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The College at Brockport
Health Science Department
Course Objectives
HLS 301 - Principles of Healthful Living
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Identify how personal, emotional, social, and physical elements of the
environment contribute to one’s safety, well being, and readiness to learn;
2. Recognize how one’s emotional health contributes to productive relationships and
interactions among school, home, and community, and how that enhances
learning;
3. Recognize how nutritional factors contribute to one’s readiness to learn by
explaining how food supplies the nutrients needed for growth, development,
repair, and maintenance of the body;
4. Identify strategies for preventing, identifying, and reporting various types of
abuse and neglect including sexual assault, incest, and molestation;
5. Explain the concept of prevention as it relates to major chronic and infectious
diseases in the individual and community, as well as the maintenance of health
following the onset of disease;
6. Identify a variety of prevention strategies ( such as problem solving,
communication, and stress-management skills) for resisting alcohol, tobacco, and
other drugs;
7. Explain major components of safety education which include recognizing
situations that could increase the risk of injury and violence, selecting riskreducing strategies to effectively deal with unsafe situations (i.e. conflict
resolution skills), promoting safe behavior (i.e. prevention of child abduction,
arson, and fire), and prioritizing emergency procedures to be followed when
injury, illness, violence or accidents occur.
HLS 303 - Environmental Health
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. understand what environmental risk factors affect human health;
2. understand how environmental risk factors can affect human health;
3. know the role of public health and education in environmental health issues.
HLS 306 - Contemporary Issues in Health
By the end of this course, the successful student will be able to:
1. identify principle health and health care dilemmas faced in the U.S., underlying
causes and potential strategies for resolution;
2. utilize skills in critical thinking and ethical decision making in the exploration of
health care issues;
3. clarify personal and professional attitudes and values;
4. express both verbally and in writing personal values and opinions on current
health care issues;
5. demonstrate an awareness and understanding of selected components of the
American health care system and inter-relationships among them, and
6. demonstrate an increased potential for contributing to the improvement of
personal and community health and the health care system either as an informed
consumer or a participating professional.
HLS 311 - Nutrition
Course Objectives:
1. to provide a basic understanding of the role of nutrients;
2. to understand the digestion and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins,
vitamins and minerals;
3. to be able to successfully and accurately evaluate diets based on sound principles;
4. to understand the need for specific nutrients both in terms of quality and quantity,
throughout the life-cycle;
5. to be aware of the physical and chemical composition of food;
6. to objectively examine current controversies in nutrition;
7. to be a more effective nutritional consumer;
8. to utilize tools such as dietary analysis, food pyramids, new food labels, and US
dietary goals;
9. to understand principles of food safety and food science technology.
HLS 312 - Mental Health
At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of mental health and mental illness;
2. develop a personal plan for effective interpersonal communication and careful
selection of a lifestyle that fits one's own needs, goals, objectives for living, and
philosophy of life.
HLS 313 - Introduction to Safety
Course Objectives:
1. learn the basic concepts in injury prevention and control as well as the various
safety models;
2. become familiar with basic statistical concepts in the field of safety and use these
concepts to practice and evaluate safety statistics;
3. identify how personal, emotional, social and physical elements of the environment
contribute to youths safety, well being and readiness to learn;
4. describe how to promote a safe environment through conflict resolution skills
within the home, school, workplace and community;
5. explain how to use Universal Precautions and triage emergency procedures when
injury, illness, violence or accidents occur;
6. describe how fatigue, drugs, alcohol and stress increase accidents and injury;
7. identify factors that contribute to accidents in childhood, adolescence and
adulthood;
8. analyze data on how to prevent accidents within the home, school, and
community;
9. create a safety plan for home, school or community.
HLS 314 - Family Live
The general overarching objectives of this course include the following:
1. gaining factual knowledge (terminology, classifications, trends);
2. learning fundamental principles, generalizations, theories;
3. learning to apply course material (clarify thinking, solve problems, make
decisions);
4. learning how to find and use resources for answering questions or solving
problems;
5. developing a clearer understanding of, and commitment to, personal family
values.
HLS 317 - Introduction to Family Life
Students will be able to…
1. define Public Health;
2. explain why Public Health is controversial;
3. describe the role of government in Public Health;
4. discuss the scientific methods that form the basis for Public Health;
5. explain the ethical principles that apply to Public Health;
6. describe the historical role of infectious and chronic diseases in Public Health;
7. describe the role of psychosocial factors in determining the health status of a
community;
8. examine the United States medical system with respect to its costs and benefits
for the public’s health.
HLS 409/509 - Introduction to Alcohol and Other Drugs
Upon completion of the course, the successful student will be able to:
1. Explain the psychopharmacological effects of substance use and abuse on human
behavior;
2. Discuss and analyze the role and impact of illegal substance use and abuse on the
individual, family, and society from a biological, social, psychological, and
spiritual model;
3. Demonstrate awareness of the psychopharmacological impact of substance use
and abuse on the individual;
4. Explore the significance of substance abuse on the criminal justice, mental health,
education, and traffic safety systems;
5. Understand the importance of substance abuse prevention and treatment measures
from an international, national, and statewide perspective;
6. Differentiate between primary, secondary and tertiary prevention.
HLS 410 - Introduction to HealthCare Administration
Following completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. identify key historical events that shaped the development of the present health
care system;
2. define health and describe factors contributing to disease conditions.
3. define key terms associated with health care delivery (e.g., PPO, managed care,
DRG);
4. demonstrate the ability to access health system data and related information using
on-line services;
5. describe sources and trends of health care financing;
6. identify and critique models of health care reform;
7. understand contemporary issues in health care delivery;
8. describe the functions of the public health care sector;
9. identify administrative job competencies and employment opportunities in the
health care administration.
HLS 411 - Management Communications in Health Care Administration
Following the completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. identify the elements of the “Communication” including an awareness of the
impact culture has upon sending and receiving messages;
2. identify the essential principles for business writing;
3. write selected business communications appropriate for scenarios described in the
course materials;
4. identify characteristics of and conduct a business meeting;
5. summarize the elements of verbal and non-verbal communication in a business
environment;
6. describe the principles of public speaking in a business environment;
7. plan, organize and present a public speech using graphic software to support the
verbal presentation;
8. analyze communication techniques for their compliance to business standards;
9. create a professional portfolio, which will provide a representative sample of the
participant’s ability to perform all aspects of communication in a managerial job
function
HLS 412 - Health Care Administration Planning
Outcomes and objectives:
1. participants will recognize appropriate tools to use for needs assessment, planning
and evaluation of prospective project;
2. participants will use the principles of Mining Gold Group in class and recognize
how group process can influence healthcare administration planning;
3. participants will understand the concepts of vision; mission; values and
customers;
4. individual projects will provide participant an opportunity to assess an existing
program. Results will be presented in class;
5. groups of participants will explore the planning process for an assigned service.
The group will review the steps needed, the regulatory and funding implications
of the project. Development of a business plan;
6. participants will be aware of a selection of current issues in healthcare planning at
a local, state and national level.
HLS 413 - Risk Assessment
Upon completion of the course students will be able to:
1. define key concepts and terms associated with risk management including the role
of risk managers in controlling risks in the workplace (Ex. Insurance, legal,
governance, Just culture of safety etc.);
2. identify the elements of risk in operations, regulations, corporate compliance,
employer risks, patient communications and financing;
3. identify and apply the elements of risk management loss control to the areas of
risk identified in class and in discussions;
4. identify how quality of care/safety is used to mitigate and control risks.
HLS 419/519 - Human Sexuality
Overarching goals for this course: I expect all my students to:
1. analyze and interpret their own sexual attitudes, values, and behaviors, and
practice maintaining openness toward other's sexual attitudes, values, and
behaviors;
2. evaluate sexual situations and formulate options for safe and healthy decisionmaking;
3. demonstrate the ability to design and implement sexual education in a
nonjudgmental way, to a wide range of sexual beings, using both informal and
formal approaches.
HLS 421/521 - Group Counseling Skills for Alcohol and Other Drug Counselors
By the end of this course, the successful student will:
1. be familiar with Yalom’s approach to group therapy including the topics
mentioned above;
2. be able to discuss patient characteristics, therapist characteristics, group
development, and therapeutic techniques as they relate to group therapy;
3. be knowledgeable of ethical principles as they relate to group therapy and his/her
role as a group facilitator;
4. have synthesized academic and experiential interpersonal learning modalities as
exhibited through discussion and participation in the group process;
5. have examined and summarized in writing the similarities and differences of
community support groups for addicted patients and group therapy;
6. have experienced potential avenues for personal growth other than those
previously practiced.
HLS 422/522 - Individual Treatment Planning for Alcohol and Other Drugs
By the end of this course, the successful student will:
1. be prepared to therapeutically work with clients on an individual basis
investigating issues of substance abuse / addiction via a stage of change model;
2. understand the treatment planning process and the different elements that
comprise a written treatment plan;
3. be able to assist others in contemplating their individual goals;
4. be able to present a psychoeducational presentation or didactic on a topic
appropriate for treatment settings;
5. possess a portfolio of treatment plans, structured exercises, “homework”
assignments, and didactic materials to address numerous treatment issues.
6. Have synthesized academic and experiential learning modalities as exhibited
through exams, discussion, and participation in class activities.
HLS 424/524 - Alcoholism/Substance Abuse Counseling for Diverse Populations
Upon completion of the course, the successful student will:
1. Be familiar with the diverse populations currently prevalent in the United States;
2. Understand that numerous variables (e.g. social class, encounters with prejudice,
immigration, acculturation, language, and gender) create diversity even among
specific ethnic and cultural groups and therefore be able to avoid stereotyping;
3. Demonstrate awareness of his/her own sense of culture, ethnicity, race, sexual
orientation, ability, age, and other areas of diversity and the privileges or
oppressions associated with these. As a result, successful students will gain
respect for, validate, and be open towards those with different social and cultural
perceptions and expectations other than their own;
4. Understand and respect the attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of culturally,
ethnically, and racially different individuals and understand how to apply these
strengths to enhance therapeutic work with their clients;
5. Be able to demonstrate the attainment of cultural competence in the previously
identified areas.
HLS 426/526 - HIV/AIDS Issues and Implications
By the end of this course, students will:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the historical and epidemiological impact of
HIV/AIDS locally, nationally, and globally;
2. demonstrate factual knowledge of the biological and pathological aspects of HIV
and AIDS;
3. describe testing procedures, clinical interventions and treatment modalities
associated with HIV/AIDS;
4. Describe the connection between HIV/AIDS and STD’s;
5. Evaluate different prevention and educational strategies;
6. Discuss controversial issues such as confidentiality, disability laws, harm
reduction, etc.;
7. Advocate for health promotion in the area of HIV/AIDS.
HLS 435/535 - Evaluation and Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drugs
Upon completion of the course, the successful student will:
1. Be able to discuss the purposes and domains of evaluation and assessment in the
addiction field;
2. Understand the concepts of measurement (e.g., reliability and validity) and apply
them to the evaluation and interpretation of an assessment instrument;
3. Be knowledgeable of the ethics and standards of the field as they apply to
evaluation, assessment and testing.
4. Be able to discuss assessment as it relates to acute intoxication, screening,
diagnosis, psychosocial issues, neuropsychological dysfunction, and psychiatric
comorbidity;
5. Have the ability to compare and contrast the major diagnostic systems;
6. Recognize the diagnostic criteria of mental disorders which frequently co-occur
with addictive disorders;
7. Be able to list the elements of, perform, and record a standard psychosocial
assessment;
8. Have the ability to discuss issues related to the integration of the assessment
process into multidisciplinary case conferences and individualized treatment
planning;
9. Recognize the limits of his/her competence in the area of evaluation and
assessment. S/he will be able to seek supervision when near these limits and refer
clients when beyond these limits.
HLS 445/545 - Psychopharmacology of Alcohol and Other Drugs
Students will be able to identify:
1. intoxication and withdrawal symptoms of drugs/alcohol;
2. DSM-IV symptoms of drugs/alcohol abuse and dependence;
3. the Bio-Psycho-Social Model of Drug/Alcohol abuse;
4. Neuron Structure;
5. nerve impulse transmission – including electrical component, neurotransmitter
function, and impact of various drugs on process;
6. neuroanatomy, including understanding of major centers (brain stem, cerebellum,
cerebrum, mid brain, etc.) and smaller substructures (reticular activating system,
medical foreabrain bundle, locus coeruleus, etc.);
7. neurotransmitter function, structure, synthesis, destruction, receptor sites, and
location for acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA,
endorphins, etc;
8. mechanisms of drug action;
9. routes of administration;
10. absorption, circulation, metabolism, and elimination of drugs;
11. dose levels;
12. an in-depth understanding of the various drugs of abuse (and medications used in
psychiatry) involving: structure, solubility, action, effect, short and long term
impact. Drugs covered include stimulants (cocaine, caffeine, amphetamines),
depressants (alcohol, sedatives), opiates (heroin, morphine, synthetics),
hallucinogens (LSD, peyote, MDMA, etc.), marijuana, and psychotherapeutic
medications (antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics).
HLS 450 - Global Health
Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. describe key determinants of health in low and high income countries;
2. describe and explain the variations in access, type and quality of health services
between and within countries;
3. describe patterns of disease in and between countries and regions of the world;
4. analyze worldwide public health campaigns against major diseases such as AIDS,
smallpox, and malaria;
5. recount Millennium Development Goals for Global Health;
6. use World Health Organization (WHO) and related statistical tables to present
health related data of countries and regions;
7. describe and analyze successful global health education initiatives.
HLS 455/555 - Ethics in Alcohol and Other Drugs
By the end of this course, the successful student will:
1. be able to apply the code of ethics given ethical dilemmas;
2. be able to summarize client rights and counselor responsibilities in the field of
alcohol and drug counseling;
3. identify issues related to the counselor as a person and how one’s values may
affect the counseling relationship;
4. understand the unique ethical issues when treating persons with co-occurring
disorders, those involved with criminal justice system, and children or
adolescents;
5. understand the ethics of harm reduction and treating chronic pain in the context of
addition.
HLS 471/571 - Childhood and Adolescent Stress
This course is designed to enable students to:
1. identify what stress is (symptoms, causes);
2. identify physiological, psychological, and behavioral manifestations of stress in
children and adolescents;
3. identify specific stress responses in children, such as the dependent response, the
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
impulsive response, the passive-aggressive response, and the repressed response;
identify and explain causes of stress in children and adolescents include: our
changing society, family, school, sports, handicapping conditions (e.g. learning
disabilities), media, peer shock, emotional and physiological growth and
development changes and concerns, health-related causes, violence and child
abuse, and other environmental factors;
identify a child’s and adolescent’s vulnerability to stress through use of various
instruments and surveys;
become aware of the negative ways that young people cope with stress;
explain and demonstrate positive, useful skills and enriching experiences for
young people to reduce their stress levels in a healthful manner;
explain and demonstrate relaxation techniques and programs for young people to
manage their stress more effectively.
HLS 488 - Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology
By the end of this course, the successful student will be able to:
1. describe fundamental principles, concepts and definitions of epidemiology as
applied to the identification of disease causes and levels of incidence,
2. develop microcomputer skills to enter, analyze, and report data using the
statistical software program SPSS
3. develop hypotheses and corresponding research methodologies for testing,
4.
understand the components of basic descriptive, inferential, and epidemiological
statistics,
5.
define and calculate disease rates, rate adjustments, and odds ratios,
6.
describe the uses and interpret the findings from basic statistical tests,
7.
critique basic epidemiologic research derived from the literature, and
8.
Identify he sources of national, local and state health care data
HLS 495 - Research Methods in Health Education and Promotion
By the end of this course, the successful student will be able to:
1. describe the fundamentals of research practice in health education;
2. identify different research study formats;
3. develop hypotheses and corresponding research methodologies for testing;
4. complete a review of literature;
5. complete a human subjects review proposal;
6. complete a research proposal;
7. enter, analyze and interpret the findings of sample data using SPSS software;
8. complete a service learning project;
9. present result of a research study in a professional setting.
HLS 496 - Internship In Health Care Administration
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to...
1. identify an organization and individual that can serve as the internship site and
mentor;
2. identify competencies and job roles associated with the mentor's position;
3. compare their personal competencies to that of the mentor's position;
4 develop a career path plan of action, including further competencies and
credentials/education needed to assume a position similar to that of the mentor;
5. complete one or several significant job tasks at the work environment, such as a
needs assessment, planning document, literature search, research project, product
development plan, training program, or product marketing strategy, among others;
6. understand the day to day workings of a health care organization.
HLS 497/597 – Intern Seminary for Alcohol & Other Drugs
Students will:
1. Participate in class discussion demonstrating completion of assigned readings;
2. Discuss current clinical internship experiences, demonstrating the integration of
previous academic training by linking clinical experiences to academic concepts;
3. Participate in clinical group supervision, presentations, and class discussion in
order to demonstrate and further extend their competence in clinical skills (i.e.,
clinical evaluation; treatment planning; referral; case management; counseling;
client, family, and communication education; documentation; and professional
and ethical responsibilities);
4. Engage in peer supervision in order to enhance the professional competencies of
other members of the class;
5. Discuss individual treatment planning, counseling strategies, and intervention
approaches/theories as they utilize them to work with clients in the field. They
will present case studies and will participate in discussion of case studies
presented by their classmates;
6. Review the processes of group and family therapy as they utilize them to work
with clients in the field and will provide feedback to classmates who are
discussing similar issues;
7. Deepen exploration of their personal values and beliefs as they encounter issues in
the field setting with clients, peers, and colleagues and will assist classmates in
their own values clarification process.
8. Deal with problematic issues and feelings which they may encounter in their field
work by discussing them in the seminar setting and will give feedback to their
classmates who are engaged in the same;
9. Explore techniques for conflict reso9lution with colleagues, develop skills for
negotiations with supervisors, and practice assertiveness and communication
skills;
10. Seek insight from classmates and from the instructor/supervisor about their own
thoughts, feelings, and behaviors and provide feedback to assist their classmates
in gaining similar insight by providing feedback and personal observations;
11. Explore the group stages and process as they emerge during group supervision
sessions and appropriately utilize the group process for personal growth;
12. Explore issues involving ethics and confidentiality as they emerge through their
field work;
13. Engage in role plays and other simulated activities which will be designed to
assist them in work with clients, colleagues and supervisors in the field;
14. Integrate their personal experience in the field with other services and activities
available in the community by observing field settings other than their own and
by engaging and learning from outside presenters;
15. Widen their knowledge base by utilizing reading material, watching videos,
attending workshops, and observing presentations of others in the classroom
setting and in the community.
HLS 498/598 - Internship for Alcohol and Other Drugs
1. To differentiate between levels of care/treatment for individuals suffering from a
severe alcohol/substance abuse problem;
2. To conduct alcohol/substance abuse diagnostic and evaluative assessments;
3. To design, develop and implement individualized treatment plans;
4. To perform individual, family and group sessions;
5. To make appropriate treatment referral for individuals suffering forma severe
alcohol/substance abuse problem;
6. To interact with appropriate health care professionals in the treatment of addiction
and resulting problems;
7. To understand competencies required for the CASAC and CASAC Trainee
Credential;
8. To understand the significance of the professional ethics and the role of the
addiction professional;
9. To discuss and understand the CASAC application process and the issue of
reciprocity;
10. To review student internship placements and evaluate the internship placement
experience.
HLS 600 - Issues in Health and Wellness
By the end of this course, the successful student will be able to:
1. identify and analyze current trends in the field of health and health care,
experienced in the U.S. and other nations, underlying causes, and potential
strategies for resolution;
2. utilize skills in critical thinking and ethical decision making in the exploration of
health and healthcare issues;
3. clarify personal and professional attitudes and values,;
4. express both verbally and in writing personal values and opinions on current
health care issues;
5. identify characteristics of a research paper;
6. write Chapter One of the major paper/thesis on a contemporary issue in health and
wellness;
7. understand the underlying concepts supporting various health policy positions.
HLS 602 - Principles and Philosophy of Health Education
The objectives of this course are designed to support knowledge portion of the
Professional Education Unit’s Conceptual Framework which focuses on knowledge,
reflection and leadership.
1. Students will explore and describe what is health and what is the role and purpose
of health education in society.
2. Students will be able to describe and explain the Role Delineation Project and its
impact on the role of health education in society.
3. Students will be able to describe the PRECEDE/PROCEED Model, MATCH
Model, and PATCH Model and apply these health promotion planning models to
health education.
4. Students will be able to describe individual, interpersonal, and public health
strategies for health behavior change.
5. Students will begin to develop a theoretical foundation for the field of health
education.
6. Students will be able to describe and understand basic epidemiological terms,
concepts and health data.
7. Students will be able to describe basic ingredients of effective health education
programs;
8. Students will apply a model of moral reasoning, techniques of critical thinking for
the purpose of developing a strategy for addressing contemporary and
controversial health education issues.
HLS 640 - Program Planning
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Discuss program planning as a process requiring an ongoing, strategic approach;
2. Differentiate between different models of program planning;
3. Strategically assess individual and community needs, resources, and support for
health education programs;
4. Conduct a needs assessment using various data collection techniques;
5. Establish a coalition/health promotion team;
6. Determine the health priorities of a community;
7. Design a comprehensive, theoretically based intervention;
8. Strategically plan effective health education programs;
9. Demonstrate ability to write and prioritize program goals and objectives;
10. Establish appropriate budgets for a designed program;
11. Identify steps to preparing for program implementation;
12. Discuss program implementation process, activities, monitoring, and barriers;
13. Understand the origins and purposes of evaluation in health education and
promotion;
14. Identify appropriate evaluation methods and designs for selected programs;
15. Distinguish different types of evaluation;
16. Plan for an evaluation of a health education program;
17. Define the components of evaluations including selection of a proper design,
identification of appropriate measures, and collection, analysis, and reporting of
data;
18. Develop a survey to include in an evaluation and assess validity and reliability of
that instrument;
19. Understand the issues involved in sample selection and sample size both in the
design of the evaluation and in the interpretation of the results;
20. Evaluate program effectiveness;
21. Understand issues associated with measurement and data collection;
22. Construct an evaluation report that effectively communicates the results of the
evaluation.
HLS 641 - Health Education Organization in School and Community
Students will demonstrate proficiency in several of the Health Education Competencies
1. assess individual and community needs for health education;
2. plan health education strategies, interventions, and programs;
3. implement health education strategies, interventions, and programs;
4. administer health education strategies, interventions, and programs;
5. communicate and advocate for health and health education;
HLS 684 - Statistics and Measurement for Health Education
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to…
1. gain knowledge about statistical and evaluation methods used in health education
research;
2. organize and interpret data used in health education research;
3. read and interpret statistical tables and figures in the professional literature;
4. create and present statistical tables and figures using APA style format;
5. design a health education research project that includes the collection and analysis
of data;
6. develop microcomputer skills to enter, analyze, and report data.
HLS 686 - Seminar in Research Design
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to…
1. discuss the methods and uses of scientific inquiry in the health fields.
2. demonstrate an understanding of the language and concepts used in scientific
research
3. describe the differences between experimental and non-experimental
research.
4. list the major steps in conducting empirical research.
5. describe the process of carrying out a research proposal, major paper, and thesis in
the Dept. of Health Science, SUNY-Brockport.
6. improve their research writing skills.
7. demonstrate knowledge of the APA editorial style.
8. review, identify, and evaluate the research design of published reports.
9. discuss the ethical issues related to empirical research.
10. formulate and write a research proposal.
HLS 698 - Major Paper in Health Education
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to…
1. employ or develop appropriate data-gathering instruments;
2. apply survey techniques to acquire health data;
3. investigate physical, social, emotional, and intellectual factors influencing health
behaviors;
4. identify behaviors that tend to promote or compromise health;
5. recognize the role of learning and effective experiences in shaping patterns of
health behavior;
6. analyze needs assessment data;
7. determine priority areas of need for health education;
8. incorporate feasible ideas and recommendations into the planning process;
9. develop subordinate measurable objectives as needed for instruction;
10. determine the availability of information, personnel, time & equipment needed to
implement the program for a given audience;
11. assess the relevance of existing program objectives to current need;
12. determine standards of performance to be applied as criteria of effectiveness;
13. establish a realistic scope of evaluation efforts;
14. develop an inventory of existing valid and reliable tests and survey instruments;
15. select appropriate methods for evaluating program effectiveness;
16. recommend strategies for implementing results of evaluations;
17. determine the extent of available health education services;
18. match health education services to proposed program activities;
19. identify gaps and overlaps in the provision of collaborative health services;
20. suggest approaches for integrating health education within existing health
programs;
21. assemble educational material of value to the health of individuals and
community groups;
22. access principal on-line and other database health information resources;
23. evaluate the state of the art of health education;
24. analyze the foundations of the discipline of health education;
25. describe major responsibilities of the health educator in the practice of health
education;
26. investigate social forces causing opposing viewpoints regarding health education
needs and concerns;
27. demonstrate proficiency in communicating health information and health
education needs.
HLP 302 - Foundations of Health Education
At the conclusion of this course students will be able to perform, at an introductory level,
the following competencies of an entry-level health educator:
1. assess individual and community needs for health education, specifically,
2. plan effective health education programs;
3. implement health education programs;
4. evaluate effectiveness of health education programs;
5. coordinate provision of health education services;
6. acting as a resource person in health education;
7. communicating health and health education needs, concerns, and resources;
HLP 485 - Dimensions of School and Community Health
Following the completion of this course, the student will be able to gain a greater
understanding for health education in school and community environments by:
1. actively processing and discussing experiences in their field placements;
2. discussing topics relevant to the effective delivery of health education;
3. analyzing ethical and legal aspects, and other considerations influencing
choices among methods; and
4. engaging in class discussion and with selected professionals in the field.
HLP 486-Field Experience
This course is designed to enable students to:
1. Observe and familiarize themselves with school and community sites;
2. Apply their knowledge of health and health education in school and community
sites;
3. Demonstrate beginning planning, assessment, implementation, evaluation, and
research skills in school and community sites;
4. Demonstrate beginning administrative skills in school and community sites;
5. Act as a resource person for health education in school and community sites;
6. Communicate and advocate for health and health education needs, concerns, and
resources, in school and community sites; and
7. Analyze their feelings, attitudes, and concerns about working as a health educator
in a school and community sites.
HLP 491 – Health Education Methods
This course will enable students to achieve, at an introductory level, the following:
1. Assess individual and community needs for health education;
2. Plan effective health education programs;
3. Implement health education programs;
4. Evaluate effectiveness of health education programs;
5. Coordinate provision of health education services;
6. Acting as a resources person in health education;
7. Communicating health and health education needs, concerns, and resources.
HLP 492 - Interpersonal Communication in Health Education
By the end of this course, the successful student will:
1. be able to describe/define major interpersonal communication theories and
constructs;
2. be able to apply interpersonal communication theories to his/her own life;
3. have developed critical thinking skills and an ability to communicate with his/her
ideas both orally and in writing;
4. have practiced integrating applicable constructs to his/her communication with
others.
HLP 493 - Health Education Program Planning and Evaluation
Students will be able to…
1. Synthesize literature and data to identify a need for intervention and possible
approaches to intervention.
2. Apply a planning system to solve a health problem.
3. Write mission statements, goals, and SMART objectives.
4. Design an intervention by applying one or more appropriate health behavior
theories.
5. Develop a program implementation plan that includes a timeline, budget, and
staffing plan.
6. Describe a program and the inter-relationship of goals, objectives, activities,
inputs and outputs.
7. Create an evaluation plan by choosing an appropriate evaluation design and data
collection method(s), writing a data analysis plan, and developing a sound
dissemination plan.
HLP 498/HLS 598 - Internship for Alcohol and Other Drugs
Course Objectives:
1. to differentiate between levels of care/treatment for individuals suffering from
severe alcohol/substance abuse problem;
2. to conduct alcohol/substance abuse diagnostic and evaluative assessments;
3. to design, develop and implement individualized treatment plans;
4. to perform individual, family and group sessions;
5. to make appropriate treatment referral for individuals suffering from a severe
alcohol/substance abuse problem;
6. to interact with appropriate health care professionals in the treatment of addiction
and resulting problems;
7. to understand the competencies required for the CASAC and CASAC Trainee
Credential;
8. to understand the significance of the professional ethics and the role of the
addiction professional;
9. to discuss and understand the CASAC application process and the issue of
reciprocity;
10. to review student internship placements and evaluate the internship placement
experience.
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