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World History
Ms. Cannavina
Name:___________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 1: THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION (Prehistory – 2300 BC)
Main Ideas: Students will learn:



About early humans and their migration patterns.
That systemic agriculture brought huge economic, political, and social changes for early humans.
The development of the first Mesopotamian civilization of Sumeria .
CCSS Standards:





RH.9-10.2: Determine the central idea or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of
how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
WHST.9-10.1a: Introduce precise claims, distinguish the claims from alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships among the claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
Early Humans (Once upon a time…)
A.
Prehistory
B.
Early Stages of Development
C.
The Old Stone / Paleolithic Age (2 million BCE to 10,000 BCE)
II.
The Neolithic Revolution
A.
Agricultural Revolution
B.
Consequences
C.
The Bronze Age
III.
The Rise of Civilizations
***The rise of civilizations began approximately 5000 years ago, usually (although not always) located along the
river valleys. There are seven areas that historians focus on: Mesopotamia, Nile Valley, Indus Valley, Huang He
(Yellow) River Valley, Niger Valley, Mexico, and the Andes Mountains. Mesopotamia is the oldest (3300BCE) and
Niger is the newest (400 CE).
I.
***The basic features of civilizations include:
1. Cities
2. Central Governments
3. Traditional Economy: relies on habit, custom, or ritual and tends not to change over time.
4. Organized Religion: Polytheistic
5. Social Classes
6. Art and Architecture
7. Roads, bridges, and other public works
8. System of Writing: Pictographs: (or pictograms) simple drawings that look like the objects they represent.
9. Specialized Jobs
10. Cultural Diffusion: the spread of ideas, customs, and technology from one people to another. Occurred
through migration, trade, and warfare
IV.
Civilization Begins In Mesopotamia
A.
The Impact of Geography
B.
The Sumerians
The Cradle of Civilization
Terms: archaeology; anthropology; culture; artifacts; hominids; Donald Johansen; Louis & Mary Leakey; homo erectus
& homo sapiens; “Out of Africa” Theory; Neanderthals; nomads; Paleolithic Art; “Panel of Heroes”; domestication;
Fertile Crescent; Tigris & Euphrates; ziggurats; cuneiform; Gilgamesh; social hierarchy; theocracy
Chapter 1 Homework: Answer in complete sentences. Use proper heading. To be collected.
1.
Page 13, Question 3
2.
Page 17, Question 3
3.
Page 18, Question 5; 8; 13 & 14
4.
Read the two primary sources and answer the questions that follow.
Definitions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Prehistory: the long period of time before people invented writing.
Archaeology: the study of past societies through analysis of want people have left behind.
Anthropology: the study of human life and culture.
Culture: refers to the way of life in a society, which includes beliefs, values, and practices.
Artifacts: objects made by humans (ie: tools, pottery, weapons)
Historians: scholars who study and write about the historical past.
Primary Sources: “Sumerian School Days” & “The Epic of Gilgamesh”
Introduction: Many clay tablets etched with the distinctive cuneiform style of writing have been excavated from the ruins of ancient
cities of Sumer. The subjects of these tablets include advice on farmining, astrological prediction, epic poetry, and witty proverbs.
One of the most interesting deals with a the day to day activities of a Sumerian schoolboy. Written about 2000 BC, probably by a
schoolteacher, this tablet provides wonderful insight into the mind of a student from one of the world’s earliest civilizations.
Schoolboy, where did you go from earliest days?
I went to school.
What did you do in school?
I recited my tablet, ate my lunch, prepared my new tablet, wrote it, finished it; they assigned me my oral work, and in the
afternoon they assigned me my written work. When school was dismissed, I went home, entered the house, and found my father
sitting there. I told my father of my written work, then recited my tablet to him, and my father was delighted… When I arose early in
the morning, I faced my mother and said to her: “Give me my lunch, I want to go to school!” My mother gave me two rolls, and I set
out… In school the fellow in charge of punctuality said: “Why are you late?” Afraid and with pounding heart, I entered before my
teacher and made a respectful curtsy. My [principal] read my tablet, said: “There is something missing,” and caned me… The fellow
in charge of silence said, “Why did you talk w/o permission,” and caned me… the fellow in charge of good behavior said, “Why did
you rise w/o permission?” and caned me… The fellow in charge of Sumerian said: “Why didn’t you speak Sumerian!” and caned
me… My teacher said, “Your copy is unsatisfactory” and caned me… My teacher took no delight in me; even stopped teaching me
his skill in the scribal art; in no way prepared me in the matters essential to the art of being a “young scribe…” I went home and said
to my father, “Give the teacher a bit extra salary, and let him become more kindly… let him not neglect me any longer.” To that, my
father gave head, and it was done…
My teacher said to me, “Young fellow, b/c you hated not my words, neglected them not, may you complete the scribal art
from beginning to end. Because you gave me everything w/o stint, paid me a salary larger than my efforts deserve, and have honored
me… your point stylus write well for you; may your exercises contain no faults. Of your brothers, may you be their leader; of your
friends may you be their chief; may you rank the highest among the schoolboys... You have carried out well the school’s activities;
you are a man of learning.”
Analyzing Primary Sources:
1.
Based on this excerpt, what was the major subject taught in this Sumerian school?
2.
How did the school boy overcome his problems with his teacher?
3.
Describe in three ways in which school is different from school in Sumerian times.
The Epic of Gilgamesh
What is good in a man’s sight is evil for a god.
What is evil to a man’s mind is good for his god.
Who can comprehend the counsel of the gods in heaven?
Who can comprehend the counsel of the gods in heaven?
The plan of a god is deep waters; who can fathom it?
Where has befuddled mankind ever learned what is a god’s conduct?
What view of life is being expressed here?
World History
Ms Cannavina
Name: __________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 2: THE SPREAD OF CIVILIZATION
(3100 BC – 200 BC)
Main Ideas: Students will learn:




That Egyptian civilization brought periods of continuity and stability over thousands of years.
That b/w 3100 BC and 200 BC many civilizations flourished in central and western Asia, and around the Mediterranean Sea
as well.
That environmental changes, along w/ migrations, led to major changes in ancient India’s culture.
That dynasties in ancient China developed philosophies, political theories, and cultural achievements.
CCSS Standards:





I.
RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
RH.9-10.7: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (charts, research data) w/ qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
WHST.9-10.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships b/w claim and reasons, b/w reasons and evidence, and b/w claims and counterclaims.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
Egyptian Civilization
A.
The Impact of Geography
“Egypt is wholly the gift of the Nile” – Herodotus
1.
The Nile River
2.
Egypt’s Natural Defenses
B.
The Importance of Religion
1.
Egyptian Mythology
2.
Mummification
C.
The Course of Egyptian History
*** Scholars divide the history of ancient Egypt into three main periods: Old, Middle, and New
Kingdoms. Although power passed from one dynasty, or ruling family, to another, the land generally remained united.
A pattern would be established: long term stability with a strong leader, freedom from invasions, the building of temples
and pyramids, and cultural activity. B/w periods there would be chaos and invasion.
***Menes, the king of Upper Egypt, would unite Upper and Lower Egypt in about 3100 BCE. He
founded the Egypt’s first capital at Memphis.
1.
The Old Kingdom
(2700 – 2200 BC)
2.
The Middle Kingdom (2050 – 1750 BC)
3.
The New Kingdom
(1550 – 1050 BC)
D.
Social Structure
E.
Contributions
II.
The Indus Valley Civilization
A.
Geography
B.
India’s First Civilization
1.
Mohenjo-Daro & Harappa
3.
Decline
2.
Rulers and Economy
C.
Arrival of the Aryans
1.
Aryans Migrate into India
2.
Aryan Ways of Life
D.
Society in Ancient India
E.
Religious Beliefs
III.
The Rise of China
*** Early Chinese civilizations had the same characteristics as other civilizations: traditional farming, river valley
location, cities, govt, belief systems, contributions to art, law, and technology, and the exchange of ideas w/ other cultures.
Early Neolithic villages were discovered, dating back to approximately 8000 BC. Higher civilizations, however, were
located on the Yellow River Valley starting from 2000 BC: Xia, Shang, and Zhou Dynasties. These dynasties may be
overlapping. All dynasties, however, were heavily influenced by China’s geography.
A.
The Geography of China
B.
Xia Dynasty
(2205 – 1766 BC)
C.
Shang Dynasty (1766 – 1122 BC)
1.
Government
3.
Religion
2.
Social Structure
4.
Contributions
D.
Zhou Dynasty
1.
Feudal Government
4.
Family in Ancient China
2.
Mandate of Heaven
5.
Contributions
3.
Economy
6.
Fall of the Zhou: “Period of the Warring States”
Terms: delta; silt; cataracts; polytheistic; Amon-Re; Osiris; Anubis; Isis; Seth; mummification; ma’at; bureaucracy;
vizier; pharaohs; Great Sphinx and Khufu; Hyksos; Thutmosis I; Amenhotep IV/ Akhenaten; Tutankhamen; Hatshepsut;
Ramses II: hieroglyphics; hieratic; demotic; papyrus; subcontinent; Himalayas; Hindu Kush; Khyber Pass; Bolan Pass;
Ganges R; Gangetic Plain; Deccan Plateau; Ghats Mts; monsoons; Mohenjo-Daro; Harappa; veneration; Vedas;
Sanskrit; rajahs; caste system; patriarchal; sati/suttee; Indra; Brahman; Yellow R (Huang He); Yangtze R; Gobi Desert;
Tian Shan; Himalayas; Middle Kingdom; clans; Anyang; yin and yang; oracle bones; pictographs; ideographs; filial piety;
Book of Documents; Book of Songs
CHAPTER 2 HOMEWORK: Answer in complete sentences.
1.
Page 26, Questions 4 & 5
2.
Page 35, Question 2
3.
Page 40, Question 5
4.
Page 44, Questions 1; 3; 4; 8; 10 & 11
World History
Ms Cannavina
Name: __________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 3: EARLY EMPIRES IN THE ANCIENT MIDDLE EAST
(2300 BC – 300 BC)
Main Ideas: Students will learn:



That b/w 3100 BC and 200 BC many civilizations flourished in central and western Asia, and around the Mediterranean.
That strong leaders established empires in Akkad and Babylon.
That the Assyrians and the Persians established vast empires in the ancient world.
CCSS Standards:





I.
II.
RH.9-10.2: Determine the central idea or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of
how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
WHST.9-10.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships b/w claims and reasons, b/w reasons and evidence, and b/w claim and counterclaim.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
Peoples in the Eastern Mediterranean
A.
The Role of Nomadic Peoples
1.
Pastoral Nomads
3.
2.
Indo-Europeans
B.
The Phoenicians: The Carriers of Civilization
The Israelites
A.
Overview
Hittite Kingdom (1400 – 1200 BC)
*** Hebrews were one of the many nomadic groups who lived in the Fertile Crescent. Their legendary founder,
Abraham, came from “eber”, meaning the “other side” of the Euphrates River. According to Hebrew tradition, the Hebrews became
enslaved in Egypt, and God helped them escape from slavery w/ Moses’ help (the Exodus). After wandering around in the desert,
they finally returned to Palestine, and land they believed God (Yahweh) had promised them. Over time, Hebrew beliefs evolved into
the religion we today called Judaism. They are known as “Jews” in honor of one of their tribes, Judah, and the new territory they
claimed, Judea. There are about 14 million Jews worldwide. Their size, however, is disproportionate to their influence and impact on
history.
B.
C.
D.
Belief in One God: Monotheism
Sacred Text: TaNakh
The Israelites: History
I am who am
*** B/w 1200 and 1000 BC, the Israelites emerged as a distinct group of people, organized in tribes, who
established a united kingdom known as Israel. According to their accounts in the Hebrew Bible, they migrated from Mesopotamia to
Palestine, which they called Canaan. There they experienced three powerful kings: Saul, David, and Solomon. Solomon, who
ruled 970 to 930 BC, strengthened royal power, expanded the govt, and encouraged trade. Under Solomon, ancient Israel was at the
height of its power. Its center was the city of Jerusalem. They were able to unite as their rivals, like the Egyptians and the Hittites,
declined. After the death of Solomon, however, the kingdom was divided and forever weakened. The Hebrews were later conquered
by the Assyrians, Greeks, and Romans. The final blow to the Jewish nation would be a series of diasporas during the Roman Empire.
Wherever the Jews settled, however, they lived in close-knit communities and maintained their identity through the careful
preservation of tradition. The Jewish people would be a subjected people for most of their history, up to the establishment of modern
Israel in 1948.
III.
Early Empires
A.
Definition & Characteristics
B.
Akkadian Empire
C.
Babylonian Empire & The Code of Hammurabi
D.
The Kingdom of Kush (750 BC – 350 AD)
E.
Assyrians (1350 – 850 BC)
IV.
The Persian Empire (2000 BC – 100 BC)
A.
Cyrus the Great
B.
Darius I
C.
Zoroastrianism
D.
Fall
Terms: Hattushash; Iron Age; alphabet; covenant; Torah; Nevi’im; Ketuvim; Ten Commandments; Sargon;
Nebuchadnezzar; satrapy; satraps; Persian Royal Road; Persepolis; Ahuramazda; Ahriman
CHAPTER 3 HOMEWORK: Answer in complete sentences.
1.
Page 50, Question 2
2.
Page 54, Question 4
3.
Page 59. Question 4
4.
Page 60: 6; 7; 8; 9; 11; 15 & 16
World History
Ms. Cannavina
Name: _________________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 4: THE ANCIENT GREEKS
(1600 BC – 133)
Main Ideas: Students will learn





That the earliest Greek state and subsequent settlements were influenced by their physical environment.
That the differences b/w Athenian and Spartan values led to different forms of govt.
That Athens’ growing power led to conflict w/ Sparta.
That ideas from the classical age of Greece helped to shape Western civilization.
That Greek culture spread to new lands, due to conquests.
CCSS Standards:





I.
II.
IV.
RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
RH.9-10.7: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (charts, research data) w/ qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
WHST.9-10.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships b/w claim and reasons, b/w reasons and evidence, and b/w claims and counterclaims.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
The Impact of Geography
A.
Geographic Features
B.
Geography & the Polis
Early Civilizations
A.
The Minoans (2000 BC – 1400 BC)
C.
The Greeks in a Dark Age
B.
The Myceneans (1400 BC – 1200 BC)
D.
Homer: Iliad & Odyssey
III.
The Greek City-States
A.
Polis: The Center of Greek Life
1.
Definition: Polis
3.
Rights & Responsibilities
2.
Geography and the Polis
4.
Military System
B.
Forms of Govt: Aristocracy; Oligarchy; Tyranny; Democracy
C.
Sparta
D.
Athens
E.
Forces for Unity
Classical Greece
A.
Persian Wars
B.
The Age of Pericles
***The years after the Persian War from 460 BCE to 429 BCE were a golden age for Athens under the able
statesman Pericles. B/c of his wise and skillful leadership, the economy thrived and the govt became more democratic.
V.
1.
Athenian Democracy
2.
Culture Thrives in Athens
C.
The Peloponnesian War
Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age
A.
Philip II of Macedonia
B.
Alexander as Conqueror
VI.
Greek and Hellenistic Contributions
A.
Philosophers: Lovers of Wisdom
B.
Literature
C.
Art and Architecture
3.
Economy
C.
D.
Alexander as Ruler
Alexander’s Legacy
D.
E.
Science
Math
Terms: Aegean & Mediterranean Seas; Knossos; Trojan War; arête ; Iliad; Achilles; Odyssey; acropolis; agora; citizens; hoplites;
phalanx; helots; ephors; Mount Olympus; Zeus; Ares; Aphrodite; Athena; alliance; Battle of Thermopylae; Delian League; direct
democracy; Peisistratus; Cleisthenes; Draco; Solon; Council of 500; stipend; jury; ostracism; Parthenon; Alexandria; Sophists;
rhetoric; Socrates & Socratic Method; Plato & The Republic; Aristotle; Epicureanism; Stoicism; Zeno; Aeschylus; Sophocles;
Euripides; Oedipus Rex ; Herodotus; Thucydides; Aristarchus; Archimedes; Hippocrates; Pythagoras; Euclid; Ptolemaic Egypt
CHAPTER 4 HOMEWORK *** Complete sentences!
1.
Page 67; Question 5
2.
Page 72; Question 4
3.
Page 77; Question 4 & 5
4.
Page 82; Question 1
5.
Page 88: Questions 4; 7; 9; 14 & 15
World History
Ms. Cannavina
Name: __________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 5: INDIA’S FIRST EMPIRES:
CULTURAL COHESION IN A DIVIDED SUBCONTINENT (1000 BC – 500 AD)
Main Ideas: Students will learn:



That Ancient Indian society and religion was influenced strongly by Aryan beliefs.
Buddhism, which shares some beliefs w/ Hinduism, came to rival it as a religion in India.
New Indian empires grew rich through trade and left a lasting legacy of accomplishments.
CCSS Standards:





I.
RH.9-10.2: Determine the central idea or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of
how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
WHST.9-10.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships b/w claims and reasons, b/w reasons and evidence, and b/w claim and counterclaim.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
Review: Aryans & the Vedic Age (1500 BC – 500 BC)
*** India’s first civilization emerged in the Indus River Valley. Excavations show that the Indus Valley covered the largest
area of any ancient civilization and that its two main cities, Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa, were carefully planned. Aryan warriors,
from Europe to Asia, invaded India and developed a new civilization. The Vedas and the great Aryan epic poems, the Mahabharata
and the Ramayana reveal much about the lives and religious beliefs of the early Aryans. Like the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh, the
Indian epics mix history, mythology, adventure, and religion. Their writing system was known as Sanskrit. They would eventually
blend w/ the people they conquered, although they are generally linked to the development of the caste system, which separated
Aryans from non-Aryans.
II.
III.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Hinduism
A.
Origins
B.
Beliefs
1.
Universal Spirit
3.
Karma & Dharma
2.
Reincarnation: Samsara
C.
Caste System
D.
Sacred Texts: Vedas; Upanishads; Brahamanas; Mahabharata; Bhagavad-Gita
E.
Religious Practices
“The Sight of the Snow wipes out the sins of the world.”
Buddhism
A.
The Enlightened One
B.
Basic Principles & Sacred Texts
Four Noble Truths
Ordinary Life is full of suffering.
This suffering is caused by selfish desires.
The way to end suffering is to end desire for selfish goals and see others as an extension of ourselves.
The way to end desire is to follow the Eightfold Path.
Eightfold Path: way to achieve Nirvana: union w/ the universe
Right View:
We need to know the Four Noble Truths.
Right Intention:
We need to decide what we really want.
Right Speech:
We must seek to speak the truth and to speak well of others.
Right Action:
Do not kill, steal, lie, be unchaste, take drugs or alcohol.
Right Livelihood:
We must do work that uplifts our being.
Right Effort:
The Buddha emphasized that effort was required to follow the Way, and it must be as
great as the effort of an ox that travels through deep mud carrying a heavy load.
Right Mindfulness:
We must keep our minds in control of our senses.
Right concentration:
We must mediate to see the world in a new way.
IV.
C.
Comparison w/ Hinduism
D.
Major Sects of Buddhism: Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism
E.
Decline in Buddhism in India
The Mauryan Empire (321 BC – 185 BC)
*** The Mauryas (and later the Guptas) would be the only civilization able to unite India under one rule. They both began in
the north, which had geographic benefits. The mountains helped protect civilizations from invaders (generally, except the passes, like
Khyber Pass). The Indus and Ganges Rivers flowed through the north, providing water and fertile soil which sustained a population.
A.
B.
V.
Candragupta Maurya
Asoka and Reform
The Kushan Empire
*** After the collapse of the Mauryan Empire, a number of new kingdoms arose along the edges of India in Bactria, now
Afghanistan. In the first century, AD, nomadic warriors seized power and established the new Kushan kingdom. For the next two
centuries, the Kushans spread over N.India as far as the Ganges Valley into modern day Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Central Asia. In
the rest of India, other kingdoms fought for control. The Kushan kingdom became a key link in the Silk Road trade b/w the
Mediterranean region and easternmost Asia, chiefly b/w the Roman Empire and China. India’s role in trade became more prominent
once sailors learned to navigate the Indian Ocean. With trade came the Greek alphabet and Persian Zoroastrianism. The Kushans
developed a calendar based on both the moon and the sun, a form of which is still used in India today. Persian invaders brought the
Kushan kingdom to an end in the third century AD.
VI.
The Gupta Empire
*** About 500 years after the rule of the Mauryas, the Gupta Dynasty again united most of India. During Gupta rule, the
people of India experienced peace and prosperity under a strong govt, were greatly influenced by Hindu ideas, and produced many
achievements in math and science. This period of great cultural achievement is known as a golden age. The two centuries of Gupta
rule and influence are considered a “golden age” more for their cultural brilliance, however, than for their political power .
A.
B.
C.
Candra Gupta I
Gupta Society: Govt, Economy, Women, Village Life
The Influence of Hinduism
*** The Gupta Dynasty adopted and actively promoted Hinduism. It became a powerful, attractive alternative to
waning Buddhism, which was on the decline. Society came to by ordered by Hinduism. The caste system was elaborated. Priests
became more influential w/ rulers, govt officials, and landlords. Hinduism had a strong impact on all areas of Indian life. During this
time, most Indian people lived in small villages, where Hindu ideas about caste and family regulated society. This created a stable, if
stagnate, society, which also promoted the advancement of cultural achievements.
D.
End of Gupta Rule
*** Eventually, Gupta India declined under the pressure of weak rulers, civil war, and foreign invaders. From
central Asia came the White Huns, a nomadic people who overran the weakened Gupta Empire, destroying its cities and trade. Once
again, India split into many kingdoms. It would see no other great empire like those of the Mauryas or Guptas for almost 1000 years.
However, modern India is a direct descendent of those ancient empires and still shares its diversity. Ancient texts like the
Mahabharata help to provide a common culture.
VII.
Gupta’s Golden Age
*** Under the Guptas, India enjoyed a golden age, or a period of great cultural achievement. Characteristics of a golden age
include an emphasis on learning, achievements in the arts and sciences, a booming economy based on trade, and peace and prosperity
under a strong, stable govt. The Gupta Empire emerged as a classical civilization, a society that serves as a model of excellence and
has lasting value and relevance.
A.
B.
Mathematics
Medicine
C.
D.
Architecture
Literature
Terms: Dogma; Brahman; Brahma the Creator; Vishnu the Preserver; avatar; Shiva the Destroyer; samsara; atman;
moksha; ahimsa; varnas; Brahmins; kshatriyas; vaisyas; sudras; untouchables; jatis; gurus; Diwali; ghats; Yeti;
Himalayas; Siddhartha Gautama; Tripitaka; sangha; Bodhisattvas; Pataliputra; stupas; pillars
CHAPTER 5 HOMEWORK: Answer in complete sentences
1.
2.
3.
4.
Page 95, Question 4
Page 99, Question 1
Page 106, Question 1, 3, 6, 9, 10, 12 & 13
Primary Sources (Separate Assignment)
World History
Ms. Cannavina
Name: ________________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 6: THE FIRST CHINESE EMPIRES
(221 BC – 220 AD)
Main Ideas: Between 200 BC and 220 AD, strong, unified empires w/ complex belief systems emerged in China. These
civilizations set patterns in govt, religion, and philosophy that influenced later cultures. Students will learn:
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The teachings of Confucius, based on ideals of duty and social good, influenced Chinese govt and society.
Legalism and Daoism were two other important philosophies that arose in China.
Shi Huangdi united China and built a strong authoritarian govt, which laid the groundwork for China’s classical age.
Under Han rulers, the Chinese made huge advances in trade, govt, technology, and the arts.
CCSS Standards:





RH.9-10.2: Determine the central idea or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of
how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
WHST.9-10.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships b/w claims and reasons, b/w reasons and evidence, and b/w claim and counterclaim.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
Review: Xia, Shang, Zhou… Warring States Period
I.
The Chinese Philosophies
***Between 500 and 200 BC, three major schools of thought about the nature of human beings emerged in China.
These philosophies focused on the immediate world in which people lived and on how to create a stable order in that
world. They shared a common purpose of restoring harmony in a chaotic world.
A.
Confucianism
B.
Daoism
C.
Legalism “The nature of man is evil. His goodness is acquired.”
II.
Qin Dynasty
***The Qin Dynasty was noted for its intense brutally, led by the “First Emperor”, Shi Huangdi. Nevertheless, it
ushered in China’s Classical Age—a term historians use when a civilization sets patterns in govt, philosophy, religion,
science, and the arts that serve as a framework for later cultures.
A.
Qin Shi Huangdi (221 – 206 BCE)
B.
Changes
C.
The Great Wall
D.
The Emperor’s Army
E.
The Great Fall
III.
Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE)
A.
Liu Pang
B.
Emperor Wudi “Martial Emperor of the Han”
C.
Economy and Trade
D.
Confucian Bureaucracy
E.
The Fall of the Han
***Expansion helped to strengthen the Han empire but also led to its decline. “Men and women know
how to adorn their faces; but there is none who knows how to adorn their character.”
F.
Achievements of the Han Golden Age
***The Han period was one of the golden ages of Chinese civilization. Han China made such
tremendous advances in so many fields that the Chinese later called themselves “the people of Han.”
G.
Mahayana Buddhism in China
Terms: filial piety; Analects; Laozi; Tao Te Ching; yin and yang; Han Feizi; Zheng; Xianyang; censorate; Terra Cotta
Warriors; Han Gaozu; expansionism; granaries; monopoly; scholar-officials; warlords; tribune; sinicization;
acupuncture
CHAPTER 6 HOMEWORK: Answer in complete sentences.
1.
Page 113, Question 1
2.
Page 117, Question 3
3.
Page 121, Question 3
4.
Page 122, Question 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12 & 13
5.
Primary Sources (Separate Assignment)
We look at it [Tao] and do not see it; its name is invisible.
We listen to it and do not hear it; its name is The Inaudible.
We touch it and do not find it… Its name is The Subtle [formless].
Manifest plainness. Embrace simplicity.
Reduce selfishness. Have few desires.
Lao-tsu
Fine words and an insinuating appearance are seldom associated with true virtue.
Have no friends not equal to yourself.
Good government obtains when those who are near are made happy, and those who are far off are attracted.
When we see men of worth, we should think of equaling them; when we see men of contrary character, we should turn inwards and
examine ourselves.
Confucius
World History
Ms. Cannavina
Name: __________________________
OLMA
CHAPTER 7: THE ROMANS:
THE RISE AND FALL OF AN EMPIRE (750 BC – 500 AD)
Main Ideas: Students will learn:
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That the Romans conquered the Italian Peninsula and eventually the entire Mediterranean world.
That internal instability in the Roman Empire eventually led to civil wars and increased power for the military.
That Caesar Augustus created a new social order that began the Roman Empire, and that the Romans expanded trade and
spread their culture throughout the empire.
That a new faith, Christianity, spread across the Roman Empire and became their official religion.
That Eastern Europe evolved into the Byzantine Empire, which preserved and transmitted Greek and Roman culture.
Germanic kingdoms became the dominant political force in Europe during the early Middle Ages, while Christianity became
the dominant religion.
CCSS Standards:





RH.9-10.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether or not earlier events caused later one
or simply preceded them.
RH.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
RH.9-10.7: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (charts, research data) w/ qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
WHST.9-10.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships b/w claim and reasons, b/w reasons and evidence, and b/w claims and counterclaims.
WHST.9-10.1d: Establish and maintain a formal and style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
“Remember Romans… to rule the people under law, to establish … the way of Peace.”
*** Virgil
“Robbery, butchery, and [rape] they call ‘Empire.’ They create a desert and call it Peace.”
*** Tacitus
I.
The Rise of Rome
A.
The Land and the People of Italy
B.
The Roman Republic
C.
The Punic Wars (264 – 146 BCE) “Carthage must be destroyed”
D.
The Struggle of the Orders (494 – 440 BCE)
E.
Roman Law
II.
From Republic to Empire
A.
Growing Inequality and Unrest
B.
The Collapse of the Republic
C.
Julius Caesar
D.
The Age of Augustus
1.
The Second Triumvirate
3.
Pax Romana
2.
As Emperor
E.
The Good Emperors
F.
The Extent of the Roman Empire
G.
Economy & Trade
H.
Roman Society: Women, education, religion
I.
Slavery
“Every slave we own is an enemy we harbor.”
III.
The Roman Achievement
A.
Greco-Roman Civilization
***To the Romans, Greek art, literature, philosophy, and scientific genius represented the height of
cultural achievement. They borrowed heavily from Greece and adapted many of the Greek and Hellenistic achievements.
The blending of Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman traditions produced what is known as the Greco-Roman Civilization.
Trade and travel during the Pax Romana helped spread this new civilization.
B.
Literature, History, and Philosophy
*** In all these areas, the Romans owed a great debt to the Greeks. Many Romans spoke Greek and
imitated Greek styles in prose and poetry. Still, the greatest Roman writers used Latin to create their own literature.
IV.
C.
Roman Art and Architecture
D.
Science and Mathematics
E.
Roman Law
The Development of Christianity
A.
Roman Religion
B.
Jewish Unrest
C.
The Rise of Christianity
D.
Triumph of Christianity
V.
The Long Decline
A.
The Late Roman Empire: The Empire Divides
*** The death of Marcus Aurelius in 180 marked the end of the golden age of the Pax Romana. Political
Violence and civil war became common. In one 50 year period, at least 26 emperors reigned, and only one died of natural
causes. By the third century AD, the empire was troubled by a number of that nearly caused it to collapse. Among these
civil war and disputes over the rule of the empire. Emperors Diocletian and Constantine tried to bring in reforms to stop
the decline.
1.
Diocletian
2.
Constantine
B.
Reasons for Collapse
*** The decline of the Western Roman Empire, was a long, slow process, but when the Germanic tribes
ousted the emperor in Rome in 476 AD, that was that. There were many reasons for the decline.
VI.
The Byzantine Empire
***The Byzantine Empire continued on for another 1000 years after the fall of the Rome. The empire:
 Had a strong govt and uniform codes under Justinian.
 Was closely tied to the Orthodox Christian Church.
 Made contributions in architecture; engineering, and arts.
 Affected the later developments of Russia and other nations of Eastern Europe.
A.
The Reign of Justinian
B.
Achievements of the Byzantine Empire
C.
Orthodox Christian Church
D.
Decline and Fall of Empire
Terms: Apennines; Etruscans; patricians; plebeians; consuls; praetors; Hannibal; “New Wisdom”; tribunes; Law of the
Twelve Tables; latifundia; “Bread & Circuses”; Tiberius & Gaius Gracchus; legions; Marius; triumvirate; Crassus;
Pompey; Julius Caesar; Rubicon; Brutus and Cassius; Octavian; Battle of Actium; imperator; praetorian guard;
paterfamilias; Pax Romana; Caligula; Nero; Trajan; Hadrian; Marcus Aurelius; Spartacus; Jupiter; Juno; Neptune; Mars;
Virgil; Aeneid; Juvenal and Martial; Livy; Tacitus; frescoes and mosaics; Colosseum; engineering; aqueducts; diaspora;
Edict of Milan; Justinian’s Code; Hagia Sophia; icons; mosaics; patriarch; schism; excommunication
CHAPTER 7 HOMEWORK: Answer in complete sentences
1.
Page 138, Questions 2 & 3
2.
Page 144, Questions 1 & 5
3.
Page 146, Questions 1, 4, 7, 9, 11 & 12
4.
“Pax Romana” was a time of peace, essentially “enforced” by Rome. Who enforces the peace now? Why should
that make you nervous?