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Transcript
The Father’s House Kingdom
Ministry
The Mysteries: JEWISH ROOTS of Christianity
INSTRUCTOR: Apostle Sophia Fenton
JEWISH ROOTS
Judaism
"religion,
philosophy,
and way of
life"
of
the
Jewish
people,
based on the
ancient
Mosaic Law.
JEWISH ROOTS
The SEVEN FEASTS: The Appointed Time of
Yeshua/God
It was on Mount Sinai that GOD gave Moses
the dates and observances of the SEVEN FEASTS.
Here are their names:
1. Passover (Pesach) - Nisan 14-15
2. Unleavened Bread (Chag Hamotzi) - Nisan 15-22
3. First Fruits (Yom habikkurim) - Nisan 16-17
4. Pentecost (Shavu'ot) - Sivan 6-7
5. Trumpets (Yom Teru'ah) - Tishri 1
6. Atonement (Yom Kippur) - Tishri 10
7. Tabernacles (Sukkot) - Tishri 15-22
JEWISH ROOTS
The SEVEN FEASTS: The Appointed Time of
Yeshua/God
When do they happen? God's calendar is based on the phases of the
moon.
Each
month
in
a
lunar
calendar
begins
with
a
new
moon.
Pesach/Passover falls on the first full moon of Spring. The first three feasts, Pesach,
Unleavened Bread and First Fruits fall in March and April. The fourth one,
Shavu'ot/Pentecost, marked the summer harvest and occurs in late May or early
June. The last three feasts, Trumpets, Yom Kippur and Sukkot/Feast of
Tabernacles happen in September and October.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Jewish Holidays
Understanding the Appointed Times
General information about
the most significant mo'edim (or
"APPOINTED
TIMES")
that
are
important to Jews all over the world.
All of the Biblical mo'edim are
prophetic and reveal great truth
about the plans and counsel of the
LORD God of Israel.
JEWISH ROOTS
New American Standard Bible (©1995)
He has made everything appropriate in its time. He has also set eternity in their
heart, yet so that man will not find out the work which God has done from the
beginning even to the end.
JEWISH ROOTS
Job
5:9
Christ
{He}
performs
wonders that cannot be fathomed,
miracles that cannot be counted.
JEWISH ROOTS
Christianity is Jewish – Historical Background
Jewish roots of the Christian Faith. Often times Christians fail to
recognize the Jewishness of Christianity, but if you think about it, its
roots are woven deep into Judaism. God’s chosen people are the
Jews; JESUS WAS A JEW; the DISCIPLES, including the CHURCH’S
FIRST LEADER – Peter, was a Jew; all 66 books of the Bible were
written by Jews. These are just a few examples of how the context
of Judaism permeates the pages of Scripture. With such an
emphasis of the Jewish Faith, how could one possibly interpret
Scripture without considering its rich context?
JEWISH ROOTS
Jewish Days of the Week
The Jewish week (shavu'a) begins on Sunday and ends on Shabbat:
JEWISH ROOTS
JEWISH ROOTS
The Blessings of
Observing of
Shabbat
The Importance of Shabbat
The fourth of the ten mitzvot (commandments) is,
"Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy" (Ex. 20:8,
KJV). In Judaism Shabbat is therefore considered to be
the most important day of the week, since the observance
of Shabbat is explicitly set forth as one of the Ten
Commandments. In fact, Shabbat is considered the most
important of the Jewish Holidays, even more important
than Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur!
During Shabbat, no "work" (defined under 39 main
categories associated with the building of the Tabernacle
in the desert) is to be performed, since this would violate
the idea of "rest" (shabbaton) that is to mark the day.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Blessings of
Observing of
Shabbat
Exodus 20:8 Remember the
sabbath day, to keep it
holy.
JEWISH ROOTS
Introduction to the Jewish Sabbath
call the Sabbath a delight and the holy day of the
LORD honourable
Isaiah 58:13
Shabbat begins at sunset on Friday evening and ends Saturday night when three
stars are visible in the sky (25 hours). On Shabbat we remember that God created the world
and then rested from His labours.
The commandment to observe the Sabbath comes from
the Fourth Commandment, of course, which actually spans three pesukim (verses) and is by
far the longest of the Ten Commandments.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Meaning of Shabbat
The word shabbat ("Sabbath") is clearly
connected to the verb shavat, meaning "to cease,
desist, rest." The root first appears in Genesis 2:2-3
regarding God's creative activity:
On the seventh day of creation, God
ceased (shevat) from His melakhah (creative
The word translated
"keep" (shamor) means to
guard something held in trust,
to
protect
and
to
watch
closely. Not only are we to
activity), and blessed that time by setting it apart
remember the Sabbath, but
(i.e., called it "holy" (kadosh) as a memorial of the
we are to guard and protect
work of His hands. The seventh day, then, first of all
its sanctity as something of
celebrates God's role as Creator of the universe.
great value.
JEWISH ROOTS
The
of
Preparation
a
Table
Sharing
Shabbat
and
the
of
the
Shabbat Meal.
JEWISH ROOTS
Rosh Hashanah
Awakening of the Soul
In traditional Judaism, Rosh Hashanah (lit. "the head of the year") is
celebrated as Jewish New Years Day. The holiday is observed on the first two
days of the Hebrew month of Tishri (i.e., the seventh "new moon"of the year),
which usually falls in September or October, and marks the beginning of a tenday period of prayer, self-examination and repentance (aseret yemei teshuvah),
which culminates on the fast day of Yom Kippur. These ten days are referred to
as Yamim Norai'm ,‫נֹור ִאים‬
ָ ‫י ִָמים‬the "Days of Awe," or the High Holy Days. Rosh
Hashanah also commemorates the creation of the universe )‫ ְּב ִריאַ ת ָהעֹולָ ם‬by God.
JEWISH ROOTS
Rosh Hashanah
Awakening of the Soul
In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall
observe a day of solemn rest, a memorial proclaimed with blast of
trumpets, a holy convocation. - Leviticus 23:24
JEWISH ROOTS
The Liturgy and the Theme of Rosh Hashanah
According to Jewish tradition, on Rosh Hashanah the destiny of the
righteous, the tzaddikim, are written in the Book of Life ,)‫ ֵספֶ ר ַה ַחיִ ים‬and the
destiny of the wicked, the resha'im, are written in the Book of Death ( ‫ֶספֶ ר‬
.)‫ ַה ָמוֵת‬However, most people will not be inscribed in either book, but have
ten days -- until Yom Kippur -- to repent before sealing their fate. Hence the
term Aseret Yemei Teshuvah ( - )‫עֲ ֶש ֶרת י ְֵּמי ְּתׁשּובָ ה‬the Ten Days of Repentance.
On Yom Kippur, then, everyone's name will be sealed in one of the books.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Liturgy and the Theme of Rosh Hashanah
Sounding the Shofar
Sounding the Shofar
SOUNDING THE SHOFAR
The
SHOFAR (ram's horn) is the most-
mentioned musical instrument in the Scriptures.
It is blasted at least 100 times during a typical
Rosh Hashanah service, thus satisfying the
commandment to make Teru'ah ("noise") on
this day.
The SOUND OF THE SHOFAR, then, is
meant to stir the heart to fear and to inspire
TESHUVAH (repentance): "When the shofar is
blown in the city, don't the people tremble?"
(Amos 3:6).
JEWISH ROOTS
SOUNDING THE SHOFAR
There are four primary types of SHOFAR BLASTS:
 Tekiah ()‫ ְּת ִקיעָ ה‬A long single blast (the sound of the King's coronation)
 Shevarim ( )‫ ְּׁשבָ ִרים‬Three short wail-like blasts (signifying repentance)
 Teru'ah ( ‫תרּועָ ה‬Nine
ְּ
staccato blasts of alarm (to awaken the soul)
 Tekiah ha-Gadol ( ‫ ְּת ִקיעָ ה ַהגָדֹול‬A great long blast (for as long as you can blow!)
The general custom is to first blow tekiah, followed by shevarim, followed
by teruah, and to close with tekiah hagadol:
JEWISH ROOTS
The Sounding of the Shofar during the Appointed Time
of Rosh Hashanah!
JEWISH ROOTS
The Custom of Rosh Hashanah
Blow the Shofar in Zion
In Joel 2:15, the prophet reitrated God’s command to the Isrealites at Sinai:
“Blow the shofar in Zion, declare a holy fast, call a sacred assembly.” Note
Autumn in Israel was a time of repentance, and remembrance. The High Holy
Days began with the Festival of Blowing Shofars and signalled the beginning of a
civil new year {Rosh Hashanah}. The Shofar Blasts also signalled the beginning of
the Ten Days of Awe in preparation for the highest and holiest day of the year,
Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement).
JEWISH ROOTS
The custom of Rosh Hashanah
Minhagim (Customs) of Rosh Hashanah
Special customs (minhagim) observed on Rosh Hashanah include:
Candle lighting and kiddush - As with all the Jewish holidays, candles are lit just
before the start of the holiday. Kiddush is also said over the wine.
Dipping apples (or challah) in honey before eating the holiday meal offers up
the wish for a "sweet year" ahead.
JEWISH ROOTS
Custom of Rosh Hashanah
Tashlikh - On Tishri 1, 5773 during the afternoon, many Jews perform the ritual of
"tashlikh," or "casting off," a ceremony in which Jews symbolically cast their sins
into a body of water. We walk to flowing water, such as a creek or river, and
empty our pockets into the river, symbolically casting off our sins. Often Michah
7:18-20, Psalm 118:5-9, and Psalms 33 and 130 are recited during the Tashlikh
ceremony.
The Ten Days of Repentance
As mentioned above, most people are neither entirely righteous
(tzaddikim) nor entirely wicked (resha'im) on the day of Rosh Hashanah. The
Aseret Yemei Teshuvah, or Ten Days of Repentance, provide a time for us to
repent and turn whole-heartedly to the LORD in order to be sealed into the Book
of Life. These days set the tone for the coming most holy Day of Atonement.
Teshuvah, Tehillah, and Tzedakah - repentance, prayer, and charity - these are
the spiritual virtues of the High Holidays, and the mood of the Tashlikh ceremony
is based upon their heightened observance.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Coming Judgment
According to later rabbinical tradition, on Rosh Hashanah the destiny of
the righteous, the tzaddikim, are written in the Book of Life, and the destiny of the
wicked, the resha'im, are written in the Book of Death.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Coming Judgment – Yom Kippur
Most people, however, won't be inscribed in either book, but
are given ten days -- until Yom Kippur -- TO REPENT BEFORE SEALING
THEIR FATE. Hence, on Yom Kippur, then, everyone's name will be
sealed in one of the TWO BOOKS.
The ten days between Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur are therefore called Aseret Yemei
Teshuvah - the "Ten Days of Repentance" - because personal
repentance
can
affect
the
divine
decree
for
good....
JEWISH ROOTS
Sukkot – The Season of Joy
The Festival of Sukkots
The Feast of Tabernacles
The Feast of Tabernacles: Sukkots eight days of Sukkots starting from Tishri 15 to Tishri 22,
5773.
JEWISH ROOTS
Sukkot – The Season of Joy
The Festival of Sukkots
The Feast of Tabernacles
Sukkot in the Scriptures
In Biblical times, Sukkot was considered the most important of all the
holidays, referred to simply as "the Feast" (1 Kings 12:32). It was a time of many
sacrifices (Num. 29:12-40) and a time when (on Sabbatical years) the Torah
would be read aloud to the people (Deut. 31:10-13). It is one of the three required
festivals
of
the
LORD
(Exod.
23:14;
Deut.
16:16).
The Torah explicitly commands three things regarding the festival of Sukkot:
To gather the "four species" (Lev. 23:40)
To rejoice before the LORD (Deut. 16:13-14; Lev. 23:40)
To live in a sukkah (Lev. 23:42)
JEWISH ROOTS
Sukkot – The Season of Joy
The Festival of Sukkots
The Feast of Tabernacles
Introduction to Sukkot
The
seventh (and final) feast given
to Israel is called Sukkot ( )‫סֻ ּכֹות‬or the "FEAST
OF TABERNACLES." Sukkot is observed in the
fall, from the 15th to the 22nd of Tishri.
During this time many Jewish families
construct a sukkah )‫סֻ ּכָה‬a small hastily built
hut in which meals are eaten throughout the
festival. The sukkah is used to remember the
huts [plural: sukkot] Israel lived in during their
40 year sojourn in the desert after the exodus
from Egypt
JEWISH ROOTS
The Feast of Dedication
Hanukkah
Dedication against Assimilation
Introduction
The
Hebrew
word
chanukah
means
"dedication" and marks an eight day winter
celebration (from Kislev 25 - Tevet 3) that
commemorates the rededication of the
Second Temple after a small group of
Jewish believers defeated the forces of
assimilation at work in their world. As such,
Chanukah represents
the VICTORY OF
FAITH over the ways of speculative reason,
and demonstrates the power of the miracle
in the face of mere humanism.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Feast of Dedication
Hanukkah
Dedication against Assimilation
Customs of Chanukah (Minhagim)
Regardless of the relative obscurity of the origins of Chanukah, Rabbinic
tradition has instituted various rules (mitzvot) and customs (minhagim) for the
observance of this eight-day festival to commemorate the Jews victory over
their enemies.
Among these are: Celebrating Chanukah for eight days, from Kislev 25 to Tevet
3 on the Jewish calendar (Talmud: Shabbat 21b)
Lighting the Chanukiah, a special form of MENORAH designed to recall the
MIRACLE of the eight days in which the sanctified oil burned in the temple. The
nightly kindling of the Chanukiah with its increasingly brighter light is a symbol of
godly resistance to both tyranny and the forces of assimilation (Talmud: Sukkah
JEWISH ROOTS
The Feast of Dedication
Hanukkah
Dedication against Assimilation
Be JOYOUS on Chanukah and
Be joyous on Chanukah and
avoid signs of sadness (i.e., no
avoid signs of sadness (i.e., no
mourning or fasting, except in
mourning or fasting, except in
the case of shiva [Talmud:
Shabbat 21b]).
the case of shiva [Talmud:
Shabbat 21b]).
The Lighting of the Hanukkah Candles for Eight Days.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Feast of Dedication
Hanukkah & Torah Reading: Dedication against Assimilation
Day 1
Torah
HAFTARAH
BRIT CHADASHAH
Chanukah 1
(Kislev 25)
Chanukah 2
(Kislev 26)
Chanukah 3
(Kislev 27)
Chanukah 4
(Kislev 28)
Chanukah 5
(Kislev 29)
Chanukah 6
(Kislev 30)
Chanukah 7
(Tevet 1)
Chanukah 8
(Tevet 2)
Numbers 7:1-7:17
Zech. 2:14-4:7
(only if Shabbat)
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-3
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
John 9:1-7;
John 10:22-39
Numbers 7:18-7:29
Numbers 7:24-7:35
Numbers 7:30-7:41
Numbers 7:36-7:47
Numbers 28:1-17;
Numbers 7:54-59
Numbers 7:48-7:59
Numbers 7:54-8:4
(Rosh Chosesh Tevet)
JEWISH ROOTS of JESUS
JEWISH ROOTS
The Feast of Dedication
Hanukkah: Dedication against Assimilation – JESUS and Chanukah
At that time the Feast of Dedication (Chanukah) took place
at Jerusalem. It was winter, and Jesus was walking in the temple, in
the colonnade of Solomon. So the Jews gathered around him and
said to him, "How long will you keep us in suspense? If you are the
Christ, tell us plainly. (John 10:22-24, ESV)
During a season of remembering miracles (nissim), Yeshua pointed
out that the works that He did attested to His claim to be the longawaited Mashiach of the Jewish people (John 10:37-38). His works
and character clearly displayed the true Light of who He was, and
these works still shine to us today. Yeshua was and forever shall be
the greatest Jew who ever lived upon the earth.
JEWISH ROOTS
The Feast of Dedication
Hanukkah: Dedication against
Assimilation – JESUS and
Chanukah
And of course, as Mashiach ben Yosef, our
Suffering Servant, YESHUA is the Ultimate Shamash He is our Light who enables us to shine a sacred fire of
sacrificial love to the darkened outside world. Yeshua
commanded "Let your light so shine before men, that
they may see your good works, and glorify your
Father which is in heaven" (Matt 5:16). He told us that
He is the Light of the world, and that whoever follows
Him will not have darkness, but the Light of Life:
I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall
not
walk
in
but shall have the light of life. (John 8:12)
darkness,
JEWISH ROOTS
The Fast Days of the Jewish Year!
Fast Days (Tzomim)
In addition to Yom Kippur, The Talmud
(Tractate Rosh Hashana 18b) discusses
four fast days (based on Zechariah 8:19)
that commemorate the destruction of
the First and Second Temples and the
exile of the Jewish People from their
homeland. In addition, two other fast
days are mentioned in the Rabbinical
literature,
yielding
a
total
of
six
tzomot/fast day (seven if Yom Kippur is
included).
JEWISH ROOTS
Synopsis: of Jewish Roots of Yeshua /Jesus
From the Jewish study above: It behold
the Corporate Bride of Christ to have an
understanding of their Jewish Roots of
their Faith in God.
As if there were no Old Testament – there
could not be a New Testament.
The Old Testament were a shadow or
symbolic of things/prophesies to come
and fulfil.
The New Testament is now a fulfilment of
the Old Testament.
Shalom – The Peace of Yeshua be upon
The Father’s House Kingdom
Ministry
The Mysteries: Jewish Roots of Christianity
INSTRUCTOR: Apostle Sophia Fenton