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Transcript
HEART HEALTHY MENU
BREAKFAST
Nonfat milk
100% whole wheat Pan de Sal
Margarine
Orange
1 cup (8 oz.)
1 or 2
½ tsp.
1
LUNCH
Skinless chicken adobo
Sauteed eggplant & bitter melon
Rice
Cantaloupe
3 oz.
1 bowl (8 oz.)
1 bowl (8 oz.)
1/4
DINNER
Milk fish (Bangus)
Spinach sinigang
Rice
Banana
3 oz.
1 cup (8 oz.)
1 bowl (8 oz.)
½
EAT HEART SMART
FILIPINO STYLE
American Heart Association
Western States Affiliate
100 Montgomery St. #1650
San Francisco, CA 94104
Phone: (415) 433-2273
Fax: (415) 228-8402
Website: http://www.americanheart.org
Developed By:
The Filipino Community Heart
Council
San Francisco
GETTING STARTED:
FILIPINO DISHES FOR THE FAMILY
INTRODUCTION
This eating guide has been especially developed for those
who enjoy Filipino cuisine. Food choices have long been
identified as a contributing factor to cardiovascular
disease. Some typical Filipino dishes have certain
ingredients which can increase these risks.
The American Heart Association recommends that you
lower your cholesterol, fat, and sodium intake, and
achieve and maintain your ideal body weight. These heart
healthy food choices can be started for persons age two
and older. Early healthy habits will help yield long term
benefits.
The American Heart Association has identified the
following risk factors contributing to cardiovascular
disease:
Cigarette Smoking
High blood pressure (Hypertension)
High levels of cholesterol and fat in the blood
Diabetes
Obesity
Lack of regular exercise
Family history of heart disease
Use of oral contraceptives
For a comprehensive and specialized diet designed to
meet your individual needs, ask your primary care health
provider to refer you to a registered dietitian.
Page 2
Pork Adobo with Eggplant
Ingredients:
½ lb.
2 Tbsps.
2 Tbsps.
1 Tbsp.
1 Tbsp.
4
2 cloves
4
2
Pork loin, fat trimmed, cut in bite size
pieces
Soy sauce
Vinegar*
Brown sugar
Olive oil
Japanese eggplants
Garlic, chopped
Peppercorns
Bay leaves
Cooking Instructions: Heat oil and braise pork at high heat
until slightly brown. Pour liquid ingredients in followed by
the sugar, the herbs and spices. Bring to a boil. Simmer for
20 to 25 minutes. Cut eggplants into halves and place on top
of meat while simmering.
*For a more traditional recipe, you may wish to increase the
vinegar by 1-2 Tbsp.
Serves: 4
Single Serving Nutrient Values
Calories
Percent calories from fat
Protein
Carbohydrate
Cholesterol
Sodium
Total Fat
Saturated
Polyunsaturated
Monounsaturated
253.1 kc
62
10.25 gm
13.52 gm
34.74 mg
250.7 mg
17.14 gm
6.269 gm
0.994 gm
7.826 gm
Page 11
GETTING STARTED:
FILIPINO DISHES FOR THE FAMILY
Arroz Caldo
Ingredients:
1 clove
1 Tbsp.
1 tsp.
2 pieces
1 c.
2 c.
1 tsp.
1 stalk
Garlic, minced
Fresh ground ginger
Olive Oil
Chicken drumsticks, de-boned & skinless
Day old cooked rice
Chicken stock
Fish sauce
Dash of fresh ground pepper
Green onions
Saffron
Cooking Instruction: Saute garlic and ginger in hot olive oil.
Add the chicken then the rice. Pour in the chicken stock.
Bring to a boil. Season with fish sauce and group pepper.
Serve hot with green onions and saffron.
Variation: For a thicker soup, use ½ cup raw rice instead of
cooked rice.
Serves: 3
Single Serving Nutrient Values
Calories
Percent calories from fat
Protein
Carbohydrate
Cholesterol
Sodium
Total Fat
Saturated
Polyunsaturated
Monounsaturated
Page 10
178.1 kc
26
11.51 gm
20.58 gm
27.27 mg
205.8 mg
5.112 gm
1.377 gm
0.592 gm
1.714 gm
AMERICAN
ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN HEART
HEART ASSOCIATION
DIETARY
DIETARY GUIDELINES
GUIDELINES
LOW CHOLESTEROL
Cholesterol is a fatty substance present in foods from animals (Ex.
Egg yolk, certain shell fish, organ meats, etc.) High intake leads to
increased deposits in blood vessels, which may lead to blockage
of blood vessels.
LOW SATURATED FAT
Saturated fat is from animal and plant sources (Ex: high fat dairy
products, animal fat, coconut, etc.) It raises blood cholesterol and,
therefore, increases the risk of heart disease.
POLYUNSATURATED FAT
Polyunsaturated fat is of vegetable origin. However, the American
Heart Association recommends reducing all fat in the diet to no
more than 30% of total calories.
TRIGLYCERIDE
Triglyceride is a type of fat in our bodies. Elevated triglycerides
are another risk factor for heart disease. Limit your intake of
saturated fat and cholesterol, lose weight if overweight or
maintain desirable weight, exercise regularly and limit alcohol
and carbohydrate intake.
LOW SODIUM
Sodium is a mineral found in foods and many condiments such as
salt and Vetsin (monosodium glutamate.) High sodium intake is
associated with elevation of blood pressure. Hypertension or high
blood pressure makes the heart work harder to pump blood. An
overworked heart becomes less healthy. Hypertension can also
damage vessel walls, making deposit of cholesterol easier.
WEIGHT CONTROL
Keeping weight within normal limits will help to reduce the
workload of the heart. It will also help lower serum cholesterol,
and risks of high blood pressure (another factor, which can
increase heart disease risk.)
Page 3
COMMON FOOD MYTHS
MYTH: “Vegetable oil is not fattening.”
TRUTH: False. All types of oil
have the same amount of sat and
should be limited to 30% of total
calories. But olive oil, canola oil
and peanut oil contain the type of
fat that helps lower blood cholesterol, thereby reducing the risk of
heart attack.
NUTRITIONAL GUIDE
USE IN
MODERATION
2% reduced fat milk
Evaporated low fat milk
Almond gelatin
Reduced fat ice cream
Cheese made from skim milk
Whole milk & extra rich milk
Evaporated milk
Sweetened condensed milk
Gata (coconut milk)
Ice cream
Cream
Sour cream
Half & half cream
Quesong Puti
All cheeses made from whole
milk
Soup: cream varieties
Chocolate & malted drinks
Custards & puddings
Leche Flan (custard)
Fruits canned in syrup
Candied fruits
Candied vegetables
Avocado
Coconut
Pickles (Atsara)
Preserved vegetable and fruits
Commercial fruit drinks
Oils: safflower, corn, sesame,
cottonseed, soybean mayonnaise,
salad dressing
Oils: Manteca Baboy, butter, lard
shortening, coconut oil, palm oil
MYTH: “Rice is fattening; therefore to reduce weight, we need
to cut down the amount of rice and eat more meat.”
TRUTH: False. Rice has fewer calories and no fat when compared to the same amount of meat. The focus should be limiting the amount of empty calories, e.g., fats, sweets. But because
rice contains calories it can contribute to weight gain if we eat
excessive portions.
MYTH: “Consumption of an animal organ part will improve
that body function for humans. For example: consuming pork
brains will make us smarter; chicken feet soup strengthens our
feet, etc.”
TRUTH: False. After our stomach digests the organ part, it is
broken down into various nutrients. Therefore, it is not possible for the organ part to retain the same biological function
after our body consumes it. Moreover, brain contains a large
amount of cholesterol. Regular consumption would increase
the risk of heart attack. Research also has shown that bone
soup does not contain any significant amount of calcium no
matter how long it is cooked. Furthermore, chicken feet
contain a lot of animal fat, which increases risk of heart attack.
Page 4
USE THESE LESS
OFTEN
Seasonings: reduced sodium soy
sauce, salt substitute, (with physicians approval), margarines
made from the allowed oils
Seasonings: salt seasonings, salt,
flavor enhancers, Vetsin (MSG),
regular soy sauce, meat
tenderizer, fermented black
beans, fermented bean cake
Sauces: patis (fish sauce), Bagoong (shrimp and anchovy
paste), barbeque, hoisin, catsup,
oyster, plum, teriyaki, shrimp
and bean pastes, sugar, honey,
jam, jelly candy and sweets
Page 9
NUTRITIONAL GUIDE
FOOD GROUP
DAIRY
FRUITS &
VEGETABLES
OILS &
CONDIMENTS
USE THESE MORE
OFTEN
Skimmed milk or 1% low fat
milk
Evaporated skimmed milk
Nonfat yogurt
Low fat yogurt
Low fat cottage cheese
All fresh vegetables and frits
(unless otherwise listed)
100% fruit juice
Fruits canned in juice
Unsalted vegetable juices
Oils: olive, canola and peanut
in limited amounts
*use only small amounts of oil
when cooking.
Seasonings: ginger, garlic,
garlic powder, anise, chili
powder, mustard, wine,
vinegar, herb/spices, five
spice powder, curry, pepper
Page 8
CHOOSING HEALTHY FOODS
FOR A
HEALTHY HEART
1. Vegetables, fruits and grains do not contain cholesterol. Only
animal food such as meat,
especially organ meats, milk,
and dairy products and eggs
contain cholesterol. Use olive oil
for salad dressing instead of
creamy dressing.
2. Saturated fats raise your
cholesterol. Ounce for ounce,
poultry and fish provide just about as much cholesterol as red
meat such as beef or lamb. However, poultry and fish are
recommended in diets to lower coronary heart disease risk
because they are low in saturated fat, while red meats are high
in saturated fat. Grill or broil meats over drip pan so that fat
may escape. Cool soups and stews and remove the hard layer
of fat from the top. Limit consumption of fried foods.
3. Many home-prepared and
commercially bakes goods
such as cookies and crackers
are made with butter, solid
shortening and eggs and can
contribute to the saturated fat
and cholesterol content of the
diet. In preparing baked goods
requiring eggs, use egg whites
instead of the whole egg in
order to lower the cholesterol. Substitute low fat or skim milk
dairy products for regular dairy products. Limit egg yolk
consumption to no more than 4 per week; this includes eggs
incorporated into recipes.
Page 5
NUTRITIONAL GUIDE
FOOD GROUP
MEATS/PROTEINS
GRAINS/STARCHES
Page 6
NUTRITIONAL GUIDE
USE THESE MORE
OFTEN
USE IN
MODERATION
Bangus (Milk/Fish)
Fish (Baked/Steamed)
Tuna (Packed in water)
Tulya (Clams)
Mackerel, salmon,
Sardines (Fresh)
Crab meat
Lobster
Abalone
Scallops
Frog Legs
Poultry: Chicken, turkey without
skin
Beef: Rump, top & bottom round,
chuck, Libro (tripe)
Pork: Leg, whole rump,
center shank
Meat Alternatives: Dried beans,
tofu, egg whites
Shrimp
Pusit (squid)
Poultry: duck (without skin)
Beef: Extra lean ground beef,
round steak)
Lamb: Leg
Pork: Canadian bacon, center and
loin cuts, ham
Organ Meat: gizzard, tongue
Meat Alternatives: canned beans,
peanut butter, unsalted nuts
Rice (Steamed)
Whole Grain bread
Unsweetened cereals
Oatmeal
Whole grain crackers
White bread
Pan de Sal
Dried rice noodle
Pancit
Bijon
Miki
Sotanghon
Potato (baked, boiled)
Taro root
Sweet potato
Egg noodles
Fresh rice noodles
Plain baked bun
Unsalted crackers
Instant noodles (without condiment package)
Malagkit (sweet rice)
USE THESE LESS
OFTEN
Fish: Fried or salted fish, sardines canned in oil, dried Dillis,
Daing
Meat: Fatty meat cuts (loin, club
steak, spareribs), untrimmed red
meat, brisket, corned beef, rib
roast, bacon, Chinese bacon, &
sausage, franks, Siopao
(barbequed pork), roast pork,
pigs feet, beef and pork jerky,
luncheon meats, preserved salted meats and fish, Pork
Tocino
Poultry: Fried chicken, roasted
duck, goose
Organ Meat: Liver, heart, kidney
and brain
Meat Alternatives: egg yolk,
Penoy (salted or preserved egg),
Itlog Na Maalat (salted eggs),
Balut (incubated egg), preserved
tofu, and salted nuts
Barbequed pork buns
Doughnuts
Pastries
Cookies
Cakes
Biscuits
Fried grain products
Potato chips
French fries
Buttered popcorn
Salted crackers
Instant noodles (with condiment
package)
Ensaymada
Desserts made with coconut milk
such as bibingka or suman
Page 7