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Transcript
The Illustrated
Day of Infamy
Speech given by
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
December 8, 1941
Although the rest of the world
had been engaged in war since
September of 1939,
The United States did not
formally declare war until
December 8th 1941.
One day after the Japanese launched a
surprise attack on Pearl Harbor,
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
addressed a special session of
congress to ask for a formal
declaration of war against the Empire
of Japan.
In response to this declaration of war
against one of her allies
Germany declared war against the
United States on December 11, 1941.
Four years later at a cost of
418,500 American service men killed and
another 671,846 service men wounded,
both Germany and Japan were forced to
surrender.
With a combined loss of
62 million lives world wide
World War II was the bloodiest war
to date.
Its effects are still influencing policies
being made today.
On returning home to Japan after the
attack on Pearl Harbor
Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto,
who planned the attack but was against
going to war with the United States,
learned that the attack happened two
hours before the Japanese
Ambassador to the U. S. delivered an
official statement breaking off
diplomatic negotiations with Japan.
After learning of this mistake
Admiral Yamamoto addressed his staff
and said:
“I feel all we have accomplished
this day is
to awake a sleeping giant
and fill him with a terrible resolve.”
Credits
Pictures are from various collections
of the
Library of Congress
online at
www.loc.gov
Administrative Assistance
Provided by
An Adventure of the American Mind
At
Waynesburg College
http://aam.waynesburg.edu
Narration
by:
Mr. White’s Graphic Arts I class
at Jefferson-Morgan High School
Mike A.
Chris B.
Nathan E.
Dave H.
Mac K.
Matt K.
Cody L.
Josh L.
Terry L.
Frank P.
John R.
Brian W.
May 2006