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Transcript
Landforms from Volcanoes
Lesson Concept
Volcanoes are classified by how they are formed (quiet or explosive
eruption) and the resulting land formation (shield, cinder cone, or
composite/stratovolcano).
Link
Lesson 6.15 provides models for how forces erupt a volcano.
Lesson 6.16 builds on the eruption models in 6.15 and explains the
different land formations that result from quiet or explosive
eruptions. Lesson 6.17 links all seismic activity from earthquakes
and volcanoes that result in changes on the Earth.
Time
75 minutes
Materials
Whole Class
Overhead projector/Document Camera
Laptop computer connected to projector
Partner Students
H1a-c Pictures with types of volcanoes
H2
Cards with titles of volcanoes
Individual
H3 Volcano foldable
H4 Rubric for foldable
Colored Pencils
Science Text
Resources
R1 Teacher Background
Advance
Preparation!
1. Locate science chapter on types of volcanoes in text.
2. Duplicate and cut out picture cards of volcanoes H1a-c and
titles cards on H2.
3. Duplicate volcano foldable (H3) for each student.
4. Duplicate rubric for foldable (H4).
5. Read through teacher background on R1.
6. Preview website: http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volc/types.html!
6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
!S cience M atters
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1
!
Procedure
Engage:
(10 minutes) Volcanoes are not all alike and different forces form
different volcano shapes.
1.
Ask students to think about how different eruptions with the model of Alka Seltzer.
With your partner, discuss the different landforms that might result from each type
of eruption. Chart student ideas.
2.
Display the USGS web site http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volc/types.html, which depicts
the different types of volcanoes. What is the difference between the different
volcanoes? What caused the differences? Add to chart.
3.
Ask students to think, pair, share the following questions: How would you
recognize a cinder volcano? How would you recognize a shield volcano? How
would you recognize a composite/stratovolcano? Chart student criteria for each
volcano types.
Teacher Note: It may be necessary to refer back to the United States Geological Survey
website referenced above. Cite examples of each of these types of volcanoes. cinder
volcano-Paricutin in Mexico composite/stratovolcano- Mt. St. Helens, shield volcanoKilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawaii.
Explore
(10 minutes) Volcanoes are classified into three types: cinder,
shield, and composite/stratovolcano.
4.
Distribute cut out H1 a-c (Volcano Pictures) and cut out cards H2 (Volcano Title
Labels) to partners in the class. Ask students to think about what they saw in the
video and sort the pictures into three categories: cinder, shield, and
composite/stratovolcano.
5.
Debrief sorting by asking the following questions: Which volcano pictures were
easy to sort? Which volcano pictures were difficult to sort? Is there anything we
should add to our criteria chart to make sorting easier?
Explain
(35 minutes) Types of Volcanoes Reference “Foldable Book”.
6.
Distribute H3 (Volcano Foldable). Ask each student to make a foldable for
recording information.
7.
Use textbook pages (own text) as a reference for information on types of
volcanoes. Ask students to develop the foldable book on volcanoes including the
following information: three types of volcanoes, drawings that match the type,
description of volcano and an example.
Extend
8.
(15 minutes) Feedback on foldable book.
Ask each student to display volcano foldable on his/her desk.
6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
!S cience M atters
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2
!
9.
Ask students to exchange foldable books with a partner to evaluate one another’s
work using H4 (rubric).
Evaluate:
(5 minutes) Volcanoes are recognized based on their
formation, shapes and materials, which are deposited during
an eruption.
!
10. Ask students to return the rubric and foldable book to their partner.
11. Ask students to self-evaluate his/her own work and his/her partner’s
comments. Ask students to make adjustments to his/her foldable making sure all
components of the rubric are included.
12. Ask students to write a paragraph justifying the score he/she gave himself/herself.
!!
!!
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6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
!S cience M atters
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3
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H1a
Composite Volcano (Stratovolcano)
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6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
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4
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H1b
Shield Volcanoes
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6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
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H1c
Cinder Cone Volcanoes
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6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
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6
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Cinder
Shield
Cinder
Shield
Shield
Composite
Composite
Cinder
Composite
Stratovolcano/
Stratovolcano/
Stratovolcano/
Cards for types of volcanoes
6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
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7
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6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
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6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
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9
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Teacher Background:
Volcanoes are typically found at the fault lines between tectonic plates. There can be
active volcanoes, which are currently, or have recently erupted. There are also dormant
volcanoes, which haven’t erupted recently, and extinct volcanoes, which will never erupt
again.
There are 3 major types of volcanoes:
Cinder Cone Volcanoes
These are the simplest type of volcano. They occur when particles and blobs of lava are
ejected from a volcanic vent. The lava is blown violently into the air, and the pieces rain
down around the vent. Over time, this builds up a circular or oval-shaped cone, with a
bowl-shaped crater at the top. Cinder cone volcanoes rarely grow larger than about
1,000 feet above their surroundings.
Composite/Strata Volcanoes
Composite volcanoes, or stratovolcanoes, make up some of the world’s most
memorable mountains: Mount Rainier, Mount Fuji, and Mount Cotopaxi, for example.
These volcanoes have a conduit system inside them that channels magma from deep
within the Earth to the surface. They can have clusters of vents, with lava breaking
through walls, or issuing from fissures on the sides of the mountain. With all this
material coming out, they can grow thousands of meters tall. As we’ve seen with the
famous Mount Saint Helens, composite volcanoes can explode violently.
Shield Volcanoes
These are large, broad volcanoes that look like shields from above – hence the name.
The lava that pours out of shield volcanoes is thin, so it can travel for great distances
down the shallow slopes of the volcano. These volcanoes build up slowly over time, with
hundreds of eruptions, creating many layers. They’re not likely to explode
catastrophically. Perhaps the best-known shield volcanoes are the ones that make up
the Hawaiian Islands, especially Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea
6.16 Landforms from Volcanoes: Earthquakes/Volcanoes:
!S cience M atters
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10
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