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Transcript
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Reading Guide 18-3 “Mapping the Stars” (Pages 564-571)
1. Advances in astronomy have led to a better understanding of:
a. _____________________________________
b. _____________________________________
PATTERNS IN THE SKY
2. People in ancient cultures connected stars in patterns and named sections of the sky
based on those patterns. What are those patterns called?
______________________________________________________________
3. What is the name of the constellation pictured above, and how did the ancient
Greeks and Japanese view it differently? See figure 1 on page 564
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4. A constellation is a region of the sky. How many are there? Pg. 565 ________
Sky map of constellations in the Northern Hemisphere in the spring
5. As Earth revolves around the Sun, constellations appear to change location
from season to season. Will people in the Northern Hemisphere see different
constellations in the Spring as people in the Southern Hemispheres? Explain.
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FINDING STARS IN THE NIGHT SKY
6.An instrument that is used to determine a star or planet’s location is a(n) See Page 566
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7.What are three reference points used to describe a star or planet’s position in
relation to a person’s position?
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8.Some stars located near Earth’s poles can be seen year-round, at all times of night. What
are these stars called and why can they be seen year-round?
See Page 567
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THE SIZE AND SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE
9. A light-year is equal to the distance that light travels in __________________.
10. One light-year is about 9.46 trillion _______________________, which is
equal to about 5.9 trillion miles.
11. How far are the farthest objects that we can observe? _________________________
THE DOPPLER EFFECT
12. What is the name of the effect that describes how the pitch of a sound seems
higher as it gets closer and lower as it gets farther away? ______________________
13. When a star or galaxy moves quickly away from an observer, the light it emits
appears redder than it usually would, this effect is called
_____________________________________________.
14. When a star or galaxy moves quickly toward an observer, the light it emits
appears bluer than it usually would, this effect is called
_____________________________________________.
15. Edwin Hubble discovered that the light from all galaxies except the Milky Way’s
close neighbors are moving apart from each other. Since Edwin Hubble determine that
the universe must be expanding, what are they affected by?
See Page 570 _______________________________________________
Use the diagram above and what you know about redshift and blueshift to answer the
next two questions.
16. Which observer above would see the light from the galaxy affected by redshift?
________________________________________
17. Which observer above would see the light from the galaxy affected by blueshift?
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