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Transcript
Cross-domain Link Prediction
and Recommendation
Jie Tang
Department of Computer Science and Technology
Tsinghua University
1
Networked World
• 1.26 billion users
• 700 billion minutes/month
• 280 million users
• 80% of users are 80-90’s
• 555 million users
•.5 billion tweets/day
• 560 million users
• influencing our daily life
• 79 million users per month
• 9.65 billion items/year
• 500 million users
• 35 billion on 11/11
2
• 800 million users
• ~50% revenue from
network life
Challenge: Big Social Data
• We generate 2.5x1018 byte big data per day.
• Big social data:
– 90% of the data was generated in the past 2 yrs
– Mining in single data center  mining deep
knowledge from multiple data sources
3
Social Networks
Info. Space vs. Social Space
Opinion Mining
Info.
Space
Interaction
Social
Space
Understanding the
mechanisms of interaction dynamics
4
Innovation
diffusion
Business
intelligence
Core Research in Social Network
Application
Prediction
Meso
5
Social
influence
BIG Social
Data
Action
Social Theories
Advertise
Micro
Social tie
Structural
hole
Group
behavior
Community
ER
model
Theory
Search
Macro
BA model
Social
Network
Analysis
Information
Diffusion
Algorithmic
Foundations
Part A:
Let us start with a simple case
“inferring social ties in single network”
(KDD 2010, PKDD 2011 Best Runnerup)
6
Real social networks are complex...
• Nobody exists merely in one social network.
– Public network vs. private network
– Business network vs. family network
• However, existing networks (e.g., Facebook and Twitter)
are trying to lump everyone into one big network
– FB/QQ tries to solve this problem via lists/groups
– however…
• Google circles
7
Even complex than we imaged!
• Only 16% of mobile phone users in Europe have created
custom contact groups
– users do not take the time to create it
– users do not know how to circle their friends
• The Problem is that online social network are
…
8
Example 1. From BW to Color
(KDD’10)
9
Example 2. From BW to Color
(PKDD’11, Best Paper Runnerup)
Enterprise email network
How to
infer
CEO
Manager
Employee
User interactions may form implicit groups
10
What is behind?
Publication network
Both in office
08:00 – 18:00
From Home
08:40
From
Office
11:35
From
Office
15:20
From Office
17:55
From
Outside
21:30
11
Mobile communication network
Twitter’s following network
What is behind?
Publication network
Questions:
- What are the fundamental forces behind?
Twitter’s following network
- A generalized framework for inferring social ties?
- How to connect the different networks?
Both in office
08:00 – 18:00
From Home
08:40
From
Office
11:35
From
Office
15:20
From Office
17:55
From
Outside
21:30
12
Mobile communication network
inferring social ties in single network
Learning Framework
13
Problem Analysis
Input: Temporal
collaboration network
Output: Relationship analysis
1999
Ada
(0.9, [/, 1998])
Ada
Bob
2000
(0.4,
[/, 1998])
(0.5, [/, 2000])
2000
(0.8, [1999,2000])
Jerry
2001
Ying
2002
(0.7,
[2000, 2001])
Smith
(0.49,
[/, 1999])
Bob
Ying
2003
2004
Dynamic collaborative network
Jerry
(0.2,
[2001, 2003])
(0.65, [2002, 2004])
Smith
Labeled network
Output: potential types of relationships and their probabilities:
(type, prob, [s_time, e_time])
[1] C. Wang, J. Han, Y. Jia, J. Tang, D. Zhang, Y. Yu, and J. Guo. Mining Advisor-Advisee Relationships from Research
14
Publication
Networks. KDD'10, pages 203-212.
Overall Framework
1
4
2
•
•
•
•
•
3
ai: author i
pj: paper j
py: paper year
pn: paper#
sti,yi: starting
time
• edi,yi: ending
time
• ri,yi: probability
The problem is cast as, for each node, identifying which neighbor has the highest
15
probability
to be his/her advisor, i.e., P(yi=j |xi, x~i, y), where xj and xi are neighbors.
Time-constrained Probabilistic Factor Graph (TPFG)
y0
g
st
ed
y0
f 0(y0,y1,
y2,y3,y4,y5)
g 2(y2)
16
y2
g
st
ed
f 1(y1, y2,y3)
y3
f 3(y3, y4,y5)
y5
g 5(y5)
∞
-∞
y1
g
st
ed
y1
y2
0
1
y5
g
st
ed
0
0.2
∞
0
3
0.8
2002
2004
y4
g 4(y4)
0
0.1
∞
0
0
1
∞
0
1
0.9
1999
2000
y3
g
st
ed
0
0.2
∞
0
y4
g
st
ed
0
0.3
∞
0
1
0.8
2000
2001
3
0.7
2001
2003
• Hidden variable
yx: ax’s advisor
• stx,yx: starting time
edx,yx: ending time
• g(yx, stx, edx) is
pairwise local
feature
• fx(yx,Zx)= max
g(yx , stx, edx)
under time
constraint
• Yx: set of potential
advisors of ax
Maximum likelihood estimation
• A general likelihood objective func can be defined as
y0
g
st
ed
y0
f 0(y0,y1,
y2,y3,y4,y5)
y2
g
st
ed
f 1(y1, y2,y3)
g 5(y5)
y3
f 3(y3, y4,y5)
y5
g 2(y2)
∞
-∞
y1
g
st
ed
y1
y2
0
1
y5
g
st
ed
0
0.2
∞
0
3
0.8
2002
2004
y4
g 4(y4)
0
0.1
∞
0
0
1
∞
0
1
0.9
1999
2000
y3
g
st
ed
0
0.2
∞
0
2000
1
0.8
y4
g
st
ed
0
0.3
∞
0
2001
2001
3
0.7
1 N
P( y1 ,, y N )   f i ( yi | { y x | x  Yi 1})
Z i 1
with
f i ( yi | { y x | x  Yi 1})  g ( yi , st ij , ed ij )   ( y x , ed ij , st xi )
xYi 1
2003
where Φ(.) can be instantiated in different ways, e.g.,

1,
 ( y x , ed ij , st xi )  

0,
17
y x  i  ed ij  st xi
y x  i  ed ij  st xi
Inference algorithm of TPFG
• rij = max P(y1, . . . , yna|yi = j) = exp (sentij + recvij)
y0
sent
recv
0
1
?
y0
sent
recv
a0
a0
1
a1
y1
sent
recv
a2
y2
sent
recv
0
u2,0
?
1
u2,1
?
y5
sent
recv
0
u5,0
?
0
u1,0
?
y3
sent
recv
2
a5
1
u3,1
?
a4
y4
sent
recv
y1
sent
recv
y2
sent
recv
0
u4,0
?
3
u4,3
?
0
u2,0
v2,0
y5
sent
recv
1
1
2
a2
1
1
3
u5,3
?
0
u3,0
?
a3
1
Phase 1
18
1
1
3
1
0
1
1
0
u1,0
v1,0
2
a5
Phase 2
1
u3,1
v3,1
3
3
3
u5,3
v5,3
0
u3,0
v3,0
a3
1
1
u2,1
v2,1
0
u5,0
v5,0
y3
sent
recv
a1
a4
y4
sent
recv
0
u4,0
v4,0
3
u4,3
v4,3
Results of Model 1
• DBLP data: 654, 628 authors, 1,076,946 publications,
years provided.
• Ground truth: MathGenealogy Project; AI Genealogy
Project; Faculty Homepage
Datasets
RULE
IndMAX
Model 1
TEST1
69.9%
73.4%
75.2%
78.9%
80.2%
84.4%
TEST2
69.8%
74.6%
74.6%
79.0%
81.5%
84.3%
TEST3
80.6%
86.7%
83.1%
90.9%
88.8%
91.3%
heuristics
19
SVM
Supervised
learning
Empirical optimized
parameter parameter
Results
[1] J. Tang, J. Zhang, L. Yao, J. Li, L. Zhang, and Z. Su. ArnetMiner: Extraction and Mining of Academic Social Networks.
20
KDD’08,
pages 990-998.
Part B:
Extend the problem to cross-domain
“cross-domain collaboration recommendation”
(KDD 2012, WSDM
21
Cross-domain Collaboration
• Interdisciplinary collaborations have generated
huge impact, for example,
– 51 (>1/3) of the KDD 2012 papers are result of
cross-domain collaborations between graph theory,
visualization, economics, medical inf., DB, NLP, IR
– Research field evolution
Biology
Computer
Science
bioinfor
matics
[1] J. Tang, S. Wu, J. Sun, and H. Su. Cross-domain Collaboration Recommendation. KDD’12, pages 1285-1293. (Full
22
Presentation
& Best Poster Award)
Cross-domain Collaboration (cont.)
• Increasing trend of cross-domain collaborations
Data Mining(DM), Medical Informatics(MI), Theory(TH), Visualization(VIS)
23
Challenges
Data Mining
Large
graph
1 Sparse
Connection: <1%
Theory
?
?
Automata
theory
heterogeneous
network
Sociall
network
2 Complementary
expertise
Complexity
theory
Topic
3
skewness: 9%
24
Graph theory
Related Work-Collaboration recommendation
• Collaborative topic modeling for recommending papers
– C. Wang and D.M. Blei. [2011]
• On social networks and collaborative recommendation
– I. Konstas, V. Stathopoulos, and J. M. Jose. [2009]
• CollabSeer: a search engine for collaboration discovery
– H.-H. Chen, L. Gou, X. Zhang, and C. L. Giles. [2007]
• Referral web: Combining social networks and collaborative
filtering
– H. Kautz, B. Selman, and M. Shah. [1997]
• Fab: content-based, collaborative recommendation
– M. Balabanovi and Y. Shoham. [1997]
25
Related Work-Expert finding and matching
• Topic level expertise search over heterogeneous networks
– J. Tang, J. Zhang, R. Jin, Z. Yang, K. Cai, L. Zhang, and Z. Su. [2011]
• Formal models for expert finding in enterprise corpora
– K. Balog, L. Azzopardi, and M.de Rijke. [2006]
• Expertise modeling for matching papers with reviewers
– D. Mimno and A. McCallum. [2007]
• On optimization of expertise matching with various constraints
– W. Tang, J. Tang, T. Lei, C. Tan, B. Gao, and T. Li. [2012]
26
cross-domain collaboration recommendation
Approach Framework
—Cross-domain Topic Learning
27
Author Matching
Medical Informatics
Data Mining
GS
Author
v1
GT
Cross-domain
coauthorships
v'1
v2
v'2
…
…
Coauthorships
vN
v' N'
vq
28
Query user
Recall Random Walk
• Let us begin with PageRank[1]
3
0.2
0.2
4
2
r = (1- a )M × r + a U
0.2 5
1
1
M ij =
outdeg(vi )
1
Ui =
N
a = 0.15
0.2
?
3
0.2
?
4
2
?
5
?
1
(0.2+0.2*0.5+0.2*1/3+0.2)0.85+0.15*0.2
[1] L. Page, S. Brin, R. Motwani, and T. Winograd. The pagerank citation ranking: Bringing order to the web. Technical
29 SIDL-WP-1999-0120, Stanford University, 1999.
Report
Random Walk with Restart[1]
rq = (1- a )M × rq + a U
ì1, i = q
Ui = í
î0, i ¹ q
1/3
0.1
4
1
M ij =
outdeg(vi )
1/3
0.25
3
0.1
2
1/3
0.15
q
Uq=1
1
1
0.4
[1] J. Sun, H. Qu, D. Chakrabarti, and C. Faloutsos. Neighborhood formation and anomaly detection in bipartite graphs. In
30
ICDM’05,
pages 418–425, 2005.
Author Matching
Medical Informatics
Data Mining
GS
Author
v1
GT
Cross-domain
coauthorships
1
v2
v'1
v'2
…
…
Coauthorships
vN
v' N'
vq
31
Query user
Topic Matching
Topics Extraction
Data Mining
GS
Topics
Topics
GT
z1
v1
2
z'1
3
z2
z'2
v2
…
vN
z3
z'3
…
…
zT
z'T
vq
Topics correlations
32
Medical Informatics
v'1
v'2
…
v' N'
Recall Topic Model
• Usage of a theme:
–
–
–
–
–
33
Summarize topics/subtopics
Navigate documents
Retrieve documents
Segment documents
All other tasks involving unigram
language models
Topic Model
• A generative model for generating the co-occurrence of documents
d∈D={d1,…,dD} and terms w∈W={w1,…,wW}, which associates latent
variable z∈Z={z1,…,zZ}.
• The generative processing is:
w1
w2
P(w|z)
P(z|d)
d1
z2
d2
zZ
dD
wW
P(d)
…
…
z1
[1]34T. Hofmann. Probabilistic latent semantic indexing. SIGIR’99, pages 50–57, 1999.
Topic Model
w1
w2
P(w|z)
P(z|d)
d1
z2
d2
zZ
dD
wW
35
P(d)
…
…
z1
Maximum-likelihood
• Definition
– We have a density function P(x|Θ) that is govened by the set of
parameters Θ, e.g., P might be a set of Gaussians and Θ could be the
means and covariances
– We also have a data set X={x1,…,xN}, supposedly drawn from this
distribution P, and assume these data vectors are i.i.d. with P.
– Then the log-likehihood function is:
L( | X )  log p( X | )  log  p( xi | )  log p( xi | )
i
i
– The log-likelihood is thought of as a function of the parameters Θ
where the data X is fixed. Our goal is to find the Θ that maximizes L.
That is
*  arg max L( | X )

36
Topic Model
• Following the likelihood principle, we determines P(d),
P(z|d), and P(w|d) by maximization of the logco-occurrence times
P(d), P(z|d),
likelihood
functionUnobserved
of d and w. Which is
and P(w|d)
data
obtained according to
the multi-distribution
L( | d , w, z )  log  P(d , w) n ( d ,w)
d
w
   n(d , w) log P(d , w)
Observed data
dD wW


   n(d , w) log   P( w | z ) P(d | z )P( z ) 
dD wW
 zZ

37
Jensen’s Inequality
• Recall that f is a convex function if f ”(x)≥0, and f is strictly convex
function if f ”(x)>0
• Let f be a convex function, and let X be a random variable, then:
E[ f ( X )]  f ( EX )
• Moreover, if f is strictly convex, then E[f(X)]=f(EX) holds true if and
only if X=E[X] with probability 1 (i.e., if X is a constant)
38
Basic EM Algorithm
• However, Optimizing the likelihood function is analytically intractable but
when the likelihood function can be simplified by assuming the existence
of and values for additional but missing (or hidden) parameters:
L( | X )   log p( xi | )   log  p( xi , z | )
i
i
z
• Maximizing L(Θ) explicitly might be difficult, and the strategy is to instead
repeatedly construct a lower-bound on L(E-step), and then optimize that
lower bound (M-step).
– For each i, let Qi be some distribution over z (∑zQi(z)=1, Qi(z)≥0), then
p( x(i ) , z (i ) ; )
p( x(i ) , z (i ) ; )
(i )
Qi ( z ) log
i log (i ) p( x , z ; )  i log (i ) Qi ( z ) Q ( z(i) )  
(i )
Qi ( z (i ) )
i z
z
z
i
(i )
(i )
(i )
– The above derivation used Jensen’s inequality. Specifically, f(x) = logx is a
concave function, since f”(x)=-1/x2<0
39
Parameter Estimation-Using EM
• According to Basic EM:
Qi ( z (i ) )  p( z (i ) | x(i ) ; )
• Then we define
Qi ( z (i ) )  p( z | d , w)
• Thus according to Jensen’s inequality
p ( w | z ) p (d | z ) p ( z )
p( z | d , w)
dD wW
zZ
p( w | z ) p(d | z ) p ( z )
   n(d , w) p( z | d , w) log
p( z | d , w)
dD wW
zZ
L()    n(d , w) log  p( z | d , w)
40
(1)Solve P(w|z)
• We introduce Lagrange multiplier λwith the constraint that
∑wP(w|z)=1, and solve the following equation:


p( w | z ) p(d | z ) p( z )


n
(
d
,
w
)
p
(
z
|
d
,
w
)
log


P
(
w
|
z
)

1
 


  0
P( w | z )  dD wW
p
(
z
|
d
,
w
)
zZ
 z

 n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
 dD
P( w | z )
   0,
 n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
 P( w | z )   dD
 P(w | z )  1,

,
w
      n(d , w) P ( z | d , w),
wW dD
 n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
 P( w | z ) 
  n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
dD
wW dD
41
The final update Equations
• E-step:
P( z | d , w) 
P ( w | z ) P( d | z ) P( z )
 P(w | z)P(d | z) P( z)
zZ
• M-step:
 n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
P( w | z ) 
  n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
dD
wW dD
 n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
P(d | z ) 
  n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
wW
dD wW
  n(d , w) P( z | d , w)
P( z ) 
  n(d , w)
dD wW
wW dD
42
PLSI(SIGIR’99)
Document
d
Topic
z
w
Word
Nd
D
[1]43T. Hofmann. Probabilistic latent semantic indexing. SIGIR’99, pages 50–57, 1999.
LDA (JMLR’03)
Document specific
distribution over
topics
θ
α
Topic
Topic distribution
over words
β
Document
z
Φ
w
T
Word
Nd
D
[1]44D. M. Blei, A. Y. Ng, and M. I. Jordan. Latent dirichlet allocation. JMLR, 3:993–1022, 2003.
Cross-domain Topic Learning
Identify “cross-domain” Topics
Data Mining
Medical Informatics
Topics
GS
GT
z1
v1
v2
…
vN
vq
45
v'1
z2
v'2
z3
…
zK
…
v' N'
Collaboration Topics Extraction
Step 1:
γ
γt
λ
Step 2:
Ad
(v, v')
θ
s=1
β
s
Φ
x
v
α
s=0
z
Collaborated document d
46
v
v'
source
domain
θ'
target
domain
Intuitive explanation of Step 2 in CTL
Collaboration
topics
47
cross-domain collaboration recommendation
Experiments
48
Data Set and Baselines
• Arnetminer (available at http://arnetminer.org/collaboration)
Domain
Authors
Relationships
Source
Data Mining
6,282
22,862
KDD, SDM, ICDM, WSDM, PKDD
Medical Informatics
9,150
31,851
JAMIA, JBI, AIM, TMI, TITB
Theory
5,449
27,712
STOC, FOCS, SODA
Visualization
5,268
19,261
CVPR, ICCV, VAST, TVCG, IV
Database
7,590
37,592
SIGMOD, VLDB, ICDE
• Baselines
–
–
–
–
–
49
Content Similarity(Content)
Collaborative Filtering(CF)
Hybrid
Katz
Author Matching(Author), Topic Matching(Topic)
Performance Analysis
Training: collaboration before 2001
Cross
Domain
Data
Mining(S)
to
Theory(T)
Validation: 2001-2005
ALG
[email protected]
[email protected]
MAP
[email protected]
ARHR
-10
ARHR
-20
Content
10.3
10.2
10.9
31.4
4.9
2.1
CF
15.6
13.3
23.1
26.2
4.9
2.8
Hybrid
17.4
19.1
20.0
29.5
5.0
2.4
Author
27.2
22.3
25.7
32.4
10.1
6.4
Topic
28.0
26.0
32.4
33.5
13.4
7.1
Katz
30.4
29.8
21.6
27.4
11.2
5.9
CTL
37.7
36.4
40.6
35.6
14.3
7.5
Content Similarity(Content): based on similarity between authors’ publications
Collaborative Filtering(CF): based on existing collaborations
Hybrid: a linear combination of the scores obtained by the Content and the CF methods.
Katz: the best link predictor in link-prediction problem for social networks
Author Matching(Author): based on the random walk with restart on the collaboration graph
Topic Matching(Topic): combining the extracted topics into the random walking algorithm
50
Performance on New Collaboration
Prediction
CTL can still maintain about 0.3 in terms of MAP which is significantly higher than baselines.
51
Parameter Analysis
(a) varying the number of topics T
52(c) varying the restart parameter τ in the random walk
(b) varying α parameter
(d) Convergence analysis
Prototype System
http://arnetminer.org/collaborator
Treemap: representing subtopic
in the target domain
Recommend Collaborators &
Their relevant publications
53
Part C:
Further incorporate user feedback
“interactive collaboration recommendation”
(ACM TKDD, TIST, WSDM 2013-14)
54
Example
Finding co-inventors in IBM (>300,000 employers)
Kun-Lung Wu is
matching to me
Ching-Yung Lin
Milind R Naphade
Ching-Yung Lin
Milind R Naphade
Find me a partner to
collaborate on
Healthcare…
Recommended
collaborators by
interactive learning
Jimeng Sun
Jimeng Sun
Philip is not a
healthcare people
Luo Gang
Luo Gang
Kun-Lung Wu
Kun-Lung Wu
Philip S. Yu
Philip S. Yu
Recommend Candidates
Interactive feedback
Existing co-inventors
Refined Recommendations
Recommendation
[1]55S. Wu, J. Sun, and J. Tang. Patent Partner Recommendation in Enterprise Social Networks. WSDM’13, pages 43-52.
Challenges
• What are the fundamental factors that influence the
formation of co-invention relationships?
• How to design an interactive mechanism so that the
user can provide feedback to the system to refine the
recommendations?
• How to learn the interactive recommendation
framework in an online mode?
56
interactive collaboration recommendation
Learning framework
57
RankFG Model
Random variable
constraint
Social correlation
factor function
Pairwise factor
function
Recommended
collaborator
58
Map each pair to a node in the
graphical model
The problem is cast as, for each relationship, identifying which type has the
highest probability.
Modeling with exponential family
h (y1, y2)
y1=?
y1
y2=2
y2
….
y5=?
g (y45, y34)
g (y12, y34)
y5
P( yi | Yi )  exp{ k hk (Yci )}
y4
g (y12,y45)
y4=2
f(v2,y2)
...
v5
P( xi | yi )  exp{ j g j ( xij , yi )}
j 1
v4
v2
k
d
f(v4,y4)
v1
ci
f(v5,y5)
f(.)
f(v1,y1)
Partially Labeled
Model
relationships
Likelihood objective function
P( X , G | Y ) P(Y )
P(Y | X , G ) 
P( X , G )
 P( X | Y )  P(Y | G )  P(Y | G ) P( xi | yi )
i
59
Ranking Factor Graphs
• Pairwise factor function:
• Correlation factor function:
• Log-likelihood objective function:
• Model learning
60
Learning Algorithm
Expectation Computing
Loopy Belief Propagation
61
Still Challenge
How to incrementally incorporate
users’ feedback?
62
Learning Algorithm
Incremental estimation
63
Interactive Learning
New variable
New factor node
1) add new factor nodes to the factor
graph built in the model learning
process.
2) 𝑙-step message passing:
Start from the new variable node
(root node).
Send messages to all of its neighborhood factors.
Propagate the messages up to 𝑙-step
Perform a backward messages passing.
3) Calculate an approximate value of the
marginal probabilities of the newly factors.
64
From passive interactive to active
• Entropy
• Threshold
• Influence model
[1] Z. Yang, J. Tang, and B. Xu. Active Learning for Networked Data Based on Non-progressive Diffusion Model.
WSDM’14.
[2] L. Shi, Y. Zhao, and J. Tang. Batch Mode Active Learning for Networked Data. ACM Transactions on Intelligent
65
Systems
and Technology (TIST), Volume 3, Issue 2 (2012), Pages 33:1--33:25.
Active learning via Non-progressive
diffusion model
• Maximizing the diffusion
66
MinSS
• Greedily expand Vp
67
MinSS(cont.)
68
Lower Bound and Upper Bound
69
Approximation Ratio
70
interactive collaboration recommendation
Experiments
71
Data Set
• PatentMiner (pminer.org)
DataSet
Inventors
Patents
Average increase
#patent
Average increase #coinvention
IBM
55,967
46,782
8.26%
11.9%
Intel
18,264
54,095
18.8%
35.5%
Sony
8,505
31,569
11.7%
13/0%
Exxon
19,174
53,671
10.6%
14.7%
• Baselines:
–
–
–
–
Content Similarity (Content)
Collaborative Filtering (CF)
Hybrid
SVM-Rank
[1] J. Tang, B. Wang, Y. Yang, P. Hu, Y. Zhao, X. Yan, B. Gao, M. Huang, P. Xu, W. Li, and A. K. Usadi. PatentMiner:
72
Topic-driven
Patent Analysis and Mining. KDD’12, pages 1366-1374.
Performance Analysis-IBM
Training: collaboration before 2000
Data
IBM
Validation: 2001-2010
ALG
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
MAP
[email protected]
Content
23.0
23.3
18.8
15.6
24.0
33.7
CF
13.8
12.8
11.3
11.5
21.7
36.4
Hybrid
13.9
12.8
11.5
11.5
21.8
36.7
SVMRank
13.3
11.9
9.6
9.8
22.2
43.5
RankFG
31.1
27.5
25.6
22.4
40.5
46.8
RankFG+
31.2
27.5
26.6
22.9
42.1
51.0
RankFG+: it uses the proposed RankFG model with 1% interactive feedback.
73
Interactive Learning Analysis
Interactive learning achieves a close performance to the complete learning with
only 1/100 of the running time used for complete training.
74
Parameter Analysis
Factor contribution analysis
Convergence analysis
RankFG-C: stands for ignoring referral chaining factor functions.
RankFG-CH: stands for ignoring both referral chaining and homophily.
RankFG-CHR: stands for further ignoring recency.
75
Results of Active Learning
76
Summaries
• Inferring social ties in single network
– Time-dependent factor graph model
• Cross-domain collaboration recommendation
– Cross-domain topic learning
• Interactive collaboration recommendation
– Ranking factor graph model
– Active learning via non-progressive diffusion
77
Future Work
Family
?
Inferring social ties
Friend
?
Reciprocity
Lady Gaga
You
Lady Gaga
You
You
You
Triadic Closure
?
78
Lady Gaga
Shiteng
Lady Gaga
Shiteng
References
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
79
Tiancheng Lou, Jie Tang, John Hopcroft, Zhanpeng Fang, Xiaowen Ding. Learning to Predict Reciprocity and
Triadic Closure in Social Networks. In TKDD, 2013.
Yi Cai, Ho-fung Leung, Qing Li, Hao Han, Jie Tang, Juanzi Li. Typicality-based Collaborative Filtering
Recommendation. IEEE Transaction on Knowledge and Data Engineering (TKDE).
Honglei Zhuang, Jie Tang, Wenbin Tang, Tiancheng Lou, Alvin Chin, and Xia Wang. Actively Learning to Infer
Social Ties. DMKD, Vol. 25, Issue 2 (2012), pages 270-297.
Lixin Shi, Yuhang Zhao, and Jie Tang. Batch Mode Active Learning for Networked Data. ACM Transactions
on Intelligent Systems and Technology (TIST), Volume 3, Issue 2 (2012), Pages 33:1--33:25.
Jie Tang, Jing Zhang, Ruoming Jin, Zi Yang, Keke Cai, Li Zhang, and Zhong Su. Topic Level Expertise
Search over Heterogeneous Networks. Machine Learning Journal, Vol. 82, Issue 2 (2011), pages 211-237.
Zhilin Yang, Jie Tang, and Bin Xu. Active Learning for Networked Data Based on Non-progressive Diffusion
Model. WSDM’14.
Sen Wu, Jimeng Sun, and Jie Tang. Patent Partner Recommendation in Enterprise Social Networks.
WSDM’13, pages 43-52.
Jie Tang, Sen Wu, Jimeng Sun, and Hang Su. Cross-domain Collaboration Recommendation. KDD’12,
pages 1285-1293. (Full Presentation & Best Poster Award)
Jie Tang, Bo Wang, Yang Yang, Po Hu, Yanting Zhao, Xinyu Yan, Bo Gao, Minlie Huang, Peng Xu,
Weichang Li, and Adam K. Usadi. PatentMiner: Topic-driven Patent Analysis and Mining. KDD’12, pages
1366-1374.
Jie Tang, Tiancheng Lou, and Jon Kleinberg. Inferring Social Ties across Heterogeneous Networks.
WSDM’12, pages 743-752.
Chi Wang, Jiawei Han, Yuntao Jia, Jie Tang, Duo Zhang, Yintao Yu, and Jingyi Guo. Mining Advisor-Advisee
Relationships from Research Publication Networks. KDD'10, pages 203-212.
Jie Tang, Jing Zhang, Limin Yao, Juanzi Li, Li Zhang, and Zhong Su. ArnetMiner: Extraction and Mining of
Academic Social Networks. KDD’08, pages 990-998.
Thank you!
Collaborators: John Hopcroft, Jon Kleinberg (Cornell)
Jiawei Han and Chi Wang (UIUC)
Tiancheng Lou (Google)
Jimeng Sun (IBM)
Jing Zhang, Zhanpeng Fang, Zi Yang, Sen Wu (THU)
Jie Tang, KEG, Tsinghua U,
Download all data & Codes,
80
http://keg.cs.tsinghua.edu.cn/jietang
http://arnetminer.org/download