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World History
Unit Curriculum Document
Unit Number and Title:
Time Frame:
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres (1450 -1750)
Part B: Exploration and Expansion
Curriculum
3 Weeks
Concepts:
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Expansion
Exploration
Renaissance
Reformation
Innovation
Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas):
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The actions of individuals, groups, and/or institutions can
affect the world.
The student will know:
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Rise of the Ottoman Empire, influence of the Ming dynasty
on world trade, traditional historical points of reference in
world history
Essential Questions:
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The student will be able to:
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Identify major causes and describe effects of the rise of the
Ottoman Empire
Identify major causes and describe effects of the influence of
the Ming dynasty on world trade
Identify major causes and describe effects of European
exploration
Identify major causes and describe effects of the Columbian
Exchange
Identify major causes and describe effects of European
expansion
Identify major causes and describe effects of the Renaissance
Identify major causes and describe effects of the Reformation
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Explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and
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Characteristics and impact of the European Renaissance
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
What happens when cultures collide?
What causes societies to change?
Page 1 of 9
World History
Unit Curriculum Document
and the Reformation
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Characteristics and impact of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec
civilizations
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Causes and impact of European expansion
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Relationship between geography and the historical
development of a region or nation (i.e., Reformation map,
trade routes map, chart of New World and Old World
exchange)
Impact of geographic factors on major historic events and
processes, including the influence of human and physical
geography (i.e., early European exploration routes)
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
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religious impact of the Renaissance
Explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and
religious impact of the Reformation
Explain how prior civilizations influenced the political,
economic, social, cultural development of the Maya, Inca, and
Aztec civilizations
Compare the major political, economic, social, and cultural
developments of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations
Explain how the Inca and Aztec empires were impacted by
European exploration/colonization
Analyze the causes of European expansion
Explain the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the
Americas and Europe
Explain the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on West Africa
and the Americas
Explain the impact of the Ottoman Empire on Eastern Europe
and global trade
Explain Ming China's impact on global trade
Explain new economic factors and principles that contributed
to the success of Europe's Commercial Revolution
Analyze geographic distributions and patterns in world history
shown on maps, graphs, charts, and models
Compare geographic distributions and patterns in world
history shown on maps, graphs, charts, and models
Interpret maps, charts, and graphs to explain how geography
has influenced people and events in the past
Analyze the influence of human and physical geographic
factors on trade in the Indian Ocean
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World History
Unit Curriculum Document
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Locate places and regions of historical significance
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Characteristics of absolute monarchy and limited monarchy
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Identify the characteristics of absolute monarchy
Identify the characteristics of limited monarchy
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How contemporary political systems have developed from
earlier systems of government, including ideas contained in
the English Bill of Rights and philosophies of Thomas
Aquinas and John Calvin
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Identify the impact of political and legal ideas contained in the
English Bill of Rights
Explain the political philosophies of individuals such as
Thomas Aquinas and John Calvin
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Significance of political choices and decisions made by
individuals, groups, and nations throughout history (i.e.,
Henry VIII and the Act of Supremacy, Queen Elizabeth I’s
defense of Protestantism)
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Describe how Henry VIII and Elizabeth I have participated in
supporting or changing their governments
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History and relevance of major religious and philosophical
traditions on various events (i.e., Thirty Years War,
Inquisition)
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Identify examples of religious influence on various events
referenced in the major eras of world history
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Roles of women, children, and families in different
historical cultures
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Describe the major influences of Elizabeth I
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How the development of ideas has influenced institutions
and societies, including how individualism and growing
secularism influenced Christianity and political
developments
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Explain the relationship among Christianity, individualism, and
growing secularism that began with the Renaissance
Explain how the relationship among Christianity,
individualism, and growing secularism influenced subsequent
political developments
Relationship between the arts and the times during which
they were created
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Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
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Identify significant examples of art and architecture that
demonstrate an artistic ideal or visual principle
Page 3 of 9
World History
Unit Curriculum Document
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How major scientific and mathematical discoveries and
technological innovations affected societies prior to 1750
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Critical-thinking skills to organize and use information
acquired from a variety of valid sources, including
electronic technology
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Analyze examples of how art, architecture, literature, music,
and drama reflect the history of the cultures in which they are
produced
Identify examples of art, music, and literature that transcend
the cultures in which they were created and convey universal
themes
Identify the origin and diffusion of major ideas in
mathematics, science, and technology that occurred in the
Ming Dynasty
Summarize the major ideas in astronomy, mathematics, and
architectural engineering that developed in the Maya, Inca,
and Aztec civilizations
Explain the impact of the printing press on the Renaissance
and the Reformation in Europe
Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying
cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting,
finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations
and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and
developing connections between historical events over time
Student Understanding (student friendly TEKS)
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1D – I can identify causes and effects of the rise of the Ottoman Empire, the influence of the Ming dynasty on world trade, European
exploration and the Columbian Exchange, European expansion, and the Renaissance and the Reformation.
5A – I can explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and religious impact of the Renaissance.
5B – I can explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and religious impact of the Reformation.
6A – I can compare the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations and
explain how prior civilizations influenced their development.
6B – I can explain how the Inca and Aztec empires were impacted by European exploration/colonization.
7A – I can analyze the causes of European expansion.
7B – I can explain the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the Americas and Europe.
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
Page 4 of 9
World History
Unit Curriculum Document
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7C – I can explain the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on West Africa and the Americas.
7D – I can explain the impact of the Ottoman Empire on Eastern Europe and global trade.
7E – I can explain Ming China's impact on global trade.
7F – I can explain new economic factors and principles that contributed to the success of Europe's Commercial Revolution.
15A, 16C – I can create and interpret maps, graphs, and charts to explain how geography has influenced history.
15B – I can analyze and compare geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and models.
16A – I can locate places and regions related to major events and turning points in world history.
16B – I can analyze the influence of human and physical geography on trade in the Indian Ocean.
19B – I can identify the characteristics of an absolute monarchy and a limited monarchy.
20B – I can identify the impact of political and legal ideas of the English Bill of Rights.
20C – I can explain the political philosophies of Thomas Aquinas and John Calvin.
21A – I can describe how people have participated in supporting or changing their governments.
23B – I can identify examples of religious influence on various events.
24B – I can describe the major influences of Elizabeth I.
25C – I can explain the relationship among Christianity, individualism, and growing secularism and how it influenced subsequent
political developments.
26A – I can identify significant examples of art and architecture from classical civilizations that demonstrate order, balance, and
proportion.
26B – I can analyze examples of how art, architecture, literature, music, and drama reflect the history of the cultures in which they
are produced.
26C – I can identify examples of art, music, and literature that convey universal themes.
27A – I can identify the origin and diffusion of major ideas in mathematics, science, and technology that occurred in the Ming
Dynasty.
27B – I can summarize the major ideas in astronomy, mathematics, and architectural engineering that developed in the Maya, Inca,
and Aztec civilizations.
27C – I can explain the impact of the printing press on the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe.
29F – I can analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting,
finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and developing
connections between historical events over time.
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
Page 5 of 9
World History
Unit Curriculum Document
TEKS
 Student Expectations and Knowledge and Skills Statement
(1) History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in world history. The student is expected to:
(D) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following important turning points in world history from 1450 to 1750: the rise of the Ottoman
Empire, the influence of the Ming dynasty on world trade, European exploration and the Columbian Exchange, European expansion, and the Renaissance and
the Reformation
(5) History. The student understands the causes, characteristics, and impact of the European Renaissance and the Reformation from 1450 to 1750. The student
is expected to:
(A) explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and religious impact of the Renaissance
(B) explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and religious impact of the Reformation
(6) History. The student understands the characteristics and impact of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations. The student is expected to:
(A) compare the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations and explain how prior civilizations
influenced their development
(B) explain how the Inca and Aztec empires were impacted by European exploration/colonization
(7) History. The student understands the causes and impact of European expansion from 1450 to 1750. The student is expected to:
(A) analyze the causes of European expansion from 1450 to 1750
(B) explain the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the Americas and Europe
(C) explain the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on West Africa and the Americas
(D) explain the impact of the Ottoman Empire on Eastern Europe and global trade
(E) explain Ming China's impact on global trade
(F) explain new economic factors and principles that contributed to the success of Europe's Commercial Revolution
(15) Geography. The student uses geographic skills and tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
(A) create and interpret thematic maps, graphs, and charts to demonstrate the relationship between geography and the historical development of a region or
nation
(B) analyze and compare geographic distributions and patterns in world history shown on maps, graphs, charts, and models.
(16) Geography. The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and processes. The student is expected to:
(A) locate places and regions of historical significance directly related to major eras and turning points in world history
(B) analyze the influence of human and physical geographic factors on major events in world history, including the development of river valley civilizations,
trade in the Indian Ocean, and the opening of the Panama and Suez canals
(C) interpret maps, charts, and graphs to explain how geography has influenced people and events in the past
(19) Government. The student understands the characteristics of major political systems throughout history. The student is expected to:
(B) identify the characteristics of the following political systems: theocracy, absolute monarchy, democracy, republic, oligarchy, limited monarchy, and
totalitarianism
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
Page 6 of 9
World History
Unit Curriculum Document
(20) Government. The student understands how contemporary political systems have developed from earlier systems of government. The student is expected
to:
(B) identify the impact of political and legal ideas contained in the following documents: Hammurabi's Code, the Jewish Ten Commandments, Justinian's Code
of Laws, Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the
Citizen
(C) explain the political philosophies of individuals such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Voltaire, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Thomas
Aquinas, John Calvin, Thomas Jefferson, and William Blackstone
(21) Citizenship. The student understands the significance of political choices and decisions made by individuals, groups, and nations throughout history. The
student is expected to:
(A) describe how people have participated in supporting or changing their governments
(23) Culture. The student understands the history and relevance of major religious and philosophical traditions. The student is expected to:
(B) identify examples of religious influence on various events referenced in the major eras of world history
(24) Culture. The student understands the roles of women, children, and families in different historical cultures. The student is expected to:
(B) describe the major influences of women such as Elizabeth I, Queen Victoria, Mother Teresa, Indira Gandhi, Margaret Thatcher, and Golda Meir during
major eras of world history
(25) Culture. The student understands how the development of ideas has influenced institutions and societies. The student is expected to:
(C) explain the relationship among Christianity, individualism, and growing secularism that began with the Renaissance and how the relationship influenced
subsequent political developments
(26) Culture. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. The student is expected to:
(A) identify significant examples of art and architecture that demonstrate an artistic ideal or visual principle from selected cultures
(B) analyze examples of how art, architecture, literature, music, and drama reflect the history of the cultures in which they are produced
(C) identify examples of art, music, and literature that transcend the cultures in which they were created and convey universal themes
(27) Science, technology, and society. The student understands how major scientific and mathematical discoveries and technological innovations affected
societies prior to 1750. The student is expected to:
(A) identify the origin and diffusion of major ideas in mathematics, science, and technology that occurred in river valley civilizations, classical Greece and Rome,
classical India, and the Islamic caliphates between 700 and 1200 and in China from the Tang to Ming dynasties
(B) summarize the major ideas in astronomy, mathematics, and architectural engineering that developed in the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations
(C) explain the impact of the printing press on the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe
(29) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic
technology. The student is expected to:
(F) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing,
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
Page 7 of 9
World History
Unit Curriculum Document
making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and developing connections between historical events over time
Targeted College Readiness Standards:
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I.E.3
II.A.2
III.A.3
IV.A.1
V.B.1
Targeted ELPs:
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1C
2H
3C
4I
5B
Academic Vocabulary:
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Renaissance
Reform
Individualism (Humanism)
Absolutism
Constitutional Monarchy
Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
Language of Instruction:
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Commercial Revolution
Thomas Aquinas
John Calvin
Atlantic Slave Trade
Columbian Exchange
Absolute Monarchy
Limited Monarchy
Colonization
Exploration
Queen Elizabeth I
Secularism
Scientific Revolution
Copernicus
Galileo
Isaac Newton
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World History
Unit Curriculum Document
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Robert Boyle
Glorious Revolution
Instruction
Instructional Resources:
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World History: Patterns of Interaction, McDougal Littell
Mastering the TEKS In World History, Jarrett, Zimmer, Killoran
o Chapter 11
o Chapter 12
o Chapter 13
Maps 101: http://www.maps101.com Username and password required
Technology:
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Suggested ways to incorporate technology and/or websites
into the unit
Exemplar Lessons:
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Career Connections/Real Life Application:
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Suggested ways to make content relevant
Research Based Instructional Strategies:
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Assessment
Student self-assessment & reflection:
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Unit 4: Connecting Hemispheres 2014-15
Acceptable evidence or artifacts:
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Performance Task Unit 4B
Page 9 of 9
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