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Transcript
Smart Spaces. Ch.1: Ubiquitous
Computing and Smart Applications
Outline
Smart Spaces
§ 1. Ubiquitous computing
Chapter 1:
§ 2. Smart Components
§ 3. Features, Challenges, and
Approaches
Ubiquitous Computing
and Smart Applications
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
1
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
Ubiquitous computing
(Ubicom)
§1. Ubiquitous computing
Popular terms today:
„
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Ubiquitous computing
Calm technology
Internet of Things (IoT
(IoT))
Pervasive computing
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The purpose of a computer is to help you do something
else. The best computer is a quiet, invisible servant
The more you can do by intuition the smarter you are;
the computer should extend your unconscious
Technology should create calm
4
Waves of Computing
We live in a Digital World
Many computational
devices and systems
Information processing is
thoroughly integrated into
everyday objects and
activities
Machines that fit the
human environment
instead of forcing humans
to enter theirs
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
Specialized elements of hardware and software,
connected by wires, radio waves and infrared, will be
so ubiquitous that no one will notice their presence.
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
Calm Technology
„
Mark Weiser introduced the term "ubiquitous
computing" around 1988
„
Mobile computing
Ambient intelligence
Semantic Web
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
2
1.
Mainframes era (Past)
Each machine shared by lots of people
One computer, many people
2.
Personal computing era (Present)
One person, one desktop
3.
Ubiquitous computing (Future)
Technology recedes into the background of our lives
One person, many devices
5
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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1
Smart Spaces. Ch.1: Ubiquitous
Computing and Smart Applications
One big space
Ambient intelligence (AmI)
All kinds of devices and networks,
anywhere, anytime:
„
Sensors, active badges, cards,
phones, laptops, embedded
controllers, robots, PCs,
Internet servers, ...
„
Pervasive computing: Small
and inexpensive processing
devices, distributed at all
scales throughout everyday life
„
The Internet of things:
networked interconnection of
everyday objects
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
Electronic environments become
sensitive and responsive to the
presence of people
„ Support of people in carrying out
their everyday life activities using
information and intelligence that is
hidden in the space
„
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Smart space
„
„
The vision of incorporating sensing, computation,
and communication into everyday things in order to make them
and their surroundings “smart”
„
Smart things can detect where they are, sense what is around
them, detect and communicate with other smart things,
remember what they were used for previously, and reason about
the kind of future actions they might likely be used for
Smart Spaces are a realization of ubiquitous
computing vision
„
Relevant real-world information is stored and kept up to date
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
World Wide Web
„ Peer-to-Peer systems
„ Parallel computing
„ Cloud computing
„ Artificial Intelligence
„
„
Digital entity that makes services available for each user in a
seamless way using the most suitable available resources
8
Related approaches
Ubiquitous computing:
„
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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§2. Components
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
10
Candidate Smart Domains
Smart devices
Smart environments
„ Smart interaction
„
„
(Taken from Sofia
project)
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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2
Smart Spaces. Ch.1: Ubiquitous
Computing and Smart Applications
Smart Devices
„
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Smart Environments
Tab, Pad, Board
Mobile devices
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Multi-purpose ICT devices:
mobile phone, camera, games console, ...
Loosely-bound to users (accompanied) or tightlybound to users (wearable)
Personalized, configured to a specified owner
Single portal to internal and external services
Service access: Open service discovery and
Intermittent resource access
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
„
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Physical environments: embedded with a variety of
smart devices of different types including tags, sensors,
and controllers
Humans environments: humans accompanied by smart
devices
Environment with associated “digital
representation”
14
Summarizing
A smart space is a virtual, servicecentric, multi-user, multi-device,
dynamic interaction environment
that applies a shared view of
resources
Remote control of devices
Resource discovery
Information dissemination
Predictive and decision-making capabilities
Sensing physical environment and adapting
behavior accordingly
„
Virtual computing environments: smart devices access
pertinent services anywhere and anytime
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
Smart Interactions
„
Replacing the hazardous work, physical labor,
and repetitive tasks with automated agents
where you are
who you are with
what resources are nearby
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
15
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
§3. Features, Challenges,
and Approaches
Some examples
Smart Home
Smart meetings/conferences
„ Car smart space
„ Healthcare smart space
„ Building maintenance
„
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Embedded, Mobile: many networked devices are
„
Sensible and Context aware: these devices can
„
Personalized: they can be tailored to your needs
„
Adaptive: they change in response to you
„
Proactive, Anticipatory: they understand your
„
! Exploit these ideas for your project
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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integrated into the environment
recognize you and your situational context
desires without conscious mediation
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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3
Smart Spaces. Ch.1: Ubiquitous
Computing and Smart Applications
Technology models
Lack of common standards
Re-thinking of almost every aspect of
computing needs to be done
„
devices, vendors, product domains, and
produced information
mobile wireless networks
„ service-oriented computing
„ human computer interaction
„ autonomous systems, contextawareness, artificial intelligence
„ micro-electromechanical systems,
sensors, robots
„
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
Huge number of participating
„
Semistructured information:
The same information can be used
according with different structures
! Ontology-based approach can help here as we’ll see later
19
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
No global central control
Human-computer interaction
Peer-to-Peer vs. Clouds?
„ Various levels of hierarchy can help
„
„
Previous models are inappropriate to the
ubiquitous case
„
Information division
„ Composition/decomposition
„ Multiple small agents
„
„
„
„
21
Privacy and Security
Preliminary ideas appear in mobile phones,
digital players, radio-frequency identification
tags (RFID), interactive whiteboards
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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The opposite of virtual reality
Is it good that the computers are
invisible?
„ Who can turn them off?
„ Who controls the flow of information,
and who has access to it?
„
People always try to misuse a
technology to realize their own benefits
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
command-line
menu-driven
GUI-based
New model has yet to emerge
„
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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23
„
Virtual reality puts people inside a
computer-generated world
„
Ubiquitous computing forces the computer
to live in the world with people
A very difficult integration of human factors,
computer science, engineering, and social
sciences
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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4
Smart Spaces. Ch.1: Ubiquitous
Computing and Smart Applications
Smart Space Application
1.
2.
3.
Literature
Many diverse devices
Customization (personalization)
Proactivity
„
„
„
„
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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Mark Weiser, The Computer for the Twenty-First
Century. Scientific American, pp. 94-10,
September 1991
Stefan Poslad. Ubiquitous Computing: Smart
Devices, Environments and Interactions. Wiley
Publishing, 2009.
Diane Cook and Sajal Das. How smart are our
environments? An updated look at the state of the
art. Pervasive and Mobile Computing, pp. 53-73,
Elsevier, 2007.
Jon Mitchell. Inspiring The Internet Of Things: A
Comic Book, 2011.
Dmitry G. Korzun, 2011-2012
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