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Transcript
Seasonal Motion & Ecliptic
“Motion” Debriefing
• Stars circle NCP counterclockwise
– For circumpolar stars: EW if above Polaris,
but WE if below Polaris
• Stars move E W but also up (rising) and
down
• The sun AND the stars move around the
observer, so the sun stays (approx.) fixed
amongst the stars
Daily Motion: View changes in
hours
Seasonal Motion:
View changes in
months
• At the same time, say
midnight, different
constellations are high in
the sky if you observe a
month or so later (or
earlier)
The Apparent Motion of Stars at
Different Latitudes
• Apparent motion: motion as it appears in the sky
• This is due to the position (latitude) of the observer on
earth, and the fact that the earth rotates about its axis
• This can also be explained by a competing theory: that
there is a celestial sphere which rotates around the
motionless earth.
The observation of these different
star movement patterns made it
obvious to humans early on that
we live on a sphere
• Change your observation spot on the
spherical earth, and you will change the
pattern of motion you observe
Daily and yearly motion intertwined
Solar vs Siderial Day
–
–
Earth rotates in 23h56m
also rotates around sun
 needs 4 min. to “catch
up”
Consequence: stars rise 4
minutes earlier each
night (or two hours
per month, or 12
hours in ½ year)
After 1/2 year we see a completely different sky at night!
Seasonal Motion
• Daily Rising and Setting:
– Due to the rotation of the
Earth around its axis
– Period of rotation:
1
siderial day= 23h56m4.1s
– 1 solar day (Noon to Noon) =24h
– Stars rotate around the
North Star – Polaris (Anim)
• Seasonal Changes:
– Monthly differences caused
by Earth’s orbit around sun
– Animation
The Zodiac throughout the Year
Example: In Winter sun in Sagittarius, Gemini at night sky;
in summer sun in Gemini, Sagittarius at night sky
The Sun shifts its position on the Celestial Sphere.
Therefore its visibility changes seasonally
The Ecliptic plane & the Ecliptic
Zodiacal signs vs. Constellations
•“Constellation” is a modern,
well-defined term
- Some constellations are big, some
are small on the celestial sphere
•“Zodiacal sign” is the old
way of dividing the year and
the Sun’s path into 12 equal
parts
-
360/12=30, so each zodiacal sign is exactly 30 degrees “long”
0 degrees: Aries, 30 degrees: Taurus, 60 degrees: Gemini, 90
degrees: Cancer, etc.
Homework
• Figure out maximal altitude of the sun in
these steps
– Where is NCP (what is its altitude angle)?
– Where is therefore the celestial equator?
– How high is the sun on the celestial sphere
above/below the celestial equator?
– Add or subtract this angle from the altitude of
the celestial equator
Reminder: iSkylab 1 due in two
weeks, Sep 23
• Observe!
• Ask questions!
• Already demonstrated Option 1
measurement (shadow of a stick  altitude
of the Sun)
• Will construct a quadrant
To Sun
iSkylab: Sun Option
Gnommon
Shadow
• What: Determine how the height of the sun above the
horizon at a specific time is changing as the days pass by
measuring the length of the shadow it casts with a gnomon
(essentially a stick in the ground).
• Time: Once you know how to do it, this only takes a
minute per observation.
• Commitment: Do this over several, not necessarily
consecutive days, at exactly the same time.
• Weather: Need to see the shadow for a minute, so can do
on partly cloudy, possibly hazy but not overcast days.
iSkylab: Moon Option 1
What: Determine the height of the moon
above the horizon with the help of a
quadrant (essentially a bob dangling
from a protractor), and see how it
changes as the days go by.
Time: Once you know how to do it, this
only takes a minute per observation.
Commitment: Do this over several, not
necessarily consecutive days, at exactly
the same time.
Weather: Need to see the moon for a
minute, so can do on partly cloudy,
possibly hazy but not overcast days.
iSkylab: Moon Option 2
• What: Determine the position of the moon with respect to
the stars by sketching the position and the shape of the
moon and the bright stars in the sky. Document changes as
the days go by.
• Time: Once you know how to do it, this takes several
minutes per observation.
• Commitment: Do this over several, not necessarily
consecutive days, exact time does not matter.
• Weather: Need to see the moon and the stars for several
minutes, so it needs to be a cloudless night with good
seeing.