Download Sentence Pattern Three: Subject–Verb–Indirect Object–Direct Object

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Transcript
Sentence Pattern Three: Subject–Verb–Indirect Object–Direct Object
(S-V-IO-DO)
This pattern adds one more element to that of Sentence Pattern Two.
That element is called the indirect object. The pattern is subject plus action
verb plus indirect object plus direct object. Many times, the indirect object is
found by asking To whom? or To what? after the verb and the direct object.
The questions go like this: The subject did what to whom? Look at the
examples to see this pattern. In these examples, the subjects are boldface, the
verbs are underlined once, the direct objects are underlined twice, and the
indirect objects are italicized.
Example:
Bobby Bowden gave quarterbacking in college his
undivided attention.
Example:
He taught others the game.
Example:
Florida State University paid him the ultimate
compliment.
Adapted from: http://www.theledger.com/top50/pages/bowden.html.
In the first example, to find the indirect object, you ask: Bowden gave
attention to what? The answer is quarterbacking, which is the indirect
object. You follow the same process in the second example. He taught the
game to whom? The answer is others, which is the indirect object. Finally,
you can see the pattern in the third example: The University paid the
compliment to whom? The answer, him, is the indirect object. The indirect
objects are diagrammed as follows:
Example:
Bobby Bowden gave quarterbacking in college his
undivided attention.
Diagram:
Bobby Bowden
gave
(to)
attention
quarterbacking
Example:
He taught others the game.
Diagram:
He
taught
game
(to)
___others__
In each of these diagrams, you can see that the indirect object is placed on a
line under the verb. The word to is placed on a slanted line, in parentheses,
because the preposition is understood. In fact, you could rewrite the sentence
with the preposition, and you would have an object of the preposition rather
than a direct object. For example, the last diagram would read, He taught the
game to others. Remember that the indirect object occurs between the verb
and the direct object. You can practice locating indirect objects in the
following exercise.