45. 1999.
Gestain™
Description:
Gestain™ is specifically designed to provide the appropriate foundational archetypal balances to encourage optimal health
and development.
Indications: Pregnancy
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Dried Plasma, Dried Whole Milk, Dried Whey, Dried Egg, Casein,
Lecithin, L-Arginine, Milk Calcium, Chlorella, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton,
Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural
Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement,
Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arthington JD, et al. Effect of dietary IgG source (colostrum, serum, or milk-derived supplement) on the efficiency of IgG absorption in newborn Holstein calves. J Dairy Science. 83:1463-1467. 2000.; Artjomgton JD, et al. Passive
immunoglobulin transfer in newborn calves fed colostrum or spray-dried serum protein alone or as a supplement to colostrum of varying quality. J Dairy Science. 83: 2834-2838. 2000.; Bach A, et al. Medium chain triglycerides – an
update. Am J Clin Nutr. 36:950-962. 1982.; Borg BS, et al. Evaluation of the chemical and biological characteristics of spray-dried plasma protein collected from various locations around the world. Proceedings of the American Association
of Swine Vet. 2002.; Borg BS, et al. Effects of a water-soluble plasma protein product on weanling pig performance and health with and without Escherichia coli challenge. Proceedings of the Allen D. Leman Swine Conf. 26:23-24. 1999.;
Bosi PI, et al. Effect of different spray-dried plasmas on growth, ileal digestibility, nutrient deposition, and immunity and health of early-weaned pigs challenged with E. coli K88. Asian-Aus. J Anim Sci. 14:1138-1143. 2001.; Bjerve
36 – Wysong RX
KS, et al. Omega 3 fatty acids: Essential fatty acids with important biological effects, and serum phospholipid fatty acids as marker so dietary omega 3 fatty acid intake. Am J Clin Nutr. 57:801S-805S. 1993.; Buescher ES, et al. Antioxidant
properties of human colostrum. Pediatric Res. 24 (1):14-19. 1988.; Chesney RW. Taurine: is it required for infant nutrition? J Nutr. 118:6-10. 1988.; Chesney RW Taurine: its biological role and clinical implications. Advances in Pediatrics.
22:1-42. 1985.; Coffey, et al. The impact of environment and antimicrobial agents on the growth response of early-weaned pigs to spray-dried porcine plasma. J Anim Sci. 73:2532-2539. 1995.; Collins MD, et al. Probiotics, prebiotics,
and symbiotics: Approaches for modulating the microbial ecology of the gut. Am J Clin Nutr. 69(5):1052S-1057S. 1999.; Dai D, et al. Role of bacterial colonization in neonatal necrotizing entercolitis and its prevention. Chung Hua
Min Kuo Hsiao I Hsueh Hui Tsa Chih. 36(6):357-365. 1988; DeWit JN. Marschall Rone-Poulenc Award Lecture. Nutritional and functional characteristics of whey proteins in food products. J Dairy Sci. 81(3):597-608. 1998.; Gatnau
RJ, et al. Plasma (Appetein®) as an alternative to antimicrobial usage in weaning pigs. Proceedings of the EAAP 51st Annual Meeting (The Hague). Paper P5.5, p 343.; Erasmus U. Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill. Alive Books, Burnaby, BC
Canada. 1993.; Fox PF. Advanced Dairy Chemistry. Elsevier Applied Science, London. 1992.; Francis GL, et al. Insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 in bovine colostrum. J Biochem. 251:95-103. 1988.; Geggel HS, et al. Nutritional requirement
for taurine in patients receiving long-term parenteral supplementation. NEJM. 312:142-146. 1985.; Hamosh M, et al. Gastric lipolysis and fat absorption in preterm infant: Effect of medium-chain triglycerides or long-chain triglyceridecontaining formulas. Pediatrics. 83(1):86-92. 1989.; Hayes KC, et al. Taurine in metabolism. Ann Rev Nutr. 1:401-425. 1981.; Hayes KC, et al. Retinal degeneration associated with taurine deficiency in the cat. Science. 188:949-951.
1975.; Hunt EQ, et al. Oral bovine serum concentrate improves cryptosporidial enteritis in calves. J Pediatr. 2002.; Illinois Dairy Report. “Antimicrobial Proteins in Milk.” 1996.; Innis SM, et al. Development of visual acuity in relation
to plasma and erythrocyte omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids in health term gestation infants. Am J Clin Nutr. 60:347-352. 1994.; Jensen RG, et al. The composition of milk fat. J Dairy Sci. 74:3228-43. 1991.; Jensen RG, et al. Handbook
of Milk Composition. Academic Press, San Diego. 1995.; Jiang RX, et al. Dietary plasma protein reduces small intestinal growth and lamina propria cell density in early-weaned pigs. J Nutr. 130:21-26. 2000.; Julius MH, et al. A colostral
protein that induces the growth and differentiation of resting B-lymphocytes. J Immunol. 140(5):1366-1371. 1988.; Knowles RP, et al. Clinical impressions of the use of an enzyme additive in large and small animals. VM/SAC. 74(12):1733.
1979.; Langhendries JP, et al. Intestinal flora in the neonate: Impact on morbidity and therapeutic perspectives. Arch Pediatr. 5(6):644-653. 1998.; Ley BM. Colostrum: Nature’s Gift to the Immune System. BL Productions. 1990.; Majamaa
H, et al. Probiotics: A novel approach in the management of food allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 99(2):179-185. 1997.; Mepham TB. Biochemistry of Lactation. Elsevier, London. 1983.; Morrill JL, et al. Plasma proteins and a probiotic
as ingredients in milk replacer. J Dairy Sci. 78:902-907. 1995.; Nollet, et al. Protection of just weaned pigs against infection with F18+ Escherichia coli by non-immune plasma powder. Vet Microbiol. 65:37-45. 1999.; Nollett H, et al.
The use on non-immune plasma powder in the prophylaxis of neonatal Escherichia coli diarrhea in calves. J Vet Med. 46:185-196. 1999.; Park KGM, et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte natural cytoxicity by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645646. 1991.; PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Medical Economics, In. Montavale, NJ 2001.; Pion PD, et al. Myocardial failure in cats associated with low plasma taurine: a reversible cardiomyopathy. Science. 237:764-767. 1987.; Quigley
JD, et al. Effects of spray-dried plasma in the diets of companion animals. Presented at the 2002 Pet Food Forum, Chicago, IL.; Quigley JD, et al. Effects of oral antibiotics of IgG on survival, health and growth in dairy calves challenged
with Escherichia coli. Food Ag Immunol. 12:311-318. 2000.; Quigley JD, et al. Milk replacers with or without animal plasma for dairy calves. J Dairy Sci. 79:1881-1884. 1996.; Russell LE. Effect of plasma source and processing method
of growth performance of young pigs. J Anim Sci. 72(Suppl 1):156.; Russell LE. Blood and BSE: Reasons that blood products are safe. Feed Management. 52(3)25-28. 2001.; Snodgrass DR, et al. The immunoprophylaxis of rotavirus
infections in lambs. Vet Red. 102:146-148. 1978.; Torrallardona D, et al. Effect of spray dried animal plasma and colistin on performance, structure of small intestine and ileal and caecal microbiology of weanling pigs experimentally infected
with Escherichia coli K99. Anim Feed Sci Tech. 2002.; Touchette KJ, et al. Effect of spray-dried plasma and lipopolysaccharide exposure on weaned pigs: I. Effects on the immune axis of weaned pigs. J Anim Sci. 80:494-501. 2002.;
Tyrell D. The Immunology of Infant Feeding. Plenum Press, NY. 1980.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. The effect of spray-dried porcine in diets with different protein sources on the performance of weanling piglets. Report P1.137.
Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1995.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. Spray dried porcine and bovine plasma and animal and plant protein in diets of weaned piglets. Report P1.185. Praktijkonderzoek
varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1997.; Van Dijk A, et al. Growth performance of weanling pigs fed spray-dried animal plasma: a review. Livest Prod Sci. 68:263-274. 2001.; Van Dijk A, et al. Small intestinal morphology
in weaned piglets fed a diet containing spray porcine plasma. Res Vet Sci. 71:17-22. 2001.; Walstra P, et al. Dairy Chemistry and Physics. Johns Wiley & Sons, New York. 1984.; Welsh JK, et al. Anti-infective properties of breast milk.
J Pediatr. 94:1-9. 1979.; Wysong RL. Lipid Nutrition: Understanding Fats and Oils in Health & Disease. Inquiry Press. Midland, MI 1990.; Wysong RL. Probiotics for animals. Wysong Companion Animal Health Letter. 96(5):4. 1996.;
Wysong RL. Probiotics for allergies. Wysong Health Letter. 98(11):42-3 1998.
Heparone™
Description:
Heparone™ is designed provide nutritional support for the liver and gallbladder through archetypal nutritional balances,
biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Liver
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Turmeric, Dandelion Root, Licorice Root, Lecithin, Milk Thistle,
Garlic, Whey, Grape Seed Extract, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton,
Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Entercococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of
Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin
Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arivazhagan S, et al. Modulatory effects of garlic and neem leaf extracts on N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats. Cell Biochem Funct. 18(1):17-21. 2000.; Bagchi D, et al. Free radicals
and grape seed proanthocyanidin extract: importance in human health and disease prevention. Toxicology. 148(2-3):187-97. 2000.; Bagchi D, et al. Protective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidins and selected antioxidants against
TPA-induced hepatic and brain lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation, and peritoneal macrophage activation in mice. Gen Pharmacol. 30:771-6. 1998.; Belinky PA, et al. Structural aspects of the inhibitory effect of glabridin on
LDL oxidation. Free Radic Biol Med. 24(9):1419-29. 1998.; Bell SJ. Whey protein concentrates with and without immunoglobulins: a review. J Med Food. 3:1-13. 2000.; Bounous G, et al. Immunoenhancing property of a dietary
whey protein in mice: role of glutathione. Clin Invest Med. 12:154-61. 1989.; Bounous G, et al. The influence of dietary whey protein on tissue glutathione and the diseases of aging. Clin Invest Med. 12:343-9. 1989.; Bounous G,
et al. Whey proteins in cancer prevention. Cancer Lett. 57:91-4. 1991.; Buchman AL, et al. Lecithin increases plasma free choline and decreases hepatic stenosis in long-term total parenteral nutrition patients. Gastroenterology. 102:136370. 1992.; Center SA. Nutritional support for dogs and cats with hepatobiliary disease. J Nutr. 128:2733S-2746S. 1998.; Center SA. Chronic liver disease: current concepts of disease mechanisms. Journal of Small Animal Practice. 40:10614. 1999.; Duff G, et al. Lecithin is known to increase the capacity of the bile to solubilize cholesterol. Am J Med. 11:92. 1951.; Faulstich H, et al. Silybinin inhibition of amatoxin uptake in the perfused rat liver. Arzneim-Forsch Drug
Res. 30:452-4. 1980.; Feher J, et al. Free radicals in tissue damage in liver diseases and therapeutic approach. Tokai J Exp Clin Med. 11:121-34. 1986.; Ferenci R, et al. Randomized controlled trial of silymarin treatment in patients with
cirrhosis of the liver. J Hepatol. 9:105-13. 1989.; Fiebrich F, et al. Silymarin, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Experentia. 35:148-50. 1979.; Fiebrich F, et al. Silymarin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. Experentia. 35:150-2.
1979.; Floreani A, et al. Plasma antioxidant levels in chronic cholestatic liver disease. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 14:353-8. 2000.; Francischetti IM, et al. Indentification of glycyrrhizin as a thrombin inhibitor. Biochem
Biophys Res Commun. 235(1):259-63. 1997.; Fujisawa K, et al. Therapeutic effects of liver hydrosylate preparations on chronic hepatitis. Asian Medical Journal. 26:497-526. 1983.; Fukai T, et al. Anti-Helicobacter pylori flavonoids
from licorice extract. Life Sci. 71(12):1449-63. 2002.; Gabetta B, et al. Characterization of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds. Fitoterapia. 71:162-75. 2000.; Germain E, et al. In vivo metabolism of diallyl disulphide in the rat: identification
of two new metabolites. Xenobiotica. 32(12):1127-38. 2002.; Green M, et al. Inhibition of DES-induced DNA adducts by diallyl sulfide: implications in liver cancer prevention. Oncol Rep. 10(3):767-71. 2003.; Haraguchi H, et al. Protection
of mitochondrial functions against oxidative stresses by isoflavans from Glycyrrhiza glabra. J Pharm Pharmacol. 52(2):219-23. 2000.; Hatano T, et al. Phenolic constituents of licorice. IV. Correlation of phenolic constituents and licorice
specimens from various sources, and inhibitory effects of licorice extracts on xanthine oxidase and monoamine oxidase. Yakugaku Zasshi. 111(6):311-21. 1991.; Hattori A, et al. Protective effect of ajoene on acetaminophen-induced hepatic
injury in mice. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 65(11):2555-7. 2001.; He Q, et al. Physiological responses to a natural antioxidant flavonoid mixture, silymarin, in BALB/c mice: I induction of transforming growth factor beta1 and c-myc in
liver with marginal effects on genes. Planta Medica. 68(8):676-9. 2002.; Hikino H, et al. Antihepatotoxic actions of flavonolignans from Silybum mariunum fruits. Planta Medica. 50:248-50. 1984.; Hirono I, et al. Safety examination
of some edible plants, part 2. J Environ Pathol Toxicol. 1:71-4. 1978.; Hu C, et al. Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. J Agric Food Chem.
51(1):301-10. 2003.; Johnson VJ, et al. Physiological responses of a natural antioxidant flavonoid mixture, silymarin, in BALB/c mice: III. Silymarin inhibits T-lymphocyte function at low doses but stimulates inflammatory processes at high
doses. Planta Medica. 69(1):44-9. 2003.; Joshi SS, et al. Chemopreventive effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract on Chang liver cells. Toxicology. 155(1-3):83-90. 2000.; Joshi SS, et al. The cellular and molecular basis of health
benefits of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract. Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2(2):187-200. 2001.; Kashiwada Y, et al. Sesquiterpene glucosides from anti-leukotriene B4 release fraction of Taraxacum officinale. J Asian Nat Prod Res. 3(3):1917. 2001.; Kim HM, et al. Taraxacum officinale inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from rat astrocytes. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 22(3):519-30. 2000.; Kinsella JE, et al. Proteins in whey: chemical, physical, and functional
properties. Adv Food Nutr Res. 33:343-438. 1989.; Kisiel W, et al. Further sesquiterpenoids and phenolics from Taraxacum officinale. Fitoterapia. 71(3):269-73. 2000.; Kiso Y, et al. Antihepatotoxic principles of curcuma longa rhizomes.
Planta Medica. 49:185-7. 1983.; Kiso Y, et al. Mechanism of anti-hepatotoxic activity of glycyrrhizin: effect on free-radical generation and lipid peroxidation. Planta Medica. 50:298-302. 1984.; Kvasnicka F, et al. Analysis of the active
components of silymarin. J Chromatogr A. 990(1-2):239-45. 2003.; Lau B. Garlic for health. Lotus Light Publications, Wilmot, WI. 32-3. 1988.; Luper S. A review of plants used in the treatment of liver disease: part two. Altern Med
Rev. 4(3):178-88. 1999.; Maguilo E, et al. Studies on the regenerative capacity of the liver in rats subjected to partial hepatectomy and treated with silymarin. Arzheim-Forsch Drug Res. 23:161-7. 1973.; Meyer HP, et al. Effects of a branchedchain amino acid-enriched diet on chronic hepatic encephalopathy in dogs. Metabolic Brain Disease. 14:103-15. 1999.; Muzes G, et al. Effect of the bioflavonoid silymarin on the in vitro activity and expression of superoxide dismutase
(SOD) enzyme. Acta Physiol Hung. 78:3-9. 1991.; Oetari S, et al. Effects of curcumin on cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase activities in rat liver. Biochem Pharmacol. 51(1):39-45. 1996.; Oganesyan KR. Antioxidant effect
of licorice root on blood catalase activity in vibration stress. Bull Exp Biol Med. 134(2):135-6. 2002.; Pelter A, et al. The structure of silybinin (silybum substance E6) – the first flavonoligonan. Tetrahedron Lett. 25:2911-6. 1968.; Polichetti
E, et al. Cholesterol-lowering effect of soybean lecithin in normolipidaemic rats by stimulation of biliary lipid secretion. Br J Nutr. 75(3):471-8. 1996.; Pompei R, et al. Glycyrrhizic acid inhibits virus growth and inactivates virus particles.
Nature. 281(5733):689-90. 1979.; Racz-Kotilla E, et al. The action of Taraxacum officinale extracts on the body weight and diureses of laboratory animals. Planta Medica. 26:212-7. 1974.; Rafi MM, et al. Novel polyphenol molecule
isolated from licorice root (Glycrrhiza glabra) induces apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest, and Bcl-2 phosphorylation in tumor cell lines. J Agric Food Chem. 50(4):677-84. 2002.; Salmi H, et al. Effect of silymarin on chemical, functional
and morphological alterations of the liver. Scand J Gastroenterol. 17:517-21. 1982.; Schopen RD, et al. Searching for a new therapeutic principle. Experience with hepatic therapeutic agent legalon. Med Welt. 20:888-93. 1969.; Schopen
RD, et al. Therapy of hepatoses. Therapeutic uses of silymarin. Med Welt. 21:691-8. 1970.; Sharma RA, et al. Effects of dietary curcumin on glutathione S-transferase and malondialdehyde-DNA adducts in rat liver and colon mucosa: relationship
Wysong RX – 37
with drug levels. Clin Cancer Res. 7:1452-8. 2001.; Shinada M, et al. Enhancement of interferon-gamma production in glycyrrhizin-treated human peripheral lymphocytes in response to concanavalin A and to surface antigen of hepatitis
B virus. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 181(2):205-10. 1986.; Soni KB, et al. Reversal of afalatoxin induced liver damage by turmeric and curcumin. Cancer Letter. 66(2):115-21. 1992.; Soudamini KK, et al. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation
and cholesterol levels in mice by curcumin. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 36(4):239-43. 1992.; Sreejayan, et al. Curcuminoids as potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation. J Pharm Pharmacol. 46(12):1013-6. 1994.; Srimal R, et al. Pharmacology
of diferuloxylmethane (curcumin), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent. J Pharmacol. 25:447-52. 1973.; Susnik F. The present state of knowledge about the medicinal plant Taraxacum officinale Weber. Med Razgl. 21:323-8. 1982.;
Suzuki H, et al. Effects of glycyrrhizin on biochemical tests in patients with chronic hepatitis – double-blind trial. Asian Med J. 26:423-38. 1984.; Takada K, et al. Core structure of glycyrrhizan GA, the main polysaccharide from the stolon
of Glycyrrhiza glabra var. glandulifera; anti-complementary and alkaline phosphatase-inducing activities of the polysaccharide and its degradation products. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 40(9):2487-90. 1992.; Thomas M, et al. Diallyl disulfide
increases rat h-ferritin, L-ferritin and transferring receptor genes in vitro in hepatic cells and in vivo in liver. J Nutr. 132(12):3638-41. 2002.; Thyagarajan S, et al. Herbal medicines for liver diseases in India. J Gastroenerol Hepatol. 17
Suppl 3:S370-S376. 2002.; Tompkins R, et al. Relationship of biliary phospholipid and cholesterol concentrations to the occurance of human gallstones. Ann Surg. 172(6):936-45. 1970.; Tong LM, et al. Mechanisms of the antioxidant
activity of a high molecular weight fraction of whey. J Agric Food Chem. 48:1473-8. 2000.; Tuchweber B, et al. Prevention by silybinin of phalloidin induced hepatotoxicity. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 51:265-75. 1979.; Tuzhilin
S, et al. The treatment of patients with gallstones by lecithin. Am J Gastroenterol. 65:231. 1976.; Valenzuela A, et al. Selectivity of silymarin on the increase of the glutathione content in different tissues of the rat. Planta Medica.
55:42. 1989.; Wagner H, et al. The chemistry of silymarin (silybinin), the active principle of the fruits and Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. Arzneim-Forsch Drug Res. 18:688-96. 1968.; Watson JP, et al. Case report: oral antioxidant
therapy for the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis: a pilot study. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 10:1034-40. 1999.; Williams CA, et al. Flavonoids, cinnamic acids and coumarins from the different tissues and medicinal
preparations of Taraxacum officinale. Phytochemistry. 42(1):121-7. 1996.; Wong CW, et al. Immunomodulatory effects of dietary whey proteins in mice. J Dairy Res. 62:359-68. 1995.; Yang CS, et al. Mechanisms of inhibition
of chemical toxicity and carcinogenesis by diallyl sulfide (DAS) and related compounds from garlic. J Nutr. 131(3s):1041S-5S. 2001.; Zhao J, et al. Anti-tumor-promoting activity of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seed
in the mouse skin two-stage initiation-promotion protocol and identification of procyanidin B5-3’ –gallate as the most effective antioxidant constituent. Carcinogenesis. 20:1737-45. 1999.
Immuncef™
Description:
Immuncef™ supports the nutritional needs of dogs and cats by supplying an archetypal balance of meat proteins, fats,
vitamins, minerals, antibodies, and other micronutrients.
Indications: Immune
Clinical Biochemistry: See Introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Dried Whole Milk, Dried Whey, Dried Egg, Casein, Lecithin, LArginine, Coriolis Mushroom, Shiitake Mushroom, Maitake Mushroom, Garlic, Cat’s Claw, Beta 1,3 Glucans, Dried Plasma,
Dried Thymus, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase,
Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae
Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage,
Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese
Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement,
Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Aguilar JL, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of two different extracts of Uncaria tomentosa (Rubiaceae). J Ethnopharmacol. 81(2):271-276. 2002. ; Anon. Beta-carotene regresses tumors in animal model. Harvard Medical Area Focus.
6/5/56:1.; Antunes LMG, et al. Effects of the antioxidants curcumin and vitamin C on the induced clastogenesis in Wistar rat bone marrow cells. Mutat Res. 465:131-137. 2000.; Augustsson K, et al. A prospective study of intake of fish
and marine fatty acids and prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers. 12(1):64-67. 2003.; Bagheri D, et al. Database of inhibitors of carcinogenesis. J Environ Sci Health. 6:261-414. 1989.; Bito T, et al. Pine bark extract pycongenol
downregulates IFN-gamma-induced adhesion of T cells to human keratinocytes by inhibiting inducible ICAM-1 expression. Free Rad Biol Med. 28:219-227. 2000.; Bonnesen C, et al. Dietary indoles and isothiocyanates that are generated
from cruciferous vegetables can both stimulate apoptosis and confer protection against DNA damage in human colon cell lines. Cancer Res. 61(16):6120-6130. 2001.; Bounous G, et al. Influence of dietary proteins on the immune system
of mice. J Nutr. 112:1747-1755. 1982.; Borchers AT, et al. Mushrooms, tumors, and immunity. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 221:281-293. 1999.; Borugian MJ, et al. Carbohydrate and colorectal cancer risk among Chinese in North America.
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. 11(2):187-193. 2002.; Braga M, et al. Preoperative oral arginine and n-fatty acids supplementation improves the immunometabolic host response and outcome after colorectal resection
for cancer. Surgery. 132(4):805-814. 2002.; Brattgierd S, et al. Effect of injected yeast glucan on the activity of macrophages in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., as evaluated by in vitro hydrogen peroxide production and phagocytic
capacity. Immunology. 83:288-294. 1994.; Bruce WR, et al. Mechanism linking diet and colorectal cancer: the possible role of insulin resistance. Nutrition and Cancer. 37(1):19-26. 2000.; Byers T, et al. Dietary carotenoids, vitamin
C and vitamin E as protective antioxidants in human cancers. Annu Rev Nutr. 12:139-159. 1992.; Byers T, et al. Epidemiologic evidence for vitamin C and vitamin E in cancer prevention. Am J Clin Nutr. 62(suppl):1285S-1392S. 1985.;
Cangemi P, et al. Thymostimulation effect on the immune response in neoplastic patients submitted to surgical treatment. Panminerva Medica. 35:218-223. 1993.; Chang R. Functional properties of edible mushrooms. Nutr Rev. 54:S91S93. 1996.; Cohen JH, et al. Fruit and vegetable intakes and prostate cancer risk. J Natl Cancer Inst. 92(1):61-68. 2000.; Drucker M. Chlorella: The key to healthy, vitality and longevity. Health and Happiness Publishing, Greenvile,
SC. 2002.; Fahey J, et al. Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers of enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens. Proc Natl Aca Sci USA. 94:10367-10372. 1997.; Franceschi S, et al. Dietary glycemic load and
colorectal cancer risk. Annals of Oncology. 12(2):173-178. 2001.; Frydoonfar HR, et al. The effect of indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane on a prostate cancer cell line. ANZ J Surg. 73(3):154-156. 2003.; Gamet-Payrastre L, et al. Sulforaphane,
a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Cancer Research. 60:1426:1433. 2000.; Gann PH, et al. Lower prostate cancer risk in men with elevated plasma lycopene
levels: Results of a prospective analysis. Cancer Research. 59:1225-1230. 1999.; Gerhauser C, et al. Cancer chemopreventative potential of sulforaphamate, a novel analogue of sulforaphane that induces phase 2 drug-metabolizing enzymes.
Cancer Research. 57:272. 1997.; Giovannucci E, et al. Intake of carotenoids and retinal in relation to risk of prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Ins. 87:1757:1776. 1995.; Hamilton KK. Antioxidant supplements during cancer treatments:
where do we stand? Clin J Oncol Nurs. 5(4):181-182. 2001.; Hardman WE. Omega-3 fatty acids to augment cancer therapy.; Head KA. Ascorbic acid in the prevention and treatment of cancer. 3(3):174-186. 1998.; Hecht SS. Chemoprevention
of cancer by iothiocyanates, modifiers of carcinogen metabolism. J Nutr. 129(3):7685. 1999.; Heinonen OP, et al. Prostate cancer and supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene: Incidence and mortality in a controlled trial.
J Natl Cancer Inst. 90:440-446. 1998.; Huang MT, et al. Inhibitory effects of curcumin on tumorigenesis in mice. J Cell Biochem Suppl. 27:26-34. 1997.; Inoue A, et al. Effect of maitake (Grifola frondosa) D-fraction on the control of
the T lymph node Th-1/TH-2 proportion. Biol Pharm Bull. 25(4):536-540. 2002.; Iqbal M, et al. Dietary supplementation of curcumin enhances antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes in ddY male mice: possible role in protection
against chemical carcinogenesis and toxicity. Pharmacology and Toxicology. 92(1):33. 2003.; Jin L, et al. Indole-3-carbinol prevents cervical cancer in human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) transgenic mice. Cancer Research.
59(16):3991-3997. 1999.; Justo GZ, et al. Effects of the green algae Chlorella vulgaris on the response of the host hematopoietic system to intraperitoneal ehrlich ascites tumor transplantation in mice. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol.
23(1):119-132. 2001.; Kapadia GJ, et al. Inhibitory effect of herbal remedies on 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-promted Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation. Pharmacol Res. 45(3):213-220. 2002.; Kawamori T, et al.
Chemopreventive effect of curcumin, a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, during the promotion/progression stages of colon cancer. Cancer Res. 59:597-601. 1999.; Kelloff GH, et al. Progress in cancer chemoprevention. Ann
NY Aced Sci. 889:1-3. 1999.; Kelloff GJ, et al. Clinical development plan: Curcumin. J Cell Biochem. 26(suppl):72-85. 1996.; Kellof GJ, et al. Clinical development plan: Indole-3-carbinol. J Cell Biochem. 26(suppl):72-85. 1996.; Kidd
P. The use of mushroom glucans and proteoglycans in cancer treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5:4-27. 2000.; Kidd PM. The use of mushroom glucans and proteglycans in cancer treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5(1):4-27. 2000.; Kodama N, et al.
Can maitake MD-fraction aid cancer patients? Altern Med Rev. 7(3):451. 2002.; Komatsu S, et al. Antitumor effect of vitamin B6 and its mechanisms. Biochim Biohphys Acta. 1647(1-2):127-130. 2003.; Komninou D, et al. Insulin resistance
and its contribution to colon carcinogenesis. Exp Biol Med. 228(4):396-405. 2003.; Kuo ML, et al. Curcumin, an antioxidant and anti-tumor promoter, induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells. Biochem Biophys Acta. 1217:95-100.
1996.; Ladanyi A, et al. Effect of lentinan on macrophage cytotoxicity against metatastic tumor cells. Cancer Immunol Immunother. 36:123-126. 1993.; Lamm DL, et al. The potential application of Allium sativum (garlic) for the treatment
of bladder cancer. Urol Clin North Am. 27(1):157-162. 2000.; Lawrence R, et al. Eicosapentaenoic acid in cystic fibrosis: evidence of a pathogenic role for leukotriene B4. Lancet. 342:465-469. 1993.; Lee JY, et al. Docosahexaenoic
acid suppresses the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in a colon tumor cell line. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 298(5):667-674. 2002.; Lee SK, et al. Modulation of in vitro biomarkers of the carcinogenic process
by chemopreventive agents. Anticancer Res. 19(1A):35-44. 1999.; Lopez-Lazaro M, et al. Flavonoids as anticancer agents: structure-activity relationship study. Curr Med Chemi Anti-Canc Agents. 2(6):691-714. 2002.; Luts W. The
carbohydrate theory. Wien Med Wochenschr. 144(16):387-392. 1994.; Madsen L, et al. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid affect mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation in relation to substrate preference. Lipids.
34:951-963. 1999.; Mai V, et al. Calorie restriction and diet consumption modulate spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min) mice through different mechanisms. Cancer Res. 63(8):1752-1755. 2003.; Manzi P, et al. Beta-glucans
in edible mushrooms. Food Chemistry. 68:315-318. 2000.; Marcus AJ. The eicosanoids in biology and medicine. J Lipid Res. 25:1511-1516. 1984.; Matsuoka H, et al. Lentinan potentiates immunity and prolongs the survival time
of some patients. Anticancer Res. 17:2751-2755. 1997.; Mertin J. Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturates and the immune system. Br J Clin Pract. 31:111-114. 1985.; Meyers DG, et al. Safety of antioxidant vitamins. Arch Intern Med.
156:925-935. 1996.; Michaud DS, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of bladder cancer in male prospective cohort. J Natl Cancer Inst. 91(7):605-613. 1999.; Miller MJ, et al. Dietary antioxidants protect gut epithelial cells
from oxidant-induced apoptosis. BMC Complement Altern Med. 1(1):11. 2001.; Mitamura T, et al. Effects of lentinan on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice with ulcerative colitis. Oncol Rep. 7:559-601. 2000.; Negri E, et al. Vegetable and
fruit consumption and cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 48:450-354. 1991.; Noda K, et al. Simple assay for antitumour immunoactive glycoprotein derived from Chlorella vulgaris strain CK22 using ELISA. Phytother Res. 16(6):581-585. 2002.;
Ooi VE, et al. Immunomodulation and anti-cancer activity of polysaccharide-protein complexes. Curr Med Chem. 7(7):715-729. 2000.; Osband ME, et al. Histiocytiosis-X: Demonstration of abnormal immunity, T-cell histamine H2-receptor
deficiency, and successful treatment with thymic extract. NEJM. 304:146-153. 1981.; Park, et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte natural cytotoxicity by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645-646. 1991.; Patchen M, et al. Temporal response of murine
pluripotent stem cells and myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells to low-dose glucan treatment. Acta Hemat. 70:281-288. 1983.; Patchen M, et al. Stimulated hemopoiesis in enhanced survival following glucan treatment in sublethally
and lethally irradiated mice. Int J Immunopharc. 7:923-932. 1985.; Patchen M, et al. Glucan: mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect. J Lec Biol. 42:95-105. 1987.; PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Medical Economics Company,
Montvale, NJ. 2001.; Piscoya J, et al. Efficacy and safety of freeze-dried cat’s claw in osteoarthritis of the knee: mechanisms of action of the species Uncaria guianensis. Inflamm Res. 50(9):442-448. 2001.; Plumb GW, et al. Antioxidant
properties of catechins and proanthocyanidins. Free Radic Res. 29(4):351-358. 1998.; Quillin P. Top 10 cancer fighting foods. Cancer Tmt Inst Amer. 1998.; Redgrave TG. Lipids in enteral nutrition. Curr Opin Nutr Metab Care. 2(2):147152. 1999.; Rice R. Fish oils: Their significance to human health. J Royal Soc Med. 81:499-501. 1988.; Samuelsson B. Leukotrienes: Mediators of immediate hypersensivity reactions and inflammation. Science. 220:568-575. 1983.;
Sandoval M, et al. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of cat’s claw (Uncaria tomentosa and Uncaria guianensis) are independent of their alkaloid content. Phytomedicine. 9(4):325-337. 2002.; Sandoval M, et al. Cat’s claw inhibits
TNFalpha production and scavenges free radicals: role in cytoprotection. Free Radic Biol Med. 29(1):71-78. 2000.; Sandoval-Chacon, et al. Antiinflammatory action of cat’s claw: the role of NF-kappaB. Aliment Pharmacol Ther.
12(12):1279-1289. 1998.; Seljelid R, Macrophage activation. Scand J of Rheumatology. 76:67-72. 1988.; Sengupta A, et al. Tomato and garlic can modulate azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Eur J Cancer Prev.
12(3):195-200. 2003.; Schwartz, et al Beta-carotene is associated with the regression of hamster buccal pouch carcinoma and the induction of tumor necrosis factor in macrophages. Biochem and Biophys Res Commun. 136:1130. 1986.;
X repair, immune function and reduced toxicity of C-MED-100, a novel aqueous extract from Uncaria tomentosa. J Ethnopharmacol. 69(2):115-126. 2000.; Shibata A, et al. Intake of vegetables, fruits, betaSheng Y, et al. Enhanced DNA
38 – Wysong R
carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin supplements and cancer incidence among the elderly: A prospective study. Br J Cancer. 66:673-679. 1992.; Simopoulos AP. Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. J Am Coll
Nutr. 21(6):495-505. 2002.; Suda D, et al. Inhibition of experimental oral carcinogenesis by topical beta-carotene. Carcinogenesis. 7:711. 1986.; Tanaka K, et al. Oral administration of Chlorella vulgaris augments concomitant antitumor
immunity. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 12(2):277-291. 1990.; Tari, et al . Effect of lentinan for advanced prostate carcinoma. Hinyokika Kiyo. 40:119-123. 1994.; Tavani A, et al. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and
cancer risk in Italy and Switzerland. Int J Cancer. 105(1):113-116. 2003.; Terano T, et al. Effect of oral administration of highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid on platelet function, blood viscosity and red blood cell deformability in healthy
human subjects. Atherscler. 46:321-331. 1983.; Traber MG, et al. Vitamin E: Beyond antioxidant function. Am J Clin Nutr. 62(suppl):1401S-1509S. 1995.; Tsuda H, et al. Milk components as cancer chemopreventive agents. Asian Pac
J Cancer Prev. 1(4):277-282. 2000.; Vietri M, et al. Curcumin is a potent inhibitor of phenol sulfotransferase (SULT1A1) in human liver and extrahepatic tissues. Xenobiotica. 33(4):357-363. 2003.; Yamanaka W. Vitamins and cancer
prevention. Postgrad Med. 82(3):149. 1987.; Zhang Y, et al. Functional relationship between age-related immunodeficiency and learning deterioration. Eur J Neurosci. 10(12):3869-3875. 1998.; Zhang YH, et al. Possible immunologic
involvement of antioxidants in cancer prevention. Am J Clin Nutr. 62(suppl):1477S-1428S. 1995.
Lithonel™
Description:
Lithonel™ is specifically designed to enhance elimination of trichobezoars and other foreign material, or impacted digestive
tract matter by stimulating motility, mucus secretion, and modifying the matrix of ingesta to decrease transit time.
Indications: Hairball
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Plums, Modified Plant Fiber, Oat Bran, Flaxseed Meal, Milk Calcium,
Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried
Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic
Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium
Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate,
Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Anderson JW, et al. Health benefits and practical aspects of high-fiber diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 59(5 Suppl):1242S-1247S. 1994.; Chen HL, et al. Mechanisms by which wheat bran and oat bran increase stool weight in humans. Am J Clin
Nutr. 68(3):711-719. 1998.; Eastwood MA. Fiber in the gastrointestinal tract. Am J Clin Nutr. 31:20. 1978.; Exogenous enzymes in monogastric nutrition – their current value and future benefits. Animal Feed Science and Technology.
86(1-2): 2000.; Howell E. Enzyme Nutrition. Avery Publishing Group, New Jersey. 1985.; Kim YS. Role of peptidases on the human small intestine in protein digestion. Gastro. 88(4):1071. 1985.; Knowles RP, et al. Clinical impressions
of the use of an enzyme additive in large and small animals. VM/SAC. 74(12):1733. 1979.; Knudsen KE, et al. Digestion of polysaccharides and other major components in the small and large intestine of pigs fed on diets consisting of
oat fractions rich in beta-D-glucans. Br J Nutr. 70(2):537-556. 1993.; Kontula P, et al. Oat bran beta-gluco and xylo-oligosaccharides as fermentative substrates for lactic acid bacteria. Int J Food Microbiol. 45(2):163-169. 1998.; Levin
EG, et al. Comparison of psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid and cellulose in the treatment of mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Arch Intern Med. 150:1822-1827. 1990.; Reele SB, et al. Sorbitol induced diarrheal illness model. Int J
Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol. 23(8):403-405. 1985.; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis M, et al. Chemical composition and potential health effects of prunes: a functional food? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 41(4):251-286. 2001.; Terrell SS, et al. On
trial: An enzyme-producing food supplement for dogs. Vet Med. 79(11):1367. 1984.; Wursch P, et al. The role of viscous soluble fiber in the metabolic control of diabetes. A review with special emphasis on cereals rich in beta-glucans.
Diabetes Care. 20(11):1774-1780. 1997.
Neomentin™
Description:
Neomentin™ supports the nutritional needs of dogs and cats by supplying an archetypal balance of meat proteins, fats,
vitamins, minerals, antibodies, and other micronutrients.
Indications: Neoplasia
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Dried Whey, Lecithin, Coriolis Mushroom, Shiitake Mushroom, Maitake Mushroom,
Garlic, Beta 1,3 Glucans, Dried Thymus, Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Acerola
Juice, Black Currants, Rosehips), Beta-Carotene (D. salina), Vitamin E supplement, Tomato powder, Turmeric, Methylated
Sulfur, Grape Seed Extract, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Maritime Pine Bark Extract, Dried Plasma, Dehydrated Broccoli, Brussels
Sprouts, Cauliflower, Red and Green Cabbage, Kale, and Broccoli Sprouts, Alpha-D-Galactosidase, Chlorella, L-Glutamine,
Milk Calcium, Lecithin, Coconut Oil, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke,
Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Wysong
Zinc Proteinate,
R – 39
X
Iron Proteinate, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate,
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin
D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Anon. Beta-carotene regresses tumors in animal model. Harvard Medical Area Focus. 6/5/56:1.; Antunes LMG, et al. Effects of the antioxidants curcumin and vitamin C on the induced clastogenesis in Wistar rat bone marrow cells. Mutat
Res. 465:131-137. 2000.; Arbiser JL, et al. Curcumin is an in vivo inhibitor of angiogenesis. Mol Med. 4:376-383. 1998.; Augustsson K, et al. A prospective study of intake of fish and marine fatty acids and prostate cancer. Cancer
Epidemiol Biomarkers. 12(1):64-67. 2003.; Bagheri D, et al. Database of inhibitors of carcionogenesis. J Environ Sci Health. 6:261-414. 1989.; Bito T, et al. Pine bark extract pycongenol downregulates IFN-gamma-induced adhesion
of T cells to human keratinocytes by inhibiting inducible ICAM-1 expression. Free Rad Biol Med. 28:219-227. 2000.; Bonnesen C, et al. Dietary indoles and isothiocyanates that are generated from cruciferous vegetables can both stimulate
apoptosis and confer protection against DNA damage in human colon cell lines. Cancer Res. 61(16):6120-6130. 2001.; Borchers AT, et al. Mushrooms, tumors, and immunity. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 221:281-293. 1999.; Borugian
MJ, et al. Carbohydrate and colorectal cancer risk among Chinese in North America. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. 11(2):187-193. 2002.; Braga M, et al. Preoperative oral arginine and n-fatty acids supplementation
improves the immunometabolic host response and outcome after colorectal resection for cancer. Surgery. 132(4):805-814. 2002.; Bruce WR, et al. Mechanism linking diet and colorectal cancer: the possible role of insulin resistance. Nutrition
and Cancer. 37(1):19-26. 2000.; Byers T, et al. Dietary carotenoids, vitamin C and vitamin E as protective antioxidants in human cancers. Annu Rev Nutr. 12:139-159. 1992.; Byers T, et al. Epidemiologic evidence for vitamin C and
vitamin E in cancer prevention. Am J Clin Nutr. 62(suppl):1285S-1392S. 1985.; Chang R. Functional properties of edible mushrooms. Nutr Rev. 54:S91-S93. 1996.; Clark L, et al. Decreased incidence of prostate cancer with selenium
supplementation: results of a double-blind cancer prevention trial Br J Urol. 81:730-734. 1998.; Chan MM-Y. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor by curcumin, a phytochemical. Biochem Pharmacol. 49:1551-1556. 1995.; Chiao JW,
et al. Modulation of growth of human prostate cancer cells by the N-cetylcysteine conjugate of pehethyl isothiocyanate. Int J Oncol. 16(6):1215-1219. 2000.; Cohen JH, et al. Fruit and vegetable intakes and prostate cancer risk. J Natl
Cancer Inst. 92(1):61-68. 2000.; Drucker M. Chlorella: The key to healthy, vitality and longevity. Health and Happiness Publishing, Greenvile, SC. 2002.; Fahey J, et al. Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers of
enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens. Proc Natl Aca Sci USA. 94:10367-10372. 1997.; Franceschi S, et al. Dietary glycemic load and colorectal cancer risk. Annals of Oncology. 12(2):173-178. 2001.; Frydoonfar HR, et
al. The effect of indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane on a prostate cancer cell line. ANZ J Surg. 73(3):154-156. 2003.; Gamet-Payrastre L, et al. Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis
in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Cancer Research. 60:1426:1433. 2000.; Gann PH, et al. Lower prostate cancer risk in men with elevated plasma lycopene levels: Results of a prospective analysis. Cancer Research. 59:1225-1230.
1999.; Gerhauser C, et al. Cancer chemopreventative potential of sulforaphamate, a novel analogue of sulforaphane that induces phase 2 drug-metabolizing enzymes. Cancer Research. 57:272. 1997.; Giovannucci E, et al. Intake of
carotenoids and retinal in relation to risk of prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Ins. 87:1757:1776. 1995.; Hamilton KK. Antioxidant supplements during cancer treatments: where do we stand? Clin J Oncol Nurs. 5(4):181-182. 2001.; Hardman
WE. Omega-3 fatty acids to augment cancer therapy.; Head KA. Ascorbic acid in the prevention and treatment of cancer. 3(3):174-186. 1998.; Hecht SS. Chemoprevention of cancer by iothiocyanates, modifiers of carcinogen metabolism.
J Nutr. 129(3):7685. 1999.; Heinonen OP, et al. Prostate cancer and supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene: Incidence and mortality in a controlled trial. J Natl Cancer Inst. 90:440-446. 1998.; Huang MT, et al. Inhibitory
effects of curcumin on tumorigenesis in mice. J Cell Biochem Suppl. 27:26-34. 1997.; Inoue A, et al. Effect of maitake (Grifola frondosa) D-fraction on the control of the T lymph node Th-1/TH-2 proportion. Biol Pharm Bull. 25(4):536540. 2002.; Iqbal M, et al. Dietary supplementation of curcumin enhances antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes in ddY male mice: possible role in protection against chemical carcinogenesis and toxicity. Pharmacology and
Toxicology. 92(1):33. 2003.; Jin L, et al. Indole-3-carbinol prevents cervical cancer in human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) transgenic mice. Cancer Research. 59(16):3991-3997. 1999.; Justo GZ, et al. Effects of the green algae Chlorella
vulgaris on the response of the host hematopoietic system to intraperitoneal ehrlich ascites tumor transplantation in mice. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 23(1):119-132. 2001.; Kawamori T, et al. Chemopreventive effect of curcumin,
a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, during the promotion/progression stages of colon cancer. Cancer Res. 59:597-601. 1999.; Kelloff GH, et al. Progress in cancer chemoprevention. Ann NY Aced Sci. 889:1-3. 1999.; Kelloff
GJ, et al. Clinical development plan: Curcumin. J Cell Biochem. 26(suppl):72-85. 1996.; Kellof GJ, et al. Clinical development plan: Indole-3-carbinol. J Cell Biochem. 26(suppl):72-85. 1996.; Kidd P. The use of mushroom glucans
and proteoglycans in cancer treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5:4-27. 2000.; Kidd PM. The use of mushroom glucans and proteglycans in cancer treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5(1):4-27. 2000.; Kodama N, et al. Can maitake MD-fraction aid cancer
patients? Altern Med Rev. 7(3):451. 2002.; Komatsu S, et al. Antitumor effect of vitamin B6 and its mechanisms. Biochim Biohphys Acta. 1647(1-2):127-130. 2003.; Komninou D, et al. Insulin resistance and its contribution to colon
carcinogenesis. Exp Biol Med. 228(4):396-405. 2003.; Kuo ML, et al. Curcumin, an antioxidant and anti-tumor promoter, induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells. Biochem Biophys Acta. 1217:95-100. 1996.; Ladanyi A, et al. Effect
of lentinan on macrophage cytotoxicity against metatastic tumor cells. Cancer Immunol Immunother. 36:123-126. 1993.; Lee JY, et al. Docosahexaenoic acid suppresses the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in a colon
tumor cell line. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 298(5):667-674. 2002.; Lee SK, et al. Modulation of in vitro biomarkers of the carcinogenic process by chemopreventive agents. Anticancer Res. 19(1A):35-44. 1999.; Liu FJ, et al. Pycnogenol
enhances immune and haemopoietic functions in senescence-accelerated mice. Cell Mol Life Sci. 54:1168-1172. 1998.; London SJ, et al. Isothiocyanates, glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 polymorphisms, and lung cancer risk: A
prospective study of men in Shanghai, China. Lancet. 356:724-729. 2000.; Lopez-Lazaro M, et al. Flavonoids as anticancer agents: structure-activity relationship study. Curr Med Chemi Anti-Canc Agents. 2(6):691-714. 2002.; Luts
W. The carbohydrate theory. Wien Med Wochenschr. 144(16):387-392. 1994.; Mai V, et al. Calorie restriction and diet consumption modulate spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min) mice through different mechanisms. Cancer
Res. 63(8):1752-1755. 2003.; Manzi P, et al. Beta-glucans in edible mushrooms. Food Chemistry. 68:315-318. 2000.; Marcus AJ. The eicosanoids in biology and medicine. J Lipid Res. 25:1511-1516. 1984.; Matsuoka H, et al. Lentinan
potentiates immunity and prolongs the survival time of some patients. Anticancer Res. 17:2751-2755. 1997.; Mertin J. Omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturates and the immune system. Br J Clin Pract. 31:111-114. 1985.; Meyers DG,
et al. Safety of antioxidant vitamins. Arch Intern Med. 156:925-935. 1996.; Michaud DS, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of bladder cancer in male prospective cohort. J Natl Cancer Inst. 91(7):605-613. 1999.; Mitamura
T, et al. Effects of lentinan on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice with ulcerative colitis. Oncol Rep. 7:559-601. 2000.; Miyazawa Y, et al. Immunomodulation by a unicellular green algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) in tumor-bearing mice. J
Ethnopharmacol. 24(2-3)L135-146. 1988.; Negri E, et al. Vegetable and fruit consumption and cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 48:450-354. 1991.; Noda K, et al. Simple assay for antitumour immunoactive glycoprotein derived from Chlorella
vulgaris strain CK22 using ELISA. Phytother Res. 16(6):581-585. 2002.; Noda K, et al. A water-soluble antitumor glycoprotein from Chlorella vulgaris. Planta Med. 62(5):423-426. 1996.; Nomoto K, et al. Antitumor activity of chlorella
extract, PCM-4, by oral administration. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 10(3):781-785. 1983.; Ooi VE, et al. Immunomodulation and anti-cancer activity of polysaccharide-protein complexes. Curr Med Chem. 7(7):715-729. 2000.; Osband ME,
et al. Histiocytiosis-X: Demonstration of abnormal immunity, T-cell histamine H2-receptor deficiency, and successful treatment with thymic extract. NEJM. 304:146-153. 1981.; Pandya U, et al. Dietary curcumin prevents ocular toxicity
of naphthalene in rats. Toxicol Lett. 115:195-204. 2000.; Park, et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte natural cytotoxicity by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645-646. 1991.; Patchen M, et al. Temporal response of murine pluripotent stem cells and
myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells to low-dose glucan treatment. Acta Hemat. 70:281-288. 1983.; Patchen M, et al. Stimulated hemopoiesis in enhanced survival following glucan treatment in sublethally and lethally irradiated mice.
Int J Immunopharc. 7:923-932. 1985.; Patchen M, et al. Glucan: mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect. J Lec Biol. 42:95-105. 1987.; PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Medical Economics Company, Montvale, NJ. 2001.;
Plumb GW, et al. Antioxidant properties of catechins and proanthocyanidins. Free Radic Res. 29(4):351-358. 1998.; Quillin P. Top 10 cancer fighting foods. Cancer Tmt Inst Amer. 1998.; Raloff J. Another reason to eat your broccoli
raw. Science News. 137:367. 1990.; Raloff J. Anticancer agent sprouts up unexpectedly. Science News On-line. 1997.; Redgrave TG. Lipids in enteral nutrition. Curr Opin Nutr Metab Care. 2(2):147-152. 1999.; Rice R. Fish oils: Their
significance to human health. J Royal Soc Med. 81:499-501. 1988.; Samuelsson B. Leukotrienes: Mediators of immediate hypersensivity reactions and inflammation. Science. 220:568-575. 1983.; Seljelid R, Macrophage activation. Scand
J of Rheumatology. 76:67-72. 1988.; Sengupta A, et al. Tomato and garlic can modulate azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Eur J Cancer Prev. 12(3):195-200. 2003.; Schwartz, et al Beta-carotene is associated with
the regression of hamster buccal pouch carcinoma and the induction of tumor necrosis factor in macrophages. Biochem and Biophys Res Commun. 136:1130. 1986.; Shibata A, et al. Intake of vegetables, fruits, beta-carotene, vitamin C,
and vitamin supplements and cancer incidence among the elderly: A prospective study. Br J Cancer. 66:673-679. 1992.; Simopoulos AP. Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. J Am Coll Nutr. 21(6):495-505.
2002.; Steinkellner H, et al. Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutat Res. 1(480-481)285-297. 2001.; Stoll BA, et
al. Western nutrition and the insulin resistance syndrome: a link to breast cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 53(2):83-87. 1999.; Stroh M. Inside broccoli: A weapon against cancer. Science News. 141:183. 1992.; Suda
D, et al. Inhibition of experimental oral carcinogenesis by topical beta-carotene. Carcinogenesis. 7:711. 1986.; Tanaka K, et al. Oral administration of Chlorella vulgaris augments concomitant antitumor immunity. Immunopharmacol
Immunotoxicol. 12(2):277-291. 1990.; Tari, et al . Effect of lentinan for advanced prostate carcinoma. Hinyokika Kiyo. 40:119-123. 1994.; Tavani A, et al. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and cancer risk in Italy and Switzerland.
Int J Cancer. 105(1):113-116. 2003.; Traber MG, et al. Vitamin E: Beyond antioxidant function. Am J Clin Nutr. 62(suppl):1401S-1509S. 1995.; Tsuda H, et al. Milk components as cancer chemopreventive agents. Asian Pac J Cancer
Prev. 1(4):277-282. 2000.; Venkatesan N, et al. Curcumin prevents adriamyscin nephrotoxicity in rates. Br J Pharmacol. 129:231-234. 2000.; Venkatesan N, et al. Pulmonary protective effects of curcumin against paraquat toxicity. Life
Sci. 66:PL21-PL28. 2000.; Verhagen H, et al. Reduction of oxidative DNA-damage in humans by Brussels sprouts. Carcinogenesis. 16:969-970. 1995.; Verhoeven D, et al. Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer
risk. Canc Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 5(9):733-748. 1996.; Verhoeven D, et al. A review of mechanisms underlying anticarcinogenicity by brassica vegetables. Chem Biol Interact. 103(2):79-129. 1997.; Verma AK. Retinoids in
chemoprevention of cancer. J Biol Regul Homest Agents. 17(1):92-97. 2003.; Vietri M, et al. Curcumin is a potent inhibitor of phenol sulfotransferase (SULT1A1) in human liver and extrahepatic tissues. Xenobiotica. 33(4):357-363. 2003.;
Yamanaka W. Vitamins and cancer prevention. Postgrad Med. 82(3):149. 1987.; Yu H, et al. Role of the insulin-like growth factor family in cancer development progression. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 92(18):1472-1489.
2000.; Zen H, et al. Effect of selenium-enriched broccoli diet on differential gene expressions in min mouse liver (1,2). J Nutr Biochem. 14(4):227-231. 2003.; Zhang SM, et al. Intakes of fruits, vegetables, and related nutrients and the
risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma among women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 9(5):477-485. 2000.; Zhang YH, et al. Possible immunologic involvement of antioxidants in cancer prevention. Am J Clin Nutr. 62(suppl):1477S1428S. 1995.; Zhang Y, et al. Anticarcinogenic activities of organic isothiocyanates: Chemistry and mechanisms. Cancer Research. 54(7):1976S1981S. 1994.; Zhang Y, et al. A major inducer of anticarcinogenic protective enzymes from
broccoli: Isolation and elucidation of structure. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 89(6):2399-2403. 1992.; Zhou N, et al. DNA damage-mediated apoptosis induced by selenium compounds. J Biol Chem. May 24, 2003.
Nephreon™
Description:
Nephreon™ supports the nutritional needs of dogs and cats by supplying an archetypal balance of meat proteins, fats,
vitamins, minerals, antibodies, and other micronutrients.
Indications: Kidney
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Dandelion Root, Dried Kidney, Uva ursi, Chlorella, Lecithin, Milk
Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase,
Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis
Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline
40 – Wysong RX
Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate,
Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin
A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Appel LG, et al. Does supplementation of diet with ‘fish oil’ reduce blood pressure? A meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials. Arch Intern Med. 153:1429-1438. 1993.; Blumenthal, et al. The Complete German Commision E Monographs
– Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. The American Botanical Council, Austin, TX. 1998.; Finco, R.R., Nutrition and treatment of renal disease. Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACVIM Forum, Charlotte, NC, 2003.; Hu C, et al.
Antioxidant, pro-oxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. J Agric Food Chem. 51(1):301-310. 2003.; Joksic G, et al. Antibacterial medicinal plants Equiseti herba
and Ononidis radix modulate micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes in vitro. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 22(1):41-48. 2003.; Kim HM, et al. Traxacum officinale inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from rat
astrocytes.; Kisiel W, et al. Further sesquiterpenoids and phenolics from Taraxacum officinale. Fitoterapia. 71(3):269-273. 2000.; Leung AY, et al. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics. 2nd
ed. New York, NY, Wiley. 205-206. 1996.; Neumayer HH, et al. Amelioration of ischemic acute renal failure by dietary fish oil administration in conscious dogs. J Am Soc Nephrol. 3(6):1312-1320. 1992.; Pyevich D, et al. Herbal diuretics
and lithium toxicity [letter]. Am J Psychiatry. 158:1329. 2001.; Racz-Kotilla E, at al. The action of Taraxacum officinale extracts on the body weight and diureses of laboratory animals. Planta Med. 26:212-217. 1974.; Toft I, et al. Effects
of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid on glucose homeostasis and blood pressure in essential hypertension. Ann Intern Med. 123:911-918. 1995.; Vaziri ND, et al. Down-regulation of hepatic lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase gene expression
in chronic renal failure. Kidney Int. 59(6):2192-2196. 2001.; Williams CA, et al. Flavonoids, cinnamic acids and coumarins from the different tissues and medicinal preparations of Taraxacum officinale. Phytochemistry. 42(1):121-127. 1996.;
Yarnell E. Botanical medicines for the urinary tract. World J Urol. 20(5):285-293. 2002.
Neuropril™
Description:
Neuropril™ is specifically designed to provide nutritional support to the neurologic system through archetypal nutritional
balances, biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Neurological
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use in pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Lecithin, Ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, Bacopa monniera, Huperzia serrata Moss,
Magnesium Taurinate, Phosphatidylserine, Acetyl-L-Carnitine, Docosahexanoic Acid (DHA), Coconut Oil, Milk Calcium,
Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus faecium
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger
Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate,
Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine
Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin,
Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Aisen Paul, et al. B vitamins slow Alzheimer’s progress. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Mar/Apr 2003. Barberger-Gateau et al. “Fish Meat, and Risk of Dementia: Cohort Study”. British Medical Journal. 325: 932-933. Oct
26, 2002. Cosgrove Joanna. Beneficial Brain Nutrients. Nutritional Outlook. June 1999; Crawford MA. The role of essential fatty acids in neural development: Implications for perinatal nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 57(supp):703S-710S.
1993. Crawford MA. The requirements of long chain N-6 and N-3 fatty acids for the brain. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Eicosanoids. Champaign, IL. 1987. Haag M. Essential fatty acids and the brain. Can J Psychiatry 48(3):195203. Apr 2003. Kim DH, et al. Effects of ginseng saponin administered intraperitoneally on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Neurosci L 29:343(1):62-66. May 29, 2003. Kuratsune H, et al. Brain regions involved in
fatigue sensations: Reduced acetylcarnitine uptake into the brain. Neuroimage. 17(3):1256-65. Nov 2002. Lefkowith JB, et al. Essential fatty acid deficiency impairs macrophage spreading and adherence. Role of arachidonate in cell
adhesion. J Biol Chem. 266(2):1071-6. 199. Moore SA. Role of the blood-brain barrier in the formation of long-chain omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids from essential fatty acid precursors. J Neurochem. 55(2):391-402. Aug 1990. Nemecz
G, Combest W. Herbal Pharmacy: Ginkgo Biloba. US Pharmacist. 22:9. 2003. Nyholm E, et al. Oral vitamin B12 can change our practice. Postgrad Med J. 79(930):218-9 Apr 2003. Wolfe LS. Eicosanoids: prostaglandins, thromboxanes,
leukotrienes, and other derivatives of carbon-20 unsaturated fatty acids. J Neurochem.38(1):1-14. Jan 1982.
Ocusone™
Description:
Ocusone™ provides nutritional support for ocular tissue through archetypal nutritional balances, biochemically rich ingredients
and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Eye
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Bilberry, Ginkgo Biloba, N-Ascorbic Acid, Acetyl Cysteine, Lutein,
Whey, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase,
Wysong RX – 41
Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae
Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage,
Choline Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate,
Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin
A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of high-dose supplementation with vitamins C and E, beta carotene, and zinc of age-related macular degeneration and vision loss: AREDS report no.8. Arch Ophthalmol. 119(10):141736. 2001.; Aruoma OI, et al. The antioxidant action of N-acetylcysteine: its reaction with hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. Free Radic Biol Med. 6:593-7. 1989.; Baier JE, et al. Radiation
protection through cytokine release by N-acetylcysteine. Strahlenther Onkol. 172:91-8. 1996.; Beatty S, et al. Macular pigment and risk for age-related macular degeneration in subjects from a Northern European population. Invest
Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 42(2):439-46. 2001.; Behr J, et al. Antioxidative and clinical effects of high-dose N-acetylcysteine in fibrosing alveolitis. Adjunctive therapy to maintenance immunosuppression. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 156:18971901. 1997.; Bell SJ. Whey protein concentrates with and without immunoglobulins: a review. J Med Food. 3:1-13. 2000.; Belleoud L, et al. Study on the effects of anthocyanin glycosides on the nocturnal vision of air traffic controllers.
Rev Med Aeronaut Spatiale. 18. 1966.; Berendschot TT, et al. Influence of lutein supplementation on macular pigment, assessed with two objective techniques. Invest Opthalmol Vis Sci. 41:3322-6. 2000.; Bertuglia S, et al. Effect
of vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides on ischaemia reperfusion injury in hamster cheek pouch microcirculation. Pharmacol Res. 31(3-4):183-7. 1995.; Bonanomi L, et al. Toxicological, pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies on
acetylcysteine. Eur J Respir Dis. 61:45-51. 1980.; Bone RA, et al. Distribution of lutein and zeaxanthin stereoisomers in the human retina. Exp Eye Res. 64:211-8. 1997.; Bongers V, et al. Antioxidant-related parameters in patients
treated for cancer chemoprevention with N-acetylcysteine. Europ J Cancer. 31A:921-3. 1995.; Bounous G, et al. The influence of dietary whey protein on tissue glutathione and the disease of aging. Clin Invest Med. 12:343-349.
1989.; Bravetti, G. Preventive medical treatment of senile cataract with vitamin E and anthocyanosides: clinical evaluation. Ann Ottalmol Clin Ocul. 115:109. 1989.; Bridi R, et al. The antioxidant activity of standardized extract of
Ginkgo biloba (Egb 761) in rats. Phytother Res. 15(5):449-51. 2001.; Brown L, et al. A prospective study of carotenoid intake and risk of cataract extraction in U.S. men. Am J Clin Nutr. 70:517-24. 1999.; Carr A, et al. Does vitamin
C act as a pro-oxidant under physiological conditions? FASEBJ. 13:1007-1024. 1999.; Challem J. Visionary vitamins: research establishes anti-oxidant nutrients as key to preventing blindness. Let’s Live Magazine. June: 52-55.
1995.; Chasan-Taber L, et al. A prospective study of carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and risk of cataract extraction in U.S. women. Am J Clin Nutr. 70:509-16. 1999.; Chirkov YY, et al. N-acetylcysteine potentiates nitroglycerininduced reversal of platelet aggregation. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 28:375-380. 1996.; Colantuoni A, et al. Effects of vaccinium myrtillus anthocyanosides on arterial vasomotion. Arzenimittelforschung. 41(9):905-9. 1991.; De
Flora, et al. Metabolic, desmutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of N-acetylcysteine. Respiration. 50:S43-S49. 1986.; De Flora S, et al. Attenuation of influence-like symptomatology and improvement of cell-mediated immunity with
long-term N-acetylcysteine treatment. Eur Respir J. 10:1535-41. 1997.; De Flora S, et al. In vivo effects of N-acetylcysteine on glutathione metabolism and on the biotransformation of carcinogenic and/or mutagenic compounds.
Carcinogenesis. 6:1735-45. 1985.; Detre Z, et al. Studies on vascular permeability in hypertension: action of anthocyanosides. Clin Physiol Biochem. 4(2):143-9. 1986.; DeVries N, et al. N-acetyl-L-cysteine. J Cell Biochem. Supp
17F:270-277. 1993.; Ellnain-Wojtaszek M, et al. Analysis of the content of flavonoids, phenolic acids as well as free radicals from Ginkgo biloba L. leaves during the vegetative cycle. Acta Pol Pharm. 58(3):205-9. 2001.; EllnainWojtaszek M, et al. Investigation of the free radical scavenging activity of Ginkgo biloba L. leaves. Fitoterapia. 74(1-2):1-6. 2003.; Hammond BR Jr, et al. Density of the hyman crystalline lens is related to the macular pigment carotenoids,
lutein and zeaxanthin. Optom Vis Sci. 74:499-504. 1997.; Hankinson SE, et al. All that glitters is not beta carotene. JAMA. 272:18. 1994.; Head KA. Natural therapies for ocular disorders, part two: cataracts and glaucoma. Altern
Med Rev. 6(2):141-66. 2001.; Hodges LC, et al. Intraocular pressure-lowering activity of phenolic antioxidants in normotensive rabbits. Curr Eye Res. 19(3):234-40. 1999.; Hodison T, et al. Carotenoid composition of Rosa canina
fruits determined by thin-layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. J Pharmaceut Biomed Anal. 16:521-8. 1997.; Holdiness MR. Clinical pharmacokinetics of N-acetylcysteine. Clinical Pharmacokinet. 20:123134. 1991.; Hollman PC, et al. Bioavailability and health effects of dietary flavonols in man. Arch Toxicol Suppl. 20:237-48. 1998.; Horakova L, et al. Standardized extracts of flavonoids increase the viability of PC12 cells treated
with hydrogen peroxide: effects on oxidative injury. Arch Toxicol. 77(1):22-9. 2003.; Jacque PF. The potential preventive effects of vitamins for cataract and age-related macular degeneration. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 69(3):198-205. 1999.;
Kelebic T, et al. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus expression in chronically infected monocyte cells by glutathione, glutathione ester, and N-acetylcysteine. Proc Natl Accd Sci. 88:986-990. 1991.; Kinsella JE, et al. Proteins
in whey: chemical, physical, and functional properties. Adv Food Nutr Res. 33:343-438. 1989.; Landrum JT, et al. A one year study of the macular pigment: the effect of 140 days of a lutein supplement. Exp Eye Res. 65:57-62. 1997.;
Laurent T, et al. Oxidant-antioxidant balance in granulocytes during ARDS. Effect of N-acetylcysteine. Chest. 109:163-6. 1996.; McKenna DJ, et al. Efficacy, safety, and use of ginkgo biloba in clinical and preclinical applications.
Altern Ther Health Med. 7(5):70-86, 88-90. 2001.; Molnar Z, et al. N-acetylcysteine treatment to prevent the progression of multisystem organ failure: a prospective, randomized placebo-controlled study. Crit Care Med. 27:11001104. 1999.; Olsson B, et al. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of reduced and oxidized N-acetylcysteine. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 34:77-82. 1988.; Pastor A, et al. Antioxidant enzyme status in biliary obstructed rats: effect of
N-acetylcysteine. J Hepatol. 27:363-70. 1997.; Pauling L. Evolution and the need for ascorbic acid. Proc Natl Acad SciUSA. 67:1643-8. 1970.; Quaranta L, et al. Effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on preexisting visual field damage
in normal tension glaucoma. Ophthalmology. 110(2):359-62. 2003.; Rehman A, et al. The effects of iron and vitamin C co-supplementation on oxidative damage to DNA in healthy volunteers. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 246:2938. 1998.; Rhee DJ, et al. Complementary and alternative medicine for glaucoma. Surv Opthalmol. 46(1):43-55. 2001.; Richer S. Multicenter ophthalmic and nutritional age-related macular degeneration study—part 2: antioxidant
intervention and conclusions. J Am Optom Assoc. 67(1):30-49. 1996.; Robert AM, et al. Action of anthocyanosides of vaccinium myrtillis on the permeability of the blood brain barrier. J Med. 8(5):321-32. 1977.; Roberts RL, et
al. N-acetylcysteine enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in neutrophils and mononuclear cells from healthy adults and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. J Infect Dis. 172:1492-1502. 1995.; Rodenstein
D, et al. Pharmacokinetics of oral acetylcysteine: absorption, binding, and metabolism in patients with respiratory disorders. Clin Pharmacokin. 3:247-54. 1978.; Roodenburg AJ, et al. Amount of fat in the diet affects bioavailability
of lutein esters but not of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and vitamin E in humans. Am J Clin Nutr. 71:1187-93. 2000.; Seddon J, et al. Dietary cartoneoids, vitamins A, C, and E, and advanced age-related macular degeneration. JAMA.
272:1413-20. 1994.; Sjodin K, et al. Metabolism of N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Biochem Pharm. 38:3981-5. 1989.; Skaper SD, et al. Quercetin protects cutaneous tissue-associated cell types including sensory neurons from oxidative stress
induced by glutathione depletion: cooperative effects of ascorbic acid. Free Rad Biol Med. 22:669-78. 1997.; Sommerburg OG, et al. Lutein and zexanthin are associated with photoreceptors in the human retina. Curr Eye Res. 19:4915. 1999.; Thiagarajan G, et al. Molecular and cellular assessment of ginkgo biloba extract as possible ophthalmic drug. Exp Eye Res. 75(4):421-30. 2002.; Tong LM, et al. Mechanisms of the antioxidant activity of a high molecular
weight fraction of whey. J Agric Food Chem. 48:1473-1478. 2000.; Tufts University. Sighted: foods for better vision. Diet & Nutrition Newsletter. 12:11. 1995.; Wong CW, et al. Immunomodulatory effects of dietary whey proteins
in mice. J Dairy Res. 62:359-368. 1995.; Ziment I. Acetylcysteine: a drug that is much more than a mucokinetic. Biomed Pharmacother. 42:513-520. 1988.; Zimmerman M, et al. Ginkgo biloba extract: from molecular mechanisms
to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Cell Mol Biol. 48(6):613-23. 2002.
Osseron™
Description:
Osseron™ supports the nutritional needs of dogs and cats by supplying an archetypal balance of meat proteins, fats, vitamins,
minerals, antibodies, and other micronutrients.
Indications: Bone and Joint
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Green-Lipped Mussel, Methylated Sulfur, Boswellia serrata, Sea Cucumber,
Turmeric, Ginger, Devil’s Claw, Yucca, Red Pepper, Cetyl Myristoleate, Glycosaminoglycans, Collagen, d-Glucosamines (nacetyl, hydrochloride and sulfates), Milk Calcium, Lecithin, Coconut Oil, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass,
Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product,
Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus
oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary
and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement,
Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin
Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
42 – Wysong RX
References:
Altman RD, et al. Effects of a ginger extract on knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 44(11):2531-8. 2001.; Ammon HP, et al. Mechanism of anti-inflammatory actions of curcumine and boswellic acids. J Ethnopharmacol.
38:113-9. 1993.; Arora R, et al. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa (turmeric). Ind J Med Res. 59:1289-95. 1971.; Awang DVC. Ginger. Can Pharma J. 309-311. 1992.; Baghdikian B, et al. An analytical study, antiinflammatory and analgesic effects of Harpagophytum procumens and Harpagophytum zeyheri. Planta Med. 63(2)171-6. 1997.; Barnett, et al. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with oral type-II collagen. Arthritis Rheum. 141:290.
1998.; Bartolucci C, et al. Chondroprotective action of chondroitin sulfate. Competitive action of chondroitin sulfate on the digestion of hyaluronan by bovine testicular hyaluronidase. Int J Tiss Res. 13:311-7. 1991.; Bassleer C,
et al. Effects of glucosamine on differentiated human chondrocytes cultivated in clusters. Rev Esp Rheumatol. 20(suppl 1):Mo95 (abs). 1993.; Bierer TL, et al. Improvement of arthritic signs in dogs fed green-lipped mussel (Perna
canaliculus). J Nutr. 132:1634S-1636S. 2002.; Bingham R, et al. Yucca plant saponin in the management of arthritis. J Appl Nutr. 27:45-50. 1975.; Bucci L. Mucopolysaccharides (Chondroitin Sulfates) as dietary supplements:
sources, production and comparative bioavailability. Chiropractic Products. Oct:54-6. 1988.; Bucci LR. Chondroprotective agents: glucosamine salts and chondroitin sulfates. Townsend Letter for Doctors. 1:52-54. 1994.; Burkhardt
H. Oxygen radicals as effectors of cartilage destruction. Arth Rheum. 29(3):379-87. 1986.; Busci L, et al. Efficacy and tolerability of oral chondroitin sulfate as a symptomatic slow-acting drug for osteoarthritis (SYSADOA) in the treatment
of knee osteoarthrosis. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 6 SupplA:25-30. 1998.; Carleson J, et al. Effects of capsaicin in tempromandibular joint arthritis in rats. Arch Oral Biol. 42(12):869-76. 1997.; Carney S. The structure and function
of cartilage proteoglycans. Physiol Rev. 68:858-910. 1988.; Caughey DE, et al. Perna canaliculus in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Eur J Rheumatol Inflamm. 6:197-200. 1983.; Christensen K. Comparison of nutritional supplement
effects in functional assessments of lower back patients measured by an objective computer-assisted tester. Second Symposium on Nutrition and Chiropractic. Palmer College. 19-22. 1989.; Chrubasik S, et al. Effectiveness of
Harpagophytum procumbens in treatment of acute low back pain. Pain. 57:317-26. 1994.; Conte A, et al. Biochemical and pharmacokinetic aspects of oral treatment with chondroitin sulfate. Drug Res. 45:918-925. 1995.; Couch
RA, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity in fractionated extracts of green-lipped mussel. N Z Med J. 95(720):803-6. 1982.; Deal CL, et al. Nutraceuticals as therapeutic agents in osteoarthritis. The role of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate,
and collagen hydrolysate. Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 25:379-95. 1999.; Deal CL, et al. Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: a double-blind trial. Clin Ther. 13(3):383-95. 1991.; Diehl HW, et al. Cetyl myristoleate isolated
from Swiss albino mice: an apparent protective agent against adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Pharm Sci. 83(3):296-9. 1994.; Drovanti A, et al. Therapeutic activity of oral glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis, a placebo-controlled doubleblind investigation. Clin Ther. 3:260-72. 1980.; Etzel R. Special extract of Boswellia serrata (H15) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Phytomed. 3:91-4. 1996.; Garrett NE, et al. Effect of capsaicin on substance P and nerve growth
factor in adjuvant arthritic rats. Neurosci Lett. 230(1):5-8. 1997.; Gibson RG, et al. Green-lipped mussel extract in arthritis. Lancet. 1:439. 1981.; Gibson RG, et al. Perna canaliculus in the treatment of arthritis. Practitioner. 224:95560. 1980.; Gibson SLM, et al. The treatment of arthritis with a lipid extract of Perna canaliculus: a randomized trial. Comp Ther Med. 6:122-6. 1998.; Giordano N, et al. The efficacy and safety of glucosamine sulfate in the treatment
of gonarthritis. Clin Ter. 147:99. 1996.; Goldberg SH. Pharmacologic therapy for osteoarthritis. Am J Orthop. 31(12):673-80. 2002.; Greenwald R. Effect of oxygen-derived free radicals on connective tissue macromolecules. Biological
and Clinical Aspects of Superoxide and Superoxide Dismutase. 160-171. 1980.; Halpern GM. Anti-inflammatory effects of a stabilized lipid extract of Perna canaliculus (Lyprinol). Allerg Immunol. 32(7):272-8. 2000.; Harab R.
Increase of chondroitin 4-sulfate concentration in the endocondral ossification cartilage of normal dogs. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta. 992(2):237-40. 1989.; Highton TC, et al. Pilot study on the effect of New Zealand Green Mussel
on rheumatoid arthritis. N Z Med J. 81:261-2. 1975.; Hook M. Cell-surface glucosaminoglycans. Ann Rev Biochem. 53:847-69. 1984.; Houpt JB, et al. Effect of glucosamine hydrochloride in the treatment of pain of osteoarthritis
of the knee. J Rheumatol. 26:2423-30. 1999.; Hunter KW, et al. Synthesis of cetyl myristoleate and evaluation of its therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis. Pharmacol Res. 47(1):43-7. 2003.; Jacob S,
et al. The Miracle of MSM. New York: Berkeley Books. 1999.; Joe B, et al. Presence of an acidic glycoprotein in the serum of arthritic rats: modulation by capsaicin and curcumin. Mol Cell Biochem. 169(1-2):125-34. 1997.; Jordt
SE. Acid potentiation of the capsaicin receptor determined by a key extracellular site. J Neurochem. 85(suppl 2):6. 2003. Kimmatkar N, et al. Efficacy and tolerability of Boswellia serrata extract in treatment of osteoarthritis of knee –
a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial. Phytomedicine. 10(1):3-7. 2003.; Kulkarni RR, et al. Treatment of osteoarthritis with a herbomineral formulation: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. J
Ethnopharmacol. 33(1-2):91-5. 1991.; Langner E, et al. Ginger: history and use. Adv Ther. 15(1):25-44. 1998.; Lanhers MC, et al. Anti inflammatory and analgesic effects of an aqueous extract Harpagophytum procumbens. Planta
Medica. 58:117-23. 1992.; Lawrence R. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM): a double-blind study of its use in degenerative arthritis. Int J Anti-Aging Med. 1:50. 1998.; Leffler CT, et al. Glucosamine, chondroitin, and manganese ascorbate
for degenerative joint disease of the knee or low back: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Mil Med. 64:85-91. 1999.; Macrides TA, et al. The anti-inflammatory effects of omega-3 tetraenoic fatty acids isolated
from a lipid extract (Lyprinol) from the New Zealand green-lipped mussel. 88th American Oil Chemists Society Annual Meeting. May 1997.; Marshall KW, et al. A single capsaicin injection partially depletes neuropeptides but does not
ameliorate inflammation severity in established feline antigen induced arthritis. J Rheumatol. 24(9):1765-8. 1997.; Matucci-Cerinic M, et al. Effects of capsaicin on the metabolism of rheumatoid arthritis synovioctes in vitro. Ann Rheum
Dis. 49(8):598-602. 1990.; McAlindon TE, et al. Glucosamine and chondroitin for treatment of osteoarthritis. A systematic quality assessment and meta-analysis. JAMA. 283:1469-75. 2000.; Mcleod DW, et al. Investigations of
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil’s Claw) in the treatment of experimental inflammation and arthritis in the rat. Br J Pharmacol. 66:140P-141P. 1979.; Miller TE. Anti-inflammatory activity of glycogen extracted from Perna canaliculus
(NZ green-lipped mussel). Agents Actions. 38 Spec No:C139-42. 1993.; Miller TE, et al. The anti-inflammatory activity of Perna canaliculus (NZ green lipped mussel). N Z Med J. 92:187-93. 1980.; Moore RD, et al. Diminished inflammatory
joint disease in MRL/lpr mice ingesting dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or methylsulfonylmethane (MSM). Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, 69th Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA. 692. 1985.; Moriizumi T. Paininduced changes in the guinea pig knee joint with special reference to cartilage healing. Virchow’s Arch. B-51:461-74. 1986.; Morreale P, et al. Comparison of the anti-inflammatory efficacy of chondroitin sulfate and diclofenac sodium
in patients with knee osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol. 146:609. 1996.; Mukhopadhyay A, et al. Anti-inflammatory and irritant activities of curcumin analogues in rats. Agents Actions. 12:508-15. 1982.; Noack W, et al. Glucosamine
sulfate in osteoarthritis of the knee. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2:51-9. 1994.; Phoon S, et al. Glucosamine. A nutraceutical in osteoarthritis. Aust Fam Physician. 31:539. 2002.; Pipitone VR. Chondroprotection with chondroitin
sulfate. Drugs Exp Clin Res. 17:3-7. 1991.; Piscoya J, et al. Efficacy and safety of freeze-dried cat’s claw in osteoarthritis of the knee: mechanisms of action of the species Uncaria guianesis. Inflamm Res. 50(9):442-8. 2001.; Prudden
JF, et al. The biological activity of bovine cartilage preparations. Clinical demonstration of their potent anti-inflammatory capacity with supplementary notes on certain relevant fundamental support studies. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 3:287321. 1974.; Pujalte JM, et al. Double-blind evaluation of oral glucosamine sulfate in the basic treatment of osteoarthritis. Curr Med Res Opin. 7:110-4. 1980.; Qiu GX, et al. Efficacy and safety of glucosamine sulfate versus ibuprofen
in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Arzneimittelforschung. 48:469. 1998.; Rainsford KD, et al. Gastroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of green lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus) preparation. Arzneimittelforschung. 30:212832. 1980.; Reddy GK, et al. Studies on the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans under the influence of new herbal anti-inflammatory agents. Biochem Pharmacol. 38(20):3527-34. 1989.; Reginster JY, et al. Long-term effects of glucosamine
on osteoarthritis progression: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Lancet. 357:251. 2001.; Reichelt A, et al. Efficacy and safety of intramuscular glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized, placebo-controlled,
double-blind study. Arzneimittelforschung. 44:75-80. 1999.; Robbins W. Clinical applications of capsaicinoids. Clin J Pain. 16(2 suppl):S86-9. 2000.; Ronca F, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of chondroitin sulfate. Osteoarthritis
Cartilage. 6 SupplA:14-21. 1998.; Safayhi H, et al. Boswellic acids: novel, specific, nonredox inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 261:1143-6. 1992.; Satsokar RR, et al. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory property
of curcumin (diferloyl methane) in patients with postoperative inflammation. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol. 24:651-4. 1986.; Setnikar I. Antiarthritic effects of glucosamine sulfate studied in animal models. Arzneim-Forsch. 41:5425. 1991.; Sewell KL. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Lancet. 30:283-6. 1993.; Sieper J, et al. Oral type II collagen treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Arthritis Rheum.
39:41-51. 1996.; Srivastava KC, et al. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) in rheumatism and musculoskeletal disorders. Medical Hypotheses. 39:343-8. 1992.; Towheed TE, et al. Glucosamine therapy for osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol. 26:22947. 1999.; Trentham DE. Effects of oral administration of Type II collagen on rheumatoid arthritis. Science. 261:1727-30. 1993.; Uebelhart D, et al. Effects of oral chondroitin sulfate on the progression of knee osteoarthritis: a pilot
study. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 6 SupplA:39-46. 1998.; Whitehouse MW, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of a lipid fraction (Lyprinol) from the NZ green-lipped mussel. Inflammopharmacology. 5:237-246. 1997.
Oxylase™
Description:
Oxylase™ is designed to provide nutritional support to the urinary tract and create a urinary environment non-conducive to
formation of calcium oxalate urinary calculi through archetypal nutritional balances, biochemically rich ingredients and nonthermal processing.
Indications: Oxalate Crystals
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Avoid use of Oxylase™ in animals with
a history of struvite urolithiasis or with other potassium supplements. Do not use in pregnant or nursing animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Coral Calcium, Potassium Citrate, Sprout Powder, Milk Calcium,
Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase,
Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic
Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium
Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate,
Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Barcelo S, et al. CYP2E1-mediated mechanism of anti-genotoxicity of the broccoli constituent sulforaphane. Carcinogenesis 1996;17:277–82. Bataille P, et al. Effect of calcium restriction on renal excretion of oxalate and the probability
of stones in the various pathophysiological groups with calcium stones. J Urol 1983; 130: 218–223. Borghi L, et al. (2002). Comparison of Two Diets for the Prevention of Recurrent Stones in Idiopathic Hypercalciuria. N Engl J Med
346: 77-84. Borsatti A. Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis: defective oxalate transport. Kidney Int 1991; 39: 1283–1298. Breslau NA, et al. Relationship of animal protein-rich diet to kidney stone formation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1988;
66: 140–146. Bren A, et al. Magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with K+ citrate and vitamin B6 improves urinary abnormalities in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Urol Int. 60(2):105-7, 1998. Burtis
W J, et al. (1993). Calcium and Kidney Stones. N Engl J Med 329: 508-509. Bushinsky DA, et al. Increased dietary oxalate does not increase urinary calcium oxalate saturation in hypercalciuric rats. Kidney Int 1999; 55: 602–612. Bushinsky
DA, et al. Increased urinary saturation and kidney calcium content in genetic hypercalciuric rats. Kidney Int 1994; 45: 58–65. Bushinsky, D. A. (2002). Recurrent Hypercalciuric Nephrolithiasis — Does Diet Help?. N Engl J Med 346:
124-125 Clapper ML, et al. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of broccoli supplements as inducers of glutathione S-transferase activity. Clin Cancer Res 1997;3:25–30. Coe FL, et al. Effects of a low calcium diet on urine calcium excretion,
parathyroid function and serum 1,25(OH)2D3 levels in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria and in normal subjects. Am J Med 1982; 72: 25–32. Coe FL, et al. New insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of nephrolithiasis:
new research venues. J Bone Miner Res 1997; 12: 522–533. Curhan, G. (2002). A normal calcium, low protein, low salt diet reduced recurrence of renal stones over 5 years. Evid Based Med 7: 152-152. Curhan G C, et al. (1993). A
Wysong RX – 43
prospective study of dietary calcium and other nutrients and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones. N Engl J Med 328(12): 833-8. Curhan GC, Willett WC, Speizer FE, Stampfer MJ. Intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of kidney
stones in women. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1999;10(4):840-845. Ettinger B, et al. Potassium-magnesium-citrate is an effective prophylaxis against recurrent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. J Urol. 150(6) :2069-73, 1997. Fahey JW, et al.
Antioxidant functions of sulforaphane: a potent inducer of Phase II detoxication enzymes. Food Chem Toxicol 1999;37:973–9. Fahey JW, et al. Broccoli sprouts: an exceptionally rich source of inducers of enzymes that protect against
chemical carcinogens. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1997;94:10367–72. Giannini, S, et al. (1999). Acute effects of moderate dietary protein restriction in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria and calcium nephrolithiasis. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 69:
267-271. Heilberg IP, et al. Sensitivity to calcium intake in calcium stone forming patients. Nephron 1996; 73: 145–153. Heilberg, I. P. (2000). Update on dietary recommendations and medical treatment of renal stone disease. Nephrol
Dial Transplant 15: 117-123. Heller, H. J. (1999). The Role of Calcium in the Prevention of Kidney Stones. J Am Coll Nutr 18: 373S-378. Hess B, et al. High calcium intake abolishes hyperoxaluria and reduces urinary crystallization
during a 20-fold normal oxalate load in humans. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1998; 13: 2241–224. Holmes RP, et al. Relationship of protein intake to urinary oxalate and glycolate excretion. Kidney Int 1993; 44: 366–372. Holt PR. (1999).
Studies of Calcium in Food Supplements in Humans. Annals NYAS Online 889: 128-137. Hosking DH, et al. The stone clinic effect in patients with idiopathic calcium urolithiasis. J Urol 1983; 130: 1115–1118. Johansson G, Backman
U, Danielson BG, et al. Effects of magnesium hydroxide in renal stone disease. J Am Col Nutr 1982;1:179-85. Lekcharoensuk C, et al. Association between patient-related factors and risk of calcium oxalate and magnesium ammonium
phosphate urolithiasis in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:520–525. Lekcharoensuk C, et al. Association between dietary factors and calcium oxalate and magnesium ammonium phosphate urolithiasis in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc
2001;219:1228-1236. Lemann, J. (1993). Composition of the Diet and Calcium Kidney Stones. N Engl J Med 328: 880-882. Lindberg J, et al. Effect of magnesium citrate and magnesium oxide on the crystallization of calcium salts
in urine: changes produced by food-magnesium interaction. J Urol 1990;143:248-51. Maheo K, et al. Inhibition of cytochromes P-450 and induction of glutathione S- transferases by sulforaphane in primary human and rat hepatocytes.
Cancer Res 1997;57:3649–52. Marangella M, et al. Hyperoxaluria in idiopathic calcium stone disease: further evidence of intestinal hyperabsorption of oxalate. Clin Sci 1982; 63: 381–385. Martini LA, et al. Dietary habits of calcium
stone formers. Brazilian J Med Biol Res 1993; 26: 805–812. Massey LK, et al. Effect of dietary oxalate and calcium on urinary oxalate and risk of formation of calcium oxalate kidney stones. J Am Diet Assoc 1993; 93: 901–906. Menrath
V. Problem plumbing ! Journal of the Feline Advisory Bureau, Vol 36, Spring 1998, pp. 21-24. Nestle M. Broccoli sprouts as inducers of carcinogen-detoxifying enzyme systems: clinical, dietary, and policy implications. Proc Natl Acad
Sci 1997;94:11149–51 [review]. Neuhaus, T. J, et al. (2000). Urinary oxalate excretion in urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. Arch. Dis. Child. 82: 322-326. Nijhoff WA, et al. Effects of consumption of Brussels sprouts on plasma and
urinary glutathione S-transferase class-alpha and -pi in humans. Carcinogenesis 1995;16:955–7. Nishiura JL, et al. Effect of calcium intake upon urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone forming (CSF) patients. In: Borghi L, Meschi
T, Briganti A, Schianchi T, Novarini A eds Kidney Stones (Proceedings of the 8th European Symposium on Urolithiasis). Editoriale Bios, Parma, Italy: 1999: 511–512. Osborne CA, et al. Changing demographics of feline urolithiasis:
perspectives from the Minnesota Urolith Center, in August JR (ed): Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine 3, WB Saunders, Philadelphia, pp349-360, 1997. Osborne CA, et al. Diagnosis, medical treatment, and prognosis of feline
urolithiasis. Vet Clinics of North America, Small Animal Practice, Vol 26(3): 589-627, 1996. Osborne CA, et al. Feline calcium oxalate uroliths: Pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Vet Clin Nutr. 1:105114, 1994.Pak CYC. Kidney stones. Lancet 1998; 351: 1797–1801. Plumb GW, et al. Are whole extracts and purified glucosinolates from cruciferous vegetables antioxidants? Free Radic Res 1996;25:75–86. Prien EL, et al. Magnesium
oxide-pyridoxine therapy for recurrent calcium oxalate calculi. J Urol 1974;112:509-12. Robertson WG, Peacock M, Heyburn PJ, Hanes FA. Epidemiological risk factors in calcium stone disease. Scand J Urol Nephrol Supplement
1980;53:15-30. Scott P, et al. (1999). Suggestive Evidence for a Susceptibility Gene Near the Vitamin D Receptor Locus in Idiopathic Calcium Stone Formation. J Am Soc Nephrol 10: 1007-1013. Seltzer MA, Low RK, Mc Donald M
et al Dietary manipulation with lemonade to treat hypocitraturic calcium nephrolithiasis. J Urol 156(3):907-9, Sep 1996. Shapiro TA, et al. 2001. Chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of broccoli sprouts: metabolism and excretion
in humans. Carcinogenesis 2001 Sep; 22(9): 1413-20; Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2001 May; 10(5): 501-8. Willett WC, et al. A Prospective study of dietary calcium and other nutrients and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones. N
Engl J Med; 328:833–8,1993). Williams CP, et al. (2001). Why oral calcium supplements may reduce renal stone disease: report of a clinical pilot study. J Clin Pathol 54: 54-62. Zhang Y, et al. A major inducer of anticarcinogenic protective
enzymes from broccoli: isolation and elucidation of structure. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1992;89:2399–403.
Panadime™
Description:
Panadime™ is designed for nutritional support of the pancreas by providing enzyme-rich non-processed food and specific
nutritional support for pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function.
Indications: Pancreas
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Note: In acute pancreatitis the stimulation of pancreatic exocrine secretion by high protein diets may promote the release
of proteases within pancreatic tissue aggravating the inflammatory response. Fasting and short term low (but high quality)
protein diets such as Vegan™ or other Wysong Dry Diets combined with Panadime™ is indicated until biochemical markers
are within normal range.
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Pepsin, Ox Bile, Pancreatin, Dried Pancreas, Garlic, Lecithin,
Dandelion Root, Grape Seed Extract, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea
Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation
Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural
Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement,
Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arivazhagan S, et al. Modulatory effects of garlic and neem leaf extracts on N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced oxidative stress in Wistar rats. Cell Biochem Funct. 18(1):17-21. 2000.; Bagchi D, et al. Free radicals
and grape seed proanthocyanidin extract: importance in human health and disease prevention. Toxicology. 148(2-3):187-97. 2000.; Bagchi D, et al. Protective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidins and selected antioxidants against
TPA-induced hepatic and brain lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation, and peritoneal macrophage activation in mice. Gen Pharmacol. 30:771-6. 1998.; Belinky PA, et al. Structural aspects of the inhibitory effect of glabridin on
LDL oxidation. Free Radic Biol Med. 24(9):1419-29. 1998.; Buchman AL, et al. Lecithin increases plasma free choline and decreases hepatic stenosis in long-term total parenteral nutrition patients. Gastroenterology. 102:1363-70.
1992.; Duff G, et al. Lecithin is known to increase the capacity of the bile to solubilize cholesterol. Am J Med. 11:92. 1951.; Exogenous enzymes in monogastric nutrition – their current value and future benefits. Animal Feed Science
and Technology. 86(1-2). 2000.; Francischetti IM, et al. Indentification of glycyrrhizin as a thrombin inhibitor. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 235(1):259-63. 1997.; Gabetta B, et al. Characterization of proanthocyanidins from
grape seeds. Fitoterapia. 71:162-75. 2000.; Germain E, et al. In vivo metabolism of diallyl disulphide in the rat: identification of two new metabolites. Xenobiotica. 32(12):1127-38. 2002.; Green M, et al. Inhibition of DES-induced
DNA adducts by diallyl sulfide: implications in liver cancer prevention. Oncol Rep. 10(3):767-71. 2003.; Hattori A, et al. Protective effect of ajoene on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury in mice. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem.
65(11):2555-7. 2001.; Howell E. Food enzymes for health and longevity. Connecticut, Omangod Press. 1980.; Hu C, et al. Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
flower extracts in vitro. J Agric Food Chem. 51(1):301-10. 2003.; Jaroni D, et al. The effect of dietary wheat middlings and enzyme supplementation II: Applied nutrient digestibility, digestive tract size, gut viscosity, and gut morphology
in strains of leghorn hens. Poult Sci. 78(12):1664-74. 1999.; Joshi SS, et al. The cellular and molecular basis of health benefits of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract. Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2(2):187-200. 2001.; Kashiwada Y,
et al. Sesquiterpene glucosides from anti-leukotriene B4 release fraction of Taraxacum officinale. J Asian Nat Prod Res. 3(3):191-7. 2001.; Kim HM, et al. Taraxacum officinale inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from
rat astrocytes. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 22(3):519-30. 2000.; Kisiel W, et al. Further sesquiterpenoids and phenolics from Taraxacum officinale. Fitoterapia. 71(3):269-73. 2000.; Knowles RP, et al. Clinical impressions
of the use of an enzyme additive in large and small animals. VM/SAC. 74(12):1733. 1979.; Lau B. Garlic for health. Lotus Light Publications, Wilmot, WI. 32-3. 1988.; Layer P, et al. Pancreatic enzymes: Secretion and luminal nutrient
digestion in health and disease. J Clin Gastroenterol. 28(1):3-10. 1999.; Lewis GE, et al. Effect of direct-fed fibrolytic enzymes on the digestive characteristics of a forage-based diet fed to beef steers. J Anim Sci. 74(12):3020-8. 1996.;
Matsui T, et al. Efficacy of phytase in improving phosphorus bioavailability in a corn-soybean meal-based diet for growing pigs. J Anim Sci. 78:94-9. 2000.; Mavromichalis I, et al. Enzyme supplementation and particle size of wheat
in diets for nursery and finishing pigs. J Anim Sci. 78:3086-95. 2000.; Polichetti E, et al. Cholesterol-lowering effect of soybean lecithin in normolipidaemic rats by stimulation of biliary lipid secretion. Br J Nutr. 75(3):471-8. 1996.;
Racz-Kotilla E, et al. The action of Taraxacum officinale extracts on the body weight and diureses of laboratory animals. Planta Medica. 26:212-7. 1974.; Richardson T. Enzymes: Principles of food science. Part 1. Ed or Fennema,
New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc. 1976.; Susnik F. The present state of knowledge about the medicinal plant Taraxacum officinale Weber. Med Razgl. 21:323-8. 1982.; Terrell SS, et al. On trial: An enzyme-producing food supplement
for dogs. Vet Med. 79(11):1367. 1984.; Thomas M, et al. Diallyl disulfide increases rat h-ferritin, L-ferritin and transferring receptor genes in vitro in hepatic cells and in vivo in liver. J Nutr. 132(12):3638-41. 2002.; Tompkins R,
et al. Relationship of biliary phospholipid and cholesterol concentrations to the occurance of human gallstones. Ann Surg. 172(6):936-45. 1970.; Tuzhilin S, et al. The treatment of patients with gallstones by lecithin. Am J Gastroenterol.
44 – Wysong RX
65:231. 1976.; Watson JP, et al. Case report: oral antioxidant therapy for the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis: a pilot study. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 10:1034-40. 1999.; Williams CA, et al. Flavonoids,
cinnamic acids and coumarins from the different tissues and medicinal preparations of Taraxacum officinale. Phytochemistry. 42(1):121-7. 1996.; Yang CS, et al. Mechanisms of inhibition of chemical toxicity and carcinogenesis by
diallyl sulfide (DAS) and related compounds from garlic. J Nutr. 131(3s):1041S-5S. 2001.; Yang WZ, et al. Effects of an enzyme feed additive on extent of digestion and milk production in lactating dairy cows. J Dairy Sci. 82(2):391403. 1999.; Zhao J, et al. Anti-tumor-promoting activity of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seed in the mouse skin two-stage initiation-promotion protocol and identification of procyanidin B5-3’ –gallate as the most effective
antioxidant constituent. Carcinogenesis. 20:1737-45. 1999.
Pathovert™
Description:
Pathovert™ supports the nutritional needs of dogs and cats by supplying an archetypal balance of meat proteins, fats,
vitamins, minerals, antibodies, and other micronutrients.
Indications: Infection
Clinical Biochemistry: See Introduction
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Dried Whey, Lecithin, Coriolis Mushroom, Shiitake Mushroom, Maitake Mushroom,
Garlic, Beta 1,3 Glucans, Dried Thymus, Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Acerola
Juice, Black Currants, Rosehips), Beta-Carotene (D. salina), Vitamin E supplement, Tomato powder, Turmeric, Methylated
Sulfur, Grape Seed Extract, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Maritime Pine Bark Extract, Dried Plasma, Dehydrated Broccoli, Brussels
Sprouts, Cauliflower, Red and Green Cabbage, Kale, and Broccoli Sprouts, Alpha-D-Galactosidase, Chlorella, L-Glutamine,
Milk Calcium, Lecithin, Coconut Oil, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke,
Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Zinc Proteinate,
Iron Proteinate, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate,
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin
D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Borchers AT, et al. Mushrooms, tumors, and immunity. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 221:281-293. 1999.; Chang R. Functional properties of edible mushrooms. Nutr Rev. 54:S91-S93. 1996.; Clark L, et al. Decreased incidence of prostate
cancer with selenium supplementation: results of a double-blind cancer prevention trial Br J Urol. 81:730-734. 1998.; Drucker M. Chlorella: The key to healthy, vitality and longevity. Health and Happiness Publishing, Greenvile, SC.
2002.; Inoue A, et al. Effect of maitake (Grifola frondosa) D-fraction on the control of the T lymph node Th-1/TH-2 proportion. Biol Pharm Bull. 25(4):536-540. 2002.; Justo GZ, et al. Effects of the green algae Chlorella vulgaris on
the response of the host hematopoietic system to intraperitoneal ehrlich ascites tumor transplantation in mice. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 23(1):119-132. 2001.; Kidd P. The use of mushroom glucans and proteoglycans in cancer
treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5:4-27. 2000.; Kidd PM. The use of mushroom glucans and proteglycans in cancer treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5(1):4-27. 2000.; Kodama N, et al. Can maitake MD-fraction aid cancer patients? Altern Med Rev.
7(3):451. 2002.; Komninou D, et al. Insulin resistance and its contribution to colon carcinogenesis. Exp Biol Med. 228(4):396-405. 2003.; Ladanyi A, et al. Effect of lentinan on macrophage cytotoxicity against metatastic tumor cells.
Cancer Immunol Immunother. 36:123-126. 1993.; Luts W. The carbohydrate theory. Wien Med Wochenschr. 144(16):387-392. 1994.; Mai V, et al. Calorie restriction and diet consumption modulate spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis
in Apc(Min) mice through different mechanisms. Cancer Res. 63(8):1752-1755. 2003.; Manzi P, et al. Beta-glucans in edible mushrooms. Food Chemistry. 68:315-318. 2000.; Marcus AJ. The eicosanoids in biology and medicine. J
Lipid Res. 25:1511-1516. 1984.; Miyazawa Y, et al. Immunomodulation by a unicellular green algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) in tumor-bearing mice. J Ethnopharmacol. 24(2-3)L135-146. 1988.; Noda K, et al. Simple assay for antitumour
immunoactive glycoprotein derived from Chlorella vulgaris strain CK22 using ELISA. Phytother Res. 16(6):581-585. 2002.; Noda K, et al. A water-soluble antitumor glycoprotein from Chlorella vulgaris. Planta Med. 62(5):423-426.
1996.; Nomoto K, et al. Antitumor activity of chlorella extract, PCM-4, by oral administration. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 10(3):781-785. 1983.; Ooi VE, et al. Immunomodulation and anti-cancer activity of polysaccharide-protein complexes.
Curr Med Chem. 7(7):715-729. 2000.; Osband ME, et al. Histiocytiosis-X: Demonstration of abnormal immunity, T-cell histamine H2-receptor deficiency, and successful treatment with thymic extract. NEJM. 304:146-153. 1981.; Park,
et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte natural cytotoxicity by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645-646. 1991.; Patchen M, et al. Temporal response of murine pluripotent stem cells and myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells to low-dose glucan treatment.
Acta Hemat. 70:281-288. 1983.; Patchen M, et al. Stimulated hemopoiesis in enhanced survival following glucan treatment in sublethally and lethally irradiated mice. Int J Immunopharc. 7:923-932. 1985.; Patchen M, et al. Glucan:
mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect. J Lec Biol. 42:95-105. 1987.; PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Medical Economics Company, Montvale, NJ. 2001.; Samuelsson B. Leukotrienes: Mediators of immediate hypersensivity
reactions and inflammation. Science. 220:568-575. 1983.; Seljelid R, Macrophage activation. Scand J of Rheumatology. 76:67-72. 1988.; Simopoulos AP. Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. J Am Coll Nutr.
21(6):495-505. 2002.; Stoll BA, et al. Western nutrition and the insulin resistance syndrome: a link to breast cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 53(2):83-87. 1999.; Tanaka K, et al. Oral administration of Chlorella vulgaris
augments concomitant antitumor immunity. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 12(2):277-291. 1990.
Pedivax™
Description:
Pedivax™ is specifically designed to provide the appropriate foundational archetypal balances to encourage optimal health
and immune development.
Indications: Pediatric/Weaning
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use in pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Dried Plasma, Dried Whole Milk, Dried Whey, Dried Egg, Casein,
Lecithin, L-Arginine, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke,
Wysong RX – 45
Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product,
Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus
oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary
and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement,
Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin
Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Arthington JD, et al. Effect of dietary IgG source (colostrum, serum, or milk-derived supplement) on the efficiency of IgG absorption in newborn Holstein calves. J Dairy Science. 83:1463-1467. 2000.; Artjomgton JD, et al. Passive
immunoglobulin transfer in newborn calves fed colostrum or spray-dried serum protein alone or as a supplement to colostrum of varying quality. J Dairy Science. 83: 2834-2838. 2000.; Bach A, et al. Medium chain triglycerides – an
update. Am J Clin Nutr. 36:950-962. 1982.; Borg BS, et al. Evaluation of the chemical and biological characteristics of spray-dried plasma protein collected from various locations around the world. Proceedings of the American Association
of Swine Vet. 2002.; Borg BS, et al. Effects of a water-soluble plasma protein product on weanling pig performance and health with and without Escherichia coli challenge. Proceedings of the Allen D. Leman Swine Conf. 26:23-24. 1999.;
Bosi PI, et al. Effect of different spray-dried plasmas on growth, ileal digestibility, nutrient deposition, and immunity and health of early-weaned pigs challenged with E. coli K88. Asian-Aus. J Anim Sci. 14:1138-1143. 2001.; Bjerve
KS, et al. Omega 3 fatty acids: Essential fatty acids with important biological effects, and serum phospholipid fatty acids as marker so dietary omega 3 fatty acid intake. Am J Clin Nutr. 57:801S-805S. 1993.; Buescher ES, et al. Antioxidant
properties of human colostrum. Pediatric Res. 24 (1):14-19. 1988.; Chesney RW. Taurine: is it required for infant nutrition? J Nutr. 118:6-10. 1988.; Chesney RW Taurine: its biological role and clinical implications. Advances in Pediatrics.
22:1-42. 1985.; Coffey, et al. The impact of environment and antimicrobial agents on the growth response of early-weaned pigs to spray-dried porcine plasma. J Anim Sci. 73:2532-2539. 1995.; Collins MD, et al. Probiotics, prebiotics,
and symbiotics: Approaches for modulating the microbial ecology of the gut. Am J Clin Nutr. 69(5):1052S-1057S. 1999.; Dai D, et al. Role of bacterial colonization in neonatal necrotizing entercolitis and its prevention. Chung Hua
Min Kuo Hsiao I Hsueh Hui Tsa Chih. 36(6):357-365. 1988; DeWit JN. Marschall Rone-Poulenc Award Lecture. Nutritional and functional characteristics of whey proteins in food products. J Dairy Sci. 81(3):597-608. 1998.; Gatnau
RJ, et al. Plasma (Appetein®) as an alternative to antimicrobial usage in weaning pigs. Proceedings of the EAAP 51st Annual Meeting (The Hague). Paper P5.5, p 343.; Erasmus U. Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill. Alive Books, Burnaby,
BC Canada. 1993.; Fox PF. Advanced Dairy Chemistry. Elsevier Applied Science, London. 1992.; Francis GL, et al. Insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 in bovine colostrum. J Biochem. 251:95-103. 1988.; Geggel HS, et al. Nutritional
requirement for taurine in patients receiving long-term parenteral supplementation. NEJM. 312:142-146. 1985.; Hamosh M, et al. Gastric lipolysis and fat absorption in preterm infant: Effect of medium-chain triglycerides or long-chain
triglyceride-containing formulas. Pediatrics. 83(1):86-92. 1989.; Hayes KC, et al. Taurine in metabolism. Ann Rev Nutr. 1:401-425. 1981.; Hayes KC, et al. Retinal degeneration associated with taurine deficiency in the cat. Science. 188:949951. 1975.; Hunt EQ, et al. Oral bovine serum concentrate improves cryptosporidial enteritis in calves. J Pediatr. 2002.; Illinois Dairy Report. “Antimicrobial Proteins in Milk.” 1996.; Innis SM, et al. Development of visual acuity in
relation to plasma and erythrocyte omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids in health term gestation infants. Am J Clin Nutr. 60:347-352. 1994.; Jensen RG, et al. The composition of milk fat. J Dairy Sci. 74:3228-43. 1991.; Jensen RG, et al.
Handbook of Milk Composition. Academic Press, San Diego. 1995.; Jiang RX, et al. Dietary plasma protein reduces small intestinal growth and lamina propria cell density in early-weaned pigs. J Nutr. 130:21-26. 2000.; Julius MH,
et al. A colostral protein that induces the growth and differentiation of resting B-lymphocytes. J Immunol. 140(5):1366-1371. 1988.; Knowles RP, et al. Clinical impressions of the use of an enzyme additive in large and small animals.
VM/SAC. 74(12):1733. 1979.; Langhendries JP, et al. Intestinal flora in the neonate: Impact on morbidity and therapeutic perspectives. Arch Pediatr. 5(6):644-653. 1998.; Ley BM. Colostrum: Nature’s Gift to the Immune System. BL
Productions. 1990.; Majamaa H, et al. Probiotics: A novel approach in the management of food allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 99(2):179-185. 1997.; Mepham TB. Biochemistry of Lactation. Elsevier, London. 1983.; Morrill JL, et al.
Plasma proteins and a probiotic as ingredients in milk replacer. J Dairy Sci. 78:902-907. 1995.; Nollet, et al. Protection of just weaned pigs against infection with F18+ Escherichia coli by non-immune plasma powder. Vet Microbiol.
65:37-45. 1999.; Nollett H, et al. The use on non-immune plasma powder in the prophylaxis of neonatal Escherichia coli diarrhea in calves. J Vet Med. 46:185-196. 1999.; Park KGM, et al. Stimulation of lymphocyte natural cytoxicity
by L-arginine. Lancet. 337:645-646. 1991.; PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Medical Economics, In. Montavale, NJ 2001.; Pion PD, et al. Myocardial failure in cats associated with low plasma taurine: a reversible cardiomyopathy. Science.
237:764-767. 1987.; Quigley JD, et al. Effects of spray-dried plasma in the diets of companion animals. Presented at the 2002 Pet Food Forum, Chicago, IL.; Quigley JD, et al. Effects of oral antibiotics of IgG on survival, health and
growth in dairy calves challenged with Escherichia coli. Food Ag Immunol. 12:311-318. 2000.; Quigley JD, et al. Milk replacers with or without animal plasma for dairy calves. J Dairy Sci. 79:1881-1884. 1996.; Russell LE. Effect of
plasma source and processing method of growth performance of young pigs. J Anim Sci. 72(Suppl 1):156.; Russell LE. Blood and BSE: Reasons that blood products are safe. Feed Management. 52(3)25-28. 2001.; Snodgrass DR, et
al. The immunoprophylaxis of rotavirus infections in lambs. Vet Red. 102:146-148. 1978.; Torrallardona D, et al. Effect of spray dried animal plasma and colistin on performance, structure of small intestine and ileal and caecal microbiology
of weanling pigs experimentally infected with Escherichia coli K99. Anim Feed Sci Tech. 2002.; Touchette KJ, et al. Effect of spray-dried plasma and lipopolysaccharide exposure on weaned pigs: I. Effects on the immune axis of weaned
pigs. J Anim Sci. 80:494-501. 2002.; Tyrell D. The Immunology of Infant Feeding. Plenum Press, NY. 1980.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. The effect of spray-dried porcine in diets with different protein sources on the performance
of weanling piglets. Report P1.137. Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1995.; Van der Peet-Schering CMC, et al. Spray dried porcine and bovine plasma and animal and plant protein in diets of weaned piglets.
Report P1.185. Praktijkonderzoek varkenshouderij. Rosmalen. The Netherlands. 1997.; Van Dijk A, et al. Growth performance of weanling pigs fed spray-dried animal plasma: a review. Livest Prod Sci. 68:263-274. 2001.; Van Dijk A,
et al. Small intestinal morphology in weaned piglets fed a diet containing spray porcine plasma. Res Vet Sci. 71:17-22. 2001.; Walstra P, et al. Dairy Chemistry and Physics. Johns Wiley & Sons, New York. 1984.; Welsh JK, et al. Antiinfective properties of breast milk. J Pediatr. 94:1-9. 1979.; Wysong RL. Lipid Nutrition: Understanding Fats and Oils in Health & Disease. Inquiry Press. Midland, MI 1990.; Wysong RL. Probiotics for animals. Wysong Companion
Animal Health Letter. 96(5):4. 1996.; Wysong RL. Probiotics for allergies. Wysong Health Letter. 98(11):42-3 1998.
Respityl™
Description:
Respityl™ is designed to restore natural balances and provide healing nutrients for the respiratory tract through archetypal
nutritional balances, biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Respiratory
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Quercitin, Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate,
Acerola Juice, Black Currants, Rosehips), Beta-Carotene (D. salina), Vitamin E supplement, Tomato powder, Turmeric,
Methylated Sulfur, Grape Seed Extract, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Maritime Pine Bark Extract, Chlorella, Coriolis Mushroom,
Shiitake Mushroom, Maitake Mushroom, Dried Thymus, Glucosamine, Milk Calcium, Lecithin, Coconut Oil, Plums, Lactoferrin,
Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product,
Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase,
Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Niacin
Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin AAcetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Aderele W, et al. Plasma vitamin C (ascorbic acid) levels in asthmatic children. African J Med Sci. 14:115. 1985.; Agarwal S, et al. Tomato lycopene and its role in human health and chronic diseases. CMAJ. 163:739-744. 2000.;
Bagnato A, et al. Long term treatment with Thymomodulin reduces airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Annals of Allergy. 62(5):425. 1989.; Bito T, et al. Pine bark extract pycnogenol down regulates IFN-gamma-induced
adhesion of T cells to human keratinocytes by inhibiting inducible ICAM-1 expression. Free Radic Biol Med. 28(2):219-27. 2000.; Borchers AT, et al. Mushrooms, tumors, and immunity. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 221:281-93. 1999.;
Burney P. The origins of obstructive airway disease: a role for diet? Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 151:1292-3. 1995.; Cathcart R. The vitamin C treatment of allergy and the normally unprimed state of antibodies. Med Hypotheses.
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46 – Wysong RX
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on human monocytes: its identity with the phagocytic receptor for particulate activators of the alternative complement pathway. J Immunol. 134:2588-93. 1985.; Declume C. Anti-inflammatory evaluation of a hydroalcoholic extract
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112(11):2076-80. 2002.; Jayanthi SAU, et al. Effect of DL alpha-lipoic acid on some carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes in stone forming rats. Biochem Int. 25(1):123-36. 1991.; Johnson EJ. The role of lycopene in health and disease.
Nutr Clin Care. 3:35-43. 2000.; Kagan VE, et al. Recycling of vitamin E in human low density lipoproteins. J Lipid Res. 33(3):385-97. 1992.; Kamiimura M. Anti-inflammatory activity of vitamin E. J Vitaminor. 18(4):204-9. 1972.;
Kessler M, et al. Anti- and pro-oxidant activity of rutin and quercetin derivatives. J Pharm Pharmacol. 55(1):131-42. 2003.; Kidd P. The use of mushroom glucans and proteoglycans in cancer treatment. Altern Med Rev. 5:4-27.
2000.; Kim HY, et al. Effects of phenol-depleted and phenol-rich diets on blood markers of oxidative stress, and urinary excretion of quercetin and kaempferol in healthy volunteers. J Am Coll Nutr. 22(3):217-23. 2003.; Komuro K,
et al. Induction of T-lymphocytes from precursor cells in vitro by product of the thymus. Journal of Experimental Medicine. 138:479-84. 1973.; Kraus J, et al. Beta1-3-glucans: anti tumor activity and immunostimulation. H Cell Biol.
53:431-44. 1991.; Ladanyi A, et al. Effect of lentinan on macrophage cytotoxicity against metastatic tumor cells. Cancer Immunol Immunother. 36:123-6. 1993.; Liesveld JL, et al. Flavonoid effects on normal and leukemic cells.
Leuk Res. 27(6):517-27. 2003.; Lin SY, et al. Protection by quercetin against cooking oil fumes-induced DNA damage in human lung adenocarcinoma CL-3 cells: role of COX-2. Nutr Cancer. 44(1):95-101. 2002.; Liu C, et al. Lycopene
supplementation inhibits lung squamous metaplasia and induces apoptosis via up-regulation insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 in cigarette smoke-exposed ferrets. Cancer Res. 63(12):3138-44. 2003.; Maccaglia A, et al.
Differential effects of quercetin and resveratrol on Band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation signaling of red blood cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 305(3):541-7. 2003.; MacNee W, et al. Oxidants and antioxidants as therapeutic targets
in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 160:S58-S65.; Manzi P, et al. Beta-glucans in edible mushrooms. Food Chemistry. 68:315-8. 2000.; Matsuoka H, et al. Lentinan potentiates immunity and prolongs
the survival time of some patients. Anticancer Res. 17:2751-5. 1997.; McCarty M. Asthma treatment. Med Hypothesis. 13:45-50. 1984.; McCay PB. Vitamin E: interactions with free radicals and ascorbate. Annu Rev Nutr. 5:32340. 1985.; Mettlin C, et al. Vitamin A and lung cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 62:1435-8. 1979.; Michaud DS, et al. Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective U.S. cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 72:990-7. 2000.;
Middleton Jr E, et al. Quercetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of endothelial cell intracellular adhesion molecule-1. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 107:435-6. 1995.; Mohsenin V, et al. Effect of ascorbic acid on response
to methacholine challenge in asthmatic subjects. American Rev Respir Dis. 127:143-7. 1993.; Moini H, et al. Bioflavonoid effects on the mitochondrial respiratory electron transport chain and cytochrome c redox state. Redox Rep. 4(12):35-41. 1999.; Moini H, et al. Enzyme inhibition and protein-binding action of the procyanidin-rich French maritime pine bark extract, pycnogenol: effect on xanthine oxidase. J Agric Food Chem. 48(11):5630-9. 2000.; Morita
K, et al. Chlorella accelerates dioxin excretion in rats. J Nutr. 129:1731-6. 1999.; Omenn GS, et al. Effects of a combination of beta-carotene and vitamin A on lung cancer and cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med. 334:1150-5.
1996.; O’Neill CA, et al. Aldehyde-induced protein modifications in human plasma: protection by glutathione and dihydrolipoic acid. J Lab Clin Med. 124(3):359-70. 1994.; Packer L, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.
Free Radic Biol Med. 19(2):227-50. 1995.; Packer L, et al. Antioxidant activity and biologic properties of a procyanidin-rich extract from pine (Pinus maritime) bark, pycnogenol. Free Radic Biol Med. 27(5-6):704-24. 1999.; Paetau
I, et al. Carotenoids in human buccal mucosa cells after 4 wk of supplementation with tomato juice or lycopene supplements. Am J Clin Nutr. 707:490-4. 1999.; Patchen M, et al. Glucan: mechanisms involved in its radioprotective
effect. J Leuc Biol. 42:95-105. 1987.; Plaper A, et al. Characterization of quercetin binding site on DNA gyrase. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 306(2):530-6. 2003.; Podda M, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid supplementation prevents symptoms
of vitamin E deficiency. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 204(1):98-104. 1994.; Rao AV, et al. Bioavailability and in vivo antioxidant properties of lycopene from tomato products and their possible role in the prevention of cancer.
Nutr Cancer. 31:199-203. 1998.; Rao AV, et al. Role of lycopene as antioxidant carotenoid in the prevention of chronic diseases: a review. Nutr Res. 19:305-23. 1999.; Redlich CA, et al. Characterization of carotenoid, vitamin
A, and á-tocopherol levels in human lung tissue and pulmonary macrophages. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 154:1436-43. 1995.; Repine JE, et al. Oxidative stress in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Am J Respir Crit Care Med.
156:341-57. 1997.; Riso P, et al. Does tomato consumption effectively increase the resistance of lymphocyte DNA to oxidative damage? Am J Clin Nutr. 69:712-8. 1999.; Robak J, et al. Flavonoids are scavengers of superoxide
anions. Biochem Pharmacol. 37:837-41. 1988.; Roginsky V. Chain-breaking antioxidant activity of natural polyphenols as determined during the chain oxidation of methyl linoleate in Triton X-100 micelles. Arch Biochem Biophys.
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quercetin sensitizes a CD95-resistant cell line to apoptosis by activating protein kinase Calpha. Oncogene. 22(21):3330-42. 2003.; Sato M, et al. Quercetin, a bioflavonoid, inhibits the induction of interleukin 8 and monocyte
chemoattractant protein-1 expression by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in cultured human synovial cells. J Rheumatol. 24:1680-4. 1997.; Schock BC, et al. Antioxidants and oxidative stress in BAL fluid of atopic asthmatic children.
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of antioxidants and their impact on systemic oxidative stress. Clin Pharmacokinet. 42(5):437-59. 2003.; Sengupta A, et al. The anti-carcinogenic role of lycopene, abundantly present in tomato. Eur J Cancer Prev. 8:325-30. 1999.;
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Nutr. 70(4):536-43. 1999.; Yoshimoto T, et al. Potent inhibitors of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. Biochem Biophys Res Com. 116:612-8. 1983.
Sedadul™
Description:
Sedadul™ provides nutrients to specifically target areas of the brain involved in stress, sedation and calmness.
Indications: Hyperactivity
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Caution is advised when using Sedadul™
with antiepileptic medications, sedatives or antidepressants. Do not use in pregnant or nursing animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Valerian Root, St. John’s Wort, Gotu Kola, Lemon Balm, Chamomile, Lecithin,
Coconut Oil, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried
Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic
Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium
Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate,
Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Avallone R, et al. Benzodiazepine-like compounds and GABA in flower heads of Matricaria chamomilla. Phytotherapy Research 1996; 10: S177-S179. Blumenthal M, et al. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton,
MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000: 230-232. Blumenthal M. The complete German Commission E Monographs: therapeutic guide to herbal medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council, 1998. Brinker F. Herb
Contraindications and Drug Interactions. 2nd ed. Sandy, Ore: Eclectic Medical; 1998: 32-33. Cerny A, et al. Tolerability and efficacy of valerian/lemon balm in healthy volunteers ( a double-blind, placebo-controlled, mulicentre study).
Fitoterapia. 1999; 70: 221-228. Chesson AJ, et al. Practice parameters for the evaluation of chronic insomnia. Sleep 2000; 23:5. Cirigliano M. Chamomile for Use as Antiinflammatory, Antispasmodic and Sedative. Alternative Medicine
Alert 1999; September: 100-104. Davidson JRT, et al. Herbs for the Mind. New York: Guilford Press; 2000. DeSmet PA, et al. St. John’s Wort as an antidepressant. BMJ 1996 Aug 3: 313(7052): 241-2. Donath F. Critical evaluation of
the effect of valerian extract on sleep structure and sleep quality. Pharmacopsychiatry 2000;33: 47-53. Ernst E, et al. Adverse Effects Profile of the Herbal Antidepressant St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.). 1998: Eur. J. Clin.
Pharmacol., 54: 589-594. Ernst E. The Desktop Guide to Complementary and Alternative Medicine: An Evidence-Based Approach. Mosby, Edinburgh; 2001: 169. ESCOP. Proposal for a European Monograph on the Medicinal Use of
Matricariae Flos (Chamomile Flowers). Brussels, ESCOP. 1990. Foster, S. Chamomile, Botanical Series, No. 307. Austin, Texas, American Botanical Council, 1991. Fussel A, et al. Effect of a fixed valerian-hop extract combination (ZE
91019) on sleep polygraph in patients with non-organic insomnia: a pilot study. Eur J Med Res 2000; 5(9): 385-90. German herbal monograph, “Piperis methystici rhizoma”, Bundesanzeiger, no. 101, June 1, 1990. Habersang S, et
al. [Pharmacological studies with compounds of chamomile. IV. Studies on toxicity of (-)-alpha-bisabolol (author’s transl)]. [German]. Planta Medica 1979; 37: 115-23. Harrer G, et al. Comparison of Equivalence Between the St. John’s
Wort Extract LoHyp-57 and Fluoxetine. 1999: Drug Res., 49: 289-296. Holm E, et al. Studies on the profile of the neurophysiological effects of D,l-kavain: Cerebral sites of action and sleep-wakefulness-rhythm in animals, ArzneimittelForsch 41: 673-83, 1991. Houghton PJ. The scientific basis for the reputed activity of valerian. J Pharm Pharmacol 1999; 51: 505-512. Jamieson D, et al. The antinociceptive actions of kava components in mice. Clin Exp Pharmacol.
Physiol. 17: 495-507, 1990. Johnson D, et al. Neuropsychological active profile and tolerance of kava extract. Therapiewoche Neurologie Psychiatr. 5: 349-54, 1991. Kim HL, et al. St. John’s Wort for depression. A Meta-Analysis of
Well-Defined Clinical Trials. 1999: J. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 187: 532-539. Kinzler E, et al. Clinical efficacy of a kava extract in patients with anxiety syndrome: Double-blind placebo-controlled study over four weeks, Arzneimittel-Forsch
41: 584-88, 1991. Kuhlmann J. The influence of valerian treatment on reaction time, alertness and concentration in volunteers. Pharmacopsychiatry 1999; 32: 235-241. Larzelere MM, et al. Anxiety, depression and insomnia. Prim Care
2002 Jun; 29(2): 339-60, vii. Linde K, et al. St. John’s Wort for depression- an overview and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. BMJ 1996; 313: 258-61. Mann C, et al. The chemistry, pharmacology, and commercial formulations
of chamomile. Herbs, spices and medicinal plants 1986; 1: 235-280. Martens D. Chamomile: The Herb and the Remedy. Prover, The Journal of the Chiropractic Academy of Homeopathy 1995; 6: 15-18. Newall CA, et al. Herbal medicines:
a guide for health-care professionals. London: Pharmaceutical Press, 1996: ix, 296. Roberts A, et al. The Effect of Olfactory Stimulation On Fluency Vividness of Imagery and Associated Mood a Preliminary Study. British Journal of
Medical Psychology 1992; 65: 197-199.Rotblatt M, et al. Evidence-Based Herbal Medicine. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & Belfus, Inc; 2002: 249-251. Salamon I. Chamomile, A Medicinal Plant. The Herb, Spice, and Medicinal Plant Digest
1992; 10:1-4. Schelosky, et al. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 58: 639-40, 1995. Schilcher, H.: Die Kamille, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft, Stuttgart, 1987, 152 pp. Schultz V, et al. Rational Phytotherapy:
A Physician’s Guide to Herbal Medicine. New York, NY: Springer- Verlag; 1998: 26, 37, 83,181,260. Spinella M. Herbal Medicines and Epilepsy: The Potential for Benefit and Adverse Effects. Epilepsy Behavior 2001 dec; 2(6): 524532. Stevinson C, et al. Valerian for Insomnia: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Sleep Medicine 2000. 1: 91-99. Tyler, V.E. Herbs of Choice- The Therapeutic use of Phytomedicinals, Birmingham, New York: Pharmaceutical
X
Products Press, 1994. Viola H, Wasowski C, Levi De Stein M, et al. Apigenin, a component of Matricaria recutita flowers, is a central benzodiazepine receptors- ligand with anxiolytic effects. Planta Medica 1995; 61: 213-216. Vitiello
Wysong R – 47
B. Hypericum perforatum Extracts as Potential Antidepressants. 1999: J. Pharm. Pharmacol., 51: 513-517. Wing YK. Herbal treatment of insomnia. Hong Kong Med J 2001 Dec; 7(4): 392-402. Wong AH, et al. Herbal remedies in psychiatric
practice. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998; 55(11): 1033-1044. Zanoli P, et al. Behavioral characterization of the flavonoids apigenin and chrysin. Fitoterapia 2000 Aug; 71 Suppl 1: S117-23.
Streseper™
Description:
Streseper™ is designed to address the special nutritional needs created by stress. Various forms of stress as well as working
and athletic exertion place a unique strain on the body’s immune system and metabolic pathways. Factors such as infectious
disease and social and emotional factors also can create demands which require nutritional resources – in quantity and
quality – above and beyond those required to maintain homeostasis.
Indications: Stress/Performance
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use in pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate,
Acerola Juice, Black Currants, Rosehips), Beta-Carotene (D. salina), Vitamin E supplement, Tomato powder, Turmeric,
Methylated Sulfur, Grape Seed Extract, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Maritime Pine Bark Extract, Dried Whey, L-Arginine, L-Lysine,
Inositol, Methylate Sulfur, Coriolis, Shiitake and Maitake Mushrooms; Garlic, Coenzyme Q10, Beta 1,3 Glucans, Colostrum,
Dried Thymus, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase,
Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried
Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae
Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage,
Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese
Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement,
Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
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their univalent redox potentials: a pulse radiolysis study. Free Rad Biol Med. 1995; 19:45-52. Bounous G, et al. Immunoenhancing property of dietary whey protein in mice: role of glutathione. Clin Invest Med. 12:154-61. 1989. Bounous
G, et al. Influence of dietary proteins on the immune system of mice. J Nutr. 112:1747-55. 1982. Bounous G, et al. The biologic activity of undenatured dietary whey proteins: role of glutathione. Clin Invest Med. 14:296-309. 1991.
Bounous G, et al. The influence of dietary whey protein on tissue glutathione and the disease of aging. Clin Invest Med. 12:343-9. 1989. Bray TM, et al. Enhancement of tissue glutathione for antioxidant and immune functions in malnutrition.
Biochem Pharmacol. 47:2113-23. 1994. Buchman AL, et al. Lecithin increases plasma free choline and decreases hepatic stenosis in long-term total parenteral nutrition patients. Gastroenterology. 102(4 pt.1):1363-70. 1992. Campos
R, et al. Silybinin dihemisuccinate protects against glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation induced by acetometophin on rat liver. Planta Med. 55:417-9. 1989. Cooke MS, et al. Novel repair action of vitamin C upon in vivo oxidative
DNA damage. FEBS Lett. 1998; 439:363-367. Crane FL. Biochemical functions of coenzyme Q10. J Am Coll Nutr. 2001;20(6):591-598. DiMario FR, et al. The effects of silymarin on the liver function parameters of patients with alcoholinduced liver disease: A double-blind study. Der Toxisch-metabolische Leberscladen. Hans. Verl-kontor, Lubeck, Germany. Pp.54-58. 1981.Ernster L, et al. Biochemical, physiological and medical aspects of ubiquinone function. Biochim
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of the effect of alpha-lipoic acid and alpha-tocopherol supplementation on measures of oxidative stress. Free Rad Biol Med. 1999; 27:1114-1121. Matthews RT, et al. Coenzyme Q10 administration increases brain mitochondrial concentrations
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et al. Safety of antioxidant vitamins. Arch Intern Med. 156:925-935. 1996. Mohr D, et al. Dietary supplementation with coenzyme Q10 results in increased levels of ubiquinol-10 within circulating lipoproteins and increased resistance
of human low-density lipoprotein to the initiation of lipid peroxidation. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1992;1126(3):247-254. Natrej CV, et al. Lipoic acid and diabetes: effect of dihydrolipoic acid administration in diabetic rats and rabbits.
J Biosci. 1984; 6:37-46. Nickander KK, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid: antioxidant potency against lipid peroxidation of neural tissues in vitro and implications for diabetic neuropathy. Free Rad Biol Med. 1996; 21:631-639. Oetari S, et al.
Effects of curcumin on cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase activities in rat liver. Biochem Pharmacol. 51(1):39-45. 1996. Ohmori H, et al. Augmentation of the antibody response by lipoic acid in mice II. Restoration of the
antibody response in immunosuppressed mice. Japan J Pharmacol 1986; 42:275-280. Osband ME, et al. Histiocytosis-X: Demonstration of abnormal immunity, T-cell histamine H2-receptor deficiency, and successful treatment with thymic
extract. NEJM. 304:146-53. 1981. Overvad K, et al. Coenzyme Q10 in health and disease. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999;53(10):764-770. Packer L, et al. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant. Free Rad Biol Med. 1995; 19:227-250.
Packer L, et al. Neuroprotection by the metabolic antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid. Free Rad Biol Med. 1997; 22:359-378. Pauling L. Evolution and the need for ascorbic acid. Proc Natl Acad SciUSA. 1970; 67:1643-1648. Pizzini RP, et
al. Dietary nucleotides reverse malnutrition and starvation-induced immunosuppression. Arch Surg. 125;1:86-89. 1990. Price G, et al. Immunologic deficiencies in senescence. J Immun. 108(2):403-12. 1972. Reed TJ. The chemistry and
function of lipoic acids. Adv Enzymol. 1957; 18:319-347. Reuben C. Antioxidants: Your Complete Guide. Prima Publishing, Rocklin, CA. 1995. Salmi H, et al. Effect of silymarin on chemical, functional and morphological alterations
of the liver. Scand J Gastroenterol. 17:517-21. 1982. Schopen RD, et al. Therapy of hepatoses. Therapeutic uses of silymarin. Med Welt. 21:691-8. 1970. Soni KB, et al. Reversal of aflatoxin induced liver damage by turmeric and curcumin.
Cancer Letter. 66(2):115-21. 1992. Sonnenbichler J, et al. Stimulating influence of a flavonolignan derivative on proliferation, RNA synthesis and protein synthesis in liver cells. Assessment and Management of Hepatobiliary Disease.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin. 1987:265-72. Soudamini KK, et al. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation and cholesterol levels in mice by curcumin. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 36(4):239-43. 1992. Sreejayan, Rao MN. Curcuminoids as potent
inhibitors of lipid peroxidation. J Pharm Pharmacol. 46(12):1013-6. 1994. Suzuki H, et al. Effects of glycyrrhizin on biochemical tests on patients with chronic hepatitis- Double-blind trial. Asian Med J. 26:423-38. 1984. Svensson
M, et al. Effect of Q10 supplementation on tissue Q10 levels and adenine nucleotide catabolism during high-intensity exercise. Int J Sport Nutr. 1999;9(2):166-180. Tirosh O, et al. Neuroprotective effects of alpha-lipoic acid and its positively
charged amide analogue. Free Rad Biol Med. 1999; 26:1418-1426. Tran MT, et al. Role of coenzyme Q10 in chronic heart failure, angina, and hypertension. Pharmacotherapy. 2001;21(7):797-806. Tuchweber B, et al. Prevention by
48 – Wysong RX
silybinin of phalloidin induced hepatotoxicity. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 51:265-75. 1979. Weber C. Dietary intake and absorption of coenzyme Q. In: Kagan VE, Quinn PJ, eds. Coenzyme Q: Molecular Mechanisms in Health and Disease.
Boca Raton: CRC Press; 2001:209-215. Zino S, et al. Randomized controlled trial of effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on plasma concentrations of lipids and antioxidants. BMJ. 314:1787-1791. 1997.
Struvatrol™
Description:
Struvatrol™ is designed to provide nutritional support to the urinary tract and production of acidic urine through archetypal
nutritional balances, biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Struvite
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use Struvatrol™ in acidotic
animals, those with a history of calcium oxalate urolithiasis or during pregnancy and lactation.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Cranberry, Bilberry, Uva ursi, DL-Methionine, Ascorbic Acid, Milk Calcium,
Lecithin, Coconut Oil, Plums, Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Dried
Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus
acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation
Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried
Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Zinc Proteinate,
Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine
Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin,
Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Avorn J, et al. Reduction of bacteriuria and pyuria after ingestion of cranberry juice. JAMA. 1994;271:751–754. Axelrod DR. Ascorbic acid and urinary pH. JAMA 1985;254:1310–1. Blumenthal M, et al. (eds). The Complete Commission
E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Boston, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 224–5. Blumenthal, M. (ED) The Complete German Commissison E Monographs (English translation). American Botanical
Council. 1998. Buffington CA. Lower urinary tract disease in cats- new problems, new paradigms. J Nutr. 124:2643S-2615S, 1994. Buffington T. Feline struvite urolithiasis: magnesium effect depends on urinary pH. Feline Practice. 15:2933, 1985. Buffington T. The role of diet in feline urolithiasis: a reappraisal. Vet Forum, 1986.ESCOP monographs. Fascicule 2: Uvae Ursi Folium. Exeter, UK: European Scientific Co-operative on Phytotherapy, 1997. ESCOP monographs.
Fascicule 5: Uvae Ursi Folium. Exeter, UK: European Scientific Co-operative on Phytotherapy, 1997. Foo LY, et al. A-Type proanthocyanidin trimers from cranberry that inhibit adherence of uropathogenic P-fimbriated Escherichia coli. J Nat
Prod. 2000 Sep;63(9):1225-8. Foo LY, et al. The structure of cranberry proanthocyanidins which inhibit adherence of uropathogenic P-fimbriated Escherichia coli in vitro. Phytochemistry. 2000 May;54(2):173-81. Frohne V, et al. Untersuchungen
zur Frage der harndesifizierenden Wirkungen von Barentraubenblatt-extracten. Planta Med 18: 1-25, 1970. Habash MB, et al. The effect of water, ascorbic acid, and cranberry derived supplementation on human urine and uropathogen adhesion
to silicone rubber. Can J Microbiol. 1999;45:691–694. High KP. Nutritional strategies to boost immunity and prevent infection in elderly individuals. Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Dec 1;33(11):1892-900. Howell A, et al. Cranberry juice and adhesion
of antibiotic-resistant uropathogens.. The Journal of the American Medical Association 2002 June 19;287(23). Howell AB, et al. Inhibition of the adherence of P-fimbriated Escherichia coli to uroepithelial-cell surfaces by proanthocyanidin
extracts from cranberries [letter]. N Engl J Med. 1998;339:1085–1086. Hyde, F.F. British Herbal Pharmacopoeia. British Herbal Medicine Assoc: West Yorks, England, 1983 Jahodar L, et al. Antimicrobial effect of arbutin and an extract of the
leaves of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi in vitro. Ceskoslov Farm 1985; 34:174–8. Kedzia B, et al. Antibacterial action of urine containing arbutin metabolic products. Med Dosw Mikrobiol 27: 305-314, 1975. Klenner, F.R. Observations on the
dose and administration of ascorbic acid when employed beyond the range of a vitamin in human pathology. J. App. Nutr., 23:61-88, 1971. Klenner, F.R. Significance of high daily intake of ascorbic acid in preventive medicine. J. Int. Acad.
Prev. Med., 1:45-49, 1974. Kontiokari T, et al. Randomized trial of cranberry-ligonberry juice and Lactobacillus GG drink for the prevention of urinary tract infections in women. British Medical Journal 2001 June;322:1571. Kontiokari T,
et al. Randomized trial of cranberry-lingonberry juice and Lactobacillus GG drink for the prevention of urinary tract infections in women. BMJ. 2001;322:1–5. Lehmann J, et al. The relation of sulfur metabolism to acid-base balance and electrolyte
excretion: the effects of dl-methionine in normal man, J Clin Invest 38:2215-23, 1959. Marinade: The Extra Pharmacopoeia. Blacow, N.W., Ed, The Pharmaceutical Press, London. 26th Edition, page 76, 1972. Matsuda H, et al. Pharmacological
studies on leaf of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L) Spreng. V. Effect of water extract from Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L) Spreng (bearberry leaf) on the antiallergic and antiinflammatory activities of dexamethasone ointment. J Pharm Soc Japan 1992;
112:673–7. Ofek I, et al. Anti-Escherichia coli adhesin activity of cranberry and blueberry juices [letter]. N Engl J Med. 1991;324:1599. Schaeffer AJ. Recurrent urinary tract infection in the female patient. Urology. 1988;32(suppl 3):12–15.
Schlager TA, et al. Effect of cranberry juice on bacteriuria in children with neurogenic bladder receiving intermittent catheterization. J Pediatr. 1999;135:698–702. Schmidt DR, et al. An examination of the anti-adherence activity of cranberry
juice on urinary and nonurinary bacterial isolates. Microbios. 1988;55:173–181. Sirsi M. Antimicrobial action of vitamin C on M. tuberculosis and some other pathogenic organisms. Indian J Med Sci 1952;6:252–5. Sobota AE. Inhibition
of bacterial adherence by cranberry juice: Potential use for the treatment of urinary tract infections. J Urol. 1984;131:1013–1016. Stothers L. A randomized placebo controlled trial to evaluate naturopathic cranberry products as prophylaxis
against urinary tract infection in women. Presented at: American Urological Association 2001 Annual Meeting; June 2–7, 2001; Anaheim, Calif. Publ ID: 318. Terris MK, Issa MM, Tacker JR. Dietary supplementation with cranberry concentrate
tablets may increase the risk of nephrolithiasis. Urology. 2001;57:26–29. Tsukada K, et al. Cranberry juice and its impact on peri-stomal skin conditions for urostomy patients. Ostomy Wound Manage. 1994 Nov-Dec;40(9):60-2, 64, 668. Walker EB, Barney DP, Mickelsen JN, et al. Cranberry concentrate: UTI prophylaxis. J Family Pract 1997;45:167–8. Zafriri D, et al. Inhibitory activity of cranberry juice on adherence of type 1 and type P fimbriated Escherichia coli to eucaryotic
cells. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1989;33:92–98..
Uratrar™
Description:
Uratrar™ is specifically designed to provide nutritional support to the urinary tract through archetypal nutritional balances,
biochemically rich ingredients and non-thermal processing.
Indications: Urinary Health
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Diarrhea or digestive upset may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use in pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Ascorbic Acid, Cranberry, Uva Ursi, Milk Calcium, Plums, Lactoferrin,
Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus
faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product,
Wysong RX – 49
Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus
niger Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Iron
Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate,
Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12
Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Grases F, et al. Urolithiasis and phytotherapy. Int Urol Nephrol 26(5):507-11. 1994. Howell AB. Cranberry proanthocyanidins and the maintenance of urinary tract health. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 42(3 Suppl):273-8. 2002. Howell and
Foxman . Cranberry Juice and Adhesion of Antibiotic-Resistant Uropathogens. JAMA.287:3082-3083. 2002. Reid G..The role of cranberry and probiotics in intestinal and urogenital tract health. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 42(3 Suppl):293300. 2002. Ritch-Krc EM et al. Carrier herbal medicine: Traditional and contemporary plant use. J Ethnopharmacol. 52(2):85-94. 1996. Schindler G, et al. Urinary excretion and metabolism of arbutin after oral administration of Arctostaphylos
uvae ursi extract as film-coated tablets and aqueous solution in healthy humans. J Clin Pharmacol. 42(8):920-7. 2002. Yarnell E Botanical medicines for the urinary tract. World J Urol.20(5):285-93. 2002. Zheng W, Wang SY. Oxygen
radical absorbing capacity of phenolics in blueberries, cranberries, chokeberries, and lingonberries. J Agric Food Chem. 15;51(2):502-9. 2003.
Vermiden™
Description:
Vermiden™ is designed to provide nutritional support for animals suffering from intestinal parasites, which jeopardize the
health of the G/I lining and compromise nutritional status.
Indications: Parasites
Clinical Biochemistry: See introduction.
Precautions, Adverse Reactions, Contraindications:
Digestive upset or diarrhea may result if over consumed or not gradually introduced. Do not use for pregnant or nursing
animals.
Ingredients:
Beef, Beef Liver, Ground Bone, Fish Oil, Coconut Oil, Desiccated Sea Plankton, Garlic, Black Walnut, Milk Calcium, Plums,
Lactoferrin, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Artichoke, Amylase, Protease, Lipase, Cellulase, Dried Enterococcus faecium
Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation
Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger
Fermentation Product, Phytase, Natural Extractives of Rosemary and Sage, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate,
Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine
Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin,
Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.
Analysis: Protein 50.0%, Fat 28%, Fiber 2.8%, Moisture 3.0%
References:
Adetumbi M, et al. Allium sativum (garlic) – a natural antibiotic. Medical Hypoth. 12:227-37. 1983.; Anesini C, et al. Screening of plants used in Argentine folk medicine for antimicrobial activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology.
39:119-28. 1993.; Ankri S, et al. Antimicrobial properties of allicin from garlic. Microbes Infect. 1(2):125-9. 1999.; Barr SC, et al. Giardiasis of dogs and cats. Comp Cont Edu Pract Vet. 16:603-14. 1994.; Cellini L, et al. Inhibition
of Helicobacter pylori by garlic extract (Allium sativum). FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology. 13:273-7. 1996.; Chowdhury AKZ, et al. Efficacy of aqueous extract of garlic and allicin in experimental shigellosis in rabbits.
Indian J of Med Res. 93:33-6. 1991.; Cline S, et al. Determination of methyl 2-benzimidazolylcarbamate in black walnut fruit. J Agric Food Chem. 29(5):1087-8. 1981.; Collins GH. A limited survey of gastro-intestinal helminthes
of dogs and cats. NZ Vet J. 21:175-6. 1973.; Curreli N, et al. Effects of plant-derived naphthoquinones on the growth of Pleurotus sajor-caju and degradation of the compounds by fungal cultures. J Basic Microbiol. 41(5):253-9.
2001.; Davis LE, et al. In vitro synergism of concentrated Allium sativum extract and amphotericin B against Cryptococcus neoformans. Planta Medica. 60:546-9. 1994.; Fetterer RH, et al. Effects of plumbagin on development of
the parasitic nematodes Heamonchus contortus and Ascaris suum. Comp Biochem Physiol C. 100(3):539-42. 1991.; Foster S, et al. Black walnut in medicinal plants. Houghton Mifflin Co. New York, NY. 276. 1990.; Galey FD,
et al. Black walnut (Juglans nigra) toxicosis: a model for equine laminitis. J Comp Pathol. 104(3):313-26. 1991.; Gallwizt H, et al. Ajoene is an inhibitor and subversive substrate of human glutathione reductase and Trypanosoma
cruzi trypanothione reductase: crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies. J Med Chem. 42(3):364-72. 1999.; Hasslinger MA. Ollulanus tricuspis, the stomach worm of the cat. Feline Pract. 14:22-35. 1984.; Hennig L, et
al. Selective inactivation of parvulin-like peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases by juglone. Biochemistry. 37(17):5953-60. 1998.; Hoshino T, et al. Effects of garlic preparations on the gastrointestinal mucosa. J Nutr. 131:1109S-1113S.
2001.; Kamei H, et al. Inhibition of cell growth in culture by quinones. Cancer Biother Radiopharm. 13(3):185-8. 1998.; Lawson LD, et al. Characterization of the formation of allicin and other thiosulfinates from garlic. Planta Medica.
58:345-50. 1992.; Lawson LD, et al. Pre-hepatic fate of the organosulfur compounds derived from garlic (Allium sativum). Planta Medica. 59:A688. 1993.; Lee KW, et al. Hematologic changes associated with the appearance of eccentrocytes
after intragastric administration of garlic extract to dogs. Amer J Vet Res. 61(11):1446-50. 2000.; Lun, et al. Antiparasitic activity of diallyl trisulfide (dasuansu) on human and animal pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma sp., Entamoeba
histolytica and Giardia lamblia) in vitro. Ann Soc Belge Med Trop. 74:51-9. 1994.; Mahoney, et al. Regulation of aflatoxin production by naphthoquinones of walnut (Juglans regia). J Agric Food Chem. 48(9):4418-21. 2000.;
Munday R, et al. Induction of quinone reductase and glutathione transferase in rat tissues by juglone and plumbagin. Planta Med. 66(5):399-402. 2000.; Nok AJ, et al. Allium sativum-induced death of African trypanosomes. Parasitology
Res. 82:634-7. 1996.; Singh KV, et al. Activity on multiple resistant bacteria of garlic (Allium sativum) extract. Fitoterapia. LV(5):313-5. 1984.; Soffer SA, et al. Evaluation of the antiparasitic effect of aqueous garlic (Allium sativum)
extract in Hymenolepiasis nana and giardiasis. J Egypt Soc Parasit. 21(2):497-502. 1991.; Sugie S, et al. Inhibitory effects of plumbagin and juglone on azoxymethane-induced intestinal carcinogenesis in rats. Cancer Lett. 127(12):177-83.; Weber ND, et al. In vitro virucidal effects of Allium sativum (garlic) extract and compounds. Planta Medica. 58:417-23. 1992.
50 – Wysong RX