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1208
Monday
09:00-17:00
National Library
Board
Innovations in Mobile Use
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Out of Touch? On the Lack of Emotional Support Over the Mobile Phone
Orit Ben-Harush, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
The Future of the Public Phone: Findings From a Six-Country Asian Study on Telecom Use at the BOP
Nirmali Ruth Sivapragasam, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Connection vs. Control: Mobile Phone Usage of Foreign Domestic Workers in Sinagpore
Trisha Tsui-Chuan Lin, SINGAPORE
Bottom of the Pyramid Expenditure Patterns on Mobile Phone Services in Selected Emerging Asian
Countries
Aileen Agüero, DIRSI - Instituto de Estudios Peruanos (IEP), PERU
Harsha de Silva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
United States' Rural Poor: Emerging Mobile Markets in Appalachia
L. Meghan Peirce, Ohio U, USA
Mobile Phones Without Guarantees: The Promises of Technology and the Contingencies of Culture
Cara J. Wallis, Texas A and M U, USA
RedefiningMobile Society: Emerging Concepts and Theories of Wireless Communication
Debashis Aikat, U of North Carolina, USA
Users' Perspectives on an Evolving Mobile Media Ecology: Uses and Conceptualizations of the Mobile
Lee M. Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Thilo von Pape, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Mobile Internet in France: Between Innovation and Social Contexts of Media Reception
Corinne Martin, U Paul Verlaine, FRANCE
The Media Convergence Lifestyle Profile in Thailand
Parichart Saithanoo, Thammasat U, THAILAND
Mobile Internet Uses in Everyday Life and a Sense of Place: A Korean Case Study
Dong-Hoo Lee, U of Incheon, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
An M-Learning Reflexivity: Learning About the Mobile and Using the Mobile for Learning
Fernando de la Cruz Paragas, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Mobile People, Mobile Societies, Mobile Cultures Not Just Mobile Learning
John Traxler, U of Wolverhampton, UNITED KINGDOM
Mobile Communications and the Public Sphere in South Korea: Possibilities and Limitations
Hyun-Chin Lim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
'Mobile Phones Are Just Like Our Hands and Legs': The Use of Mobile Phones by Disabled Persons in
China
Jin Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Texting Among Like Aged Persons
Rich Ling, IT U of Copenhagen-Telenor, DENMARK
Does Mobile Phone Make Egalitarian Couples? The Effect of Mobile Phone Use on Perceived Behavioral
Control
Ban-ya Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
A World More Intimate: Exploring the Role of Mobile Phones in Maintaining and Extending Social
Networks
Rhonda McEwen, U of Toronto, CANADA
The Skillful Management of Mobile Phones' Ring in Institutional Social Performances
Christian Licoppe, Telecom Paristech, FRANCE
Movable Type: Findings from the 'Young, Mobile, Networked' Study
Kate Crawford, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Constant Connections: Piloting a Mobile Phone Based Peer Support Program for Nuer (Southern
Sudanese) Women
Dennis Wollersheim, La Trobe U, AUSTRALIA
Are We Evolved to Live with Mobiles? An Evolutionary View of Mobile Communication
Chih-Hui Lai, Rutgers U, USA
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
The Mobiles preconference workshop examines innovations in a variety of societal contexts highlighting
different phenomena of mobile phone uses. With advancements in functionality and transmission
technologies, mobile phones not only serve as a distribution platform, but also enable content production
and consumption anytime, anywhere. Juxtaposed with the engagement of social media, the extent and
effects of mobile communications are amplified, for instance through the use of Twitter, Facebook and
YouTube in U.S. and Iran elections, as well as in the demonstration for religious freedom by Uighur
Muslims in China. In addition, we combine innovation with tradition by expanding the perspective to
expose global mobile scholars to ICTD within the Asian research context to take advantage of the
conference location in Singapore.
2130
International Communication Association Executive Committee Meeting
Tuesday
08:00-12:00
Room 301
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
2207
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
U of Singapore
Institute of
Management
Antecedents of Crisis Communication: Developing a Research Agenda for Furthering Crisis
Communication.
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
William Timothy Coombs, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Participants
Glen T. Cameron, U of Missouri, USA
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Jesper Falkheimer, Lund U, SWEDEN
Shari Veil, U of Oklahoma, USA
Sherry Holladay, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Mats Heide, Lund U, SWEDEN
While the rapidly expanding body of crisis communication research is impressive, there are still
significant gaps in our understanding of the topic. The crisis communication research has emphasized the
study of crisis response strategies, what managers say and do after a crisis hits. Clearly there is a need to
understand the crisis response, however, the antecedents of crisis communication have been largely
neglected. Crisis antecedents include prevention, preparation, and appreciation of the variables that can
shape later crisis responses. The preconference addresses the need for crisis antecedent research. A
collection of international scholars will outline an agenda for research in crisis antecedents. The panelists
will stimulate discussion by focusing on particular aspects of crisis antecedents. Participants will be part
of the discussion for building a more detailed agenda. The outcome of the preconference will be a
specific agenda for advancing crisis antecedent research including topics, methods, and potential research
partnerships.
2208
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
National Library
Board
Innovations in Mobile Use
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Out of Touch? On the Lack of Emotional Support Over the Mobile Phone
Orit Ben-Harush, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
The Future of the Public Phone: Findings From a Six-Country Asian Study on Telecom Use at the BOP
Nirmali Ruth Sivapragasam, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Connection vs. Control: Mobile Phone Usage of Foreign Domestic Workers in Sinagpore
Trisha Tsui-Chuan Lin, SINGAPORE
Bottom of the Pyramid Expenditure Patterns on Mobile Phone Services in Selected Emerging Asian
Countries
Aileen Agüero, DIRSI - Instituto de Estudios Peruanos (IEP), PERU
Harsha de Silva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
United States' Rural Poor: Emerging Mobile Markets in Appalachia
L. Meghan Peirce, Ohio U, USA
Mobile Phones Without Guarantees: The Promises of Technology and the Contingencies of Culture
Cara J. Wallis, Texas A and M U, USA
Redefining Mobile Society: Emerging Concepts and Theories of Wireless Communication
Debashis Aikat, U of North Carolina, USA
Users' Perspectives on an Evolving Mobile Media Ecology: Uses and Conceptualizations of the Mobile
Lee M. Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Thilo von Pape, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Mobile Internet in France: Between Innovation and Social Contexts of Media Reception
Corinne Martin, U Paul Verlaine, FRANCE
The Media Convergence Lifestyle Profile in Thailand
Parichart Saithanoo, Thammasat U, THAILAND
Mobile Internet Uses in Everyday Life and a Sense of Place: A Korean Case Study
Dong-Hoo Lee, U of Incheon, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
An M-Learning Reflexivity: Learning About the Mobile and Using the Mobile for Learning
Fernando de la Cruz Paragas, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Mobile People, Mobile Societies, Mobile Cultures Not Just Mobile Learning
John Traxler, U of Wolverhampton, UNITED KINGDOM
Mobile Communications and the Public Sphere in South Korea: Possibilities and Limitations
Hyun-Chin Lim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joonkoo Lee, Duke U, USA
'Mobile Phones Are Just Like Our Hands and Legs': The Use of Mobile Phones by Disabled Persons in
China
Jin Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Texting Among Like Aged Persons
Rich Ling, IT U of Copenhagen/Telenor, DENMARK
Does Mobile Phone Make Egalitarian Couples? The Effect of Mobile Phone Use on Perceived Behavioral
Control
Ban-ya Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
A World More Intimate: Exploring the Role of Mobile Phones in Maintaining and Extending Social
Networks
Rhonda McEwen, U of Toronto, CANADA
The Skillful Management of Mobile Phones' Ring in Institutional Social Performances
Christian Licoppe, Telecom Paristech, FRANCE
Movable Type: Findings from the 'Young, Mobile, Networked' Study
Kate Crawford, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Constant Connections: Piloting a Mobile Phone Based Peer Support Program for Nuer (Southern
Sudanese) Women
Dennis Wollersheim, La Trobe U, AUSTRALIA
Are We Evolved to Live with Mobiles? An Evolutionary View of Mobile Communication
Chih-Hui Lai, Rutgers U, USA
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
The Mobiles preconference workshop examines innovations in a variety of societal contexts highlighting
different phenomena of mobile phone uses. With advancements in functionality and transmission
technologies, mobile phones not only serve as a distribution platform, but also enable content production
and consumption anytime, anywhere. Juxtaposed with the engagement of social media, the extent and
effects of mobile communications are amplified, for instance through the use of Twitter, Facebook and
YouTube in U.S. and Iran elections, as well as in the demonstration for religious freedom by Uighur
Muslims in China. In addition, we combine innovation with tradition by expanding the perspective to
expose global mobile scholars to ICTD within the Asian research context to take advantage of the
conference location in Singapore.
2210
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Media Development
Authority
Online Social Capital: An Agenda for Future Research
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Where Have We Met Before? Viewing Social Network Site Use Within the Broader Communication
Ecology of Users
Charles Steinfield, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Cliff Lampe, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Vitak, Michigan State U, USA
―You Are Who You Know‖: The Origins and Evolution of Online Social Capital Theories and Concepts
Debashis ‗Deb‘ Aikat, U of North Carolina, USA
Mediated Relations: A Reflection on Conceptualizing Social Capital in the Online World
Maurice Vergeer, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yon Soo Lim, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Chieng-Leng Hsu, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Han Woo Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Virtual Brokerage and Closure: Network Structure and Social Capital in a Large Virtual World
Cuihua Shen, U of Southern California, USA
e-Research Applications for Tracking Online Socio-Political Capital in Asia-Pacific Region
Steven Sams, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Chien-Leng Hsu, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yon-Soo Lim, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Maurice Vergeer, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Han Woo Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Collective Action: A Quantitative Model of Engagement and Interaction in Social Networks
Giorgos Cheliotis, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Wang Rong, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Towards a Multi-Dimensional Instrument for Analyzing Organizational Social Capital
John W. Bakke, Telenor Business Development and Research, NORWAY
Rebecca Ellis, U of Essex, UNITED KINGDOM
Jo Herstad, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Tom Julsrud, Telenor Business Development and Research, NORWAY
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Tonje Osmundsen, NTNU Social Research Ltd., NORWAY
Per Morten Schiefloe, NTNU Social Research Ltd., NORWAY
Michiel Shoemaker, Nijmegen School of Management, THE NETHERLANDS
Andreas Søyland, NTNU Social Research Ltd., NORWAY
Platforms for Mediated Sociability/Entertainment and Online Social Capital: The Case of Facebook and
Video Games
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Grace Chi En Kwan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The Case of Bridging Social Capital in Rural Communities
Jennifer L. Gregg, U of Louisville, USA
How Does Virtual Community Influence Older Netizens' Social Capital? A Case Study of OldKids Website
in Mainland China
Huan Wu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Finding a Home Away from Home: International College Students‘ Use of Online Social Networking Sites
for Bridging and Bonding Social Capital
Joe Jin Phua, U of Southern California, USA
Seung-A Annie Jin, Boston College, USA
Social Capital, Politics and Facebook: A Case Study of Turkey
Didem Turkoglu, Bogazici U, TURKEY
M. Selcan Kaynak, Bogazici U, TURKEY
The Rise of Participatory Media in China: Focusing on Online Discussion of ‗South China Tiger‘
Rhong Zang, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
ICT Use and Social Capital in an International Context: A Comparison of the United States and Korea
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michgan, USA
This preconference aims to showcase new scholarly work examining definitional, operational and practical
issues related to the study of new forms of social capital, with particular emphasis on case studies and
applications beyond the US context. The proliferation of social media, online games and other platforms for
online and mobile socializing suggests an increased importance of communication research for the study of
social capital and its implications. The aim of this preconference is to promote research into new forms of
social capital and examine technological affordances of different social media platforms. Furthermore, we
invite submissions examining the emerging hybrid forms of informal sociability, and discussing the
(continued) importance of physical proximity and face-to-face contact for the creation and maintenance of
different forms of social capital.
2211
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Wee Kim Wee
School of
Communication
Doctoral Consortium of the Communication and Technology Division
Sponsored Sessions
The Communication and Technology (CAT) Division proudly announces the first-ever Doctoral
Consortium to be held in conjunction with the 2010 Conference of the International Communication
Association. The consortium intends to bring together PhD candidates working on Communication and
Technology to give them the opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive and
international atmosphere. The goals of the event are to provide feedback and advice to participating PhD
candidates on their in-progress research thesis. Moreover, the doctoral consortium will provide the
opportunity to meet experts as well as fellow PhD candidates from different backgrounds working on
related topics. During the consortium, students will be invited to present their work, following which they
will receive feedback from their fellow students and faculty participants, all of whom will have read the
proposals in advance of the Doctoral Consortium. In addition, one faculty participant will be assigned to
respond in detail to each proposal. Besides the presentations of proposals, there will also be discussion of
other topics such as ethics, research methods, publishing the thesis, and positioning one's work for the job
market. There will also be a variety of social activities in the program.
2212
Media Literacy Education in Asia: New Developments
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Ngee Ann
Polytechnic
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Renee Hobbs, Temple U, USA
Participants
Wen Xu, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jung-Ym Ahn, Seaoul Women's U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Fiona Jia, Shenzhou Media Literacy Education, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jiwon Yoon, Temple U, USA
Brian Lee, SIM U, SINGAPORE
Respondent
Chi-Kim Cheung, Hong Kong U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Media literacy education has been developing rapidly in Asia, with substantial exploration of this field by
scholars and practitioners. Several universities in China now offer graduate degrees in media literacy
education. In South Korea, there is significant government support for media literacy education. In Hong
Kong, the government recently funded a large-scale research project to determine the impact of media
literacy education on youth attitudes, knowledge and behavior. The Singaporean government has
mandated media literacy as well. How is media literacy education being conceptualized in Asian nations?
What are the unique characteristics that distinguish the motivation to practice media literacy education in
China, South Korea and Hong Kong? What are the opportunities and challenges that media literacy
educators face in these nations?
2217
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Singapore Health
Promotion Board
Health Communication Campaigns: Issues and Strategies in Asia, Australia, and Southeast Asia
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
May O. Lwin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Judith A. McDivitt, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Leslie Snyder, U of Connecticut, USA
Douglas Storey, Johns Hopkins U - Bloomberg, USA
Yin-Leng Theng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Melanie A. Wakefield, The Cancer Council Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Systematic, evidence-based, theoretically-driven, locally-focused health communication campaigns have
the capacity to achieve population-level change. Hosted by the Singapore Health Promotion Board and the
Wee Kim Wee School of Communication at Nanyang Technological University, the preconference will
bring together ICA members conducting research on health communication with practitioners, researchers
and funders of health communication campaigns in Asia, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It will be held at
the Health Promotion Board premises in the compound of the Singapore General Hospital and organized
around recent theoretical and empirical reviews on health communication campaigns and differences in
the ways they are funded, planned, implemented, monitored and evaluated. In highly interactive sessions,
Participants will address unique regional issues, including applicability of models relying on norms and
risk perceptions, cultural diversity and literacy, campaign planning and evaluation, selection of
community channels, and logistical and political considerations that pose challenges to health
communication campaigns.
2218
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Singapore
Management U
Global Public Relations and Strategic Communication: Envisioning the Interplay of Culture and
Communication Outside the Two-Way Symmetrical Box
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Richard C. Stanton, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Marina Vujnovic, Monmouth U, USA
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Chiara Valentini, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
Respondent
Dean Kruckeberg, U of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA
This panel takes advantage of the international setting to explore how diverse cultural perspectives impact
communication with publics. One must assume each society/culture would have something to offer to
public relations, and these contributions do not have to be overlaid on contemporary Western public
relations as a baseline, e.g., two-way symmetry. Panelists will explore alternative visions of the role of
public relations in society that bring contributions from indigenous cultures and will discuss applications
to global public relations, strategic communication and public diplomacy.
2232
The 'Chindia' Challenge to Global Communication
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Room 303
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Oliver Boyd-Barrett, Bowling Green State U, USA
Yuezhi Zhao, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Bella Mody, U of Colorado, USA
Zhengrong Hu, Presidents Office, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Vibodh Parthasarathi, Jamia Millia Islamia, INDIA
Xin Xin, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Participant
The 'Chindia' Challenge to Global Communication
Daya Thussu, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
The transformation of communication and media in China and India - the world's two most populous
countries and fastest growing economies - has profound implications for what constitutes the 'global'.
Jairam Ramesh, currently India's Environment Minister, is credited with the notion of 'Chindia',
representing what has been termed as the 'rise of the rest'. The combined economic and cultural impact of
'Chindia', aided by their worldwide diasporas, is creating globalization with an Asian accent, a
phenomenon that is likely to influence globalized media and its study. Though both countries have
experienced different trajectories of growth in recent decades and represent two distinct political and
media systems, they also demonstrate interesting similarities. The rise of 'Chindia' offers exciting
opportunities as well as challenges to media and communication researchers. This preconference aims to
bring together scholars from around the world, especially from China and India, to examine and explore
this phenomenon.
2233
Researching (Popular) Media in the Age of Convergence: Methodological Innovations in the Study
of Contemporary Media Industries, Texts, Technologies, and Audiences
Tuesday
09:00-21:00
Room 304
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
John Hartley, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Jean Burgess, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Axel Bruns, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Lucy Montgomery, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Linda Duits, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marlene Wolf, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Knut-Arne Futsaeter, TNS - Gallup, NORWAY
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Nele Simons, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Ranjana Das, Dept of Media and Communications, UNITED KINGDOM
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Ilona Ammann, Ludwig-Maximilians U - Munich, GERMANY
Lothar Mikos, U of Film and Television, GERMANY
Stephanie Giese, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Marko Bachl, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Debashis Aikat, U of North Carolina, USA
Russell L. Stockard, California Lutheran U, USA
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Stacie Furia, Northland College - Ashland, USA
Denise D. Bielby, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
The processes of digitization and deregulation have transformed the production, distribution and
consumption of information and entertainment media over the past three decades. Today, researchers are
confronted with profoundly different landscapes of domestic and personal media than the pioneers of
qualitative audience research that came to form much of the conceptual basis of Cultural Studies first in
Britain and North America and subsequently across all global regions. The process of media convergence,
as a consequence of the dual forces of digitisation and deregulation, thus constitutes a central concept in
the analysis of popular mass media. From the study of the internationalisation and globalisation of media
content, changing regimes of media production, via the social shaping and communication technologies
and conversely the impact of communication technology on social, cultural and political realities, to the
emergence of transmedia storytelling, the interplay of intertextuality and genre and the formation of
mediated social networks, convergence informs and shapes contemporary conceptual debates in the field
of popular communication and beyond. However, media convergence challenges not only the conceptual
canon of (popular) communication research, but poses profound methodological challenges. As
boundaries between producers and consumers are increasingly fluent, formerly stable fields and categories
of research such as industries, texts and audiences intersect and overlap, requiring combined and new
research strategies. This preconference aims to offer a forum for the presentation and discussion of
methodological innovations in the study of contemporary media and the analysis of the social, cultural
and political impact and challenges arising through media convergence.
2234
Cultural Research and Political Theory: New Intersections
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Room 305
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Penelope Ann O'Donnell, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Esther Chin, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Kate Crawford, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Tanja Dreher, U of Technology Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Anders Esmark, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Lewis A. Friedland, U of Wisconsin, USA
Gerard Michael Goggin, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Melissa Gregg, U of Australia, AUSTRALIA
Jostein Gripsrud, U of Bergen, NORWAY
James Hay, U of Illinois, USA
Heikki Johannes Heikkila, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
David Hesmondhalgh, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Srinath Jayaram, Old Dominion U, USA
Jinsun Lee, Old Dominion U, USA
Yi Ling, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Justine Lloyd, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Alexandre Macmillan, U de Montréal, CANADA
Tim Markham, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Chris Russill, Carleton U, CANADA
Matt Stahl, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
Frances Shaw, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
Jo Tacchi, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Cate Thill, U of Notre Dame - Australia, AUSTRALIA
Participant
Co-chair of preconference
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Exciting potential intersections are emerging between research into communications and culture and
theoretical work on political norms. Alongside well-known experiments with new forms of public
deliberation and debates on the public sphere in the 1990s and 2000s, there has been much new work in
political theory that rethinks the reference-points of political practice (Fraser, Benhabib and so on).
Meanwhile, researchers in cultural studies and communications have become increasingly interested not
only in questions of citizenship and democracy in general, but specifically in the role that popular culture
and everyday communications play in helping us imagine, enact and sustain the new forms of practice that
political theory proposes, for example the work of Lauren Berlant, Michael Warner, Henry Jenkins and
the current CRN-funded 'Listening Project' in Australia.This preconference seeks to bring together
researchers and communication practitioners interested in how cultural research can invigorate political
theory, and vice versa, around the specific focus of defining the terms and means of contemporary
politics within and beyond the horizon of neoliberalism.
Sponsored by the Department of Media and Communication ans Centre for the Study of Global Media
and Democracy, Goldsmiths, Univeristy of London.
2235
Cultural Research and Political Theory: New Intersections Break Out
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Room 306
Sponsored Sessions
2236
A One-Day Preconference: Shaping Global Communicative Practice and Work Cultures: Women's
Labor From the Global South
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Room 307
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
B. Syamasundari, Dastkar Andhra, INDIA
YeonJu Oh, Bowling Green State U, USA
Women are increasingly filling "gaps" by formally and informally acquiring such skills and sliding in and
out of various work contexts. Such women's labor is termed as "precarious labor" by feminists examining
these issues. Precarious labor draws on notions of immaterial, free, digital and consumer labor articulated
by scholars such as Negri and Hardt. Such workers play a crucial role in helping the transition to
"globalization" in various ways. They help develop global labor practices and co-create communicative
processes and work environments.Capitalizing on ICA's location for 2010 conference (Singapore) which
is potentially accessible to representatives of women and men who work in such environments in the
Global South, we would like that this preconference brings together researchers, practitioners and activists
who work on issues related to Women's Labor from the Global South.
2237
Intercultural Dialogue
Tuesday
09:00-17:00
Room 308
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Kristine L. Fitch, U of Iowa, USA
Donal Carbaugh, U of Massachusetts, USA
Todd L. Sandel, U of Oklahoma, USA
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
Sponsored by the Language and Social Interaction Division and the Intercultural Communication
Division, this day-long preconference serves as a follow-up and continuation of the 2009 NCA Summer
Conference on Intercultural Dialogue held in Istanbul, Turkey. Scholars throughout the world who study
issues related to intercultural communication often use a variety of terms and terminology that are specific
to a particular geographic area and disciplinary history. In order to cross cultural boundaries and dialogue
about these issues, it is essential that we understand one another's terms. In this preconference, we will
examine real intercultural communication encounters in an effort to establish and define the key terms that
international scholars use to understand these dialogues.
2430
International Communication Association Annual Board of Directors Meeting
Tuesday
13:00-17:00
Room 301
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Gianpietro Mazzoleni, U of Milan, ITALY
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Rohan Samarajiva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
R. G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
Malte Carlos Hinrichsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Michele Cheng Hoon Khoo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Diana I. Rios, U of Connecticut, USA
Robert Huesca, Trinity U, USA
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Richard Buttny, Syracuse U, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina, USA
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
J. Alison Bryant, PlayScience, USA
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
John L. Sherry, Michigan State U, USA
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Margaret J. Pitts, Old Dominion U, USA
2631
International Communication Association's Annual Member Meeting
Tuesday
16:00-17:00
Room 302
Sponsored Sessions
2846
ICA Opening Plenary: Infinite Availability: About Hyper-Communication [and Old Age]
Tuesday
18:00-19:30
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Chair
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Participant
Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Stanford U, USA
We have more opportunities to communicate than ever before in the history of Homo sapiens. This is the
elementary fact that I am referring to with the word "hyper-communication," and I refrain from saying
that hyper-communication is either a very good or a very bad thing. The frequency with which we talk to
other persons face-to-face, that is in mutual physical presence, has most likely not increased - but it has
probably also not dramatically declined during the past decades. If we have more opportunities to
communicate than ever before, in the sense of conducting interactions based on the use of natural
languages, then this increase is clearly a function of technical devices whose effects neutralize the
consequences of physical and sometimes also of temporal distance. Some of us old ones feel that this is
simply too much - and that, at the same time, it is not enough presence. If the process of Modernity has
largely been a process of disenchantment, we have now written "Rational Re-enchantment" on our
revolutionary banners. But I am fully aware that this is but another Gray Panthers' revolution.
2916
ICA's 60th Annual Conference Opening Welcome Reception
Tuesday
19:30-21:30
Concourse
Sponsored Sessions
3120
The Obesity Crisis: Tipping the Balance in Children's Energy Intake and Expenditure Through
Media
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chairs
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Parent Power: How Parents and Caretakers Can Reduce the Effects of Food Advertising
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Gaming to Improve Children's Health
Amanda Exner Staiano, Georgetown U, USA
How to Use Brand Characters to Promote Fruit and Vegetables
Simone M. de Droog, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Regulatory Power? How Evidence Can Help Balance Contrary Pressures on Public Policy in the Case of
Junk Food Advertising to Children
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
The media are often blamed for the worldwide crisis of overweight and obese children. However, media
can also be a positive force in curbing the obesity epidemic. This roundtable discussion addresses the
question of how we can use and regulate the media to tip the balance in children's energy intake and
expenditure. Based on Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems model, participants bring various levels of
expertise to frame how media can be used and regulated at a: (1) micro level by parents (e.g., advertising
mediation, consumer communication), (2) meso level by media presentations and marketing approaches
(e.g., advergames, exergames, characters), and (3) macro level (e.g., social policy). After short
presentations by the panelists, Professor Sandra Calvert will integrate the findings of the differing levels
of environmental factors and discuss other levers to curb the obesity crisis. The audience will then be
invited to contribute to the discussion.
3123
Discourse on Blackness: Racial Textuality in Alter Spaces and Counterpublics
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 204
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Dark Glamour: Beauty and the Rise of the Black Fashion Model
Madison Moore, Yale U, USA
Black Down Under
Khadijah Lorraine White, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Racing Independent Production: Making and Marketing Black and Latino Web Series
Aymar Jean Christian, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The New Pulp Fiction: Street Lit and Its "Urban" Particularities
Shaun Ossei-Owusu, U of California, USA
Respondent
John Lester Jackson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
3124
Reputation and Trust in a Time of Crisis
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 205
Public Relations
Chair
Jennifer L. Bartlett, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Losing Public Trust: German Banks During the Financial and Economic Crises: Theoretical Remarks and
Empirical Results
Guenter Bentele, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
The Missing Link: The Narrative (De)Construction of Personal, Organizational and Systemic Trust in the
Discourse on the Financial Crisis
Juliana J.C. Raupp, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Friederike Schultz, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Impact of the Financial Crisis on the Media Reputation of Companies in Switzerland
Mark Eisenegger, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Mario Schranz, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Maintaining Reputation in Times of Crisis: A Time Series Analysis
Diana Ingenhoff, U of Fribourg, SWITZERLAND
Trust and reputation are becoming increasingly important as central concepts of Public Relations
Research. Under the conditions of a Media Society, increasing importance is attached, especially, to
public trust, understood as the attribution of trust or distrust by public communications to persons,
organizations, institutions and systems exposed to public perception. Strong trust and reputation effects
can be observed especially in times of crisis. The aim of this panel is to create a rationale for the
fundamental significance of trust and reputation for business organizations on the basis of new theoretical
concepts and empirical research. It will show how the current financial crisis affects trust in organizations,
how it influences their reputation and the role the media play within these processes. The panel intends to
broaden the discussion about trust and reputation from the perspective of Public Relations and Crisis
Communication Research.
3125
Rethinking Convergence/Culture
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 206
Philosophy of Communication
Participants
The Limits of Convergence
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Queensland/U of Iowa, USA
Social Media, Convergence, Warfare: A Special Case of Divergence
Jack Zeljko Bratich, Rutgers U, USA
Convergence: A Plea for Sociological Specificity
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
Convergence Culture & the Legacy of Feminist Cultural Studies
Catherine Anne Driscoll, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Grassroots & Astroturf: Governing Through Cultures of Convergence in Obama-land
James Hay, U of Illinois, USA
Media Convergence: An Old, Old Story
Toby Miller, U of California – Riverside, USA
Over the first decade of the 21st century there has been a growing perception that we live in an era of
media "convergence," and what Henry Jenkins and his followers have termed a "convergence culture."
There are at least four ways that the expression "convergence" has been deployed and its meaning
solidified-as a description of new synergy (a "horizontal" realignment) among media companies and
industries, as the multiplication of "platforms" for news and information, as a technological hybridity that
has folded the uses of separate media into one another (e.g., watching a television broadcast on a cell
phone), and as a new media aesthetic involving the mixing of documentary and non-documentary forms.
This Roundtable raises questions about and provides alternatives to these recent conceptions of
"convergence culture." It is particularly skeptical about the overuse of the term and the limited ways that
accounts of the term have conceptualized "convergence" and "culture" It seeks to demonstrate how the
term 'convergence culture' is capable of carrying a range of meanings that have not as yet been fully
mapped.
3126
Studies in Persuasive, Mediation, & Legal Discourses
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Chair
Torsten Reimer, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Talking About Sustainability: Responses to Frames in Persuasive Messages About Sustainable
Agriculture and Food
Baldwin Van Gorp, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Margot van der Goot, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Modeling Face-to-Face Conflict Mediation
Andrew Craig Tollison, U of Texas, USA
Erik W Green, U of Texas, USA
Madeline Maxwell, U of Texas, USA
Emily Richardson, U of Texas, USA
References as Indication of Being On-Task/Off-Task in the Course of Mediation Sessions
Alena L. Vasilyeva, Rutgers U, USA
Decisional Implications of Justices' Oral Argument Styles: Eight Cases About Same-Sex Marriage
Karen Tracy, U of Colorado, USA
Russell Parks, U of Colorado, USA
3130
Self-Presence and Exploration of Identity Online
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jorge F. Pena, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Self-Presence, Explicated (TOP Student Paper)
Rabindra A. Ratan, U of Southern California, USA
Productive Identities: Game Creation and the Self
Renyi Hong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
You Are What You Post: Using Social Network Profiles to Express Identity
Sherice Gearhart, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
Seok Kang, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
Morality in Virtual Reality: The Moral and Immoral Self and Other
Kathryn Segovia, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Benoit Monin, Stanford U, USA
Respondent
Hartmut B. Mokros, Rutgers U, USA
3131
Online Collaboration and Group Decision-Making
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Namkee Park, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Belonging and Trust in Online Communities: The Case of CouchSurfing as a Global Cooperative Social
Network
Pascale Roy Lafontaine, U of Hawaii, USA
Devan Rosen, U of Hawaii, USA
Blake Hendrickson, U of Hawaii, USA
Why Keeping Up Avatar Appearances and Metaverse Design Matters: A Model of Effective Team
Collaboration in 3D Virtual Environments
Sarah Fleur van der Land, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Alexander Peter Schouten, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Frans Feldberg, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Factors Influencing Willingness to Contribute Information to Online Communities
Xigen Li, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Looking Through the Eyes of an Avatar
Laura Hoffmann, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Jennifer Klatt, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Anh Lam-chi, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nina Haferkamp, U of Münster, GERMANY
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
3132
Understanding News Coverage
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Journalism Studies
Chair
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
A Holey Web: The European Network of News Flows - A Network Analysis (TOP STUDENT PAPER)
Judith Moller, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Cross-Ownership, Markets, and Content on Local TV News
Danilo Yanich, U of Delaware, USA
Democratic Theory as Explanatory Factor for International Differences in Political Media Coverage
Katharina Hemmer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Global Cities and the Illegal Immigration Debate
Andrew Rojecki, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Enemy's Leader Television Appearances During Wartime
Tsfira Grebelsky-Lichtman, Hebrew U and Ono Academic College, ISRAEL
3133
Effects of Election Campaigns: Theoretical and Methodological Innovations Analyzing the 2009
German National Election
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Chair
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Effects of Television Spots: Relationships Among Candidate Evaluation, Issue Learning, and Voter
Political Information Efficacy
Lynda Lee Kaid , U of Florida, USA
David Lynn Painter, U of Florida, USA
Maridith A. Dunton Miles, U of Florida, USA
Effects of Personalized TV Ads on Candidate Evaluation and Voting Decisions
Michaela Maier, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Silke Adam, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Yet Another Miniature Campaign: The 2009 Televised Debate
Juergen Maier, U of Kaiserslautern, GERMANY
Thorsten Faas, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Lukas Otto, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Merkel vs. Steinmeier: A Quasi-Experimental Study on the Effects of Involvement on the Evaluation of
TV-Debates
Patrick Bacherle, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Respondent
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
This panel presents findings from the first wave of the German Longitudinal Election Study (GLES)
which was conducted during the 2009 German national election campaign. The focus hereby lies on
theoretical and methodological innovations in campaign research. While the first two papers analyze how
televised ads affected the evaluations of candidates and issues laying a focus on the distinction between
personalized and not-personalized TV ads, the other two papers analyze the effects of televised debates
giving special attention to the stability of effects over time and to the state of involvement on the
recipients' side. The papers base on data which were gathered with different methods (content analysis,
survey data, continuous response measurements) within the GLES. This combination of data sources
allows the examination of the mentioned research questions with appropriate strategies of analysis in
order to help to expand the state of research on effects of campaign communication.
3134
Celebrity, Audiences, and Media: The Politics of Personality
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Joel Penney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
What Were They Thinking?! Discipline, Hegemony, and Pleasure in Worst-Dressed Celebrities Discourse
Joel Penney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
On the Trail of 007: Media Pilgrimages Into the World of James Bond
Stijn Reijnders, Erasmus U - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Celebrity Suicide and the Search for the Moral High Ground: Comparing Frames in Media and Audience
Discussions of the Death of a Flemish Celebrity
Hildegarde D. Y. Van den Bulck, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Nathalie Claessens, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Live From DC: Saturday Night Live Political Parody References in Presidential Rhetoric
Josh Compton, Dartmouth College, USA
3135
Individual and Organizational Identity
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Matthew G. Isbell, Merrimack College, USA
Participants
Dinamics of Corporate Identity: A Case Study of a Brazilian Soccer Club
José Coelho Albino, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Alexandre de Pádua Carrieri, U Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), BRAZIL
Ana Luiza Almeida, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Frederico Barros, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Frederico Saraiva, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Diego Figueiredo, U Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), BRAZIL
Employer Brand Identification: A Case Study of a Low-Prestige Company
Sanne Frandsen, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Dual Organizational Identification and Expatriates' Adaptation
Kumi Ishii, Western Kentucky U, USA
Sachiyo Morinaga Shearman, East Carolina U, USA
"Out the Door," "Back for More," or "New Horizons": Multiple Meanings for Encore Careers
Margaret Richardson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Ted Zorn, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Respondent
Vernon D. Miller, Michigan State U, USA
3136
Journalism and Elections
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 307
Journalism Studies
Chair
Hillel Nossek, College of Management Academic Studies, ISRAEL
Participants
Red or Blue? The Use of Dichotomous Colors in News Coverage (Top Student Paper)
Asta Zelenkauskaite, Indiana U, USA
Ya Gao, Indiana U, USA
Rich Powell, Indiana U, USA
The Political Pundits' Tea Party: Reframing the Candidates in the 2008 Presidential Debate
Keunmin Bae, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Pamela Jo Brubaker, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael Horning, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Daniel J. Tamul, Pennsylvania State U, USA
What Does the Audience Want? Understanding Media Choices by Examining the 2009 American
Presidential Inauguration
Angela M. Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
Holli A. Semetko, Emory U, USA
3137
Experiencing Cognitive Dissonance: Diaspora and National Belonging
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
Acts That Matter: New Ethicscapes in the Global World
Anne Ellerup Nielsen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Britta Timm Knudsen, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
Confident or Depressed About Motherland-Cognitive Dissonance and Selective Media Exposure Between
Hong Kong and China
Juntao HE, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Li Cui, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Filipino Diaspora in Japan: Exploring Religiosity in Timog Online's Forum
Reggy Capacio Figer, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
Globalization and the South Koreans' "A Single-Blood Nation" Self-Image: An Analysis of Korean
Newspaper Coverage
Jang Hyun Kim, U of Hawaii, USA
Chung Joo Chung, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Hyeonju Son, U of Hawaii, USA
3138
Case Studies of Media Framing
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Rita Maria Figueiras, CECC - Catholic U, PORTUGAL
Participants
Chinese Migrant Workers in Media Agenda During Global Recession
Kejun Chu, Iowa State U, USA
Rong Huang, Nanjing U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Clashing Over Conversion: "Who is a Jew" and Media Representations of an Israeli Supreme Court
Decision
Bryna Bogoch, Bar Ilan U, ISRAEL
Contention Between Framing by News Sources and Framing by Media
Peng Kee Chang, U Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Musa Abu Hassan, U Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Ezhar Tamam, U of Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Not So Different After All: Framing Abortion in Media and Nonmedia Blogs
Gi Woong Yun, Bowling Green State U, USA
Sung-Yeon Park, Bowling Green State U, USA
Kyle J Holody, Bowling Green State U, USA
Kisung Yoon, Bowling Green State U, USA
Shuang Xie, Bowling Green State U, USA
Anca Birzescu, Bowling Green State U, USA
Christian Alexander Vukasovich, Bowling Green State U, USA
Angela Prater, Northhampton Community College, USA
3139
Research on International Media
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
Participants
Intermedia Agenda-Setting in the Age of Globalization: A Multinational Agenda-Setting Test
Ying Roselyn Du, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Patterns of Relationships Between Issues
Stefan Geiss, Johannes Gutenberg U Mainz, GERMANY
Political Cartoons in a Model African State: A Case Study of Botswana Newspapers
Eno Akpabio, U of Botswana, BOTSWANA
The Media as Irreplaceable Mediator: An Integrative Theoretical Model for the Societal Importance of
International Mass Communication
Giovanna Dell'Orto, U of Minnesota, USA
3140
The Challenges of the Converged Services on the Communications Law and Regulator: Asian
Perspective
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Market, Departmental Interests and Ideology: Exploring the Predicament of Laws and Regulations of
Media Convergence From the Development of Mobile TV in China
Weizhen Lei, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
New Convergence Policy by the Democratic Government in Japan
Minoru Sugaya, Keio U, JAPAN
The Legal and Policy Implications of Establishing the Communications Authority in Hong Kong: Lessons
From the United Kingdom
Richard W. S. Wu, U of Hong Kong, HONG KONG
Grace L K Leung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The Challenge of the Converged Services on the Communication Regulatory Framework in Singapore:
Take Mobile TV as an Example
Trisha Tsui-Chuan Lin, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Accommodating Convergence in the Digital Age: Regulator's Perspective
Yu-li Liu, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
From the regulatory perspective, while technology is bringing telecommunications, broadcasting and the
Internet closer together, the laws and regulations for each sector become outdated. Therefore, there are
discussions about whether to revise the laws separately or to integrate all the relevant laws. In addition to
revising the relevant laws, there are also discussions about the necessities of integrating the regulators.
China, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan all have converged services such as IPTV. However,
Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan have not granted mobile TV licenses after their public consultations.
The panel will discuss the converged services' challenges to the current telecommunications laws and
broadcasting laws and the relevant regulators by citing experiences from China, Hong Kong, Japan,
Singapore, and Taiwan.
3141
Gendered Discourses and Networks of Science, Technology, and Modernity
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 312
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Koen Leurs, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
(Dis-)Performing "Western Civilized Humanness"
Christopher Gamble, U of Washington, USA
Cybermasculinity of Parody Cultures in DC Inside
Jungmin Kwon, U of Illinois, USA
Performing Gender and Ethnicity in Sociotechnological Networks
Koen Leurs, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Young Swedish Female Top-Bloggers and the Performance of Authentic Selves
Mia E. Lövheim, Oslo U, NORWAY
3142
Open Space: The Flexible Space of Interface and New Media Machines
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Adrian David Cheok, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino Koh, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Mili John Tharakan, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Open Space is multi-platformed new media exhibition exploring open space as a conceptual zone in
Singapore and Southeast Asia, mobilizing collaboration, participation, dialogue, process, encounters,
permeability and community. Open Space proposes a relational mode rather than a fixed object. Open
Space is where technologies, people and places converge. Curatorial team: Patricia R. Zimmermann,
Nikki Draper, Sharon Lin Tay, Nanyang Technological University; Wenjie Zhang, Singapore; with
curatorial associate Jenna Ng and curatorial assistant Koon Yen Low. This Open
Space/Singapore/Southeast Asia session explores innovative conceptual models, interfaces, and machines
working on flexible space. It showcases designers, engineers, and artists from the Mixed Reality
Lab/Keio/CUTE Center at National University of Singapore discussing and showing prototypes that crack
open spaces and places, including new media inventions, gadgets, utensils, textiles , and new interfaces.
3143
Boundary Work: Discourses of Identity and Exclusion in Communication History
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 314
Communication History
Chair
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
Participants
Blockbuster Titillation: Voyeurism and the Freakshow
Sharrona Pearl, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Imagining the Russian Community: Novoye Russkoe Slovo, the First Red Scare, and the Palmer Raids,
1919-1920
Anna A. Popkova, U of Minnesota, USA
In Search of Alien Aerials: The WWI Campaign Against Amateur Radio
Noah Arceneaux, San Diego State U, USA
"The Market is Better Off Without the Public": The Stock Ticker and Stock Market Participation in the
Textual Discourse of the Financial Community, 1867-1917
Caroline Jack, St. Louis U, USA
Respondent
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
3144
High Density Session: Information Systems in Cognitive Processing of Persuasive Messages
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Byungho Park, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Ambivalent Attitudes and Persuasion
Chingching Chang, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Investigating Why Reward-Based Messages Sustain Cooperation Rates in Social Dilemmas
Kyle R. Andrews, Northern Illinois U, USA
The Interaction Effect of Attitude Base and Multiple Attacks on the Effectiveness of Inoculation
Bobi Ivanov, U of Kentucky, USA
Michael Pfau, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kimberly A. Parker, Bellarmine U, USA
The Marker System: A Procedure for Using Implicit Attitude Measures With Mediated Messages
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
A Fool in the Door: Inducing Empathy to Increase Compliance
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Camiel J. Beukeboom, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Relationship Between Memory and Persausion Outcomes in Processing Smoking Cessation Narratives
Ashley Nicole Sanders-Jackson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Role of Media Sequence and Involvement in Cross-Media Campaigns
Hilde Voorveld, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Neijens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Edith Gloria Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Effect of Evidence Quality, Source Expertise, and Personal Involvement on Attitude Change: A
Conceptual Replication of Petty, Cacioppo, and Goldman (1981)
Sungeun Chung, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Meghan B. McLaughlin, Western Illinois U, USA
Ashely S. Wentzel, Western Illinois U, USA
Hilary Churchill, Western Illinois U, USA
Gordillo Flores, Western Illinois U, USA
Natalia I. Galvan, Western Illinois U, USA
Meagan R. Maricle, Western Illinois U, USA
Janet Lee Marlette, Western Illinois U, USA
Steven John Pingolt, Western Illinois U, USA
Stephanie E Sellers, Western Illinois U, USA
Jessica L. Strattman, Western Illinois U, USA
Hanna Akberom Tedla, Western Illinois U, USA
3145
Health Communication and Global Perspectives on HIV and AIDS
Wednesday
08:30-09:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Lalatendu Acharya, Purdue U, USA
Participants
Older Adults' Perspectives on HIV/AIDS Prevention Strategies for Rural Kenya
Nancy W. Muturi, Kansas State U, USA
Samuel C. Mwangi, Kansas State U, USA
Postcolonial Constructions of HIV/AIDS: Meaning, Culture, and Structure
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Shaunak Jagdish Sastry, Purdue U, USA
Stigma in the Private Sphere: HIV Status and Disclosure Communication in Senegalese Families
Khadidiatou Ndiaye, Michigan State U, USA
Roxanne Parrott, Pennsylvania State U, USA
HIV-Related Information Seeking Among Residential University Students in Three Caribbean Countries
Livingston A. White, U of the West Indies (CARIMAC), JAMAICA
3220
Wee Watchers: Issues Surrounding Television and Video Viewing by Younger Audiences
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Dalia Liran Alper, Communication School, ISRAEL
Participants
Brainy Einsteins: A Qualitative Content Analysis of the Marketing of Baby Videos
Erin Leigh Ryan, U of Alabama, USA
Infants' Visual Attention to Videos as a Function of Program Pacing
Alice Howard Gola, Georgetown U, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
Peer Pressure Among Parents? Understanding Parents' Decisions to Use Very Young Children's
Television Media
H. Erin Lee, U of Texas, USA
Jaehee Cho, U of Texas, USA
New Perspectives on the Digital Divide in U.S. Homes With 6-to-9-Year-Old Children
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Jennifer Anne Kotler, Sesame Workshop, USA
Respondent
Dalia Liran Alper, Communication School, ISRAEL
3223
Local News as a Focal Point of Journalism Research
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 204
Journalism Studies
Chair
Susanne Fengler, Erich Brost Institute for International Journalism, GERMANY
Participants
Defining Hyperlocal Media: Proposing a Framework for Discussion
Emily T. Metzgar, Indiana U, USA
David D. Kurpius, Louisiana State U, USA
Karen M. Rowley, USA
Democratizing Journalism: Realizing the Citizen's Agenda for Local News
Irene Costera Meijer, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Constructing Distance: Coverage of Local vs. Nonlocal Events by Hong Kong Newspapers
Zhongshi Guo, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Yu Huang, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Yiuming To, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Fong Yee Chan, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Competing With Whom? Where? And How? An Empirical Study of Online Newspaper Competition
Mengchieh Jacie Yang, U of Texas, USA
Hsiang Iris Chyi, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
3224
Transparency and Trust in Government and Corporations
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 205
Public Relations
Chair
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Examining Effective Government Communication: Media Use, Perceived Communication Effectiveness,
Government Transparency, and Trust in Government
Yi-Ru Regina Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Angus Weng Hin Cheong, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Xiaoqin Li, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OFMACAU
The Association Between South Korean Citizens' Perceptions of Government Crisis Communication and
the Government-Public Relationship
Hanna Park, U of Florida, USA
Linda Hon, U of Florida, USA
The Role of Public Relations in Online Trust Management
Christian Pieter Hoffmann, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Andrea vonKaenel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Transparency Matters: The Concept of Organizational Transparency in the Academic Discourse
Stefan Wehmeier, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Oliver Raaz, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
3225
Interpersonal Conflict: Cultural and Relational Predictors of Strategy Selection
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Tatsuya Imai, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Conflict Avoidance in Families: Functions, Outcomes, and Applied Implications
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Jennifer L. Hardesty, U of Illinois, USA
Ashley V. Middleton, U of Illinois, USA
Defining Face and Conflict in Romantic Relationships: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Uganda and
Ethiopia
Courtney Vail Fletcher, California State Polytechnic U, USA
Fight vs. Flight: A Game Theory Perspective on Conflict Escalation and Abuse
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Pavica Sheldon, Louisiana State U, USA
Melissa Hardaway, Louisiana State U, USA
Doing Unto Others: Effects of Relationship on Positive and Negative Reciprocity in a Trust-Dictator
Game
Renyi Hong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Kian Wee Nathanael Tan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Shimin Tiffany Goh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Shu-Lin, Natalynn Ong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Techological U, SINGAPORE
3226
Analyzing Contemporary Nonfiction Image Discourses
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 207
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Participants
The Strange Case of Nonfiction Animation
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Valentijn Tije Visch, U of Geneva, THE NETHERLANDS
Contested Images of the Other: An Assessment of the Ethnographic Reality Series
Jelle Mast, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
The Visual Culture of News Photography
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Photo Journalism as a Mechanism of Inclusion and Exclusion of New Immigrants
Baldwin Van Gorp, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Bijin-Tokei: Pin-Up Documentary or a Discourse of Digital City?
Toyoko Sato, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Nonfiction image discourses in contemporary society present visual scholarship with some of the most
interesting challenges both in terms of analyzing and making sense of it. The hybridization of non-fiction
and its amalgamation with fictional genres and approaches constantly forces us to revisit customary
distinctions and their broader impact. Loaded (or 'burdened') with a host of expectations and implicit
norms of traditional documentary forms contemporary hybrid forms of 'factual' based discourses, visual
practitioners don't seem to be that bothered about crossing borders between fiction and non-fiction.
Furthermore new technologies, converging media and an ever increasing hybridization of genres and
subgenres continue to force researchers to revisit their positions and insights. This panel examines new
forms and borderline cases of non-fiction with the aim to address new forms of visual communication and
their impact on both society and visual scholarship.
3230
Telecommunication Policy and Development
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jan Fernback, Temple U, USA
Participants
Telecommunications Reform and Network Expansion: Lessons From APEC Countries
Chen-Ling Hung, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
Ching-Chih Lu, National Cheng-Chi U, TAIWAN
Benjamin Yeo, Milken Institute, USA
The Economic Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Microenterprises in the
Context of Development
Mark Levy, Michigan State U, USA
Han Ei Chew, Michigan State U, USA
P. Vigneswara Ilavarasan, Indian Institute of Technology - Delhi, INDIA
Constructing a New Information Society in the Tropics: Examining Brazilian Approaches to Information
and Communication Technology (ICTs) Through the Lens of the User and the Nonuser
Jeremiah P. Spence, U of Texas, USA
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Nadie Machado, Virtual Worlds Research Consortium, USA
Teresa Correa, U of Texas, USA
Kyung Sun Lee, U of Texas, USA
Structuring Access: A 10-Year Review of the Role of Austin Public Libraries and Community
Technology Centers in Digital Inclusion
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Laura Dixon, U of Texas, USA
Dean Graber, U of Texas, USA
R. G. Lentz, McGill U, CANADA
Jeremiah P. Spence, U of Texas, USA
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A and M U, USA
3231
Online and Offline Relationships
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sonja Utz, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Friendships Among Users of Social Network Sites: The Quality of Online, Offline, and Mixed-Mode
Friendships
Marjolijn L. Antheunis, U of Tilburg, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Meeting Up Offline: How Offline Gatherings Affect Online Communities (TOP 2 Student Paper)
Lauren F. Sessions, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Who Are Facebook Friends? Exploring the Composition of Facebook Friend Networks
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Understanding Online Intimate Relationships
Linlin Ku, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
3232
Deliberation
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Participants
Assessing Quality of Deliberation and Its Consequences: Evidence From Deliberative Polling
Sean Jeremy Westwood, Stanford, USA
Gaurav Sood, Stanford U, USA
Individuals' Motivations: What Influences Political Talk?
Lesile A. Rill, Portland State U, USA
Minority Report: The Effect of Opinion Minorities in Small Group Deliberation
Nuri Kim, Stanford U, USA
Alice Siu, Stanford U, USA
Gaurav Sood, Stanford U, USA
Political Deliberation in Three Regions on the Internet: Folk Discourse in Chinese New Media Context
Weizhen Lei, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Tianjiao Wang, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Understanding Expressive Engagement in Urban China: Differentiating Domains, Settings, and Media
Effects
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Gang Jing, U of Wisconsin, USA
Wenjie Yan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jiawen Zheng, U of Wisconsin, USA
3233
Politics, Young Citizens and Adolescents
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 304
Political Communication
Chair
Holli A. Semetko, Emory U, USA
Participants
Exploring Online Political Conversation Among Young Adults in the 2008 Presidential Election
Kanni Huang, Michigan State U, USA
Juhee Kang, Michigan State U, USA
Amy Lynn Hagerstrom, Michigan State U, USA
Political Consumerism, Young Citizens, and the Internet
Janelle Ward, Erasmus U - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Social Cognitive Theory of Political Participation Among Adolescents
Jooyun Hwang, U of Florida, USA
Spiro K. Kiousis, U of Florida, USA
The Role of Everyday Conversations in Mediating the Effects of Media Use on Policy Understanding:
With a Focus on Generational Differences
Jisuk Woo, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Mingyu Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joohan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Holli A. Semetko, Emory U, USA
3234
Cultural Production and Participatory Culture
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Participants
"Flexibility in One Place Presumes Rigidity Elsewhere": Record Industry Turbulence and the 1985-87
Legislative Lockdown of Recording Artists (Top Three Paper)
Matt Stahl, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
An Anatomy of a YouTube Meme (Top Three Paper)
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Music Video Remakes: History, Practice, and Meaning of User Production
Aymar Jean Christian, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Internet as Publicity for Cultural Products
Marc Verboord, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3235
Social Responsibility and Civil Society Relationships
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Daniel Cochece Davis, Marist College, USA
Participants
Sustainability Discourse Within a Supply Chain Relationship: Mapping Divergence and Convergence
Myria W. Allen, U of Arkansas, USA
Kasey L. Walker, U of Arkansas, USA
Robert Brady, U of Arkansas, USA
Tommye K. Johnson, U of Arkansas, USA
Justin T. Rusinowski, U of Arkansas, USA
The Impact of Corporate Sectors and Cultural Differences on Corporate Social Responsible Programs: A
Content Analysis of 200 Corporations' Web Sites
Yeonsoo Kim, U of Florida, USA
Sanghoon Lee, U of Florida, USA
A Theoretical Exploration of Organization Greening and Change
Jingfang Liu, U of Southern California, USA
Assessing Techno-Centric Models of Good Governance: A Case Study of Public-Private Partnership in
Bangalore, India
Anuradha Rao, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Respondent
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montréal, CANADA
3236
Community Participation, Public Support, and Public Policy in Health Communication
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 307
Health Communication
Chair
Kaibin Xu, Temple U, USA
Participants
Empathy, Identification, and Realism in Reponses to Stories About Individual and Social Causes of
Obesity
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
Dialogue in Public Information Campaigns: A Communicative Action Approach to Evaluating Citizen
Voice
Leanne Chang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Thomas L. Jacobson, Temple U, USA
Refining the Meanings of Genetic Determinism: U.S. Community Members' Beliefs About Threat,
Efficacy, and Essentialism
Roxanne Parrott, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Khadidiatou Ndiaye, Michigan State U, USA
Factors Affecting Public Support for Healthcare as a Government Priority
Michael G. Elasmar, Boston U, USA
Jenna Gordon, Boston U, USA
Old Wine in New Bottles? The Positioning of Participation in 17 NIH Funded CBPR Projects
Jeffery Chaichana Peterson, Washington State U, USA
Aline Gubrium, U of Massachusetts, USA
3237
Global Audiences in Globalized Contexts: The Politics of Participation, Citizenship, Consumer
Culture, and Representation
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Saskia Witteborn, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Problematic Articulations in Vernacular Soldier Videos From the War in Iraq
Christina Marie Smith, Ramapo College of New Jersey, USA
Transcultural Entertainment: Globalization and the New Indian Television
Ruma Sen, Ramapo College of New Jersey, USA
Audience as the "Citizen-Subject" of Globalizing Television in Turkey
Nazan Haydari, Maltepe U, TURKEY
Role of Entertainment-Education Radio Soap Opera in Facilitating Social Change Among Young Village
Women in India: A Critical Discourse of Transformation
Saumya Pant, U of New Mexico, USA
Respondent
Nagesh Rao, Ohio U, USA
This panel explores the constitutive role of media in re-defining the complex relationship between the
politics of participation, citizenship, consumption, and self-expression in various contexts (from the war
in Iraq, to television industry in India and Turkey, and radio soap opera in India). Within the often
contradictory and always dynamic spaces of globalization, the politics of participation and representation
are integrated into various discourses of nationalism, national security, commercial logic, entertainment,
or counterpublics. By discussing the politics of participation in the production process of various media
forms (personal videos, television programs, and the radio soap opera) the panel explores the complex
relationship between production and consumption, audience as the "citizen-subject" and audience as the
subject of "national culture".
3238
Media Framing of International Events
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
Metaframes and Transnational Homogenization in News on Trade Negotations: One Frame to Rule Them
All?
Rune Saugmann Andersen, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Same Disasters, Different Stories: How Three Arab Newspapers Framed the Asian Tsunami and
Hurricane Katrina
Yasmine Tarek Dabbous, Louisiana State U, USA
Andrea L. Miller, Louisiana State U, USA
The Worth of 197 Lives: Comparative Analysis of News Coverage on a Massacre
Zheng Yang, State U of New York - Buffalo, USA
Liang Zheng, U of Colorado, USA
Media Framing of Corporate Crisis in Global Production: Is China Really the Problem?
Nan Zheng, U of Texas, USA
Dominic Louis Lasorsa, U of Texas, USA
Yi-Hsin Yeh, U of Texas, USA
3239
Science, Health, and the Media
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
Including Limitations in News Coverage of Cancer Research: Effects of News Hedging on Fatalism,
Medical Skepticism, Patient Trust, and Backlash
Jakob D. Jensen, Purdue U, USA
Nick Carcioppolo, Purdue U, USA
Andy J King, Purdue U, USA
Jennifer Kim Bernat, Purdue U, USA
LaShara Davis, Purdue U, USA
Robert Yale, Purdue U, USA
Jessica Smith, Purdue U, USA
Integrating Models of Mass-Interpersonal Communication: Testing Moderation and Mediation Effects of
Elaborative Processing and Interpersonal Discussion on Scientific Knowledge and Public Attitudes
Toward Nanotechnology
Shirley S. Ho, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Elizabeth A Corley, Arizona State U, USA
Is It Better To Promote Fear Or Prevent Beauty?
Nam Young Kim, Louisiana State U, USA
Meghan Shara Sanders, Louisiana State U, USA
The Moderation of Perceived Realism by Narrative Causality on Information Acceptance: An Example in
Science Communication
Michael Field Dahlstrom, Iowa State U, USA
3240
Top 3 Competitive Papers and Top Student Paper: Intergroup Communication
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 311
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U/U of California - Irvine, USA
Participants
The Roles of Communication and Trust in Reported Compliance With Police in Armenia and the United
States
Katy Elizabeth Pearce, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Christopher S. Hajek, U of California – Santa Barbara, USA
Valerie E. Barker, San Diego State U, USA
Charles W. Choi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Negation Bias: When Negations Signal Stereotypic Expectancies
Camiel J. Beukeboom, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Catrin Finkenauer, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Daniel Wigboldus, Radboud U, THE NETHERLANDS
Christian Burgers, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Linguistic Abstraction and Stereotype Transmission Among Political Neutrals: Evidence for an Ingroup
Promotion Hypothesis
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Ryan Poland, U of California- Santa Barbara, USA
Jiyeon So, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Cynthia Helen Bates, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
No Radicalization Without Identification: Dynamics of Radicalization and Polarization Within and
Between Two Opposing Web Forums
Dirk Oegema, Free U, THE NETHERLANDS
Jacquelien Van Stekelenburg, Vrije U, THE NETHERLANDS
Bert Klandermans, Vrije U, THE NETHERLANDS
Top research papers in intergroup communication processes. Topics include trust/compliance between
young adults and police officers in the United States and Armenia, linguistic biases and stereotype
expectancies, and linguistic abstraction among ingroup members of Palestine.
3241
Globalizing Women and Media Research Agendas
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 312
Feminist Scholarship
Chairs
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Claudia Mellado, U of Concepcion, CHILE
This working roundtable will explore the theoretical and empirical aspects of developing cross-national
and cross-cultural research on women and media, the difficulties that may arise when different contexts
are compared, data collection methods that have been (or might be) tried, and the potential applications of
findings that may emerge from collaborative projects. The session will be led by two international
scholars who developed their own working relationship in a recent cross-cultural study on women and
media. The three-part structured discussion will follow this format: I. Macro concerns (e.g.,
globalization) with respect to women and media. Question: How should research situate women when
examining major changes such as concentration of ownership, globalization of industries, and smaller
work forces within media industries? (Leader: C. Mellado) II. Culture, language, and politics in crossnational gender research. Question: How can research designs accommodate challenges related to
cultural and other differences among the countries being studied? (Leader: C. Byerly) III. Funding and
managing the cross-cultural study. Question: What are the practical considerations of raising funds and
coordinating collaborative research on women and media among researchers in several nations? (Leaders:
C. Byerly & C. Mellado)
3242
University 2.0? The Challenges of Web 2.0 in Higher Education
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 313
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Participants
Bridging Critical Theory and Design Learning: Social Media and Generative Pedagogy
Megan Boler, U of Toronto, CANADA
Danielle Lottridge, U of Toronto, CANADA
Towards 2.0: Encouraging Emerging Technologies
Sherman Young, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Digital Literacies and the Media Studies 2.0 Debate
Graham Meikle, U of Stirling, UNITED KINGDOM
Tweaching in the Gong: Thinking Through Twitter as an Educational Tool
Jason Wilson, U of Wollongong, AUSTRALIA
This panel explores the uses of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education teaching and learning. Its four
papers explore emerging Web 2.0 pedagogies in tertiary education and address particular political,
cultural and technological challenges. Discourses emerging around new media technologies have
precipitated parallel conversations in ideas of learning and teaching — the Web 2.0 label is mirrored in
ideas of Education 2.0 (Keats & Schmidt 2007) or Media Studies 2.0 (Gauntlett 2009, Dovey & Lister
2009, Merrin 2009) which reconfigure pedagogical approaches to incorporate more participatory models.
As audiences become users and readers become writers, educators need to rethink graduate capabilities to
confront new digital literacies.
3243
Culture and Emerging Social Technologies
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Stephen Michael Croucher, Bowling Green State U, USA
Participants
A Cross-National Study of Social-Networking Services Between the U.S. and Korea
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yeolib Kim, U of Texas, USA
Cross-Cultural Study of Emerging Interpersonal Norms of Text Messaging in India and United States
Robert Shuter, Marquette U, USA
Sumana Chattopadhyay, Marquette U, USA
Gendered Avatars: Representation of Gender Differences Between Cartoonish and Simulated Online Role
Playing Games in Taiwan
Chia-I Hou, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Exploratory Study for the Consideration of the Interplay Between Japanese Interpersonal Psychology
and the Behavior on CMC
Sangmi Kim, Nagoya U, JAPAN
Respondent
Peter S. Lee, California State U - Fullerton, USA
3244
Youth and Adolescent Responses to Persuasive Health Communication
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 325
Health Communication
Chair
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Adolescent Television Viewing and the Cultivation of Unrealistic Perceptions About Smoking and
Smokers: Examining the Moderating Role of Sensation Seeking
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
Affective Antecedents of the Perceived Effectiveness of Antidrug Advertisements: An Analysis of
Adolescents' Momentary and Retrospective Evaluations
Marco C. Yzer, U of Minnesota, USA
Kathleen Vohs, U of Minnesota, USA
Monica Luciana, U of Minnesota, USA
Ronald J. Faber, U of Minnesota, USA
Bruce Cuthbert, U of Minnesota, USA
Angus MacDonald III, U of Minnesota, USA
Conversations About a Youth Antismoking Campaign: Predictors and Consequences for Smokers and
Nonsmokers
Sally Margaret Dunlop, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Conceptualization and Communication of Risk Among Rural Appalachian Adolescents
Jennifer J. Moreland, Ohio State U, USA
Janice Lee Raup Krieger, Ohio State U, USA
Michelle Miller-Day, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Michael L. Hecht, Pennsylvania State U, USA
3245
Improving Health Practitioner-Client Communication: Contemporary Challenges, Innovative
Solutions
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Effective Communication Between Parents and Nurses in Special Care Nurseries
Tara Becker, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Listening for Change: The Having a Baby in Queensland Survey
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Yvette D Miller, U of Queensland , AUSTRALIA
Rachel Thompson, U of Queensland , AUSTRALIA
Christina Lee, U of Queensland , AUSTRALIA
Teresa Walsh, U of Queensland , AUSTRALIA
Julie Porter, U of Queensland , AUSTRALIA
Faye Lawrence, U of Queensland , AUSTRALIA
Discovery Interviews: Patient Stories as a Mechanism for Improving Health Practitioner Communication
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Lori Leach, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Louise Cahill, Queensland Health, AUSTRALIA
Shoni Colquist, Queensland Health, AUSTRALIA
Hazel Harden, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Risk Perceptions in Men With a Family History of Prostate Cancer: Implications for Health Practitioners
and Men in Screening Decision Making
Michelle McDowell, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Stefano Occhipinti, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Suzanne Chambers, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
This panel examines health practitioner-client communication arguing that the intergroup nature of such
interactions creates challenges for such communication to be effective. The four papers use a range of
methodologies to explore what is effective health practitioner-client communication with an emphasis on
the client voice. The panel explores the problems experienced in health practitioner-client communication
and the potential impact of these problems. The papers then examine the implications of their findings for
training in health practitioner communication. The papers illustrate the value that different theoretical and
methodological approaches can provide in increasing our understanding of health practitioner-client
communication.
3246
New Member and Graduate Student Orientation to ICA and the Conference
Wednesday
10:00-11:15
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Michele Cheng Hoon Khoo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Malte Carlos Hinrichsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
3320
Global Feminist Issues
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 201
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Mira K. Desai, SNDT Women's U, INDIA
Participants
Still Fighting Annihilation? Media and Women's Organizations in the Portuguese Context
Maria Joao Silveirinha, U of Coimbra/CIMJ, PORTUGAL
The Medicalization of Teen Girls' Bodies in the Gardasil Cervical Cancer Vaccine Campaign
Jennifer E. Vardeman-Winter, U of Houston, USA
Grassroots Women's Movements and Political Communication in India: Vernacular Rhetoric and Street
Play Performance
Christine Lynn Garlough, U of Wisconsin, USA
Amma's Daughters: Moving Beyond Gender as Identity
Bhavana R. Upadhyaya, U of New Mexico, USA
Feminism and Globalized Domestic Service: From the Universal to the Transnational
Beverly Romero Natividad, U of Denver, USA
3323
Media Agenda Setting and Media Framing
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 204
Journalism Studies
Chair
Anita M. J. van Hoof, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Intermedia Frame Building: The U.S. Beef Import Case in South Korea
Seong Choul Hong, Indiana U, USA
Changhee Choi, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
News Framing, Pre-Existing Schemas, and Public Opinion on International Trade
Wei Zha, U of Cincinnati, USA
Robert Kirby Goidel, Louisiana State U, USA
Judith L. Sylvester, Louisiana State U, USA
Media Agenda Setting on the Rule of Law and Legitimacy in East Africa
Yusuf Kalyango, Jr., Ohio U, USA
Wayne Wanta, Oklahoma State U, USA
The Investigation of Media Framing of a Long-Lasting Strike by Nonstandard Workers in Korea (Top
Student Paper)
Jaehee Cho, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Stephen D. Reese, U of Texas, USA
3324
Managing and Coordinating Public Relations Globally
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 205
Public Relations
Chair
Mark Eisenegger, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
Matters of Global Strategic Communication: Exploring Dimensions of Media Opacity and Effects on
Media Credibility
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Anna Victorovna Klyueva, U of Oklahoma, USA
Coordination and Control of Global Public Relations After International Mergers and Acquisitions: A
Delphi Panel Investigation
Rajul Jain, U of Florida, USA
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Transnational PR? A Case Study of a Public Relations Agency in Korea
Hyunhee Kim, U of Maryland, USA
Cultural Influence on the Perceptions of Excellent Leadership in Public Relations
Juan Meng, U of Dayton, USA
Bruce K. Berger, U of Alabama, USA
3325
Philosophy, Subjectivity, Praxis
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 206
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Participants
Beyond the Interaction Paradigm? Radical Constructivism, Universal Pragmatics, and Peircean
Pragmatism
Mats V. Bergman, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Foucault's "Materiality of the Incorporeal" and Communication in Modern Society
Alexandre Macmillan, U de Montréal, CANADA
(Re)membering the Present: Metonymic Strategies in "Xenosaga Episode III: Also Sprach Zarathustra"
Robert Mejia, U of Illinois, USA
Space, Becoming, Dislocation: Politicized Mobile Art
Paula M. Gardner, Ontario College of Art and Design, CANADA
This session draws from a range of philosophical traditions to consider issues of subjectivity, power,
mobility, critical praxis and materiality in communication theory.
3326
Depicting Protest and Conflict
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 207
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
David D. Perlmutter, U of Iowa, USA
Participants
Visual Dimension of Protest: Analysis of Interactions During the Russian March
Dennis Zuev, CIES-ISCTE, PORTUGAL
Effects of Pictorial Vividness and Numeric Representation on Attitudes Toward the Tibetan Conflict in
China
Robert Andrew Dunn, U of Alabama, USA
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Mark Lent, U of Alabama, USA
For the World to Know: Engineering Messages of Protest During Color Revolutions
Olesya Venger, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Visual Framing: How Newsweek, Time, and The Associated Press Covered the 2003 Invasion of Iraq
Diana Stover, San Jose State U, USA
Respondent
David D. Perlmutter, U of Iowa, USA
3330
Digital Divide: Social and Techological Challenges
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Participants
At the Intersection of the Digital Divide and the Knowledge Gap: The Results From Three Knowledge
Acquisition Measures
JungAe Yang, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Matthew Effect or Ceiling Effect? Evolution of the Digital Divide: A Cross-Society and Within-Society
Comparison
Lun Zhang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Jonathan J.H. Zhu, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
The Older the Better: Rethinking Internet Skills. The Role of Gender, Age, Education, Internet
Experience, and Internet Use (TOP Faculty Paper)
Alexander van Deursen, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Oscar Peters, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Influence of Cultural Change on ICT Use: Perception of International Students at a U.S. University
Animesh Singh Rathore, Ohio U, USA
3331
Credibility and Online Information Evaluation
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Arun Vishwanath, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Participants
Web Credibility 2.0? Effects of Source and Content Credibility on Evaluation of Online Restaurant
Reviews (TOP 3 Student Paper)
Young Ji Kim, U of Southern California, USA
Trust Games: Impact of Seller Photo and Reputation on Trust in Computer-Mediated Transactions
Gary Bente, U of Cologne, GERMANY
Odile Baptiste, U of Cologne, GERMANY
To Share or Not to Share, That is the Question: Examining Psychological Effects of Heuristic Cues on
Users' Attitudes on a Product Review Website
Hyang-Sook Kim, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Pamela Jo Brubaker, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Andrew Kegerise, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Kiwon Seo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Examining the Impact of Multiple Negative Online Consumer Reviews and Review Helpfulness Ratings
on Persuasion
Rachel Lijie Neo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
3332
Measurement and Methodological Issues in Political Communication
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Estimating Self-Reported News Exposure Across and Within Typical Days: Should Surveys Use More
Refined Measures?
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Scott L. Althaus, U of Illinois, USA
Matthew Hibbing, U of Illinois, USA
Facets of Exposure to TV-News: A Comparison of News-Exposure Measures Based on People-Meter
Data
Anke Wonneberger, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Klaus Schoenbach, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Lex Van Meurs, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
I Knew It All Along! Evaluating Time-of-Decision Measures in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Campaign
Lauren Kogen, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Strengthening Measurement of Political Information Efficacy Among Young Voters
Justin D. Martin, American U in Cairo, EGYPT
Semantic Network Analysis: A Two-Step Approach for Flexible, Reusable, and Combinable Content
Analysis
Wouter van Atteveldt, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Nel Ruigrok, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
3333
Discourse, Symbolic Politics, and Crises
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Chair
Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Lodz Academy of International Studies, POLAND
Participants
Terrorism, Communication, and the War of Ideas: Al-Qaida's Strategic Narrative as a Brand - Top Paper
Cristina Archetti, U of Salford, UNITED KINGDOM
Credibility and Creative Ceremony: Monastic Activists and the Ecology Movement of Thailand
Craig M. Pinkerton, Ohio U, USA
Discourse Coalitions in the Media: The Reconfiguration of Peru's Environmental Governance
Bruno Takahashi, SUNY ESF, USA
Interweaving of Media Sociocultural Identities and Power
Elisabeth Le, U of Alberta, CANADA
Managing the Cartoon Crisis From a Stakeholder Perspective: Crisis Communication as a "Multilevel
Game"
Eva-Karin Olsson, CRISMART, Swedish National Defence College, SWEDEN
Kristin Lindholm, Trinity International U, USA
Respondent
Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Lodz Academy of International Studies, POLAND
3334
Face, Figure, and Form: Media Aesthetics and Technology
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Participants
Does Evil Have a Shape? Comparing Body Types of Heroes and Villains in Disney Animations
Mary Katherine Alsip, U of Alabama, USA
Physiognomy & Freakery: The Joker on Film
Mario George Rodriguez, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Dividing Attention: The Effects of Commercial Interruptions on Comprehension and Enjoyment of
Complex Televisual Narratives
Elliot T. Panek, U of Michigan, USA
The Medium Is the Joke: Online Humor About and By Networked Computers
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Menahem Blondheim, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
3335
Online Organiziational Communication
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Meikuan Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Participants
Megachurches.com: Religious Organizations and Faith Brand Community Building Online
Jie Young Kong, Arizona State U, USA
Pauline Hope Cheong, Arizona State U, USA
Angela Trethewey, Arizona State U, USA
Hyperlinking and the Long-Term Effects of Online News Strategy
Matthew Scott Weber, U of Southern California, USA
Organizational Impression Management on Corporate Blogs
Zhe Li, Rutgers U, USA
Perceptions of Causes and Outcomes of Internet Deviant Behaviors at Work and School: A Preliminary
Framework
Sunny Jung Kim, Cornell U, USA
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Respondent
Gina Neff, U of Washington, USA
3336
Journalism and the Financial Crisis
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 307
Journalism Studies
Chair
Howard Tumber, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
BBC News and the Financial Crisis: Dilemmas of Financial Reporting
Steve Schifferes, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Financial and Business Journalism: Hong Kong and the UK Compared
Damien Tambini, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Responding to the Financial Crisis: Violence in Europe
Marina Prentoulis, U of East Anglia, UNITED KINGDOM
The U.S. Press and the Economic Crisis
Anya Schiffrin, Columbia U, USA,
Business as Usual, or an Unusual Business? Celebrating and Blaming Business During the Global
Financial Crisis in Australian Journalism
Michael Stuart Bromley, U of Queenslands, AUSTRALIA
The Press and the Financial Crisis: The Watchdog That Didn't Bark
Dean Starkman, Columbia Journalism Review, USA
Respondent
Howard Tumber, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
The aim of this panel is to provide a number of theoretical, historical and empirical contributions
examining and analysing the global media's coverage of the international financial and economic crisis
and the framing of the interpretative debate on the causes. The global financial crisis 2007-2009 exposed
the fragility of the world economic system and the downside of globalisation. The worst economic
downturn since World War II led to unprecedented intervention by governments in propping up the
financial system and the world economy, with new forms of global economic governance emerging. How
well did the media cope with the emerging crisis? Using comparative data gathered from a number of
countries media content, the papers comprising this panel attempt to asses how well the ideals
underpinning journalistic and news media practices were upheld during the period of the crisis.
3337
Rethinking Development Communication
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Robert Huesca, Trinity U, USA
Participants
Advocacy Communication: Using Communication to Advocate for Structural and Normative Public
Benefit
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Developing a Video-Based Approach to the Most Significant Change Evaluation Methodology
Melissa M. Brough, U of Southern California, USA
Charlotte Lapsansky, U of Southern California, USA
Media Literacy as a Constructive Intervention in Development Communication
Jiwon Yoon, Temple U, USA
Weaving the Life of Guatemala: A Participatory Approach to Cross-Cultural Filmmaking
Sonia De La Cruz, U of Oregon, USA
3338
Influences on Media Use
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Roger Cooper, Ohio U, USA
Participants
Uses, Gratifications, and Beyond: Towards a Model of Motivated Media Exposure and Its Effects on Risk
Perception
Jiyeon So, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Correlations of Media Habits Between Generations and Across Media Modalities: Parental Influence on
Children's TV Watching and Video Game Playing
Grace S. Yang, U of Michigan, USA
Rowell Huesmann, U of Michigan, USA
Entertainment Media Use as a Coping Resource for Cancer Patients and Their Families
Abby Prestin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Misuse of Uses and Gratifications Approach in Intermedia Substitution/Complementarity Research
Sujin Choi, Indiana U, USA
3339
Third-Person Effects
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Klaus Krippendorff, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
The Influence of Presumed Media Influence on News About Science and Scientists
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Jonathan Cohen, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin, USA
Third Person Effect Research: A Cross Cultural Perspective
Aziz Douai, U of Ontario Institute of Technology, CANADA
Examination of the Moderating Role of Moral Outrage in Predicting Third-Person Behavioral Effects
Hyunseo Hwang, U of California - Davis, USA
Ock Tae Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Sun-Young Lee, U of Wisconsin, USA
The Third-Person Effect of News Coverage of Opinion Poll: In-Group Versus Out-Group
Hyunjung Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
3340
Intergroup Communication Interest Group Business Meeting
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 311
Intergroup Communication
3341
Online Gaming
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 312
Game Studies
Members of the Intergroup Communication Interest Group and ICA members interested in finding out
more about our interest group are invited to join us for our annual ICA business meeting. Top Intergroup
Communication papers will be honored during this session.
Chair
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
FIRO-MMO: Towards a Theory of Relationships in MMOs
Renyi Hong, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Online Communication and Social Well-Being: How Playing World of Warcraft Affects the Players'
Social Competence and Loneliness
Mandy Visser, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marjolijn L. Antheunis, U of Tilburg, THE NETHERLANDS
What Matters More in Online Games? A Synthetic Approach to Online Game Acceptance Factors
Gunwoo Yoon, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), KOREA,
REPUBLIC OF
SeoungHo Ryu, Kangwon National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Why We Distort in Self-Report: The Effects Cognitive Dissonance and Balance Theory on Self-Report
Errors
Adam S. Kahn, U of Southern California, USA
Rabindra A. Ratan, U of Southern California, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
3342
ICA Division and Interest Group Officers' Orientation and Training
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Sam Luna, International Communication Association, USA
Participants
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Jeffery Chaichana Peterson, Washington State U, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, U of Maryland, USA
Virginia Richmond, West Virginia U, USA
Suchitra Shenoy, DePaul U, USA
Masaki Matsunaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
Todd L. Sandel, U of Oklahoma, USA
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Susan L. Holmberg, Mid Sweden U, SWEDEN
Jonathan Alan Gray, U of Wisconsin, USA
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Jelle Mast, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Susannah R. Stern, U of San Diego, USA
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
3343
Competitively Ranked Papers in Intercultural-Interpersonal Research
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
Participants
Face Management in Social Predicaments Caused by Others: A Cross-Cultural Comparison Between U.S.
and China
Xiaowen Guan, U of St. Thomas, USA
Helpful and Unhelpful Messages for Korean Women With Breast Cancer
Hyegyu Lee, Michigan State U, USA
Hanna Joo, Michigan State U, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Same Path, Different Experience: Culture's Main and Moderating Effects on the Links Between Causal
Attribution, Emotion, and Interaction Goals in Negotiation
Meina Liu, U of Maryland, USA
The Context-Behavior Interface in Interethnic Communication: An Empirical Test Among College
Students
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kelly Lynn McKay-Semmler, U of South Dakota, USA
Respondent
Robert M. McCann, U of Southern California, USA
3344
High Density Session: Cognitive Processing of Fear, Deception, and Risk
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
30+ Years of Cultivation Surveys: A Meta-Analysis
Dorien Dossche, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Jan Van den Bulck, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
A Mediated Model of Fear of Crime and Television: The Role of Personal Risk Perception and Perceived
Ability to Cope With Crime
Kathleen Custers, Katholieke U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Incidental Discrete Affect and Risk Perception
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Processing Fluency and Processing Style as Determinants of Affective and Cognitive Responses to
Threatening Anecdotes
Charles R. Berger, U of California - Davis, USA
Receiving and Processing Emergency Alerts Through Desktop, Laptop, and Hand-Held Devices: The
Role of Anxiety
Wenjing Xie, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Validating Online Risk-Reducing Strategies
Guda van Noort, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Impact of Lie to Me on Viewers' Actual Ability to Detect Deception
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Hillary Cortney Shulman, Michigan State U, USA
Kim B. Serota, Michigan State U, USA
Weight Marks on Models: Information Labels Reduce Body Dissatisfaction Incited by the Thin Body
Ideal
Jolanda Veldhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hanneke Hoogervorst, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tanya Beliaeva, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3345
Normative Approaches to Health Communication
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Norman C. H. Wong, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Connecting Social Norms and Social Networks: A Study of Unhealthy Weight Control Intentions and
Internalization of the Thin-Ideal in China
Lu Tang, U of Alabama, USA
Chien-fei Chen, U of Tennessee, USA
Effect of Health Campaigns and Interpersonal Communication on Cannabis Use: The Role of Evaluative
Tone
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Karin Monshouwer, Trimbos Institute, THE NETHERLANDS
Gert-Jan de Bruijn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Bianca Swart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Predictors of Safe Home Food Handling Practices: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
Li Jiang, Cornell U, USA
Robert B. Gravani, Cornell U, USA
The Influence of Peer Norms and Popularity on Smoking and Drinking Behavior Among College
Fraternity Members: A Social-Network Analysis
Joe Jin Phua, U of Southern California, USA
Talking and Complying: The Role of Interpersonal Discussion and Social Norms in Public
Communication Campaigns
Lauren B. Frank, U of Southern California, USA
Joyee Shairee Chatterjee, U of Southern California, USA
Sonal Chaudhuri, BBC World Service Trust, INDIA
Charlotte Lapsansky, U of Southern California, USA
Andy Bhanot, BBC World Service Trust, INDIA
Sheila Teresa Murphy, U of Southern California, USA
3346
The Materialization of Immateriality in the Constitution of Organizations in Asia: Perspectives on
Malaysian, Chinese, Japanese, and Indian Organizations
Wednesday
11:30-12:45
Theater
Theme Sessions
Chair
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montréal, CANADA
Participants
Understanding the Meaning and Embodiment of Power Distance in a Malaysian Public Organization
Hassan Abu Bakar, U of Utara, MALAYSIA
Che Su Mustaffa, U of Utara, MALAYSIA
Materializing Guanxi: Exploring the Communicative Practice of Liao Tian in Chinese Business Settings
Mylene Elisa Hardy-Zhang, U of Aix-Marseille 3, FRANCE
Guowei Jian, Cleveland State U, USA
The Materialization of Japanese Values in the Rhetoric of Japanese Corporate Missions
Toru Kiyomiya, Seinan Gakuin U, JAPAN
The Road to Rizong Or: Buddhist Organizing in the Indian Himalayas Amid Natural Disaster
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montréal, CANADA
Jennie M. Hwang, California Polytechnic State U, USA
Respondent
Linda L. Putnam, U of California-Santa Barbara, USA
In the spirit of the 2010 ICA conference theme on the im/materiality of communication, this panel will
examine how different philosophies, ideologies, values, or principles are materialized through
communication in various organizational contexts across Asia, and how these processes enable the
constitution of different kinds of social collectivities. The panel will bring together a set of expert scholars
on the constitution of Asian organizations, hailing from diverse parts of Asia, North America, and Europe.
3446
ICA/AMIC Joint Plenary
Wednesday
13:00-14:15
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participant
The Transnational Communication of "Racism": Migration, Media and the Shaping of International
Relations
Ien Ang, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
The past two years has seen an escalating diplomatic row between India and Australia over a series
attacks on Indian students in Australia. While Indian media were quick to report these attacks as "racist",
official responses in Australia tended to downplay the occurrence of racial motivations in these attacks.
This to-and-fro dance of accusation and denial of "racism" has resulted in a spiral of signification which
has sharpened national cultural divides. The case study shows how the complex entanglement of cultural
nationalism and transnational mobility is mediated through inherited discourses of race and "racism", in a
time when (post)colonial power hierarchies are being unsettled in a rapidly changing world, especially in
the Asia Pacific region.
3520
Constructing Discourses of Identity: Diaspora, Nation, and Nationalism
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 201
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Jillian M. Baez, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
Transnational Mobility and Place/Space-Making: The Case of Forced Migrants
Saskia Witteborn, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Ritual, Power, and Diaspora: What Can the Absence of a Simple Diagonal Line Through the Letter "L"
Tell Us?
Piotr Michal Szpunar, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Ummah, Islam, and Nationalism: Dilemmas of Identity Negotiation in Contemporary Pakistan
Satarupa Dasgupta, Temple U, USA
Using Diaspora: Japanese Nationalism and Its Appropriation of the Japanese Brazilian Diaspora
Yuko Kawai, Tokai U, JAPAN
"Red Storm Rising": China as Monstrosity, Contagion, and Military Might in Lou Dobbs Tonight
Helen Ho, U of Michigan, USA
3521
Perspectives of Media Uses and Gratifications
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 202
Communication and Technology
Chair
Louis W. Leung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
A National Study of College Students' Multiplatform Video Consumption and Satisfaction
Louisa S. Ha, Bowling Green State U, USA
Uses & Grats 2.0: Do New Technologies Bring New Gratifications?
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Anthony M. Limperos, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Uses, Gratifications, and Structures: A Model of Internet Use
Tang Tang, U of Wisconsin - Oshkosh, USA
Emil Bakke, Ohio U, USA
Roger Cooper, Ohio U, USA
A Situational Theory of New Media Behaviors: Using Multitasking With Mobile Phones as an Example
Weiyu Zhang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
3522
Is There a Role for Journalism in the Web 2.0 World? Theoretical and Empirical Evidence on the
Changing Identity of the Journalistic Profession
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Participants
The (Re-) Discovery of the Audience: The Relationship Between Journalism and Audience Under the
Conditions of Web 2.0
Wiebke Loosen, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Diffusion of Self-Conception in Journalism Since the Start of World Wide Web
Michael Haller, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Sebastian Sattler, U of Bielefeld, GERMANY
Redefining Journalistic Role: Journalism as the New Knowledge Profession
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Mathias Rentsch, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Journalists' Roles in Online Networks
Matthes Fleck, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Johannes Christian Fieseler, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Respondent
Holli A. Semetko, Emory U, USA
The topic of this panel is the identity of journalism in a changing communication environment. Since the
proliferation and dissemination of new communication roles in the World Wide Web many researchers
and journalists have asked the question what the future of traditional journalism will be and if there is a
future in the first place. The panelists will address this general issue from different viewpoints and based
on different evidence of their own. The papers focus on the relationship between journalists and the
audience within Web 2.0, the changing role definitions and role perceptions of journalists and its
consequences, especially concerning the core competence and function of journalism, and to the real
interaction between traditional journalism and Internet sources. The panel wants to develop a theoretical
and practical framework for the future of journalism.
3523
Communications Research in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 204
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Aligning Research and Scholarship With Education, Industry and Policy: Australian Instances
Stuart Duncan Cunningham, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Looking Both Ways: Communication Research in Australia
Sue Turnbull, La Trobe U, AUSTRALIA
Communication in Aotearoa New Zealand: Interdisciplinarity and Fields of Study
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Celia Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Communication in Aotearoa New Zealand-Situated Scholarship: Engaging Globally and Acting Locally
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Mary Louisa Simpson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Celia Kay Weaver, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
The Australian and New Zealand Communications Association (ANZCA) celebrates its thirtieth
anniversary in 2010. This panel will involve leading researchers from Australia and New Zealand in
critical reflection upon some of the distinctive features of the field as it has developed in the two, and
some of the current developments and future challenges facing communications research in the region.
Issues to be considered include: the institutional location of communication studies teaching and research;
the impact of cultural studies on the field; shifting forms of research support; the question of
"vocationalism" and links to industry and government; the difficulties in getting "local" research
recognized in international circuits of knowledge production and distribution; and the relationship of
communication to relations between indigenous and settler populations.
3524
Nothing More Than Feelings? Public Relations and the Rise of Emotions
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 205
Public Relations
Chair
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Promoting Public Relations Values: Emotional Labor in the Age of Transparency
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Emotional Stakeholders: A Threat to Organizational Legitimacy?
Vilma L. Luoma-aho, U of Jyväskylä, FINLAND
The Role of Emotion in Crisis Communication and Strategic Conflict Management
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Glen T. Cameron, U of Missouri, USA
Pathos and PR
Oyvind Ihlen, BI Norwegian School of Management, NORWAY
Public relations as a field is interested in impressions that shape interaction and collaboration, and these
are often formed on the basis of affect and emotions. The level of public involvement in organizational
affairs is changing with the introduction of various social media, and publics today do not only want to
participate, but show and express emotion for better or worse. This places new pressures on public
relations practitioners, who in this emotion work- environment have to balance not only their own but the
emotions of different stakeholders in good times and crises. This international panel studies the timely
topic of emotions in the context of public relations from four angles: practitioners' pressures, stakeholders'
emotions, crises situations coping strategies and the rhetoric level of emotions as part of the message. The
panel suggests public relations to play a key role in organizational survival in the era of heightened
emotions.
3525
Maintaining Strong Relationships: Navigating Distance, Power, and the Internet
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Sachiyo Morinaga Shearman, East Carolina U, USA
Participants
The Role of the Internet in Maintaining Intimate Relationships
Ellen Johanna Helsper, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Monica Therese Whitty, Queen's U Belfast, UNITED KINGDOM
Monica Gerber, London School of Economics and Political Science, UNITED KINGDOM
Geographic Distance and Communication During Courtship
Laura Stafford, U of Kentucky, USA
Conversational-Dominance and Ambiguity-Generation as Factors in Predicting Perceived Power: A Study
in Chinese Heterosexual Partners
Tang Shing Tung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Yin Zhang, School of Journalism and Communication, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
A Relational Orienting Typology for Sibling Dyads: Biological Relatedness, Identity, and Parenting
Practices as Predictors
Melissa Ann Tafoya, U of Connecticut, USA
Mark A. Hamilton, U of Connecticut, USA
3526
Microanalysis of Social Interaction and Identity Construction in Language Learning
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
3527
When Terror and Danger Collide: Risk and Crisis Communication Assessment
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Participants
Towards a Discourse Model for Analysing Negotiation of Meaning in Videoconferencing-Supported
Online Language Exchange
Yuping Wang, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Jianqiu Tian, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Using Conversation Analysis to Explore Classroom Talk-for-Learning
Rod Gardner, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Complaints and Troubles Talk in the Discursive Construction of International Student Identities
Greer Johnson, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Michael Haugh, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
The Discursive Construction of EFL Student Identities: Focus Group Accounts of Chinese Native
Speakers
Shujing Li, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Xiaoqi Ma, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Chair
William Timothy Coombs, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Participants
Terror Management Theory: Promoting Tolerance in Campus Safety Campaigns
Shari Veil, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kelly Mitchell, U of Oklahoma, USA
The 'Best Practices' in Risk and Crisis Communication: Past, Present, and Future
Daniela Korbas Magal, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Zvi Reich, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
Cocreation of Meaning in Environmental Communication
Carl H. Botan, George Mason U, USA
The Influence of Chemyon on Facework and Conflict Styles: Searching for the Korean Face and Its
Impact
Yungwook Kim, Ewha Womans U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jungeun Yang, Ewha Womans U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
3528
Race, Gender, and Affective Labor
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Participants
Laboring for a 'Good Name': Thoughts on Gender, Affective Labor, and the Rise of Digital Reputation
Alison Mary Virginia Hearn, U of Western Ontario, CANADA
Work's Intimacy
Melissa Gregg, U of Sydney, Australia, AUSTRALIA
Top Model: Theorizing Television's Labor Games
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Cadillac Consumer: Race, Labor, and Consumption
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
This panel explores the concept of 'affective' or 'immaterial' labor—increasingly claimed as the
predominant mode of postindustrial work, as shaping new forms of value and political subjectivities—by
focusing on its implications for gender and race at the present moment. Featuring new work within
communication and cultural studies, the papers on the panel each examine a specific case of the 'racing'
and/or 'gendering' of affective labor—the work of online raters that produces 'digital reputation,' female
information professionals, contestants on America's Next Top Model, and African American consumers
of the Cadillac—to explore the implications of affective labor for continuing struggles over race and/or
gender as well as the limits both theoretical and political of the concept as they are revealed in the details
of such examinations. Given its thematic focus on race and gender concerns, the panel seeks cosponsorship by the Ethnicity and Race in Communication and Feminist Studies divisions of ICA.
3530
CMC Theory: Tests and Explorations
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Malcolm R. Parks, U of Washington, USA
Participants
Computer-Mediated Impression Formation: A Test of the Sticky-Cues Model Using Facebook
Brandon Van Der Heide, Ohio State U, USA
The Disclosure-Intimacy Link in Computer-Mediated Communication: An Attribution Extension of
Hyperpersonal Model
Li Jiang, Cornell U, USA
Natalya N. Bazarova, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
The Effect of Discursive Anonymity on Language Use in Computer-Mediated Communication
Young Hoon Kim, Rutgers U, USA
Scott Seung Woo Choi, Rutgers U, USA
You Don't Know Me But Can I Be Your Friend? Accepting Strangers as Friends in Facebook
Serena Leow, U of North Texas, USA
Zuoming Wang, U of North Texas, USA
3531
Making Sense of Social Network Sites
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Wenhong Chen, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Social Sensemaking: Propensity to Use Facebook to Reduce Classroom Equivocality
Cliff Lampe, Michigan State U, USA
Nicole Ellison, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Vitak, Michigan State U, USA
D. Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Richard Wash, Michigan State U, USA
To Friend or Not To Friend? How Facebook Can Make My Friend Request Decisions More Efficient
Guan-Soon Khoo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
The Effects of Social Network Sites on Romantic Relationships
Sonja Utz, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Camiel J. Beukeboom, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Contingencies of Self-Worth and Social Networking Site Behavior
Michael A. Stefanone, U at Buffalo, USA
Derek J. Lackaff, U of Texas, USA
Devan Rosen, U of Hawaii, USA
3532
Processing Political Information
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Information Systems
Chair
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Polarization in Less Than 30 Seconds: Continuous Monitoring of Voter Response to Campaign
Advertising
Shanto Iyengar, Stanford U, USA
Simon Jackman, Stanford U, USA
Kyu S. Hahn, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jongho Lim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Processing Political Messages From Favored Candidates: The Effect of Candidate Favorability on
Attitudes Toward Issues
Sungeun Chung, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Moniza Waheed, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Systematic Information Processing of Political Issues
Michael René Bauer, U of Zürich (IPMZ), SWITZERLAND
Miriam De Acevedo, U Zürich (IPMZ), SWITZERLAND
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Christian Schemer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Covering the Crisis: Economic News and Economic Expectations
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Joost van Spanje, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rens Vliegenthart, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
3533
Framing Presidential Elections and Their Results
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Chair
Clarissa C. David, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Participants
Editorial Inkblots: A Comparative Analysis of Presidential Election Cartoons from 1960, 1980, and 2008
Susan Lee Kline, Ohio State U, USA
Megan Hill, Ohio State U, USA
Racial Framing in Coverage of the 2008 Presidential Election
Kimberly A. Gross, George Washington U, USA
Johanna Harvey, George Washington U, USA
Claire Low, George Washington U, USA
U.S. and International Coverage of the Election of Barack Obama: Trends and Differences
Salma Ghanem, Central Michigan U, USA
Kimberly Selber, U of Texas – Pan American, USA
Value-Framing of Issues in the 2004 Presidential Campaign by American Newspapers in Russian
Yulia Sergeevna Medvedeva, Freelance writer, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Respondent
Clarissa C. David, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
3534
Commercial Nationalism
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Iowa, USA
Participants
The Banality of Commercial Nationalism
Graeme Turner, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Consuming Modern Mexico: Television and Consumer Culture on the Mexico-Belize Border
Anna Cristina Pertierra, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
The Commercial Re-invention of the National on Slovene Reality TV
Zala Volcic, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Securitainment: Watching the Border for Fun and Safety
Mark B. Andrejevic, U of Iowa, USA
This panel explores the ways in which recent developments in commercial broadcasting shape emerging
representations of the nation and national identity and belonging. It explores the impact that the marketing
of nationalism has on commercial broadcasting and, in turn the influence that commercialism has on the
portrayal of national identity. It argues for the salience of the notion of "commercial nationalism" in
considering media developments in the post-cold war era. Drawing on international case studies it argues
that an understanding of commercial nationalism is crucial to an interpretation of the political and cultural
implications of recent developments in broadcasting in many parts of the world, including regions where
state and public interest broadcasters have ceded the ideological field to commercial interests.
3535
Top Papers in Organizational Communication
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Intersecting Difference: A Dialectical Perspective
Linda L. Putnam, U of California-Santa Barbara, USA
Jody Jahn, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Jane Stuart Baker, U of Alabama, USA
Group Practices That Support the Use of Digital Knowledge Repositories: A Multilevel Analysis of
Information Provision
Meikuan Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Joshua B. Barbour, Texas A and M U, USA
Chunke Su, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
The Multilevel Impact of Aging: Age, Evolution, and Phase Change in the Child Rights NGO Network
Drew Berkley Margolin, U of Southern California, USA
Cuihua Shen, U of Southern California, USA
Seungyoon Lee, Purdue U, USA
Matthew Scott Weber, U of Southern California, USA
Peter Monge, U of Southern California, USA
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
Theorizing a Discourse-Based Framework for Corporate Social Responsibility
Rahul Mitra, Purdue U, USA
Respondent
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
3536
Alternative Media, Resistance, and Protest Strategies in a Global Society
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 307
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Contesting the Public Sphere in Muslim Society: New Media in Malaysia
Jack Lule, Lehigh U, USA
DIY Zines and Direct-Action Activism in Canada
Sandra Jeppesen, Concordia U, CANADA
Negotiating Hegemony: Alternative and Mainstream Media Coverage of the Globalization Debate
Jacob Groshek, Iowa State U, USA
Protesting Retail Liberalization in India: An Examination of Discursive Strategies Used by Small
Retailers
Rajesh Gaur, U of Kentucky, USA
3537
Human Rights, Human Trafficking, and Campaign Strategies
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Karin Gwinn Wilkins, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Cross-National Newspaper Coverage of Human Trafficking
Melissa Danielle Koerner, College of New Jersey, USA
Jennifer Harrison, College of New Jersey, USA
Jessica Omland, College of New Jersey, USA
Ashley Rush, College of New Jersey, USA
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Effects of an Indian-Produced Prosocial Children's Television Programme in Nepal
William J. Brown, Regent U, USA
Deborah Anne Strong, Regent U, USA
Human Rights of Rites: Multiple Case Study of Rights-Based Antifemale Genital Cutting Projects
Kyung Sun Lee, U of Texas, USA
"Made in Ukraine" Women: Forced Sexual Trafficking and Sexual Tourism; Hope for Social Justice and
Change
Olesya Venger, U of Pennsylvania, USA
3538
Advertising and the Magazines Industry in Asia
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Katherine T. Frith, Southern Illinois U, USA
Participants
The Close Relationship Between International Women's Magazines and Transnational Advertising in
Korea
Hyun Sook Oh, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Men Versus Women: Images and Discourses in Her World and FHM Singapore
Michele Cheng Hoon Khoo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The Limits of Global Fashion: The Triumph of Local Conceptions of Beauty, Sexuality and Power in
Contemporary Japanese Fashion Magazines
Todd Joseph Miles Holden, Tohoku U, JAPAN
The Beauty Concept in Chinese Culture: Images of Women in Taiwanese Women's Magazines
Pei Shan Yu, Southern Illinois U, USA
Respondent
Narayanan Iyer, Southern Illinois U, USA
The emergence of international magazines in Asia has been driven by global brands in need of advertising
vehicles to help them establish a brand presence in emerging markets with high economic growth. These
global magazines attract a large percentage of the advertising revenue in these markets, and thus local
magazines must now compete for advertising dollars with the global media. This panel will explore the
growth of men's and women's fashion magazines in selected Asian countries. Specifically, panelists will
examine the types of images being shown to Asian audiences and the types of products being advertised
in international as well as local magazines. By calling on a panel of scholars from Japan, Korea, and
Taiwan we hope to offer insights into how magazine advertising is shaping consumer culture in this
region.
3539
The Ecologies of the City: Urban Matters of Communication
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 310
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Thom Gencarelli, Manhattan College, USA
Participants
The Urban Communication Environment: A Model of Displacement
Gary Gumpert, Urban Communication Foundation, USA
Susan Drucker, Hofstra U, USA
Lewis Mumford's Ecology of Cites and the "Destiny of Megalopolis"
Peter Haratonik, The New School, USA
The City as Counter-Environment in an Age of Sprawl
Thom Gencarelli, Manhattan College, USA
Toward a Gastronomical Ecology of the Global City
Casey Lum, William Paterson U, USA
Virtually Urban: Modeling the City and the Public
Benjamin Hodges, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Icts And Ethnic Modernities: Rural-Urban Mobility And Space
Anthony Y.H. Fung, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Linchuan Jack Qiu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Mumford's Megamachine and the Post-Industrial City of Consumption
Tim Simpson, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
In the tradition of Mumford's examination of the city, McLuhan's theme of media determinism, and
Meyrowitz's consideration of the home and the influence of media technologies on social spaces, this
panel will examine the city as an environment of communication. Cities, by definition, provide a
communication environment. Physical spaces in a city, the structures and spaces in which humans
function and dwell constitutes and facilitates the domain for symbolic and social interaction. The
electronic, typographical, auditory and/or visual connection and dissemination of information are the
environments of connection and transmission. The physical urban environment and the media
environment comprise the total communication environment. This panel seeks to explore the totality of
that environment and its ecological nature.
3540
Comparative Research in Communication Law & Policy
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Participants
Introduction: How to Compare Media Policy and Regulation
Manuel Puppis, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
The Legal Perspective: Comparing Media Law
Monroe E. Price, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Comparative Communication Policy Research in Africa
Lyombe S. Eko, U of Iowa, USA
Comparative Communication Policy Research in Asia
Ki-Sung Kwak, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Comparative Communication Policy Research in Europe and North America
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
The panel, spanning a regional variety that goes beyond the usual North Atlantic zone, consists of
communication scholars who are experts in the field of media policy, regulation and governance, and who
have been engaged in comparative research.
3541
Game Studies Interest Group Top Papers
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
The Impact of Racing and Drive'Em Up Games on Risky Driving Behavior
Kathleen Beullens, Katholieke U - Leuven, BELGIUM
A Season in Syberia: Gameplay as Activity in Point-and-Click Adventure Video Games
Richard Holt, Northern Illinois U, USA
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
User Demand and Mood Repair: The Intervention Potential of Video Game Interactivity
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Top papers from the interest group, including the top student paper.
3542
Communication in China: Some Recent Developments
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
International Communication Research in Mainland China: Study of Major Journals
Yonghua Zhang, Shanghai U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Context and Content of Mobile Newspapers in China: Case Study of "i-news"
Guoliang Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Wei Hu, Shanghai Jiao Tong U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The Effect of the Multimodality of Internet Use on Political Knowledge and Participation
Lu Wei, Zhejiang U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Media Use and Class Identity in Urban China: An Analysis of Survey Data From Shanghai
Baohua Zhou, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The Global Circulation of Chinese Television Programs: Why CCTV Has a Limited Impact on the Global
Television Landscape?
Hong Zhang, Zhejiang U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Communication in China entered a new stage and underwent major transformations since the beginning of
China's "open and reform" policy three decades ago. The tempo and scale of changes in the
communication scene intensified in the past decade as the political reform was joined by the forces of
globalization and new media developments which have brought about more changes in the social and
cultural dimensions. This panel gathers a number of recent studies in communication in China to
showcase communication research in China today. Of the themes covered include the following: trends in
international communication research; developments and features of mobile newspapers (e-news); the
Internet and political participation; media and social class identity; and glocalization and global reach of
CCTV.
3543
Interpersonal Processes Across Cultures
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Margaret Miller Butcher, USA
Participants
Exploring Differences and Similarities in Predictors and Use of Upward Influence Tactics in Two
Countries
Isabel C. Botero, Illinois State U, USA
Elizabeth Foste, Illinois State U, USA
Kristin Pace, Michigan State U, USA
Toward a Pancultural Typology of Deception Motives
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Mohamed Ali, Michigan State U, USA
Marleah Dean, U of New Mexico, USA
Jeffery Hartman, Michigan State U, USA
Rasha A Abdulla, American U in Cairo, EGYPT
Fahad Sultan, Michigan State U, USA
Karina Judith Garcia-Ruano, Michigan State U, USA
Cultural Value Orientations Among Students in Japan, Thailand, and the United States: Cross-Cultural
Comparisons and Predictors of Intrapersonal Communication Affect
Robert M. McCann, U of Southern California, USA
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Shaughan A. Keaton, Louisiana State U, USA
Culture and Self-Construal as Predictors of Relational Responses to Emotional Infidelity: China and the
United States
Ruifang Zhang, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Stella Ting-Toomey, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Peter S. Lee, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Respondent
Ruifang Zhang, California State U, Fullerton, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
3544
High Density Session: Processing Email, Blogs, Wikis, and Social Networks
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Participants
Credibility in the Blogosphere: Source Effects on the Selection of Online Science Information
Stephan Winter, U Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Kathrin Schielke, U Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Jana Appel, U Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Democracy and Diversity in Wikipedia: A Preliminary Exploration of Social Network Analysis on Users'
Contribution
Xiao Wei, U of Michigan, USA
Shukun Tang, U of Science and Technology of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jiang Yang, U of Michigan, USA
Jianxun Jackson CHU, U of Science and Technology of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Effect of Trust and Privacy Concerns on Social Networking: A Trust-Based Acceptance Model for Social
Networking Systems
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Examining Affective Dispositions in Online Comments Readerships of Sporting Events
Po-Lin Pan, Arkansas State U, USA
Sandra Combs, Arkansas State U, USA
Examining the Role of Microblogs in Supporting Information Exchange
Nirupama Dharmavaram Sreenivasan, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Chei Sian Lee, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dion Goh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Online Political Debates: Evidence From a Content Analysis of Blogs
Carmen Stavrositu, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
Why Do People Get Phished? Testing Individual Differences in Phishing Susceptibility Within an
Integrated Information-Processing Model
Arun Vishwanath, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Tejaswini Herath, Brock U, USA
Raghav Rao, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Rui Chen, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Jingguo Wang, U of Texas - Arlington, USA
3545
Top Papers in Health Communication
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Participants
Exploratory Investigation of Interpersonal Discussions in Response to a Safer Sex Mass Media Campaign
Donald W. Helme, U of Kentucky, USA
Seth M. Noar, U of Kentucky, USA
Suzie L. Allard, U of Tennessee, USA
Rick S. Zimmerman, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), USA
Philip Palmgreen, U of Kentucky, USA
Karen Jean McClanahan, U of Tennessee, USA
The Tisankhenji Radio Program for Young Girls in Malawi: Using Schools for Promoting Career Goals to
Reduce Vulnerability to HIV Infection
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Rachana Sikka, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Triza Kakhobwe, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Joel Suzi, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Glory Mkandawire, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Rupali Limaye, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Jane Brown, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Lisa Aslan, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Benjamin Kaneka, Chancellor College, U of Malawi, MALAWI
The Influence of Sexually Explicit Internet Material on Sexual Risk Behavior: A Comparison of
Adolescents and Adults
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Effects of a Narrative and Summary of Scientific Evidence on Attributions of Responsibility for Obesity
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Michael A. Shapiro, Cornell U, USA
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
3546
Mediating Space, Place, and Politics
Wednesday
14:30-15:45
Theater
Theme Sessions
Participants
Communicating Urban Spaces On and Off Screen: The Mediation of Los Angeles in the Films Crash and
Quinceañera
George Allen Onas Villanueva, U of Southern California, USA
India's Media Revolution: Meaning and Materiality of Politics, Culture, and Technology in the World's
Largest Democracy
Debashis Aikat, U of North Carolina, USA
Signifying Thai Muslims: Resisting Stereotypes or Reinforcing the Tourism Machine?
Treepon Kirdnark, Bangkok U, THAILAND
Melissa A. Wall, California State U - Northridge, USA
Respondent
Kevin DeLuca, U of Utah, USA
3620
Malevolent Media: The Potentially Harmful Effects of Media on Youth
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Ellen Johanna Helsper, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Cyberbullying: Predicting Victimisation and Perpetration
Michel Rene Walrave, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Wannes Heirman, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Exploring Problematic Mobile Phone Use: Relationships Between Adolescents' Characteristics and
Mobile Phone Addiction
Namsu Park, U of Texas, USA
Yongsuk Hwang, Konkuk U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun Huh, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Is Internet Addiction a Distinct Construct From Other Psychopathological Conditions? Evidence From a
Panel Study on a Representative Sample in Hong Kong, China
KW Fu, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Scripts of Sexual Desire and Danger in U.S. and Dutch Female Teen Magazines: A Cross-Cultural
Content-Analytic Comparison
Suchi Pradyumn Joshi, Amsterdam School of Communication Research, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
John P. Murray, Kansas State U, USA
3621
Mobile Communication and Social Implication: From the Perspectives of Converging Technologies,
Networking, and Social Psychology
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 202
Communication and Technology
Chair
Sangmi Kim, Nagoya U, JAPAN
Participants
Mobile Phone Use and Delinquent Tendencies Among Japanese Teenagers
Kenichi Ishii, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
The Social Utility of Mobile Phone E-mail for Japanese Youth
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, USA
Use of Mobile Phone TV in Japan: With Respect to Social Construction of Mobile Phone as Youth
Culture
Ron Korenaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
Mobile Phone Use and the Scope of Social Perspective: Why and How Mobile Phone Use Correlates
With Social Trust?
Tetsuro Kobayashi, National Institution of Informatics, JAPAN
The Exposure of Video Contents on the Mobile: Focusing on the Change the Behavior of Video Content
Viewing
Sangmi Kim, Nagoya U, JAPAN
Including the advancement of IT, Mobile is transformed into lifestyle infrastructure. In this Session, we
consider the social and cultural implication of media convergence with respect to mobile phone usage of
Japanese youth from the diverse points of view. Widely known around the world for the views of
collectivism, Japan is generally regarded as one of the most group-oriented culture in the world. However,
it would seem that these kinds of image of Japanese are quickly slipping among the Japanese youth,
meaning they are more like individualized and intend to be aloof. Participants of this session use the
results of nation-wide surveys conducted respectively to explore the associations between the Japanese
youths' culture including social psychology and networking and the engagement of mobile
communication. We will also discuss how we can develop the theoretical framework to draw the
relationship for more cross-cultural based research.
3622
Journalism Studies Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 203
Journalism Studies
3623
Constructing Civic Identity in Communicative Spheres of Belonging
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 204
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Problematic Citizenship: Arab Speakers in the European Union
Christina Slade, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Seeking Ontological Security Beyond the Nation: The Role of Transnational Television
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Youth Publics and Construction of Citizenship in a Transnational Space
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Globalism, Localism, Vocalism: Constructing Civic Literacy Across Digital Divides
Kirsten Drotner, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
This panel will discuss new formations of civic identity in the contextual framework of transnational
public spaces. In the advanced stage of a networked global public, civic identity is constantly
discoursively re-negotiated and re-conceptualised, not so much vis- a- vis a national or even a 'global'
public but rather across often ritualised sets of 'publics of belonging.' Presentations will address this
concept in four perspectives: the translocal communicative negotiation of civic identity among Arab
communities in Europe, forms of 'communicative' civic belongings through the lens of ''ontological
security" and identify new communicative cultures of diaspora, emerging generational specific
transnational publics in their relevance for the formation of global and local citizenship. The panel
presentations will conclude with a debate of new conceptions of civic literacy.
3624
Visualizing the Crowd in American Culture
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 205
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Participants
"The People" in Jackson Era Lithographs: Caricatures of Poverty and Citizen (In)Action
Brandon Inabinet, Furman U, USA
"Yes We Can": Public Figures and the Photographic Representation of Obama's Crowd in the 2008 U.S.
Presidential Election
Walter Patrick Wade, Northwestern U, USA
Mass Publics and Spectacular Citizenship: The American Music Festival
Caitlin Bruce, Northwestern U, USA
Same Events, Two Stories: Comparing the Photographic Coverage of the 2008 Anti-China/Olympics
Demonstrations in Chinese & U.S. Newspapers
Ying Huang, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Shahira S. Fahmy, U of Arizona, USA
Respondent
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
The representation of crowds has a long and complicated political history. Crowds are representative of a
variety of different aggregate political or social groupings: they can represent "the people" of popular
sovereignty, the public, a social movement, a protest, a congregation, an audience of popular
entertainment, or a mob. As a result, the manner in which collectives are represented in visual mass media
has consequences for the judgments that public audiences pass on particular crowds, enabling or
constraining individual participation in collective political action. This panel examines this tension and
others by analyzing Jackson-era political cartoons, 1960s and contemporary music festivals, and the 2008
U.S. presidential election. The overall goal is to understand how public audiences come to identify
themselves with or distance themselves from the various collective groups that make up social and
political life. Furthermore, it asks how such relationships differ across time and social space.
3625
Diverse Approaches to Understanding the Impact of Self-Perceptions in Interpersonal Episodes
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Amanda J. Holmstrom, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
Interaction to Achieve Self-Verification in the Romantic Relationships
Tatsuya Imai, U of Texas, USA
Steve McCornack, Michigan State U, USA
Communication Efficacy as a Mediator Between Past and Subsequent Communication Following Events
That Increase Uncertainty
Su Ahn Jang, U of Missouri - St. Louis, USA
Argumentativeness, Religion, and Self-Construal: A Cross-Cultural Analysis
Stephen Michael Croucher, Bowling Green State U, USA
Big Brother Is Watching You
Sabrina Sobieraj, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Antony S.R. Manstead, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
3626
Language & Social Interaction Division Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
3627
Corporate Social Responsibility Research and Practice
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 208
Public Relations
Participants
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
Todd L. Sandel, U of Oklahoma, USA
Chair
Mary Ann Ferguson, U of Florida, USA
Participants
Beyond Eurocentrism, Toward Empowerment: A Holistic Examination of CSR Research and Practice Insights From Singapore
Mui Hean Lee, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Ka Ying Angela Mak, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a Halo Effect in Issue Management: Public Response to
Negative News About Prosocial Local Private Company
Seung Ho Cho, Mississippi State U, USA
Yong-Chan Kim, U of Iowa, USA
Corporate Social Responsibility and Reputation in Emerging Economy Contexts: An Indian Case Study
Rahul Mitra, Purdue U, USA
College Students' Perceptions About Responsible Drinking Social Causes: The Effects of Sponsorship
Identity, Perceived Motives, and Source Credibility
Yeonsoo Kim, U of Florida, USA
Sun-young Park, U of Florida, USA
Respondent
Chun-ju Flora Hung, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
3628
The New Wave of Pragmatism in Communication Studies
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Signs Matter: Pragmatist Communication Theory in a Semiotic Framework
Mats V. Bergman, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Rhetorical Pragmatism: Communicative Practices for Contemporary Democracy
Robert Danisch, Concordia U, CANADA
Pragmatism and Environmental Communication
Chris Russill, Carleton U, CANADA
The End of Communication: How to Do Things With Media
Klaus Bruhn Jensen, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Respondent
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
Philosophical pragmatism has been a significant substream in the history of ideas and an important
influence on communication research - from John Dewey via James Carey to John Durham Peters.
Recently, a "New Wave of Pragmatism in Communication Studies" (Bergman, 2008) has been gaining
momentum. This panel brings together some of the central contributors to this new wave, addressing the
applicability of the pragmatist tradition to research questions currently facing the field.
3630
ICT Adoption and Diffusion
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Lidwien van de Wijngaert, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Online Photo Sharing as Mediated Communication
Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, Pennsylvania State U, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
"My Mac is Better Than Your PC!": The Role of Attributional Biases in the Diffusion of Innovations
Arun Vishwanath, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Kate LaVail, SUNY at Buffalo, USA
An Empirical Study of Competing Applications: Three Comparison Processes (TOP 3 Faculty Paper)
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Hock Chuan Chan, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
A Close Look at Young People's Mobile TV Adoption: How Is It Different From General Mobile TV
Adoption?
Hyunjoo Lee, U at Buffalo, - SUNY, USA
Daejoong Kim, U of Buffalo, USA
Jungho Ryu, Internet Election News Deliberation Commission (IENDC) at National Election
Commission, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Sungjoon Lee, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
3631
Intercultural Contexts and Social Network Sites
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Privacy Management in Facebook and Cyworld
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Seong Eun Cho, Rutgers U, USA
A Cross-Cultural Study of Social Relationships and Use of Social Networking Sites in the US and China
Shu-Chuan Chu, DePaul U, USA
Sejung Marina Choi, U of Texas, USA
The Facebook Paradox: A Comparison of the Cultural Beliefs of Facebook Users
Jorge F. Pena, U of Texas, USA
Anu Nadina Sandlin, U of Texas, USA
Social Networking and Adjustment to Cultural Change
Jih-Hsuan Lin, Michigan State U, USA
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
Mijung Kim, Michgan State U, USA
Sung Yeun Kim, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
3632
Communication in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Elections
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Paul D'Angelo, College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
An Analysis of Candidates McCain and Obama's Rhetoric During the 2008 Presidential Campaign
Thomas Vitiello, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Malte Carlos Hinrichsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Assessing Political Outcomes of New Media Use in the 2008 Presidential Election
Jacob Groshek, Iowa State U, USA
Daniela V. Dimitrova, Iowa State U, USA
Bias in the Flesh: Attack Ads and the Effects of Visual Cues in the 2008 Presidential Campaign
Solomon Messing, Stanford U, USA
Ethan Plaut, Stanford U, USA
Maria Jabon, Stanford U, USA
The Troubling Consequences of Online Election Rumoring
R. Kelly Garrett, Ohio State U, USA
Respondent
Paul D'Angelo, College of New Jersey, USA
3633
International Studies of Framing
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 304
Political Communication
Chair
Christian Baden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
"Yankee Go Home": Class and Place in Swedish Television News
Eva Reimers, Linkoping U, SWEDEN
Contextualizing Frames in Political Discourse: Using Semantic Network Analysis to Investigate Political
Parties' Framing Strategies - TOP STUDENT PAPER
Christian Baden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Framing China Under Global Financial Crisis: Projection of Power in U.S. Elite Media Discourse
Yunya Song, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
News Frames of the Population Issue in the Philippines: Do They Reflect Strategic Frames of Message
Sources?
Clarissa C. David, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Jenna Mae Laurinaria Atun, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Erika Fille, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Christopher Monterola, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Sending and Receiving: The Ethical Framing of Intra-EU Migration in the European Press
Ekaterina Balabanova, U of Liverpool, UNITED KINGDOM
Alex Balch, U of Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
3634
Popular Communication Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 305
Popular Communication
3635
Organizational Communication Division Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 306
Organizational Communication
3636
Genre Elasticity and Adaptation
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 307
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Dennis K. Mumby, U of North Carolina, USA
Chair
Pia Majbritt Jensen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Participants
From Global to (G)local? Audiovisual Flows and Audience Preferences in Central and Eastern Europe
Vaclav Stetka, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Local vs. International Television Drama: Niche Analysis of South Korean Audience's Use of Korean,
American and Japanese Dramas
Byeng-Hee Chang, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyoungkoo Khang, U of Alabama, USA
Irkwon Jeong, Kwangwoon U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jin-Young Chung, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participation and Social Change: Indian Idol and Social Implications of Reality TV Shows in India
Lauhona Ganguly, American U, USA
The International Extent and Elasticity of Lifestyle Television
Pia Majbritt Jensen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
3637
Globalization, Cultural Geography, and Language
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Cultural Globalization and the Global Spread of English: Different Fields, Similar Paradigms
An Helene Kuppens, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Global, Hybrid, or Multiple? The New Cultural Geography of Identities
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
My Knowledge Is More Important Than Yours: A Battle of Competing "Truths"
Simin Michelle Chen, U of Minnesota, USA
Technology Adoption and Content Consumption in Chinese Television: Local City, National City, and
Global City
Jia Lu, Tsinghua U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
3638
Mass Communication Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Francesca Renee Dillman Carpentier, U of North Carolina, USA
3639
From the Student's Perspective: Instructional Communication Research
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 310
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Kekeli Kwabla Nuviadenu, Bethune-Cookman U, USA
Participants
Preferred Communication Channels Between Students and Faculty Within Extra Class Interactions
Sarah Parsloe, Marist College, USA
Amanda Benton, Marist College, USA
Daniel Cochece Davis, Marist College, USA
Nicholas Strang-Wolf, Marist College, USA
Receiver Apprehension and Multicommunicating
Alla Kushniryk, Mount Saint Vincent U, CANADA
Understanding How Students Conceptualize Knowledge: The Case of Singapore
Chunwah Lee, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Memorable Messages for Navigating College Life
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Carolyn Kay LaPlante, Michigan State U, USA
Sandi W. Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Jennifer Cornacchione, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Russell, USA
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
3640
Communication Law and Policy Division Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
3641
Games Studies Interest Group Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 312
Game Studies
3642
Representating and Regulating Sexuality and Gender in Asia
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 313
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Participants
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
John L. Sherry, Michigan State U, USA
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Chair
Jimmie Manning, Northern Kentucky U, USA
Participants
Same Tongzhi, Different Destiny: Examining the Gay Website Regulations in China, Hong Kong,
Singapore, and Taiwan
Cheng-Nan Hou, I-Shou U, TAIWAN
Living With Strangers: Cinema of Tsai Ming-Liang
Kai-man Chang, U of Tulsa, USA
Legal Transphobia: The Case of Hong Kong
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
3643
Insider's and Outsider's Perspectives on Cultural Influences on Assertiveness and
Argumentativeness: Cases From Australasian Countries
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Suwichit Chaidaroon, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Suwichit Chaidaroon, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
James Haft, Chulalongkorn U, THAILAND
Kawpong Polyorat, Khon Kaen U, THAILAND
Kazuya Hara, Meikai U, JAPAN
This panel consists of four empirical studies that highlight two interrelated communication traits:
argumentativeness and indirectness. Studies to be presented on this panel suggests that argumentativeness,
as form of assertiveness, is influenced by several cultural factors and can manifest itself directly or
indirectly in different cultures. Specifically, in Asian countries, indirect arguments are preferred in order
to promote social harmony. The panelists will share their findings of both qualitative and quantitative
research from three distinct national cultures including Thailand, Japan, and Australia. The presenters
represent both insiders and outsiders from the cultures they studied and thus will provide both emic and
etic views on the targeted intercultural phenomenon. At the end, the panelists hope to open up a dialogue
with participants to gain better understandings of argumentativeness and indirectness as a preferred form
of communication in certain cultures.
3644
Entertainment Research: Theoretical Developments and Empirical Explorations
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Participants
Media Enjoyment and Appreciation: The Role of Perceived Cognitive and Emotional Challenge in
Entertainment Experience
Anne Bartsch, Martin Luther U Halle, GERMANY
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Synchronization Theory, Flow, and Media Entertainment
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Role of Coping Styles for Media Enjoyment and Appreciation
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Matthias R. Hastall, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Entertainment as Eudaimonic Well-Being: Dimensions and Measurement
Holger Schramm, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Matthias Hofer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Entertainment and Melancholia
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Christoph Klimmt, Johannes Gutenberg U - Mainz, GERMANY
Respondent
Jennings Bryant, U of Alabama, USA
While entertainment theory and research within the field of Communication was scarce and somewhat
unusual until the 1980s, the discipline has seen the development of strong theories and various research
programs devoted to media users' exposure to entertainment programs and its effects over the past 25
years or so. But only within the past few years there has been a growing interest in new theoretical
approaches that try to differentiate, elaborate, and sometimes even overcome the more "traditional" ways
of thinking and theorizing about exposure to entertainment. This panel brings together scholars from the
US and Europe who have suggested new ways to theorize and research entertainment through media.
3645
Health Communication Division Business Meeting
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Participants
Dale E. Brashers, U of Illinois, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, U of Maryland, USA
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
3646
IAMCR Panel: Eclectic Approaches to Matters of Communication
Wednesday
16:00-17:15
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cees J. Hamelink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Locating the Hinge: When Material Decision-Making for the Internet Becomes Immaterial
Communication Policy
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
The Geopolitics of Representation
Bella Mody, U of Colorado, USA
The Great Communication Challenge: Mindless Communication
Cees J. Hamelink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
3722
Joint Reception for Journalism Studies and Mass Communication Divisions
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Mass Communication
3722
Joint Reception for Mass Communication and Journalism Studies Divisions
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 203
Mass Communication
Journalism Studies
3726
Language & Social Interaction Division Reception
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
3734
Popular Communication Reception
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
3735
Organizational Communication Division Social Hour
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
3740
Communication Law and Policy Division Reception
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
3745
Health Communication Division Reception
Wednesday
17:30-18:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
David B. Buller, Klein Buendel, Inc., USA
Participants
Dale E. Brashers, U of Illinois, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, U of Maryland, USA
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
3819
Wednesday
19:00-21:00
Conrad Hilton
Salon IV
ICA Fellows Reception
Sponsored Sessions
This reception is open to all ICA Fellows
3909
ICA Graduate Student Reception and Open Space Image and Music Fusion Show
Wednesday
20:00-22:00
Balaclava
Sponsored Sessions
Live DJ/VJ show in collaboration with the Human Studies Film Archives of the Smithsonian Institution
with original chill-out music and archival and contemporary images reprocessed from laptops on the
theme of Open Space in Southeast Asia.
4120
"It's Not That Simple": Understanding the Complexity of Youth Internet Use
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Jennifer A. Robinson, Murdoch U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Challenges Communicating Puberty and Decision Making Information to Teens: Development of an
Online Tailored Intervention
Juliann Cortese, Florida State U, USA
Mia Liza A. Lustria, Florida State U, USA
Madhurima Sarkar, Florida State U, USA
Sarah Redmond, Florida State U, USA
Casey McLaughlin, Florida State U, USA
Ivee Rosario, Florida State U, USA
Effects of Motives for Internet Use, Aloneness, and Age Identity Gratifications on Online Social
Behaviors and Social Support Among Adolescents
Louis W. Leung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The Effects of Resilience on Problematic Online Game Uses Among Korean Adolescents
Wooyeol Shin, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joohan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Dynamic Relationship Between East Asian Adolescents' Use of the Internet and Their Use of Other
Media
Joo-Young Janice Jung, International Christian U, JAPAN
Wan-Ying Lin, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Yong-Chan Kim, U of Iowa, USA
Respondent
Jennifer A. Robinson, Murdoch U, AUSTRALIA
4121
Representation of Minorities in the Media
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 202
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Miyase Christensen, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Participants
Fallen Heroes: The Recovery of White Western Heroes
Michael G. Lacy, DePaul U, USA
Grief and the Contradictions of Identity: Japanese Americans View Images of Japan in American Media
Lori Kido Lopez, U of Southern California, USA
Assimilation Into the Literary Mainstream? The Classification of Ethnic Minority Authors in Newspaper
Reviews in the United States, the Netherlands and Germany
Pauwke Berkers, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Susanne Janssen, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marc Verboord, Erasmus U - - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Polish Plumber as a Pawn in the British Newspaper Discourse on Polish Post-EU Enlargement
Immigration to the UK (Top Paper - 1st Place)
Joshua F. Hoops, Washington State U, USA
Ryan Thomas, Washington State U, USA
Jolanta Drzewiecka, Washington State U, USA
Susan Dente Ross, Washington State U, USA
Media Representations of Race Cue the State of Media Opening in Brazil (Top Paper 3rd Place)
Tania Cantrell Rosas-Moreno, Loyola U - Maryland, USA
4122
Journalists' Interactions With Public Relations and Sources
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Coorientational Analysis of Third-Person Effects in the Source-Reporter Relationships Between Public
Relations Practitioners and Journalists
Jae-Hwa Shin, U of Southern Mississippi, USA
Elite & Popular Newspaper Publication of Press Releases: Differential Success Factors?
Sam N. Lehman-Wilzig, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Michal Seletzky, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Beyond Press Releases: Detecting PR Involvement in the Current News Environment (TOP THREE
FACULTY PAPER)
Zvi Reich, Ben-Gurion U of the Negev, ISRAEL
The Usual Suspects: How Journalists Choose and Use Expert Sources
Daniel Noelleke, U of Muenster, GERMANY
Respondent
Romy Frohlich, U of Munich, GERMANY
4125
Endangered Languages
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 206
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Peter Austin, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Itesh Sachdev, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Ideologies of Revitalisation of Endangered Languages
Peter Austin, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Perspectives of Tribal Language Speakers of South Asia
Anvita Abbi, Jawaharlal Nehru U, INDIA
Language Planning for Endangered Languages: Majority and Minority Perspectives
Julia Sallabank, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Vitality of Indigenous Languages: Some Considerations From Canada and Bolivia
Itesh Sachdev, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Denise Arnold, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Juan de Dios Yapita, Instituto de Lengua y Cultura Aymara - La Paz, BOLIVIA
Respondent
Bernadette Maria Watson, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
The world's linguistic diversity is in the hands of a fraction of its population, and is being threatened as
communities shift from small languages to the few dominant tongues that are perceived to have economic,
political, social and personal power. Although factors such as 'language attitudes' have been identified as
contributing to this shift, there has been little research into what this means in theory and practice, and
how it operates across the diverse language communities of the world. Also, although various individual
attempts have been made to 'revitalise' languages there has been little comparative research to identify
effective policies and practices that can bolster linguistic vitality and support threatened languages. This
symposium will take a multidisciplinary approach to explore the forces behind language endangerment
and what can be done to respond to them at various levels, and to increase language vitality within
communities.
4126
Identity: Linguistic, Cultural, and Intercultural Aspects
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Young-ok Yum, Kansas State U, USA
Participants
Context, Reconceptualization, and the Emergence of Meaning in Intercultural Communication
Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Lodz Academy of International Studies, POLAND
Corpora, Cognitive Linguisitics, Discursive Construction of Identities
Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Lodz Academy of International Studies, POLAND
Jerzy Tomaszczyk, U of Lodz, POLAND
Oh That Hurts! A Study of Communication Styles and Intercultural Relations
Yanrong (Yvonne) Chang, U of Texas - Pan American, USA
Jing Liu, China Ocean U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Marriage as Text: Communicating and Constructing Identities in Taiwan's Transnational Families
Todd L. Sandel, U of Oklahoma, USA
Chung-Hui Liang, National Chiao Tung U, TAIWAN
4127
Employee Relations and Internal Communication and Ethics
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Oyvind Ihlen, BI Norwegian School of Management, NORWAY
Participants
A Model of Work-Life Conflict and Quality of Employee-Organization Relationships (EORs):
Transformational Leadership, Procedural Justice, and Family-Supportive Workplace Initiatives
Hua Jiang, Towson University, USA
Factors Affecting Ethical Practice of Public Relations Professionals Within Public Relations Firms
Eyun-Jung Ki, U of Alabama, USA
Hong-Lim Choi, Prain and Rhee, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jonghyuk Lee, U of Iowa, USA
Roles of Public Relations and Social Capital for Communal Relationship Building: Enhancing
Collaborative Values and Outcomes
Bumsub Jin, SUNY - Oswego, USA
Lesson Learned From Organizational Crisis: Corporate Communication and Business Ethics
S. Sophy Cheng, Chaoyang U of Technology, TAIWAN
Matthew Seeger, Wayne State U, USA
4128
Media Use, Communication, and Cognitive Processing Across the Developmental Spectrum
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 209
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Sheida Shirvani, Ohio U - Zanesville, USA
Participants
Heavy Thoughts: Cognitive Processing Styles and the Development of Implicit and Explicit Antifat Bias
in Children
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
Scott Parrott, U of Alabama, USA
The Use of Sexually Explicit Internet Material and Its Antecedents: A Longitudinal Comparison of
Adolescents and Adults
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
A Life-Span Perspective on Media Use: Television Viewing in the Lives of Older Adults
Margot van der Goot, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Johannes W. J. Beentjes, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Matthea van Selm, Radboud U - Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Communicative Triggers of Age Salience for Three Generations: Reported Events, Frequencies, and
Valences
Robert M. McCann, U of Southern California, USA
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Mary Mcllrath, Creative and Response Research Services, Inc., USA
Anthony Mulac, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
4130
Corporate and Government Use of the Internet
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Aaron S. Veenstra, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Participants
Comparing Aims and Online Content: The Web Presence of U.K. Youth Organizations
Janelle Ward, Erasmus U - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Influencing Citizen Behavior: Experiences From Multichannel Management Pilot Projects
Lidwien van de Wijngaert, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Willem Jan Pieterson, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Marije Teerling, Novay, THE NETHERLANDS
Web2.0 Use Among Chinese Civil Society Organizations
Song Shi, U of Massachusetts, USA
Mobile Phone Tracking and the Spatial Expansion of Labor Control
Kwang-Suk Lee, SungKongHoe U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
4131
Exploring Interactivity and Augmented Reality
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jeremy Birnholtz, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Media That Alert or Direct You to Objects and Locations Anywhere Around the Body
Frank Biocca, Michigan State U, USA
Corey Bohil, MINDLab, USA
Charles B. Owen, Michigan State U, USA
Kwok Hung Tang, Michigan State U, USA
The Effect of Digitally Augmented Perspective Taking Ability on Motivation, Empathic Attitude, and
Helpful Behavior
Sun Joo Ahn, Stanford U, USA
Jeremy N. Bailenson, Stanford U, USA
Framing Drivers' Perceptions of the Road: How a Voice Interface Enhances Drivers' Experience and
Performance
Yeon Kyoung Joo, Stanford U, USA
Exploring the Link Between Objectively and Subjectively Assessed Interactivity on Global Brand
Websites
Hilde Voorveld, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Neijens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Edith Gloria Smit, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
4132
Political Communication and New Media
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Communication and Technology
Chair
Martin J. Emmer, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Participants
Hunt by the Crowd: An Exploratory Qualitative Analysis on Cyber Surveillance in China
Xiaoyan Pan, U of Maryland, USA
Image, Bonding, and Collective Identity Across Multiple Platforms: Avaaz on Facebook, MySpace, and
YouTube
Anastasia Kavada, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
The Rise of Netizens: New Agents of Social Movements in the New Media Age
Jinsun Lee, Old Dominion U, USA
Use of Search Engine Data to Understand Internet-Based Political and Electoral Communication?
Han Woo Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Martin J. Emmer, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
4133
Political Knowledge and Information Acquisition
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Information Systems
Chair
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
A Bad Economy Is Good for Political Learning? Testing an Economic Theory of Political
Communication Effects
Fei Chris Shen, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Assessing Communication and Political Knowledge in Political Campaigns From a Geospatial
Perspective
Yung-I Liu, Cleveland State U, USA
Exposure to Attention-Inducing Content and Dynamics of Political Knowledge Gain as Moderated by
Close-Mindedness: A Comparative Study of Denmark, England, and Spain
Nael A.S. Jebril, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Erik Albæk, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Widening Information Gap Between High- and Low-Education Groups: Knowledge Acquisition
From Online vs. Print Sources
JungAe Yang, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Respondent
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4134
Entertaining Television: Narrative, Genre, and Audiences
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Participants
Entertaining Ideas: Social Issues in Primetime Television
Bethany Klein, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Claire Wardle, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Body of Evidence: CSI, the Detective Genre, and the Posthuman Condition
Tally Yaacobi-Gross, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Amit Pinchevski, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Lost: Ideologically "Doubling Back" on Its Audience
Ryan Lizardi, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Every Night Is a Saturday Morning: Examining Kidult Culture Through Cartoon Network's Adult Swim
Hye Jin Lee, U of Iowa, USA
4135
Globalization and Communication
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Lu Tang, U of Alabama, USA
Participants
(Re)defining Globalization From the Standpoint of Indian Women
Suchitra Shenoy, DePaul U, USA
"You Speak in Your Language and I Speak in My Language": Linguistic Tensions in a Globalizing
Environment
Martha McArdell Shoemaker, U of Houston, USA
Globalized Assemblages: Studying Globalization and Uncertainty Management in Organizations
Mikkel Flyverbom, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
Umuganda in Rwanda: The Interorganizational Control of Peasant Labor
Sarah Elizabeth Ryan, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
Respondent
Lu Tang, U of Alabama, USA
4136
The Internet and Social Capital
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 307
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
Connecting With Strong Ties Through New Media: A Study on the Psychological Dimensions of Social
Capital
Rebecca Ping Yu, U of Michigan, USA
The Use of Online Social Networking by Rural Youth and Its Effects on Community Involvement
Han Ei Chew, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Charles Steinfield, Michigan State U, USA
Alcides Velasquez, Michigan State U, USA
Social Ties for the Soul: How Russians Reconnect With the Past Through Social Network Sites
Irina A. Shklovski, IT U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
The Best of Two Worlds? Towards a Fine-Tuned Analysis of Internet Use Social Networks
Wenhong Chen, U of Texas, USA
4137
Revisiting Cultural Imperialism
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
America's Global Standing According to Popular News Sites From Around the World
Elad Segev, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Menahem Blondheim, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Creating the Third Space vs. Intensifying Hollywood Domination
Dal Yong Jin, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Media Imperialism Revisited: A Historical Analysis of Television in Barbados
Evene Estwick, Wilkes U, USA
Viewing Brazil: Local Audiences and the Interpretation of the Nation
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A and M U, USA
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
4138
Uses and Effects of the Internet
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Blogging the Writers Strike: Identity, Interaction, and Engagement for Collective Action
Nina F. O'Brien, U of Southern California, USA
Exploring Structural Inequality in the Internet Use Behavior: Evidence From A Major Chinese
Metropolis
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Wenjie Yan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Gang Jing, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jiawen Zheng, U of Wisconsin, USA
Self, Information Topics of Interest, Information Seeking Media Use
Hyunjoo Lee, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Joseph Woelfel, U at Buffalo, SUNY, USA
Using Involvement in Communication Planning
Doo Syen Kang, DePaul U, USA
4139
Branding and Politicial Communication
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Yasmin Ibrahim, Queen Mary, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Late Night Humor and Policy Assessment: Mediating Role of Political Emotions
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Hoon Lee, U of Michigan, USA
The Promotion of the American Cable TV News Media Personality and Its Influences
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
Megan Hill, Ohio State U, USA
What is Oprah Worth? A Thematic Analysis of the Value Attributed to Oprah's Endorsement of Barack
Obama
Maegan Stephens, U of Texas, USA
"Taking News Less Seriously": CNN's Shirts as a Rebranding Strategy During the 2008 Presidential
Election
Jeffrey A. Gottfried, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Heidi Khaled, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4140
Broadcasting and Audiovisual Policy and Markets
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
Participants
From Protectionism to Co-Optation: The Transition of the TV Drama Importation Policy in China - TOP
STUDENT PAPER
Yuhui Tai, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
How Deregulatory Has the European Union Really Been in the Audiovisual Sector?
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Is the Internet a Foe or Friend of Video Rentals? The Effect of the Internet on the Expenditures of Video
Rentals
Sung Wook Ji, Indiana U, USA
Public-Service Broadcasting Online: Assessing Compliance With Regulatory Requirements
Michael Latzer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Andreas Braendle, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Natascha Just, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Florian Saurwein, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Respondent
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
4141
Video Game Interactivity: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Can We Replicate Experimental Findings Based on Non-Interactive Stimuli With Interactive Stimuli?
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Young June Sah, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Does Interactivity in Video Games Intensify or Attenuate Their Effects? Measuring Video Game
Interactivity and Assessing Its Interaction With Video Game Violence
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Cynthia Helen Bates, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Implications of Natural Mapping for Video Game Theory and Research
Paul Skalski, Cleveland State U, USA
Interactivity Versus Narrative: Using Think-Aloud Data to Understand the Enjoyment of Playing
Adventure Video Games
Christoph Klimmt, Johannes Gutenberg U - Mainz, GERMANY
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Sebastian Nuss, U of Mainz, GERMANY
Respondent
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Interactivity is a commonly discussed but under examined concept in the video game literature. The fact
that each video game player generates individualized content has implications for both theoretical and
methodological aspects of video game research. This panel brings together scholars from the US, Korea,
and Europe who have recently conducted innovative research in the area of video game interactivity.
Theoretical and methodological challenges will be discussed and solutions offered.
4142
Open Space: The Collaborative Knowledge Spaces of Human Rights and New Media
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Enrico Antijonto, EngageMedia, INDONESIA
Bobby Soriano, Tactical Technology Collective, PHILIPPINES
Open Space is multi-platformed new media exhibition exploring open space as a conceptual zone in
Singapore and Southeast Asia, mobilizing collaboration, participation, dialogue, process, encounters,
permeability and community. Open Space proposes a relational mode rather than a fixed object. Open
Space is where technologies, people and places converge. Curatorial team: Patricia R. Zimmermann,
Nikki Draper, Sharon Lin Tay, Nanyang Technological University; Wenjie Zhang, Singapore; with
curatorial associate Jenna Ng and curatorial assistant Koon Yen Low. This Open
Space/Singapore/Southeast Asia session examines how technologists, activists, and organizations
mobilize new media and emerging digital technologies for human rights, social, political, and
environmental advocacy and change, especially in marginalized communities and non-governmental
organizations in the region. It also looks at the importance of online aggregated archives for emerging
movements.
4143
ICA Publications Committee Meeting
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 314
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Dale Hample, U of Maryland, USA
Karin E. Becker, Stockholm U, SWEDEN
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Mike West, International Communication Association, USA
ICA members are invited to share issues and concerns with the Publications Committee
4144
Health Communication and the News
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 325
Health Communication
Chair
Sally Margaret Dunlop, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
African Newspaper Coverage of AIDS: Comparing New Models of Press-State Relations and Structural
Factors in Sub-Saharan Anglophone Africa
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Paul D'Angelo, College of New Jersey, USA
Donna Shaw, College of New Jersey, USA
Amanda Burd, Syracuse U, USA
Kristen Kiernicki, College of New Jersey, USA
Janna Raudenbush, U of Maryland, USA
Lagged Associations Between Local TV News Viewing and Fatalistic Beliefs About Cancer Prevention
Chul-joo Lee, Ohio State U, USA
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Narrative Health Communication and Behavior Change: The Influence of Exemplars in the News on
Intention to Quit Smoking
Hyun Suk Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Cabral A. Bigman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Amy Leader, Thomas Jefferson U, USA
Caryn Lerman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
On Being 'Fat': Obese and Overweight Australians Respond to News Depictions of Obesity and
Overweight
Richard Warwick Blood, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Kate Eloise Holland, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Samantha Thomas, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Asuntha Karunaratne, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Sophie Lewis, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
4145
Families and Health Communication
Thursday
08:30-09:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Does Family Communication Affect Healthy Lifestyle Choices? An Exploration of Family Talk Among
Latinos and African Americans
Vikki Sara Katz, Rutgers U, USA
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
Heather Jane Hether, U of Southern California, USA
Stigma and Politeness: Challenging Family Health Discussions
Kelly Renee Rossetto, Boston College, USA
Rachel A. Smith, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Barbara Jones, U of Texas, USA
The Effects of Family Environment and Alcohol Refusal Self-Efficacy on Korean Adolescents' Alcohol
Use
Su Ahn Jang, U of Missouri - St. Louis, USA
Jina H. Yoo, U of Missouri – St. Louis, USA
Nam Auk Cho, Kyunggi U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Ahnlee Jang, U of Maryland, USA
Family Structure and Adolescent Drug Use
William D. Crano, Claremont U, USA
4220
Visual Technologies and Theories of Surveillance, Spectacle and the Subject
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 201
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Baldwin Van Gorp, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Participants
Society Without Secrets? The Aesthetics of Surveillance and the Question of Intimacy
Dan Arav, ISRAEL
David Gurevitz, ISRAEL
Passing Through Surveillance: Mobility, Subjectivity, and the Visual Economy of Sensor Art
Paula M. Gardner, Ontario College of Art and Design, CANADA
Bañamos: The Bathing of Spectacle of Travel, Modernity, and Place as Folklore and Performance
Reagan Romero Maiquez, U of the Philippines - Los Banos, PHILIPPINES
Ergonomic Diagrams, Medical Perception, and the Technological Subject
Travers Scott, U of Southern California, USA
4221
Individual-Level Influences: Journalists' Role Perceptions and Attitudes
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 202
Journalism Studies
Chair
Sam N. Lehman-Wilzig, Bar-Ilan U, ISRAEL
Participants
Exploring Journalistic Practice Outside the Mainstream: A Survey of Australian Travel Journalists' Role
Perceptions
Folker Christian Hanusch, U of the Sunshine Coast, AUSTRALIA
Journalists' Moral Judgment About Children: Do As I Say, Not As I Do?
Renita Coleman, U of Texas, USA
Subconscious Gatekeeping: The Effect of Death Thoughts on Bias Toward Outgroups in News Writing
David Cuillier, U of Arizona, USA
When the Watchdog Bites: Insulting Politicians on Air
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Tamar Liebes, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Efrat Daskal, Hebrew U, ISRAEL
Respondent
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
4222
Journalism Cultures in Latin America: Reinterpreting Ongoing Realities
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Leonardo Ferreira, U of Miami, USA
Participants
Professional and Territorial Cultures in Chilean Journalism
Claudia Mellado, U of Concepcion, CHILE
Multimedia Voices Among the Rural Poor: "Communicators for Development" as a Popular Journalism
Culture in the Dominican Republic
Leonardo Ferreira, U of Miami, USA
Journalistic Practices That Transcend the Culture of Silence in Colombia
Jesus Antonio Arroyave, U del Norte, COLOMBIA
Political Cultures, Citizenships and Journalism in Peru
Teresa Quiróz, U de Lima, PERU
In Latin America, journalism has also been rapidly and dramatically changing, especially during this
century. Nevertheless, details of these changes are barely debated. There are important structural
differences and commonalities in the Latin American media profession, features that should be revisited
and reassessed across national realities for an improved understanding of the region's journalism cultures.
Using different methodological approaches and various perspectives on a diverse sample of Latin
American countries, this panel analyzes contrasting and contemporary journalism cultures of the region,
offering an overview of ongoing scholarly media projects in Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, and
Peru. Altogether, the papers portray differences and similarities on various levels of Latin American
journalism, mainly journalistic and professional news media roles, community participation through news,
reflections of journalistic dynamics in newsrooms, and factors related to press freedom and credibility
across the region's news media practice.
4225
Using Statistical Procedures Wisely: Challenges and Opportunities
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Mike Friedrichsen, Stuttgart Media U, GERMANY
Participants
Important Considerations in Multi-Level Modeling
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Latent Profile Analysis: Using Categorical Variables in a Structural-Equation Model
Masaki Matsunaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
The Validity of Statistical Conclusions: Issues to Consider
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
4226
Discursive Aspects of Artifacts, Organizations, and Institutions
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Communication and Technology
Chair
Andrew Craig Tollison, U of Texas, USA
Participants
A Collection of Everyday Organizational Textual Activities
Dennis Day, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Johannes Wagner, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Some Uses of Formulations in Two Different Institutional Settings: A Comparative Study
Carles Roca Cuberes, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
Designing Authenticity: Zapotec Weavers in Oaxaca
Melissa L. Curtin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Discourse and Its Artifacts: Technology and Language Use
Klaus Krippendorff, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4227
Agenda Building and Media Relations Within Online Environments and Coalitions
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Jennifer L. Bartlett, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
An Exploratory Study to Define Issue-Focused Coalitions
Beth Kuch, U of Maryland, USA
Rowena Lyn Briones, U of Maryland, USA
Antecedents of Public Relations Planning and New Media Tactics in the Rhetoric of Isocrates
Charles William Marsh, U of Kansas, USA
Can a Declining Company Still Be Successful in Agenda-Building? A Case Study of Wachovia
Sun Young Lee, U of North Carolina, USA
Issues Management and Media Transparency: Sanlu Group's Media Manipulation in China
Aimei Yang, U of Oklahoma, USA
Shari Veil, U of Oklahoma, USA
Respondent
Juan Meng, U of Dayton, USA
4228
Theorizing the Changing Mediascape
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
Participants
The Architectures of Media Power: Editing, the Newsroom, and Urban Public Space
Scott Rodgers, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
War Reporting in the 21st Century: Political Phenomenological Perspectives on Embedding, ICTs, and
Citizen Journalism
Tim Markham, Birkbeck, U of London, UNITED KINGDOM
Working Notions of the "Active Participant" in Convergent Media Industries
Espen Ytreberg, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Vilde Schanke Sundet, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Media Life
Laura Speers, Indiana U, USA
Peter Blank, Indiana U, USA
Mark Deuze, Indiana U, USA
This session theorizes the blurring boundaries of contemporary media production, circulation and
consumption. Four case studies examine the complexities of media power in light of industrial practices,
militarism, urban space and new technologies.
4230
Health Communication: Social and Technological Challenges
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Mia Liza A. Lustria, Florida State U, USA
Participants
Influence in Online Health Information Exchange: A Test of SIDE vs. HSM
Erin K. Maloney, Michigan State U, USA
Kyle R. Andrews, Northern Illinois U, USA
Predictors of Participation in a Computer Support Group for Breast Cancer: Focusing on Supportive
Communication Behaviors During Discussion
Eunkyung Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jeong Yeob Han, U of Georgia, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Bret Shaw, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fiona M. McTavish, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H. Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Exchanging Treatment Information in Computer-Mediated Support Groups: How Health Self-Efficacy
Moderates Effects on Emotional Well-Being
Kang Namkoong, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Jeong Yeob Han, U of Georgia, USA
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
Woohyun Yoo, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fiona M. McTavish, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H. Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Searching for and Communicating Online Health Information to a Close Other
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Sandi W Smith, Michigan State U, USA
4231
Investigating Online Engagement
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Techological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Beyond Access: Differential Engagement in Online Video-Sharing Forums
Heasun Chun, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Hyunjoo Lee, U at Buffalo, SUNY, USA
The Impact of Online Brand Community Type on Consumer's Community Engagement Behaviors:
Consumer-Created vs. Marketer-Created Online Brand Community in Online Social Networking
Websites
Doohwang Lee, U of Alabama, USA
Hyuk Soo Kim, U of Alabama, USA
Jung Kyu Kim, U of Alabama, USA
Click, Drag, Flip, and Mouse-Over: Effects of Modality Interactivity on User Engagement With Web
Content
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Qian Xu, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Saraswathi Bellur, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Haiyan Jia, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Jeeyun Oh, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Guan-Soon Khoo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Determinants of Uploading User-Generated Video Content on the Internet: Toward an Integrated Model
Namkee Park, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Techological U, SINGAPORE
4232
Entertaining Campaigns: Emotionalization as a Means of Election Campaigns From an
International Perspective
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Katrin Christiane Doveling, Technical U - Dresden , GERMANY
Participants
A Systematic Analysis of Forms and Functions of Mediatized Entertaining Campaigns and Assessment of
Their Quality
Lutz M. Hagen, Technical U - Dresden , GERMANY
Effects of Emotional Responses to Televised Ads in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Campaign
Lynda Lee Kaid, U of Florida, USA
Maridith A. Dunton Miles, U of Florida, USA
David Lynn Painter, U of Florida, USA
Infotainment: Between Discursive Space and Populist Trap
Kees Brants, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Emotional Politics: Seeing- Feeling- Voting? A Comparative Analysis of Emotional News Photography in
the German Election Campaign 2009
Katrin Christiane Doveling, Technical U - Dresden , GERMANY
Elke Grittmann, Leuphana U of Lüneburg, GERMANY
Respondent
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The panel will tackle vital questions that result from current changing political communication landscape.
Recent election campaigns in large democracies around the world are explored with respect to their use of
emotionalizing entertainment factors as a means of political communication.
4233
Women, Press, Magazines, Print Media
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 304
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Ingrid Maria Hoofd, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Gender Trouble in the Public Sphere: Mainstream Press Discourses of Sex Trafficking
Rita Basílio Simões, U of Coimbra, PORTUGAL
The Discursive Construction of Women Politicians in the European Press
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Inaki Garcia-Blanco, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
The First Lady of Israeli Journalism: Hannah Semer (1924-2003)
Einat Lachover, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Women's Leadership, Communication, and Imagining the World Otherwise
Jillian Elizabeth Clare, QUTCreative Industries, AUSTRALIA
4234
Media, Space, and Cultural Identities
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Space, Time, and the Cut: BBC Documentary and the Emergence of Global Telepresence
Dan Leopard, Saint Mary's College of California, USA
Structuring Virtual Spaces as Television Places: Internet Television Remediating Conventional Structures,
Practices, and Power Dynamics
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
"Clothing Optional Beyond This Point": Experiential Retail Marketing, Brand-Name Fashion, and the
Spatial Construction of Youth Social Identity
Joel Penney, U of Pennsylvania, USA
"No Home Away From Home": The Discourse of Home in Ads for Third-Age Housing
Anat First, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
4235
Commitment and Meaning Making Through Interaction and Discourse
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
Participants
The Accomplishment of Meaningfulness in Everyday Work Life Through Communication: A Study of
Nurse-Resident Interactions in a Dutch Nursing Home
Mark Van Vuuren, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montréal, CANADA
Collapsing the Continuum: An Analysis of the Ways Multiple Role Engagement Challenges Previous
Conceptions of Boundary Management Theory
Disraelly Cruz, U of South Dakota, USA
I'd Like to Help But Have No Time! Individual and Organizational Motivations Influencing Service
Behavior
Vinita Agarwal, U of Louisville, USA
Managing Impressions and Gaining Control: Performances of Emotion Work in Financial Organizations
Dina V. Nekrassova, Rutgers U, USA
Respondent
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
4236
LGBT Media Activism
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 307
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Participants
Make It Big: Modeling the Media Strategies of the LGBT Rights Movement in Taiwan
Cheng-Nan Hou, I-Shou U, TAIWAN
Sex After Death: The Obituary as an Erratic Record of Proclivity
Nigel Starck, U of South Australia, AUSTRALIA
The "Gay Comfort Level": Examining a Media Advocacy Group's Efforts to Combat Youth Homophobia
Tara M. Kachgal, U of Wisconsin - Superior, USA
4237
National Media Systems and Nationalism
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washingon U, USA
Participants
Audience Measurement Systems and Ideas of the Nation in the Postcolonial World
Santanu Chakrabarti, Rutgers U, USA
Competing Discourse of Nationalism in the Global News Arena: The Analysis of the News Program in
Context of Russia Today
Shih-Hsien Hsu, U of Texas, USA
Finding a Place for the National Media System in the Age of Transnational Media: A Case Study of
Korean Reality Shows
Kyung Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Pluralism and Democratic Legitimacy: Election News Exposure in Hungary, Taiwan, and the United
States
Jeffrey A. Gottfried, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4238
Foreign News on Television Around the World: Consumption, Attitudes, and Perceptions
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Akiba A. Cohen, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Participants
Frequency of and Satisfaction With Foreign News on Television
Agnieszka Magdalena Stepinska, Adam Mickiewicz U, POLAND
Ven-Hwei Lo, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Eddie Kuo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Tai-Li Wang, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
Xiaoge Xu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Reasons for Viewing and Topics of Interest in Domestic and Foreign Television News
Hong Nga Nguyen Vu, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Thomas Hanitzsch, U of Munich, GERMANY
Constanza Mujica, Pontificia U Católica de Chile, CHILE
William Porath, Pontificia U Católica de Chile, CHILE
Thorsten Quandt, U Hohenheim, GERMANY
Baohua Zhou, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Mapping the Interest in News of Other Countries
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Akiba A. Cohen, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Elizabeth Godo, Ryerson U, CANADA
Abby A. Goodrum, Ryerson U, CANADA
Jacques Alkalai Wainberg, Catholic U - Porto Alegre, BRAZIL
The papers presented in this multinational panel will be based on identical telephone surveys conducted in
12 of the countries - Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Germany, Hong Kong, Israel, Poland, Portugal,
Singapore, Switzerland and Taiwan - during late 2009 and early 2010 with representative national
samples of adults. Overall, the panel seeks to address many important questions with regard to the
consumption and perceptions of foreign TV news: What are the determinants of exposure to and the
evaluation of such news? How does exposure relate to the evaluation of the news? Why do people watch
foreign news in different countries, and which topics they find most interesting? The panel will also map
the interest in news about other countries (news geography) and assess whether news contents correspond
with people's interests. Some of the survey findings will be related to the findings of a comparative
content analysis that was presented at the 2009 ICA conference.
4239
Theorizing About Framing and Agenda Setting
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Agenda-Setting: Awareness, Salience, Priority, or Just Cognitive Priming?
Volker Gehrau, U of Muenster, GERMANY
Diachronic Framing Effects in Competitive Opinion Environments: The Moderating Role of Attitude
Certainty
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Using the Landscape Model of Comprehension to Understand Framing Effects in Political Judgments
Kyun Soo Kim, Grambling State U, USA
Beverly Roskos-Ewoldsen, U of Alabama, USA
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
What a Difference a Day Made? The Effects of Repetitive and Competitive News Framing Over Time
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
4240
Philosophy, Technology, and Policy
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Copyright and Plagiarism: A Moral Rights Alternative
Edward L. Carter, Brigham Young U, USA
Maintaining Procedural Legitimacy Through Justification: A Natural-Setting Study of Procedural Justice
Determinations
Christopher V. Langone, Cornell U, USA
New Technologies in Light of the Old: Metaphors, Precedents, and Law
Harmeet Sawhney, Indiana U, USA
V. Ratandeep Suri, U of Illinois, USA
Hyangsun Lee, Indiana U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Old Habits Die Hard: Revisiting Cultural Imperative of Global Software Piracy
Seung-Hwan Mun, Northeastern Illinois U, USA
Respondent
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
4241
Violence, Pathology, and Morality in Games
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Sven Joeckel, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Do Violent Video Games Impair the Effectiveness of In-Game Advertisements? The Impact of Gaming
Environment on Brand Recall, Brand Attitude, and Purchase Intention
Seung-Chul Yoo, U of Texas, USA
Jorge F. Pena, U of Texas, USA
Individual Motives and Video Game Investment: A Predictive Model of Violent Video Game Play
L. Meghan Peirce, Ohio U, USA
Emil Bakke, Ohio U, USA
Intuitive Moral Judgments of Virtual Violence
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Relation Between Pathological Gaming, Attentional Bias, and Response Inhibition Among Male
Adolescents.
Jeroen S Lemmens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ruth van Holst, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Anna Goudriaan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
4242
Open Space: The Contingent Spaces of Performance/Performativity/ Soundscapes
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Ming Ang Song, SINGAPORE
Gustaff Harriman Iskandar, INDONESIA
Reina Wulansari, Common Room/Bandung Center for New Media Arts, INDONESIA
Addy Handy, Arts and Global Rescue, INDONESIA
Open Space is a multiplatformed new media exhibition exploring open space as a conceptual zone in
Singapore and Southeast Asia, mobilizing collaboration, participation, dialogue, process, encounters,
permeability, and community. Open Space proposes a relational mode rather than a fixed object. Open
Space is where technologies, people, and places converge. This Open Space/ Singapore/ Southeast Asia
session probes the complex, fluid relationships between performance, performativity, soundscapes,
testimony, music, and participatory content. This convergence between testimony and technology
produces exciting and unexpected contingent spaces.
4243
The Intersections of Cultures, Communication, and Conflicts in Organizational Settings: Case
Studies in China, Africa, and Taiwan
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Pei-Wen Lee, Shih Hsin U, TAIWAN
Participants
The Impact of Values and Identities on Cross-Cultural Conflicts and Their Management in Multinational
Corporations
Wenshan Jia, Chapman U, USA
Hong Fan, Tsinghua U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Jianbin Jin, Tsinghua U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
A Three Cultures Model Approach to Understanding Organizational Communication: A Case Study of a
Multi-National Organization
Herbert Blankson, Ohio U, USA
Claudia L. Hale, Ohio U, USA
Intercultural Communication in Organizational Contexts: A Case Study of LIEP
Jia Lu, Tsinghua U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Analyzing Communication Difficulties in Medical Institutions: Intercultural Communication Between
Patients and Health Care Providers
Jung-huel Becky Yeh, Shih Hsin U, TAIWAN
Intercultural Communication Between Migrant Workers, Their Employers, and Their Colleagues in
Taiwan: A Preliminary Study
Pei-Wen Lee, Shih Hsin U, TAIWAN
As workforces become increasingly globalized, communication scholars have paid more and more
attention to the role that culture plays in organizational contexts. This panel intends to examine
intercultural communication behaviors and challenges occurring in different organizational settings (e.g.,
multicultural corporations, multinational organizations, joint ventures, hospitals, and workplaces for
migrant labors) due to the influences of national, personal, and organizational cultures. Through this panel
discussion, we aim to advance individuals' understanding of effective intercultural communication and
conflict management in order to create and maintain an organizational environment that leads to work and
relational success.
4244
Measuring Meaning: Semantic Network Analysis of Discourse Texts
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Semantic Network Analysis Bridging Between Texts and Categories: An Analysis of Views on Advanced
Life Science
Aiko Hibino, Tokyo U, JAPAN
Automated and Manual Abstraction of Populist Rhetoric in Political News Coverage
Wouter van Atteveldt, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Janet Takens, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tracing Desire and Thematic Relations With Semantic Network Analysis
Leo Kim, Methodology Institute LSE, UNITED KINGDOM
Communicative and Cognitive Meaning: Using Semantic Network Analysis for Comparing Public
Discourse and Personal Understandings of EU Politics
Christian Baden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Kenneth Benoit, Trinity College Dublin, IRELAND
Measuring the semantic meaning of texts in a reliable yet valid way remains one of the prime challenges
in communication research. Semantic network analysis (SNA) is a family of techniques capable of
processing large text corpora in an automated fashion, while retaining the subtle patterns of contexts
embedded in discourse texts. This panel addresses the key challenges SNA needs to meet to be a useful
addition to the methodological repertoire of communication researchers: Two papers focus on the validity
of measured meaning, combining textual and categorical data and juxtaposing different coding techniques.
The other papers explore SNA's ability to relate measured meanings to (social-)psychological and other
conceptualizations of semantics. All papers highlight pressing methodological issues that arise from the
treatment of diverse discourse data and propose new solutions. The panel aims at demonstrating the utility
and flexibility of SNA applications in communication research and suggests avenues for further
methodological development.
4245
Culture, Communication, and Health
Thursday
10:00-11:15
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Cindy Gallois, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
Participants
How Communication Among Residents and Community Institutions Impacts Health Literacy and Health
Care Access in Diverse Ethnic Neighborhoods
Matthew D. Matsaganis, U at Albany, SUNY, USA
Hard-to-Reach? Using Health Access Status as a Way to More Effectively Target Segments of the
Hispanic Audience
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Health Information-Seeking Behaviors Among Residents of a Multiethnic, Underserved, Urban
Community: Does Ethnicity Matter?
Mugur Valentin Geana, U of Kansas, USA
Kim S Kimminau, U of Kansas Medical Center, USA
K. Allen Greiner, U of Kansas Medical Center, USA
Increasing Social Support for Depressed Individuals: A Cross-Cultural Assessment of an AffectExpectancy Approach
Jason T. Siegel, Claremont U, USA
Eusebio Martins Alvaro, Claremont U, USA
William D. Crano, Claremont U, USA
Zachary D. Hohman, Claremont U, USA
Brianna D. Lienemann, Claremont U, USA
Erin Keely O'Brien, Claremont U, USA
4320
Images of Perfect and Imperfect Bodies in Film and Advertisement: Representations and Visual
Experiences
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 201
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Participants
The Portrayal of Older People on German Prime-Time TV Advertisements
Clemens Schwender, International U - Bremen, GERMANY
Visual Communication Experiences and Paralympic Sports-Testimonials
Christian von Sikorski, Deutsche Sporthochschule Köln, GERMANY
Kai Peter Oberhaeuser, Deutsche Sporthochschule Köln, GERMANY
Carsten Möller, Deutsche Sporthochschule Köln, GERMANY
Visual Communication Experiences With Body Images in Popular Films
Dagmar Hoffmann, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Body Images of Successful Actors: The Good, the Bad, the Handsome and the Ugly
Frank Schwab, Saarland U, GERMANY
Sonja Wedegärtner, Saarland U, GERMANY
Astrid Carolus, Saarland U, GERMANY
Dagmar Unz, Saarland U, GERMANY
Respondent
Katrin Christiane Doveling, Technical U - Dresden , GERMANY
The panel deals with the representations of body images in visual and audiovisual media. The
presentations focus on the impact of perfect and imperfect individuals in conjunction with their body
images. Furthermore, the panel depicts so far underrepresented subpopulations: First of all the manner in
which older adults are presented in TV-advertisement is investigated analytically according to the content
and the images. Moreover, the panel examines the (re)presentation of Paralympics athletes in print
commercials and thus evaluates the reception of imperfect bodies. All contributions are concerned with
the consequences of the presentation of body images in the media particularly with regard to the
constitution of the viewers and readers social relations. It is shown that recipients mostly have an
analytical and critical view to visual presentations of bodies. They frequently feature a reflected handling
of mediatized body images as well as of predominant ideals of beauty.
4321
Intersectionality: Ethnicity, Race, Gender, and Sexuality
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 202
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Robeson Taj Frazier, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Hollywood's Not in Hollywood: The Transformative Effects of Global Film Markets on Asian
Masculinity and Representation
Michael K. Park, U of Southern California, USA
Globalizing Television: Ugly Betty and the American Dream
Isabel Molina-Guzman, U of Illinois, USA
Of Booties, Culos, and Hips That Don't Lie: Latina Audiences Voice Frustration and Talk Back
Jillian M. Baez, U of Michigan, USA
The Orientalized "Other" and Corrosive Femininity: Threats to White Masculinity in 300
David Chison Oh, Denison U, USA
Doreen Vivian Kutufam, Carroll College, USA
When Sexual Becomes Spiritual: Lila Downs and the Body of Voice
Christopher Joseph Westgate, Texas A and M U, USA
4322
Technology as a News Production Tool
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Sven Engesser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
Indian Journalists' Use of New Technology: Ethical Issues
Jyotika Ramaprasad, U of Miami, USA
Yu Liu, U of Miami, USA
Bruce Garrison, U of Miami, USA
Chinese Journalists' Use of New Media Technology: Ethical Issues
Yu Liu, U of Miami, USA
Filipino Journalists Decide: Is Online Journalism a Threat or an Ally?
Edson Jr. Castro Tandoc, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Journalism and Technology Use in Six European Countries: Results From a Comparative Research
Project
Henrik Ornebring, Oxford U, UNITED KINGDOM
Respondent
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
4325
Interpersonal Aspects of Online Social Networking Sites and Computer-Mediated Decision Making
Groups
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Rhonda McEwen, U of Toronto, CANADA
Participants
Partner Surveillance on Social-Network Sites: A Test of the Trust-Surveillance Hypothesis
Robert Shota Tokunaga, U of Arizona, USA
The Worried Age Groups: Privacy Concern and Frame-Breaking Online Disclosures
Ji Pan, U of South Carolina, USA
Paul Stuart Lieber, Emerson College, USA
What Makes a Difference Between Facebook, MySpace, and YouTube? Similarity and Dissimilarity
Between Online Social Networking Communities
Hyunjoo Lee, U at Buffalo, SUNY, USA
Heasun Chun, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Carolyn A. Evans, U at Buffalo, SUNY, USA
Attributions for Group Failure: Effects on Group Processes and Performance in Computer-Mediated
Groups
Natalya N. Bazarova, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
4326
Fieldwork in Multiple Languages: Issues of Interpretation and Representation
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Intercultural Communication
Participants
Susan J. Szmania, U of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA
Kumiko Tsutsui, Kumamoto Gakuen U, JAPAN
Shin-Jung Ho, Fo Guang U, TAIWAN
The panelists have all conducted fieldwork in more than one country and more than one language. Their
methods include ethnography of communication, discourse analysis, and conversation analysis. They will
share some of the issues of managing the fieldwork in contexts with different expectations for human
subjects, translating material, interpreting findings that involve translation, and presenting their findings to
multiple language audiences. They hope attendees with similar experiences or plans to work with such
data will engage in a good discussion of best practices and challenges.
4327
Top Student Papers in Public Relations
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Chun-ju Flora Hung, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Linking Agenda-Building Efforts and Public Opinion: An Exploration of the Relationships Among
Gubernatorial Communications, Media Coverage, and Job Approval Ratings
Maria De Moya, U of Florida, USA
Ji Young Kim, U of Florida, USA
Spiro K. Kiousis, U of Florida, USA
Corporate Social Responsibility: Impact of Perceived Motives and Prior Reputation on Effects of Fit of
CSR Programs
Yeonsoo Kim, U of Florida, USA
Mary Ann Ferguson, U of Florida, USA
Does Perceived Motivation Affect CSR Effectiveness?
Hyejoon Rim, U of Florida, USA
The Acceptance of Responsibility and Expressions of Regret in Organizational Apologies After a
Transgression
Kristin Pace, Michigan State U, USA
Tomasz Antoni Fediuk, Illinois State U, USA
Isabel C. Botero, Illinois State U, USA
Respondent
Yi-Ru Regina Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
4328
Social Functions of Blogging
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 209
Communication and Technology
Chair
Axel Bruns, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Active vs. Passive Blog Use: Implications for Interpersonal Discussion and Political Participation
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
Shih-Hsien Hsu, U of Texas, USA
Ingrid Bachmann, U of Texas, USA
Predicting My Own Space in the Internet: Bloggers and Civic Participation
Sungsoo Bang, U of Texas, USA
Cognitive Outcomes of Political Blog Consumption: The Role of Media Sophistication as a Social
Function
Aaron S. Veenstra, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Lifelogging: Visions of Absent Audiences
David Brake, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
4330
The Challenge of Literacy in an Information Society
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Philip Howard, U of Washington, USA
Participants
Traditional Media Skills and Digital Media Skills: Is There Much of a Difference?
Alexander van Deursen, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Wikipedia and Its Participatory Characteristics
Seong Choul Hong, Indiana U, USA
ICTs, Taiwan's Information Society, and Occupational Transformation
Wei-Ching Wang, National Taiwan Normal U, TAIWAN
Effects of Internet Connectedness and Information Literacy on Quality of Life
Louis W. Leung, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Hartmut B. Mokros, Rutgers U, USA
4331
Thinking That "Communication Matters" Matters: The Influence of Presumed Media Influence
(Cross Unit Panel)
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 302
Theme Sessions
Mass Communication
Political Communication
Health Communication
Public Relations
Journalism Studies
Chair
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Participants
The Influence of Presumed Influence: Advances in Concept and Theory
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin, USA
Influence of Presumed Influence in Strategic Communication: The Case of Direct-to-Consumer
Prescription Drug Advertising
Jisu Huh, U of Minnesota, USA
How Message Desirability Moderates the Influence of Presumed Influence on College Students'
Misperception of Sex-Related Peer Norms
Stella C. Chia, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
The Influence of Presumed Media Influence in the Fields of Politics and Political Journalism
Marco Dohle, U of Duesseldorf, GERMANY
Gerhard Vowe, U of Duesseldorf, GERMANY
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
A growing body of research in recent years has provided evidence supporting the notion that perceptions
of media effects shape reality in a variety of contexts. Stemming from Davison's notion of the third person
effect, the presumed influence hypothesis has been tested in a variety of contexts: This panel features
speakers representing five of ICA's divisions- Mass Communication, Political Communication, Health
Communication, Public Relations and Journalism Studies that report on advances in examining the
"presumed influence" hypothesis in their fields of study. The aim of this panel is to try to create crossdisciplinary discourse on perceptions of media influence, and to update scholars from different divisions
on progress in research on the presumed influence hypothesis in other subfields.
4332
Deliberation, Information, and Political Participation
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participants
A Path From the Internet to Political Participation: How Deliberation and Postmaterial Values Influence
Civic Engagement
Minha Kim, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yunkyoung Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Discussing Politics Online: The Interactive Relationship Between Offline Political Talk and Online
Political Discussion
Soo Young Bae, U of Michigan, USA
Nojin Kwak, U of Michigan, USA
Scott W. Campbell, U of Michigan, USA
Does Discussion With Disagreement Discourage All Types of Political Participation?
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Pulling Towards or Pulling Away: Deliberation, Disagreement, and Opinion Strength in Political
Participation
Magdalena E. Wojcieszak, IE U, SPAIN
Respondent
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
4333
America in the World: Media Coverage and Public Perceptions of, and Governmental Response to
U.S. Political Discourse
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Salma Ghanem, Central Michigan U, USA
Participants
How the Egyptian Government Defied the Bush Administration's Reform Agenda: Symbolic Action and
Normative Complexity in the War on Terror
William Lafi Youmans, U of Michigan, USA
In Love With Obama: German Press Coverage of the Presidential Elections Campaigns in the USA in
2004 and 2008
Christina Holtz-Bacha, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Reimar Zeh, U of Erlangen - Nuremberg, GERMANY
Pro- and Anti-Americanism in Sub-Saharan Africa
Devra Coren Moehler, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Nicolas van de Walle, Cornell U, USA
U.S. Presidential Politics on a Global Stage: A Content Analysis of 2008 Election Coverage on Al
Jazeera, the BBC, and Russia Today
Sally Ann Cruikshank, Ohio U, USA
Respondent
Salma Ghanem, Central Michigan U, USA
4334
Popular Media and Otherizing Discourses: Political and Cultural Challenges in Contemporary
Eurasia and the Pacific
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Todd Joseph Miles Holden, Tohoku U, JAPAN
Participants
The Other of 'The Othered': Popular Media and the Poor in Turkey
Hakan Ergül, Anadolu U, TURKEY
Emre Gokalp, Anadolu U, TURKEY
Incilay Cangoz, Anadolu U, TURKEY
The Representation of Racial 'Self' Among Filipinos in Newspaper Ads in Guam
Aristides Emmanuel Pereira, UOG Station CLASS/CFA, GUAM
The Representation of Racial 'Others' in Prime-Time Commercials in Korea
Michael Prieler, Hallym U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Identity, Invisibility, Intimacy and Impact: The Strategic Uses of Foreign Others in Japanese Media
Todd Joseph Miles Holden, Tohoku U, JAPAN
Nearly all nations have histories dividing in-groups from out-groups, with distinction based on factors like
age, gender, race, class, nationality and religion. While such differences can be local, globalization has
increased the incidence and types of distinction. In many countries, popular media adopt an "Otherizing"
discourse via verbal and visual representation. The purpose of this international panel is to examine this
important, understudied topic. It focuses on representations of and by "Others" in the less studied contexts
of Eur-Asia and The Pacific. Advertising, newspapers, and television programming are considered, both
quantitatively and qualitatively, based on interviews, observation and content analysis. Othering
discourses explored includes: identity construction, stereotyping, exoticization, fetishization,
demonization, and symbolic annihilation. Per the conference theme, presentations emphasize political and
cultural challenges raised by media mis/representations, and work to compare outcomes between the study
contexts. This will be facilitated by a moderator's brief commentary and panelist response.
4335
Group Communication in Organizations
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Network Centrality and Similarity of Discourse: A Sociosemantic Approach to Leadership
Johanne Saint-Charles, U of Quebec - Montréal, CANADA
Pierre Mongeau, U du Québec a Montréal, CANADA
Marie-Claude Perrault, U of Quebec - Montréal, CANADA
Diversity Management Through Intergroup Concertive Control: A Bona Fide Group Study of Employee
Network Groups
Jane Stuart Baker, U of Alabama, USA
The Impact of Characteristics of Face-to-Face Communication on Online Interactions in Hybrid Teams
Xuan Zhao, Cornell U, USA
Leadership Within the Wire: Comparing Leadership in Virtual Teams and Online Multiplayer Gaming
Clans
Anu Sivunen, Helsinki U of Technology, FINLAND
Marko Siitonen, U of Jyvaskyla, FINLAND
Respondent
Torsten Reimer, Purdue U, USA
4336
Agenda Setting, Global Politics, and Historical Continutiy
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 307
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Xi Cui, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
Historical Continuity and Discontinuity: How Do the Chinese and Indian Media Construct Globalization?
Jing Song, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Intermedia Agenda-Setting Effects in Ghana: An Analysis of Topic Agenda Influences for GovernmentOwned and Private News Websites
Etse Godwin Sikanku, U of Iowa, USA
The 2008 Russian Presidential Election Offers New Attributes: A First- and Second-Level AgendaSetting Analysis of the U.S. Media Coverage
Anastasia G Kononova, U of Missouri, USA
Saleem Elias Alhabash, U of Missouri, USA
Wayne Wanta, Oklahoma State U, USA
"Manifest Destiny" in the Guise of Globalization: The New York Times on American Leadership During
the Bush Era
Chin-Chuan Lee, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Jinguang Zhang, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
4337
Media and Creative Economies in Asia: China and the Region
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Terry Flew, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Shock of the New: Learning From New Workers' Art and Cultural Festivals in Picun Village, Beijing
Linchuan Jack Qiu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Managing Media Clusters: Is Creativity Really Changing China?
Michael Andrew Keane, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Copyright and Creative Innovation in China: An Evolutionary Approach?
Lucy Montgomery, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Competition and Innovation: Independent Production in China's TV Market
Bonnie Rui Liu, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
The papers in this panel investigate the relationships between media and creative economy in China. In
the 11th Five Year Plan period (2006 - 2010) China entered into a phase of economic and social
transformation in which terms such as 'independent innovation', 'soft power' and 'creative industries' are
frequently used by central and local government. While the central government is calling for more
innovation and creativity, new media technologies are providing people with the actual means to be more
creative, whether this be 'rebellious' forms of expression such as Internet parody, social network market
activities, or the reuse and exploitation of technological devices and networks for the development of
grassroots communities and low cost business ventures. These developments offer new possibilities for
personal expression, social engagement and grassroots transformation.
4338
Cultivation Analysis and Cultural Studies: The Mainstreaming of Opposed Traditions?
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Cultivated Performances: What Cultivation Analysis Says About Media, Binge Drinking and Gender
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Boundary Setting: How Polysemy Affects Media Effects Theory
Jan Van den Bulck, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Dangerous Liaisons: A Cultivation Investigation of the Relationship Between Media Consumption and
Economic Expectations
Amir Hetsroni, Ariel U Center, ISRAEL
Beyond First and Second Order Measures: Cultivation of Epistemological Beliefs
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Freya Sukalla, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
This panel offers a new appraisal of Cultivation Analysis, from both a mass communications and Cultural
Studies view. Our aim is to create a dialogue between these positions, with a view to identifying
meaningful points of theoretical and empirical convergence. We consider how familiar questions and
methods apply to the challenges of changing political times, and offer suggestions for new empirical
projects that effectively combine qualitative and quantitative practices.
4339
Unique Approaches to the Study of Media Effects
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Participants
Do Not Tell Me What You Watch, or You May Risk Being Disliked: An Experimental Study on the
Effects of Impression Management
Helmut Scherer, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Teresa K. Naab, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Brenya Adjei, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Julia Simone Rabea Niemann, U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Copycat Homicide: Are We Looking Closely Enough?
Aaron R Boyson, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Financial Crisis News: Short-Term and Long-Term Effects on Consumer Trust and Stock Exchange Rates
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter van Atteveldt, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Shenghui Wang, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Dirk Oegema, Free U, - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Impact of Social Interaction on the Hostile Media Effect
Hai Liang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
4340
Childhood Online - The Governance of Risks
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Alison Powell, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Mapping the Territory: Online Child Safety and Free Speech Advocacy
Alison Powell, U of Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Michael C Hills, Oxford Internet Institute, UNITED KINGDOM
Young People and Privacy Online: Policy and Activism From Canada
Leslie Regan Shade, Concordia U, CANADA
Children's Media Use, Their Right of Well-Being, and Media Literacy in Korea
Eun-Mee Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Who Regulates Children's Speech? Multi-Stakeholder Struggles Over Expression on Social Networking
Sites
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
The internet and other network technologies have offered unprecedented access to information and
communication to many people - including children. Over the past decade, debates have emerged in
many countries about the extent to which child protection and child safety online balance concerns about
protecting freedom of speech, as well as privacy, for both children and adults. All of these concerns are
currently influencing decisions about internet governance at national and international levels. This panel
provides comparative, international perspectives on this issue and reveals how debates about child
protection, online child safety, privacy, and freedom of expression are at the core of debates about the
internet's future as an open, accessible, and reliable global communications and information source.
4341
Researchers Making Sense of Virtual Worlds: Discussion Concerning the Methodologies/Methods
of Studying Virtual Worlds
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Participants
Methodological Issues With Large-Scale Social Science Data From Online Communities
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Interviews Within an Experimental Framework: A Potential on How to Make Sense of Sense-Making in
Virtual Worlds
CarrieLynn D. Reinhard, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Unpacking Participants' Interactive Behavior and Discourse Strategies in Virtual Dialoguing Through
Qualitative Analytic Methods of Investigation: Potential and Pitfalls
Caroline Ho, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Getting Informed: Researching Circulations and Establishments of a So-Called Serious Game
Mikala Hansbøl, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Decades of research on MMOGs, social worlds, digital games, virtual reality and avatars has generated
hundreds of articles with a variety of methods and methodologies on display. We know a lot about the
various virtual worlds, but how aware are we about what others are doing to know virtual worlds? How
much are we learning from each other? Given the complexity of virtual worlds, is there a single
methodological approach to study them, or should a multiple, mixed approach be undertaken? And if so,
how? We are proposing a panel that is a structured discussion of people with different methodological
approaches to discuss, in a series of rounds, what they do when they study virtual worlds. It is hoped that
both panelists and attendees will leave this session with knowledge about other methods and/or
methodologies currently being employed to understand our common phenomenon of interest, virtual
worlds.
4342
Network Analysis and Its Potential for Communication Science
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Thorsten Quandt, U Hohenheim, GERMANY
Participants
Studying Media Content From a Network Perspective: A Systematic Combination of Relational Content
and Network Analysis
Silke Adam, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Theoretical and Methodological Issues of Communication Roles
Thomas N. Friemel, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Networked Media Relations
Juliana J.C. Raupp, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Organizational Communication Networks and Corporate Identity
Franzisca Weder, Alpen-Adria Universität Klagenfurt, AUSTRIA
Respondent
Thorsten Quandt, U Hohenheim, GERMANY
Social networks exist in different ways, they include individuals, organizations or interactions. Challenges
for a theoretical research arise concerning the network dynamics of communication, coordination and
cooperation. Communication science provides terminologies and theoretical constructs which most
notably may refine the analysis of network-like relationship contexts. The panel will work out the
potential of network analysis as a research method in reflecting possible ways of operationalization of
communicator and contentwise research questions.
4343
Cultural Issues in Journalism
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Sydney J. Dillard, Purdue U, USA
Participants
China Cases Analysis: Consensus on New Media and Its Cultural Influence
Wei Meng, China National Academy of Social Sciences, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Does Al Jazeera Provide Contra-Media-Flow Information? How the Iranian Election and Its
Consequences Were Framed on Al Jazeera Arabic and CNN International
Susan Schenk, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Mohamed Ahmed Khalifa, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
New Co-Orientation Paradigms in Cross-Cultural Settings: The Case Between Hong Kong and Mainland
Journalists
Yan Yan, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Media, Cultural Diversity, and Globalization
Mohamed Zayani, Georgetown U, USA
Respondent
Robert Benjamin Capua, Marist College, USA
4344
High Density Session: Goals, Motivations, and Gratifications
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
A Cross-National Study of Mobile Internet Services: A Comparison of U.S. and Korean Mobile Internet
Users
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Elderly People as a Homogeneous Group of Adopters? Analysing Influencing Factors on the Adoption
and Appropriation of Media and Technological Devices by People Over 50 Years
Leyla Dogruel, FU - Berlin, GERMANY
Implicit Goal Processes in Selective Exposure to Media
Norman A. Porticella, Cornell U, USA
Media as Shelter for the Lonely and Socially Excluded
Tamara Eva Bouwman, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Enny Henrica Das, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Predicting Health Information Seeking in an Interactive Cancer Communication System: An Interplay
Between Perceived Social Support and Emotional Well-Being
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Kang Namkoong, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fiona M. McTavish, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H. Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Reasons for Information Technology Adoption and Sophistication in Small and Medium-Sized
Enterprises
Morteza Ghobakhloo, U Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
User Experience of Pervasive Information Systems: The Ubiquitous City in Korea
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Explicating Multitasking With Computers: Gratifications and Situations
Weiyu Zhang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Lingzi Zhang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
4345
Informing the Future of Health Journalism Research: Gaps, Opportunities, and Challenges
Thursday
11:30-12:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Participants
Kelly Blake, U.S. National Cancer Institute, USA
K. Viswanath, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
Bradford William Hesse, National Cancer Institute, USA
Thomas Abraham, U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
The U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) has a long tradition of funding cutting-edge health
communication and health journalism research, and a rich history of partnering with schools of
journalism, news organizations, professional organizations, and other institutes within the U.S. National
Institutes of Health (NIH), to fund and conduct disease-specific and statistical training for health
journalists in the U.S. and abroad. Because the landscape of journalism is ever-evolving, it is essential for
researchers to identify priority areas for future health journalism research, in order to inform funding
priorities at the national level. Outcomes of the session will inform a large NCI/NIH funding initiative
intended to allow communication researchers to expand upon current health journalism research to ensure
that future investigations are responsive to the changing nature of news in general, and health reporting in
particular.
4420
Mini Plenary: Urban Communication in Singapore in an Age of Globalization
Thursday
13:00-14:15
Room 201
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Gary Gumpert, Urban Communication Foundation, USA
Participants
Yu-Ning Hwang, Urban Redevelopment Authority, SINGAPORE
Yap Kheng Guan, Public Utilities Board, SINGAPORE
Singapore represents an unusual urban state that is governed and shaped by the uniqueness of a small citystate that is global and local at the same time. The physical smallness of Singapore means that any utility
or service that impinges on land use is highly controlled and planned. Three areas that stand out are urban
planning (where 85% of the population live in public housing), water use (where water is recycled,
desalination of seawater is being piloted and where a reservoir is being created in the city, a walking
distance from the convention centre) and traffic control, where a 1.6-litre Toyota Corolla costs almost
US$50,000. The panel speakers are from government agencies that are tasked with managing urban
planning, water and traffic in Singapore. They will explain how Singapore addresses the issues it faces
and how a number of the solutions are being emulated by other countries around the world. The Urban
Communication Foundation and the International Communication Association is bringing together a panel
representing several intersecting aspect of Singapore's urban landscape.
4421
Miniplenary: Queer in Asia: Issues, Identities, and Communication
Thursday
13:00-14:15
Room 202
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Mark A. Cenite, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Alex Au, Yawning Bread, SINGAPORE
Audrey Yue, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Respondents
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
John Nguyet Erni, Lingnan U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
This mini-plenary will address the situations of GLBT individuals and communities in Southeast Asia,
and the role of media, old and new, in creating and potentially transforming matters. One focus will be
Singapore, where laws prohibit sex between men, studies indicate that the majority has negative attitudes
against gay men and lesbians, and portrayals are censored in mainstream media with the rationale of
respecting sensitivities. GLBT communities are, however, using new media to organize politically and
socially in creative ways.
4422
Miniplenary Session, Feminist Scholarship Division: Im/material Principles, Material Practices:
The Women's Movement and Its Media in Asia
Thursday
13:00-14:15
Room 203
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Participants
The Chinese Women's Movement: Media Use, Challenges and Opportunities
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Refugee Women ARM Themselves: Transversal Dissent, Media and the State on the Thailand/Burma
Border
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Sexual and Reproductive Rights Advocacy in the Philippines: Making Headway Against a Powerful
Adversary
Sylvia Estrada Claudio, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
Interdisciplinary Importation: Unearthing Historical Traces of the Indian Women's Movement's Media
Production
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Women's Organizations and Experiences With Media Outreach: A Report From AWARE in Singapore
Dana Lam, AWARE, SINGAPORE
While there are dozens of books and articles on the women's movement's media productions in the U.S.
(and hence attention to the material forms of this movement), we know virtually nothing about the ways
in which women's movements in Asia have deployed media genres (print, electronic, and performances)
to change women's lives. Studying the media of a social movement not only gives us insight into the
mobilization of social consciousness, but it also makes visible and thus materializes a movement's
contribution to national and global histories of collective transformation. Providing case studies of the
women's movement's varied use of media in the Philippines, China, Thailand-Myanmar border region,
and India, presenters on this panel will work together to fill a gaping hole in our knowledge of feminist
agency in Asia.
4446
ICA Fellows Miniplenary: Matters of Communication: Making a Difference With Research
Thursday
13:00-14:15
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Linda L. Putnam, U of California-Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Foundations of Communication as a Practical Discipline: Praxis, Inquiry, Metadiscourse
Robert T. Craig, U of Colorado, USA
On News Images
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Kuuki as a Social Force and Compliance Without Attitude Change
Youichi Ito, Akita International U, JAPAN
The Questions That Mattered
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Respondent
Linda L. Putnam, U of California-Santa Barbara, USA
The ICA Fellows are proud to present this showcase of work by recently elected colleagues. This year,
four Fellows present overviews of their work on the underpinnings of the discipline, in interpersonal,
intercultural, and mediated contexts. This panel will address ongoing challenges for us as communication
scholars, and will pose questions about the future of our discipline in the international arena.
4520
Children, Adolescents, & Media Top Paper Session
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Contingent Computer Interactions for Young Children's Object Retrieval Success
Alexis Lauricella, Georgetown U, USA
Tiffany Pempek, Otterbein College, USA
Rachel Barr, Georgetown U, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
The Causal Relationship of Adolescents' Risky Sexual Online Behavior and Their Perceptions of This
Behavior
Susanne E. Baumgartner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Toward a Developmental Conceptualization of Media and Other Contributors to Child Obesity: The SixCs Model
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
Kelly K. Bost, U of Illinois, USA
Brent A. McBride, U of Illinois, USA
Sharon M. Donovan, U of Illinois, USA
Diana S. Grigsby-Toussaint, U of Illinois, USA
Juhee Kim, U of Illinois, USA
Janet M. Liechty, U of Illinois, USA
Angela Wiley, U of Illinois, USA
Margarita Teran-Garcia, U of Illinois, USA
Gwendolyn H. Costa Jacobsohn, USA
Familiar Characters and Toddlers' Learning From Video
Alexis Lauricella, Georgetown U, USA
Alice Howard Gola, Georgetown U, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
4521
Media Literacy, Media Transparency, Media Criticism, and Media Accountability
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 202
Journalism Studies
Chair
Claudia Mellado, U of Concepcion, CHILE
Participants
Journalism, Accountability, and the Possibilities for Structural Critique: A Case Study of Coverage of
Whistleblowing
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Joanne Hunt, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Literacy and News Credibility: Does Knowledge of Media Ownership Increase Skepticism in
News Consumers?
Seth Ashley, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Mark Anthony Poepsel, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Erin Nicole Willis, U of Missouri, USA
Reducing Hostile Media Perceptions for an Environmental Controversy Through Media Literacy
Emily K. Vraga, U of Wisconsin, USA
Melissa Tully, U of Wisconsin, USA
Heather Atkin, U of Wisconsin, USA
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin, USA
Matters of Media Ethics: Understanding Media Nontransparency Through Individual Approach to
Journalistic Ethical Decision-Making
Anastasiya Grynko, Kiev Mohyla Academy, UKRAINE
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Respondent
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
4522
Images in News
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Kimberly Meltzer, Georgetown U, USA
Participants
Effect of Motivational Relevance and Photo Thumbnails on Online News Selection Based on Readers'
Goals
Soyoung Bae, Indiana U, USA
Daesik Song, Kyungsung U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Looking at Beautiful Drama: Framing Journalistic Pictures
Bianca Olivia Nita, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Poor Framing in Television News: Redundancy Between Audio and Visual Modalities in Political News
Anita M. J. van Hoof, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Janet Takens, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Dirk Oegema, Free U, THE NETHERLANDS
Do Better-Looking Members of Congress Receive More TV Coverage?
Israel Waismel-Manor, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Respondent
Wayne Wanta, Oklahoma State U, USA
4525
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) State of Art Research Panel
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 206
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Social Influence of a Religious Hero: The Late Cardinal Stephen Kim Sou-hwan's Impact on Cornea
Donation and Volunteerism
Hyuhn-Suhck Bae, Yeungnam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
William J. Brown, Regent U, USA
Seok Kang, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
An Empirical Analysis of the Effect of Real-Name System on Internet Bulletin Boards: Focusing on How
the Real-Name System and Users' Characteristics Influence the Use of Slanderous Comments and
Abusive Language
Jeong Min Choi, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyun Soo Na, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yon Kyu Park, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Presence in 3DTV : A Study on the Perceptive Characteristics of the Presence in Three Dimensional
Imaging Programs
Sang Hee Kweon, SungKyunKwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun-Joung Cho, SungKyunKwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Byeong-Cheol Cho, Dong-A Broadcasting U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eum-Mi Kim, SungKyunKwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Am I Being Watched? The Effects of Governmental Regulations of the Internet on Youth Perceptions of
the On-line Expression Environment in South Korea
Ju Young Lee, Indiana U, USA
This is a research panel where members of Korean American Communication Association will present
their research papers on matters related to Korea and Korean Americans.
4526
Voices Raised in Public: Civic Life and Evolving Communication Technologies
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 207
Communication History
Chair
Sharrona Pearl, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Cablese [STOP]: How the Telegraph Influenced Language Use
Aditi Raghavan, Northwestern U, USA
Electrifying Speeches: The Technologizing of the Voice in the Early-20th-Century US
Brenton John Malin, U of Pittsburgh, USA
The Beginning of the End: The Decline of the Churchgoing Bell in Urban America
Deborah Lubken, U of Pennsylvania, USA
"The Totalitarian Destruction of the Public Sphere?": Public Communication in the GDR
Michael Meyen, Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Publizistik (DGPuk), GERMANY
Anke Fiedler, U of Munich, GERMANY
Respondent
Sharrona Pearl, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4527
Top Papers in Public Relations
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Vincent Hazleton, Radford U, USA
Participants
Gauging an Integrated Model of Public Relations Value: Scale Development and Cross-Cultural Studies
Yi-Hui Huang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Trust and Distrust: Refining Organization-Public Relationship Measurement in Two Samples
Hongmei Shen, San Diego State U, USA
Leadership Education in the Public Relations Curriculum: Reality, Opportunities, and Benefits
Elina V Erzikova, Central Michigan U, USA
Bruce K. Berger, U of Alabama, USA
Peer or Expert? The Persuasive Impact of YouTube Video Producers and Their Moderating Mechanism
Hye-Jin Paek, Michigan State U, USA
Thomas Hove, Michigan State U, USA
Hyun Ju Jeong, Michigan State U, USA
Mikyoung Kim, Michigan State U, USA
Respondent
Guenter Bentele, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
4528
Digital Politics: Networks, Actors, Pirates, Consumers
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Jack Zeljko Bratich, Rutgers U, USA
Participants
Networks and the Social Imagination: Key Moments in the History of the Open Internet
Thomas Streeter, U of Vermont, USA
Pirates of Silicon Valley: State of Exception and Dispossession in Web 2.0
Peter Jakobsson, Sodertorn U, SWEDEN
Fredrik Stiernstedt, Södertörn U, SWEDEN
Towards a New Critique of Online Participatory Culture: User-Generated Content and the Assembling of
Software and Users
Ganaele Langlois, U of Ontario Institute of Technology, CANADA
The Death of the Mass Audience Reconsidered: Business Models for the Digital Media Economy
Goran Bolin, Sodertorn U, SWEDEN
This session rethinks the legal, corporate, military and consumer politics of digital media. Collectively,
the papers provide new historical and theoretical frameworks for understanding the politics of online
culture.
4530
Visuality and Multimodality
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 301
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Participants
The Visual and the Verbal: A Novel Methodological Approach Integrating Iconology, Multimodality and
Visual Context Analysis
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Ognynan Seizov, Jacobs U, GERMANY
John A. Bateman, U Bremen, GERMANY
Media Principles and Multimodality
Jana Holsanova, Lund U, SWEDEN
Multimodality in Video Spots Or: Is There Non-linearity Within Linearity?
Hans-Juergen Bucher, U of Trier, GERMANY
Visual and Multimodal Analysis of Cultural Traits in Web Sites
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Interactive Software for Multimodal Analysis
Kay L. O'Halloran, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
This panel will bring together international experts from Germany, Singapore, Sweden and Belgium to
present different disciplinary approaches to the pressing topic of visuality and multimodality. It aims to
explore the theoretical and methodological connections between visuality and multimodality, two
concepts at the interface of communication science, cognitive psychology, linguistics, and computer
science. It puts the two related concepts into the larger conference perspective of im/materiality by
forming a continuous cycle of theoretical and practical interactions, from the major theoretical
prescriptions for document design to the practical constraints of the print or online publication method, to
the cognitive process of translating the material, palpable multimodal document into an immaterial mental
information unit, to the development of software tools for multimodal analysis. It takes visuality as a
starting point, since vision is responsible for the perception of the majority of multimodal presentations;
then it introduces several prominent theoretical views and principles of multimodality as a field of
research, leading to an overview of the challenges for both visual communication and multimodal
document design.
4531
ICT Use in Cultural and Political Contexts
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Rohan Samarajiva, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Participants
Information Technology and Democratic Islam
Philip Howard, U of Washington, USA
Mobile Phone Use on the Israeli Home Front During the 2006 Lebanon War and 2009 Gaza Conflict
Akiba A. Cohen, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Amit Schejter, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Parody and Resistance on the Chinese Internet
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Taiwan's Information Society and Wage Inequality
Wei-Ching Wang, National Taiwan Normal U, TAIWAN
4532
The Effects of One-Sided News Media
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Participants
A Theory of Political Campaign Media Connectedness, Part II: Clarifying Debate Viewing and Online
Media
R. Lance Holbert, Ohio State U, USA
Nick W. Geidner, Ohio State U, USA
All the News You Want to Hear: The Impact of Partisan News Consumption on Political Participation TOP STUDENT PAPER
Susanna Dilliplane, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Climate on Cable: The Effects of Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC on Global Warming Beliefs and
Perceptions
Lauren M. Feldman, American U, USA
Connie Roser-Renouf, George Mason U, USA
Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale U, USA
Obama, Pro or Con? Politically Congenial Media and Cross-Party Preference in the 2008 Election
Elizabeth Roodhouse, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Respondent
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
4533
Constructing and Negotiating Gender
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 304
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Kukhee Choo, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Cross-Generational Gender Constructions: Women, Teenagers, and Technology
Helen Thornham, City U, UNITED KINGDOM
Who We Are and What We Want: A Feminist Standpoint Approach to Defining Effective ICT Use for
West Virginian Women [Top Student Paper Award winner for FSD]
Debbie Goh, Indiana U, USA
Work-Life Negotiations Through Discourse and Materiality: Couples' Coconstructions of Work-Life,
Gender, and Power Through Larger Influences
Katherine Justyna Denker, Ball State U, USA
"I Poisoned My Baby": Motherhood Between Blame and Victimization
Carolin Aronis, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Respondent
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
4534
Media and Culture in National and Transnational Contexts
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Participants
I'm Egyptian, I'm Muslim, But I'm Also Cosmopolitan: The Unlikely Young Cosmopolitans of Cairo
Heba Elsayed, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Local Roots and Global Wings: Television Drama and Hybridity in Moroccan Cultural Identities
Jill G. Campaiola, Rutgers U, USA
The Persistence of National TV: Language and Cultural Proximity in Flemish Fiction
Alexander Dhoest, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Vuoden 1918 Taistelut Taas Tampereen Kaduilla: Remembering and Forgetting 1918 in Tampere,
Finland (Top Student Paper)
Piotr Michal Szpunar, U of Pennsylvania, USA
4535
Models and Metaphors of Organizing
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Peter Monge, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Organizing "Subjects" and "Objects": Towards a Theory of Performance as Organizing
Amanda J. Porter, U of Colorado, USA
Organizational Communication as Ventriloquism: Passion, Figures, and Incarnation
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Aggressive Mimicry as Ambiguous Communication About Organizational Forms and Its Theoretical
Implications for Community Ecology Models
Bettina M. Richards Heiss, U of Southern California, USA
Organizing, Networking, and Organizations in the Global Social Justice Movement in Aotearoa, New
Zealand
Shiv Ganesh, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Respondent
Linda L. Putnam, U of California-Santa Barbara, USA
4536
Intergroup Communication, Culture, and Conflict
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 307
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Scott A. Reid, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Cross-Cultural and Technological Challenges in Web-Based Instruction: Matters for Communication
Bolanle A. Olaniran, Texas Tech U, USA
Indi Williams, U of North Texas, USA
Natasha Rodriguez, Texas Tech U, USA
Conflict Styles Among Muslims and Christians in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States: An
Analysis of Religious and National Difference
Stephen Michael Croucher, Bowling Green State U, USA
Effects of International Stories, Previous Knowledge, and Credibility on Images of Foreign Nations: An
Image Theory Perspective
Anastasia G Kononova, U of Missouri, USA
Saleem Elias Alhabash, U of Missouri, USA
Fritz Cropp, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Memory, Empathy, Solidarity: Jews & Rwandan Tutsis and the Communication Resulting From Shared
Experiences of Atrocity
Noam Schimmel, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
4537
Social Networking Sites and Revitalized Cyber-Civic Spaces: A Global Perspective
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Weiyu Zhang, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Organizing a Digital Research Community: An Empirical Perspective
Jin Shang, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Heartbeat Vietnam (Vi trai tim tre tho 2009): A Case Study of a 'Paradigm Shift' in Fundraising Activity
in Vietnam via Social Media
Jodie Luu, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Traversing Online and Offline Worlds: Using Facebook for Social Organizing, Political Activism, and
Civic Participation
Kerk Kee, U of Texas, USA
Sebastian Valenzuela, U of Texas, USA
Namsu Park, U of Texas, USA
Dokdo Belongs to Korea: Diaspora and Civic Engagement on Facebook
Li Ting Ng, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
The evolvement of SNS into a communicative and collaborative platform has propelled a multitude of
research endeavors seeking to understand how the global reach of this technology can help different
entities facilitate social change. For stakeholders in academia, the question lies on how to effectively
create and sustain an online research community; while activists or nonprofit organizations would be
concerned about ways to leverage SNS in their bid to promote social causes and nurture the growth of
civil society in different political contexts; lastly for diaspora, it is the question of connection and
engagement in a collective discourse on a political and territorial issue of their motherland. Presenting
cases spanning from the US, UK, Vietnam and Korea, this panel aims to provide a holistic perspective on
the possibilities presented, with hope to contribute to the burgeoning understanding of SNS and its social
and political implications.
4538
Parasocial Interaction
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participants
Horton and Wohl Revisited: Exploring Viewers' Experience of Parasocial Interactions
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Charlotte Goldhoorn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Effects of Involvement With Celebrities: Examining Similarity Identification, Wishful Identification,
and Parasocial Interaction in a Celebrity Effects Model
Janel S. Schuh, U of Southern California, USA
The Role of Television Characters in Explaining Audience Sexuality
Keren Eyal, The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, ISRAEL
Goodbye, Harry? Audience Reactions to the End of Parasocial Relationships: The Case of "Harry Potter"
Hannah Schmid, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Christoph Klimmt, Johannes Gutenberg U - Mainz, GERMANY
4539
Media Policy and Management
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Amber Melissa Korbl Smallwood, U of West Georgia, USA
Participants
Beyond the Principle of Relative Constancy: Determinants of Media Expenditures Into the Era of Internet
in U.S.
Linsen Su, China Institute of Industrial Reations, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Cable Channel Diversity and Its Relationship to Network Programming in South Korea From 1997 to
2007
Sujin Choi, Indiana U, USA
Matters of the Disintegration of the State Model in the English Speaking Caribbean--Restructuring and
Redefining Public Service Broadcasting
Juliette Storr, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Who's in Control of Student Newspapers? An Analysis of Influences, Self-Censorship, and Censorship of
Content
Shaniece B. Bickham, Southern U A&M College, USA
Jae-Hwa Shin, U of Southern Mississippi, USA
4541
Between Global and Local: Macau in Transformation
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 312
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Clement YK So, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Globalizing Macau: News Frame and English Language Press in Macau
Mei Wu, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OFMACAU
Anni Lam, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OFMACAU
The Interplay of Forum Posts and Media News: Web Mining of a Social Issue in Macau
Angus Weng Hin Cheong, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Cross Generation Knowledge Gap: Socio-Economic Status (SES) Model of Macau
Xiaoqin Li, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OFMACAU
Comparative Analysis of Media Frame and Audience Frame in Hong Kong and Macau: A Case Study of
Ao Menlong Scandal
Huailin Chen, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Macau, a former Portuguese colony which returned to the Chinese sovereignty on Dec 20, 1999, has
transformed in a decade from a quiet colonial enclave to a global entrepot which is complicated to define.
Its appellations range from a spectacular "Oriental Las Vegas," a gross capital of casinos, to a successful
showcase of "One-country two-systems," all depending on how you interpret it. This panel attempts to
elaborate Macau from within and from a close examination of the tension arising in Macau from the
influence of globalization, the pressure for economic growth, the wild-spread diffusion of new media
technologies and the local aspiration to maintain a cultural identity, a stable family and harmonious
society.
4543
Intercultural Communication Division Top Papers
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Ling Chen, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Conflict Management Styles of Americans and Indonesians: Exploring the Effects of Gender and
Collectivism/Individualism
Su'udy Rizaladdin, U of Kansas, USA
Yan Bing Zhang, U of Kansas, USA
Cultivation Theory and Mental Image
Jee Young Chung, U of Alabama, USA
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
Looking Inward With an Outward Thrust in the Age of Information and Globalization: Reflections of
Nigerian Video Films and Industry
Emmanuel C. Alozie, Governors State U, USA
More Different Than Similar: Values in Political Speeches of Leaders From Developed and Developing
Countries
Moniza Waheed, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Neijens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
4544
High Density Session: Cognitive Processing Issues Surrounding Gaming, Presence, and Flow
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
A Continuous Measure of the Level of Presence Using Electroencephalography (EEG) Recording of
Gamma Band Synchrony
Frank Biocca, Michigan State U, USA
Feelings of Physical Presence in Haptic Interfaces
Seung-A Annie Jin, Boston College, USA
Why Do We Smile When Dying Virtually? Insights on Player Experience From Physiological and SelfReport Measures
Wouter M. van den Hoogen, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Karolien Poels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Yvonne A.W. de Kort, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Wijnand A. Ijsselsteijn, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
The Role of Emotional Involvement and Absorption in the Formation of Spatial Presence
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Matthias Hofer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Holger Schramm, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Website Interactivity Effects Explained by Consumers' Online Flow Experience
Guda van Noort, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hilde Voorveld, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Process of Desensitization? Examining Habituation and Attention During Violent and Nonviolent
Games
Satoko Kurita, Hokkaido U, JAPAN
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
4545
Health Communication Interventions: Lessons and Evidence
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Rajiv N. Rimal, Johns Hopkins U, USA
Participants
Looking Under the Hood of Web-Based Tailoring: A Meta-Analysis of Second-Generation Tailored
Health Behavior Change Interventions
Mia Liza A. Lustria, Florida State U, USA
Seth M. Noar, U of Kentucky, USA
Juliann Cortese, Florida State U, USA
Stephanie van Stee, U of Kentucky, USA
Robert L. Glueckauf, Florida State U, USA
Jung A. Lee, Florida State U, USA
Encouraging Teachers to Promote Cover-the-Cough in Schools: A Tailored Multimedia Intervention
Prabu David, Ohio State U, USA
Aletheia Henry, Ohio State U, USA
Jatin Srivastava, Ohio State U, USA
Jason Orcena, Ohio Dept. of Health, USA
Jennifer Thrush, Ohio Dept. of Health, USA
Reporting Standards for Studies of Tailored Interventions: A Communication Challenge
Nancy Grant Harrington, U of Kentucky, USA
Seth M. Noar, U of Kentucky, USA
Learning From Field Research: Why Emphasizing Only the C in ABC May Not Be an Effective Strategy
for the Developing World
Nupur Tustin, U of Southern California, USA
Should We Chase Ambulances? The Challenges in Locating Residents for a 911 Misuse Intervention
Project
Holley A. Wilkin, Georgia State U, USA
Kimberly Stringer, KDH Research and Communication, USA
Karen O'Quin, Georgia State U, USA
Shannon Montgomery, Georgia State U, USA
4546
Mediation and Representation: Digital Culture and Politics in Communication Studies
Thursday
14:30-15:45
Theater
Theme Sessions
Chair
Timothy Kuhn, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
Communicating Climate Change: Exploring the U.S. Climate Scientists' Roles in Policy Making Process
Jiun-Yi Tsai, U of Wisconsin, USA
iPhone Therefore I Am: Looking for Worlds in a Mediated Time of Distraction (Twenty+ Tweets)
Kevin DeLuca, U of Utah, USA
The Semiotics of Changi in the Case of Nguyen Tuong Van
Genevieve Berrick, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
The Virtual and the Real: A Philosophical Clash Defining Digital Culture
Eduardo Santana, U of Califorrnia - San Diego, USA
Respondent
Steven R. Corman, Arizona State U, USA
4620
Children, Adolescents, & Media Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
4621
Dialogues of Competition: The Confluence of Change, Communities, and Communication
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 202
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Fernando de la Cruz Paragas, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Youth Leaders' Competing Narratives on Ethnic Conflict: An Indonesian Case
Rudi Sukandar, Maarif Institute - Jakarta, INDONESIA
Islam Hadhari: An Ideological Discourse Analysis of Islamization Texts in Malaysia
Azlan R. Yahaya, Ohio U, USA
How Affirmative Action (AA) Policy Affects the Information and Communication Technologies Sector in
South Africa
Adele Mavuso Mda, Ohio U, USA
Thailand's Marginalized Groups, Community Radio, and Its License-Making Process
Chalisa Magpanthong, Ohio U, USA
Drew McDaniel, Ohio U, USA
This panel explores how competing dialogues are both product and producer of shifts in the public
spheres of four countries. It looks at how contradictory ideologies and voices can be examined to
construct shared identities and resolve social enmity, and how groups contend with policy to empower
themselves in the communication and media arena. In Indonesia, the narratives of youth leaders are
analyzed to reveal how peace can be negotiated among their communities. In Malaysia, the tension
between the discourses of indigenous and universalist constructions of national identity is examined as a
dichotomous dialectic. In South Africa, the policy on affirmative action that helps subordinated people
find their place in the information sector is contextualized in relation to the country's cultural and
economic landscape. In Thailand, grassroots initiatives towards the implementation of the licensing
processes for community radio are studied to surface how governments can circumvent media freedoms.
4622
On News Blogs, Bloggers, and Blogging
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Participants
Audience Responses to Controversy: Medium Comparison Between Letters to the Editor and Blogs
Donna Lampkin Stephens, U of Central Arkansas, USA
Nokon Heo, U of Central Arkansas, USA
Comparing Legacy News Sites With Citizen News and Blog Sites: Where's the Best Journalism?
Margaret Ellen Duffy, U of Missouri, USA
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Mi Rosie Jahng, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
A Comparative Content Analysis of Newspaper and Weblog Reporting on Attempts to Pass a Media
Shield Law
C.W. Anderson, College of Staten Island- CUNY, USA
What's Journalism Got to Do With It? Political Blogs and Bloggers
Tom Bakker, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Klaus Schoenbach, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Susanne Fengler, Erich Brost Institute for International Journalism, GERMANY
4625
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 206
Sponsored Sessions
4626
Communication History Interest Group Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 207
Communication History
4627
Public Relations Division Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 208
Public Relations
This is a business meeting where members of Korean American Communication Association (KACA)
discuss matters relevant to KACA.
Chair
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Participants
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Jennifer L. Bartlett, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
4628
Philosophy of Communication Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
4630
Visual Communication Studies Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 301
Visual Communication Studies
4631
Communication and Technology Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Luc Pauwels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Chair
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
4632
Political Communication Division Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Participant
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
4633
Feminist Scholarship Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 304
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Diana I. Rios, U of Connecticut, USA
Participants
Vicki Mayer, Tulane U, USA
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
4634
Open Space: The Permeable Spaces of New Media Installation
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 305
Sponsored Sessions
Participants
Joaquin Gasgonia Palencia, PHILIPPINES
Shannon Castleman, SINGAPORE
Jesvin Yeo, SINGAPORE
Vladimir Todorovic, SINGAPORE
Open Space is multi-platformed new media exhibition exploring open space as a conceptual zone in
Singapore and Southeast Asia, mobilizing collaboration, participation, dialogue, process, encounters,
permeability and community. Open Space proposes a relational mode rather than a fixed object. Open
Space is where technologies, people and places converge. Curatorial team: Patricia R. Zimmermann,
Nikki Draper, Sharon Lin Tay, Nanyang Technological University; Wenjie Zhang, Singapore; with
curatorial associate Jenna Ng and curatorial assistant Koon Yen Low. This Open
Space/Singapore/Southeast Asia session investigates how new media installation art in two, three and
even four dimensions generates fluid cartographies of new permeable spaces—material, imaginary,
typographic, synthetic. All speakers will show examples of their works , and discuss the conceptual and
design models they deploy to construct permeable spaces.
4635
Organizing by Dis-Locating Texts, Spaces, and Identities
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Participants
Decision-Making as a Situated and Dislocated Practice
Sylvie Grosjean, U of Ottawa, CANADA
Daniel Robichaud, U de Montréal, CANADA
Strategic Plans as a Dislocating Device
Daniel Robichaud, U de Montréal, CANADA
Chantal Benoit-Barne, U de Montréal, CANADA
Joelle Basque, U de Montréal, CANADA
Dis/locating the Birth of an Organization Through Its Im/materiality
Mathieu Chaput, U of Montréal, CANADA
Organizing by Dislocating: From 'Putting Out of Place' to 'Giving a Sense of Place'
Consuelo Vasquez, U of Québec in Montréal, CANADA
Respondent
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montréal, CANADA
This panel brings together a set of empirical studies developing the idea of the "dis-local" character of
communication in organizing. In line with the conference theme on the im/materiality of communication,
the panel offers a discussion of cases in which the displacements of texts and artifacts achieved in
interaction made organizing possible by extending its scope in time and place. The panel offers a
discussion of cases aimed at assessing the heuristic and analytical value of the idea of the material and
dislocated properties of communication in contexts such as strategic planning in a police organization,
decision-making in a 911 emergency center, identity statements in the birth of a political party, and the
spread of an educational organization throughout Chile. All these studies take up the challenge of
describing both the local features of the episodes they researched and their extension in time and space
using the notion of dislocation.
4636
ECREA Panel: Dissemination Strategies in Communication Research
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 307
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Francois Heinderyckx, European Communication Research (ECREA), BELGIUM
Participants
Cees J. Hamelink, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Linda L. Putnam, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
4637
Global Communication and Social Change Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
4638
Theorizing About Advertising
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Robert Huesca, Trinity U, USA
Chair
Eno Akpabio, U of Botswana, BOTSWANA
Participants
Self-Construal, Congruent Visuals, and Their Effects on Perception and Purchase Intention
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Yinjiao Ye, U of Rhode Island, USA
Jie Xu, Villanova U, USA
Does Corporate Advertising Work in a Crisis? The Examination of Inoculation Theory
Sojung Kim, U of Texas, USA
Using Corporate Ads as a Prime: Effects, Process, and Effectiveness
Jing Jiang, Renmin U of China, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Xiaobo Tao, North China U of Technology, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The Effects of Mobile Advertising in South Korea and the United States
Sanghee Park, Texas State U - San Marcos, USA
Jinbong Choi, Texas State U - San Marcos, USA
4639
Media Interventions Across Domains
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Avinash Thombre, U of Arkansas - Little Rock, USA
Participants
Celebrity Activists in Social Profit Campaigning: A Survey With the Flemish Public on Views and
Effectiveness
Hildegarde D. Y. Van den Bulck, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Koen Panis, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Peter Van Aelst, Leiden U, THE NETHERLANDS
Anne Hardy, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Examining the Effects of Media Literacy Interventions: A Meta-Analysis
Se-Hoon Jeong, Korea U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyunyi Cho, Purdue U, USA
Yoori Hwang, U of Minnesota, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
From Message to Behavior: Self-Other Perceptual Gap in a Health Communication Context
Ye Sun, U of Texas, USA
When Distant Others Matter More: Perceived Effectiveness for Self and Other in Child Abuse PSA
Contexts
Hye-Jin Paek, Michigan State U, USA
Thomas Hove, Michigan State U, USA
Mikyoung Kim, Michigan State U, USA
Hyun Ju Jeong, Michigan State U, USA
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
4640
Polish Electoral Campaigns and Political Communication in Comparative Perspective
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 311
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska, Polish Communication Association, POLAND
Participants
The Professionalization of Political Campaigning in Poland
Marek Mazur, U of Silesia in Katowice, POLAND
Televised Electoral Debates in Poland: Pursuing the American Model
Marek Piasecki, U of Wroclaw, POLAND
Models of Political Consulting in Poland in 1989 - 2009 in Comparative Perspective
Bartlomiej Biskup, U of Warsaw, POLAND
Tabloidization of the Political Discourse: Polish Case
Dorota Piontek, Adam Mickiewicz U, POLAND
Communicating with Citizens? Representations of "Public Opinion" in Polish Public Discourse
Robert Miroslaw Szwed, John Paul II Catholic U of Lublin, POLAND
Respondent
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Election campaigns are a stable element of political communication in Poland. 20 years of experiences
with free elections provoke some questions linked with changes of these campaigns, and a role of political
actors, media and citizens in campaigns. Polish scholars present outcomes of their empirical research
dedicated to different aspects of political communication, professionalization of campaigns, models of
political consulting, televised debates, political discourse, communicating with voters. They compare
Polish campaigns with the American and Western European models
4641
Whither Asian Communication Research: A Roundtable Forum
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 312
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Eddie Kuo, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Georgette Wang, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Naren Chitty, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Koichi Iwabuchi, Waseda U, JAPAN
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
Jack Qiu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Clement YK So, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Kwangmi K. Kim, Towson U, USA
In celebration of its 20th anniversary, Asian Journal of Communication published a special issue entitled
"Asian Communication Research: The past 20-years, and the next", (Vol 20, No. 2, 2010), to mark the
event. Nine scholars of Asian communication were invited to contribute to the special issue for a review
and analysis of Asian communication research in their respective fields, ranging from international
communication, intercultural communication, political communication, globalization, to new media. In
this Roundtable Forum, authors of the AJC 20.2 special issue are invited to share their views on the future
of Asian communication. Among the issues to be explored are: What the major trends and features of
Asian communication research in the past decades? What are major issues raised in the debates on Asian
communication? What are the directions that Asian communication research should take in the coming
decades? The panelists shall speak on Asian communication in general and on their chosen area of
specialization. The Forum will be open to the audience who may want to share their views from either an
Asian or non-Asian perspective.
4643
Intercultural Communication Business Meeting
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
4644
Emotion and Media: Four Different Approaches
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Kathleen Custers, Katholieke U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Participants
Affective Dispositions and Media Choices
Matthias R. Hastall, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Towards an On-Line Fear Typology: Vicarious and Imaginable Fear of Crime
Kathleen Custers, Katholieke U - Leuven, BELGIUM
The Impact of Interactivity and Physical Arousal Within Media Content on Affect Change
Yen-Shen Chen, Florida State U, USA
Cultivating Worry: Individuals' News Consumption and Thoughts About Developing Cancer
Jennifer Kim Bernat, Purdue U, USA
This panel aims to show that emotions and media use can affect one another in four different ways. First,
emotions can influence media use, as Matthias Hastall showed in his contribution on emotional
dispositions as predictors of media behavior. Second, media use can lead to changes in users' emotional
states. Two types of changes are discussed. Kathleen Custers looked at how media use can elicit affective
reactions (as happens when TV viewers experience fear while viewing). Yen-Chen Chen studied how
media use can lead to physiological reactions which in turn change emotions. Finally, media use can lead
to changes in emotions after media use, as Jennifer Bernat showed in her study on how news exposure
affects cancer worry. Too much attention may have gone to the study of cognitive processes and cognitive
responses. Emotions should feature higher on the agenda of future studies.
4645
Persuasion and Health Communication
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Nehama Lewis, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Applying the Extended Parallel Process Model to Exam Posters in 2008 Chinese Annual Antidrug
Campaign
Rui Shi, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Framing Moral Responsibility: The Influence of Moral Emotions on Persuasive Health Messages
Sun-Young Lee, U of Wisconsin, USA
Framing the H1N1 Flu Pandemic: Effect of Visual and Textual Frames on Perceptions of Flu
Susceptibility, Severity, and Attributions for Its Global Outbreak
Norman C. H. Wong, U of Oklahoma, USA
Lindsey Harvell, U of Oklahoma, USA
Necati Anaz, U of Oklahoma, USA
Physiological, Cognitive, and Emotional Responses to Counter Alcohol Abuse Messages Based on
Sensation Seeking Tendency: Fear vs. Humor
Moon J Lee, U of Florida, USA
Mija Shin, Disney Media Lab, USA
4646
Materializing Culture and Identity in Communication
Thursday
16:00-17:15
Theater
Theme Sessions
Chair
Timothy Kuhn, U of Colorado, USA
Participants
A Matter of Perception: Third-Culture Individuals' Interpersonal Sensitivity
Allyn Lyttle, World Help, USA
Gina G Barker, Liberty U, USA
Terri Cornwell, Liberty U, USA
Materiality of the Self: Toward a Reconceptualization of Identity in Communication
Sachi Sekimoto, U of New Mexico, USA
Public Relations, Materiality, and Marginalization in a Global Context: A Postcolonial Interrogation
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Respondent
Shiv Ganesh, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
4715
Asian Journal of Communication Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Blue Pacific
Sponsored Sessions
4720
Children, Adolescents, & Media Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
4725
Korean American Communication Association (KACA) Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 206
Sponsored Sessions
4726
Reception for the Communication History Interest Group
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 207
Communication History
4727
Public Relations Division Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 208
Public Relations
4728
Philosophy of Communication Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
4731
Communication and Technology Reception (Offsite)
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Craig E. Carroll, U of North Carolina, USA
Chair
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Offsite Social by Communication and Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and Game
Studies Interest Group @ Brewerkz Restaurant & MicroBrewerery (http://www.brewerkz.com/)
Thursday, June 24 19:00-21:00 Communication and Technology Information Systems Game Studies Pub
gathering for members of Communication & Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and
Game Studies Interest Group. Location: Brewerkz Riverside Point 30 Merchant Road #01-05/06
Riverside Point Singapore 058282 Tel: (65) 6438 7438 First drink is free for CAT/InfoSys/Game Studies
members. Complimentary finger food.
4732
Political Communication Division Reception (Off Site)
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 303
Political Communication
4733
Teresa Award Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 304
Feminist Scholarship
Participant
Kevin G. Barnhurst, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Chair
Marian J. Meyers, Georgia State U, USA
Participants
Diana I. Rios, U of Connecticut, USA
Carolyn M. Byerly, Howard U, USA
Teresa Award for the Advancement of Feminist Scholarship. We encourage self-nominations, as well as
the nomination of others. The Teresa Award recognizes work that has made significant contributions to
the development, reach and influence of feminist scholarship. While the FSD awards committee favors
research that consists of multiple projects and publications that have made a clear, coherent and sustained
contribution to the advancement of feminist scholarship over time, single works and/or activities which
have been highly influential in the field of feminist communication scholarship may also qualify someone
for nomination. More specifically, nominees for this award will have accomplished one or more of the
following: (1) opened up new theoretical and/or methodological territory in feminist research; (2) made
other important contributions to the advancement of feminist scholarship; and (3) engaged in feminist
activism within academia that advanced feminist scholarship.
4737
Global Communication and Social Change Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
4741
Game Studies Interest Group Reception (Off Site)
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 312
Game Studies
4743
Intercultural Communication Division Reception
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
4744
Information Systems Reception (Off Site)
Thursday
17:30-18:45
Room 325
Information Systems
4827
Annual Dinner of the Public Relations Division (Off Site)
Thursday
19:00-21:00
Room 208
Public Relations
Offsite Social by Communication and Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and Game
Studies Interest Group @ Brewerkz Restaurant & MicroBrewerery (http://www.brewerkz.com/)
Thursday, June 24 19:00-21:00 Communication and Technology Information Systems Game Studies Pub
gathering for members of Communication & Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and
Game Studies Interest Group. Location: Brewerkz Riverside Point 30 Merchant Road #01-05/06
Riverside Point Singapore 058282 Tel: (65) 6438 7438 First drink is free for CAT/InfoSys/Game Studies
members. Complimentary finger food.
Offsite Social by Communication and Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and Game
Studies Interest Group @ Brewerkz Restaurant & MicroBrewerery (http://www.brewerkz.com/)
Thursday, June 24 19:00-21:00 Communication and Technology Information Systems Game Studies Pub
gathering for members of Communication & Technology Division, Information Systems Division, and
Game Studies Interest Group. Location: Brewerkz Riverside Point 30 Merchant Road #01-05/06
Riverside Point Singapore 058282 Tel: (65) 6438 7438 First drink is free for CAT/InfoSys/Game Studies
members. Complimentary finger food.
The Public Relations Division will have its traditional annual dinner for members immediately following
the reception. Attendance in limited and preregistation may be required. The location and transportation
(if available) will be announced at the Division's Business Meeting.
5A15
ICA Past Presidents' Breakfast
Friday
07:00-08:30
Blue Pacific
Sponsored Sessions
5120
Empowerment and Education: Research on Media Literacy Around the World
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Combating Middle East Stereotypes Through Media Literacy Education in Elementary School
Renee Hobbs, Temple U, USA
Nuala Cabral, Temple U, USA
Aggie Ebrahimi, Temple U, USA
Jiwon Yoon, Temple U, USA
Rawia AlHumaidan, Kuwait U, KUWAIT
An Advertising Literacy Workshop to Enhance Young Adolescents' Understanding of Traditional and
Emerging Advertising of Food
Jih-Hsuan Lin, Michigan State U, USA
Wei Peng, Michigan State U, USA
A Think-Aloud Investigation Into Youths' Knowledge Structures for Internet Literacy
Elmie Nekmat, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Sun Sun Lim, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Comparing the Think-Aloud and Thought-Listing Method to Assess Children's Advertising Processing: A
Serendipitous Finding
Esther Rozendaal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Stephan Buchloh, Ludwigsburg U of Education, GERMANY
5121
Communication Technologies and Cultural Contexts: Intersections Between New Media and Old
Traditions
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 202
Communication and Technology
Participants
To See or Not to See: Cyber-Voyeuristic Practices Through Online Social Networks in Northern Malaysia
Adrian M. Budiman, U of Utara, MALAYSIA
Gatekeeping and Google's Scholars: Search and Re-Search in Singapore
Fernando de la Cruz Paragas, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
A Band's Forum Website: Building a Virtual Online Community in Indonesia
Siti Sarah, STIKOM LSPR - Jakarta, INDONESIA
Rudi Sukandar, Maarif Institute - Jakarta, INDONESIA
Blogs and Freedom of Information: Policy Responses in Thailand and Malaysia
Chalisa Magpanthong, Ohio U, USA
Drew McDaniel, Ohio U, USA
This panel explores the different ways in which new online technologies have emerged and have been
assimilated into the cultures and national settings of Southeast Asia. Collectively, these papers show how
different communities are able (or not) to adapt technologies to fit their own cultural contexts and
identities. It investigates the traditional cultures of Northern Malaysia where the rise of social networks
permit the socially-sanctioned practice of voyeurism. In countries with advanced technologies, broadband
networks allow youth easy access to information, and the panel analyzes how these search engines have
altered traditional information seeking behavior among Singaporean students. In Indonesia, a virtual
online rock band community is examined whose Website permitted fans from different countries to share
a common identity. Finally, the panel explores how freedom of information in Thailand and Malaysia has
been affected by the rise of blogging and by government responses to citizen journalism.
5122
Transformation of U.S. Journalism: Long-Term Trends
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Ellen Graham McKinley, Rider U, USA
Participants
Can Public Policy Save the News? The Uncertain History and Future of Public Service Journalism
Victor W. Pickard, New York U, USA
From Murrow to Mediocrity? The Evolution of Radio Foreign News From World War II to the Iraq War
(TOP THREE FACULTY PAPER)
Raluca Cozma, Iowa State U, USA
Health and the Public Sphere: The Politicization of Health Reporting, 1960s-2000s
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
Charles L. Briggs, U of California, USA
Marisa Brandt, U of California - San Diego, USA
'Where Once Stood Titans': Second-Order Paradigm Repair and the Vanishing U.S. Newspaper
Matthew A. Carlson, Saint Louis U, USA
Respondent
Rodney Benson, New York U, USA
5123
Online Spaces of Belonging and Participation
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 204
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Popular Communication
Chair
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Participants
Framing and Praising Allah on YouTube
Lela Mosemghvdlishvili, ISHSS, Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Be(com)ing Cyber Mocro's: Social Networking Sites, Migrant Youth, and Glocalized Youth Cultures
Koen Leurs, Utrecht U, THE NETHERLANDS
Online Social Media, Communicative Practice, and Complicit Surveillance in Transnational Contexts:
The Case of the Turkish Diaspora in Sweden
Miyase Christensen, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
Mobilizing Information in Univision Online's Election 2008 Forum
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
5124
Histories of Public Service Broadcasters Online
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 205
Communication History
Chairs
Niels Brugger, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
Maureen Burns, U of Queensland - St Lucia, AUSTRALIA
Participants
The Shifting Role of PSB Online Activities in Crossmedia Networks 1996-2009
Anja Bechmann, Aarhus U, DENMARK
DR and the History of dr.dk, 1994-2006: The Concept of Public Service as Driving Force
Niels Brugger, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
A History of ABC Online News
Maureen Burns, U of Queensland - St Lucia, AUSTRALIA
PSB and Its Creative Online Service in Taiwan: PeoPo as Taiwan's Number One Website for Citizen
Journalism
Shih-Hung Lo, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
Gwo-Hwa HO, Public Television Service (PTS) Taipei, TAIWAN
Vox Populi, Vox Dei. the Rhetoric of Risk in Public Service Media Online
Fiona Martin, U of Sydney NSW, AUSTRALIA
The History of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation Online
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Public Media and the Web in the U.S. The Case of Vocalo.org
David W. Park, Lake Forest College, USA
Meghan Grosse, Independent Researcher, USA
Content Co-Creation Networks in Bilingual Wales
Thomas M. Petzold, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Broadcasting 2.0. The Case of Al-Jazeera English
Shawn Powers, U of Southern California, USA
US Public Service Broadcasting: The Case of National Public Radio Online
Patricia Riley, U of Southern California, USA
Nicole B. Usher, U of Southern California, USA
Vikki Porter, Knight Center for Digital Media, USA
This roundtable session aims at discussing the histories of online, or world wide web, services at Public
Service Broadcasters in several countries including Australia, Denmark, the US, Wales, and Taiwan.
Unlike most of the existing literature about the histories of Public Service Broadcasters this roundtable
intends to approach the histories of Public Service Broadcaster's online activities as a field of study in its
own right and not just as an appendix to the general history of Public Service Broadcasters. Questions
such as the following will be debated: How did broadcasters such as the ABC, DR, TBS, Channel 4
Wales, and Al-Jazeera English adapt their public service remits for a global digital platform? What were
the differences and similarities between broadcasters in various countries? What can these histories tell us
about a future for public service media in a globalised, digital age?
5125
Interpersonal Deception: Deceivers, Detectors, and the Role of Culture
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Increasing Deception Detection Accuracy With Strategic Direct Questioning
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
Hillary Cortney Shulman, Michigan State U, USA
Allison Soo-Jung Shaw, Michigan State U, USA
Content in Context Improves Deception Detection
Timothy R. Levine, Michigan State U, USA
John Blair, Michigan State U, USA
Allison Soo-Jung Shaw, Michigan State U, USA
Differences and Similarities Between Koreans and Americans in Lying and Truth-Telling
HyeJeong Choi, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Jae C. Shim, Korea U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
5126
Political Discourse
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Political Communication
Chair
Mustafa Hashim Taha, American U of Sharjah, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Participants
Nationhood, Equality and Human Rights: Canada's Apology to First Nations
Patrick Wilson Belanger, U of Southern California, USA
Apartheid? Not Us! South Africa as an Ideological Discursive Category in Israeli Media Discourse
Oren Livio, U of Pennsylvania, USA
On the Visibility of Trust in the Interaction Dynamics of Collaborative Governance Project Board
Discussions
Lise van Oortmerssen, Wageningen U, THE NETHERLANDS
Cees van Woerkum, Wageningen U, THE NETHERLANDS
Microanalysis of the 2008 Presidential Debates: Direct Confrontation Over the Record
Ji Won Han, U of Texas, USA
5127
Public Relations, Issues Management, and CSR: Marriage or Divorce?
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Anne Ellerup Nielsen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Participants
What CSR Can Tell Us About Public Relations and Issues Management
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Michael L. Kent, U of Oklahoma, USA
CSR as Issues Management
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Public Relations
Anne Ellerup Nielsen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
Christa Thomsen, Aarhus U, DENMARK
The Integration of Public Relations and CSR in Organizations: A European Perspective
Irene Pollach, U of Aarhus, DENMARK
This panel focuses on the borderlines between PR, issues management. The management of public
relations and of corporate social responsibility havs been found to take on increasing similarities, since
both seek to manage stakeholder relations and therefore need to analyze multiple stakeholder groups. The
panel addresses the theoretical and conceptual challenges and potentials encountered by the public
relations field in view of the emergence of CSR and its spill-over into public relations and issues
management by raising questions such as: how are the fields interrelated, how are they organised and
organisable in practice and are they a thread or a benefit to each other?
5128
Matters of Communication: National Identity in Transition
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Participants
In Search of National Identity in Contemporary Russia
Anna A Popkova, U of Minnesota, USA
Yuliya Kartoshkina, U of North Dakota, USA
National Identity and the Media in Communist and Postcommunist Romania
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Sorin Nastasia, Southern Illinois U, USA
Cultural Identity Beyond the Nation State: Bollywood and FijiTV as Contributing Factors in Indo-Fijian
Identity
Charu Uppal, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
A Fermented Filipino National Identity: Causes and Cure
Louella Lim Lofranco, Southwest Minnesota State, USA
Respondent
Lana F. Rakow, U of North Dakota, USA
This panel explores various aspects of national identity in transition through a series of case studies from
Eastern Europe and Asia-Pacific.The panelists will look at the process of redefining national identity in
four countries - Romania, Ukraine, Fiji, and the Philippines - by approaching diverse research data with a
variety of methodologies, yet commonly addressing the following problematics: (1) the changing national
values and ways of expressing these, and (2) the tensions between the ideologies of localism and those of
globalization in reconceptualizing and communicating national values.
5130
Think Back and Look Forward: Communication Technology Theories and Models
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Akiba A. Cohen, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Participants
From the Dinosaur to the Mouse: The Evolution of Communication Technologies
Menahem Blondheim, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Habitual Use of Communication Technologies
Young Hoon Kim, Rutgers U, USA
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, USA
The Virtual Building as a Contested Communication Technology: How Technical Innovations Enter
Architects' Communication Practices
Ursula Plesner, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
The Spatial Value of ICT: A Complex Systems Approach
Kurt DeMaagd, Michigan State U, USA
Respondent
Hartmut B. Mokros, Rutgers U, USA
5131
3Ts in Capturing Spectral Communication: Technology Applications, Technology Use, and Time
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Carol Wan Ting Soon, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Challenges of Tracking Topical Discussion Networks Online
Tim Highfield, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Lars Kirchhoff, Sociomantic Labs, DENMARK
Thomas Nicolai, Sociomantic Labs GmbH, GERMANY
Sustainability of Blogging Behavior: A Survival Rate Analysis
Jonathan J.H. Zhu, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Heng Lu, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Qian Mo, Beijing Technology and Business U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Is Global Cyberspace Becoming Individualized or Globalized? Focusing on Global Hyperlink Network of
2003 and 2009
Han Woo Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
George A. Barnett, U of California - Davis, USA
Chung Joo Chung, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
Evolution of Arab Internet, Web, and Telecommunications as Predictors of ‗Civil Society‘ Development
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois – Chicago, USA
Respondent
Axel Bruns, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Internet scholars and webometrics experts have adopted various methodologies and theoretical
frameworks to understand the web of relationships. Current attempts to depict and elucidate on online
communicative and relational flows among linked entities tend to be static in nature. There is a dearth of
empirical studies which adopt a longitudinal approach in mapping the transformations of relational and
communicative patterns over time. In line with ICA 2010's theme and to address the existing research gap,
this panel of four studies explores the intersection between the material (technological applications) and
the immaterial (time). Deploying network crawling technologies, large-scale hyperlink network and
textual analysis to examine technology use by politicians, bloggers and nations over study periods ranging
from eight months to 10 years, the studies place the panel in the nexus of communication where the
materiality of technology used to encapsulate evolving communications and the immateriality of time
interact.
5132
Voting
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
Beyond Political Knowledge: Predicting Voting From the Multiplicative Effect of Media Evaluation and
Exposure
Hanlong Fu, U of Connecticut, USA
Yi Mou, U of Connecticut, USA
Coalition Signals and Vote Intentions
Michael F. Meffert, Leiden U, THE NETHERLANDS
Thomas Gschwend, U Mannheim, GERMANY
Strategic Media, Drifting Voters? The Effect of Strategy News Coverage on Electoral Behavior:
Volatility, Indecisiveness, and Abstention
Janet Takens, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Anita M. J. van Hoof, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Vote of Confidence: Dissonance Reduction at the Polls
Daniel E. Bergan, Michigan State U, USA
Kristin Pace, Michigan State U, USA
Genevieve Marie Risner, Michigan State U, USA
Mengyu Lu, Michigan State U, USA
Taejin Koh, Michigan State U, USA
Respondent
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
5133
Democratization and Freedom of Expression
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Danilo Yanich, U of Delaware, USA
Participants
Al Jazeera and the Democratization Process in the Middle East
Ahmed Mohamed El Gody, Orebro U, SWEDEN
Freedom of Expression: Institutionalization and Appreciation Among the Population in Different
Countries
Teresa K. Naab, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Dorothee Hefner, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Helmut Scherer, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Hannah Schmid, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Mareike Hansen, Hanover U of Music and Drama, GERMANY
Media and Political Communication in New Democracies in Africa
Samuel C. Mwangi, Kansas State U, USA
The Triumph of Autocracy Over Press Freedom and Rule of Law in Democratizing Zambia
Yusuf Kalyango, Jr., Ohio U, USA
Aisha Mohammed, Ohio U, USA
Respondent
Danilo Yanich, U of Delaware, USA
5134
Mediatization of Religion in Global and Local Perspectives
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Jin Kyu Park, Seoul Women's U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Scandinavian Youth Meet Religion in the Media
Mia Lövheim, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Knut Lundby, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Koogling Judaism: Mediatization of Religion and Everyday Life in Israel
Michele Rosenthal, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
The Mediatizations of Religion in North American Culture
Stewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado, USA
Biblical Stories and Mythical Narratives of Korean Television Drama
Sunny Yoon, Hanyang U, SOKOR
Mediatization of Karma: Represented Pious Practices in Korean Buddhist Television
Jin Kyu Park, Seoul Women's U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Recently, the concept of "mediatization" has been evoked by scholars to explain the transformations of
religion in the late modern era. While "mediatization" helps us to understand the vital role media have
played in the transformation of what we call religion or spirituality, it is also a problematic term since it is
based on an assumed, distinction between media and religion. This roundtable discusses both the
usefulness and the limitation of the concept "mediatization" for analyzing the ever-growing intersections
between religion and media in diverse geographical and religious contexts: Scandianavia, Israel, North
America, and Korea.
5135
Theories and Taxonomies of Looking and Image Communication
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 306
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Toward a Unified Model of Cognitive Aesthetic Processing
Arielle S. Emmett, U of Maryland, USA
What's The Big Picture? Idiosyncratic and Ideological Viewing Practices and the Hermeneutics of Visual
Rhetoric
Walter Patrick Wade, Northwestern U, USA
Talking Objects of Denys Arcand
Renira Rampazzo Gambarato, Virginia Commonwealth U in Qatar, QATAR
A Study of Contemporary Chinese Art's Reaction to the Current Sociopolitical Climate in China
Ming Cheung, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Eduard Sioe-Hao Tan, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5136
Stereotypes and Leadership in Intergroup Contexts
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 307
Intergroup Communication
Chair
Howard Giles, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Exploring the Role of Political Ideology and Media Use for the Strength of U.S. Stereotypes
Eike Mark Rinke, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Julia Lück, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Stereotype Threat in Mixed-Sex Communication
Abigail Pfiester, Concordia U, USA
Matthew S. McGlone, U of Texas, USA
Ambiguous Intergroup Leadership Roles Leading to Ambiguous Intergroup Communication: The
Scandinavian Management Tradition
Jeanette Lemmergaard, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Mette Lund Kristensen, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
What if Hydra Had No Head? Group Communication in a Social Student Protest Movement
Christian Schwarzenegger, RWTH Aachen U, GERMANY
5137
Celebrities, Audiences, and Humanitarian Causes
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Linking Small Arms, Child Soldiers, NGOs, and Citizen Diplomacy: Nicolas Cage and the Lord of War
Michael Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Cynthia Stohl, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Rachel Stohl, Chatham House, USA
Media Witnessing: Exploring Audience Discourses of Distant Suffering
Maria Kyriakidou, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
The Responsible Witnesses: A Study of Indonesian Audiences' Reception of International Human Rights
Documentaries
Kurniawan Adi Saputro, Indonesian Institute of the Arts - Yogyakarta, INDONESIA
What if I See IMF in My Courtyard? Creative Mappings in Bamako Contest Dominant Development
Discourse
Rahul Mukherjee, U of California – Santa Barbara, USA
5138
New Approaches to the Study of New Technology
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Brandon Van Der Heide, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
Experts and Amateurs in Mass Communication: Questioning the Distinction
Philippe Ross, U of Ottawa, CANADA
Habermas and the Net
Mark Balnaves, Curtin U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Tama Leaver, Curtin U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Michele Willson, Curtin U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Measuring Media Use as Affordances: A Heuristics Approach to Interactivity
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Saraswathi Bellur, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Subversion and the Social Implications of "New" Media
Shaheed Nick Mohammed, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Avinash Thombre, U of Arkansas - Little Rock, USA
Kanchan Maslekar, Free Lance Journalist, INDIA
5139
The Media and Social Reality
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Keren Eyal, The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, ISRAEL
Participants
A Content Analysis of the Normalization of Plastic Surgery in the News: A Comparative Study Between
Korea and the US
Yeonsoo Kim, U of Florida, USA
A Meta-Analysis of Cultivation Experiments: The Priming Effect on John and Jane, Who Are Watching
Prime Time Television
Dorien Dossche, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Television Exposure and Adolescents' Perceptions of the Police
Astrid Dirikx, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Dave Gelders, K.U.Leuven, BELGIUM
Jan Van den Bulck, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
The Impacts of Cosmetic Surgery Reality Shows on the Perceived Benefits and Risks of Cosmetic
Surgery
Shu-Yueh Lee, U of Wisconsin - Oshkosh, USA
5140
Information and Communication Policy and Processes
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Edward L. Carter, Brigham Young U, USA
Participants
Comparing Political, Cultural, and Economic Indicators of Access to Information in Arab and Non-Arab
States
Jeannine E. Relly, U of Arizona, USA
David Cuillier, U of Arizona, USA
Honey v. Vinegar: Testing Compliance-Gaining Theories in the Context of Freedom of Information Laws
- TOP THREE PAPER
David Cuillier, U of Arizona, USA
Personal Data Protection in E-Government: Where Are We Now? An Overview of the U.S. Legal
Landscape
Yuehua Wu, Michigan State U, USA
The Convergence Policy Making Process in South Korea
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yeolib Kim, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Edward L. Carter, Brigham Young U, USA
5141
Queer Sexual Revolutions
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 312
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
Chair
Lynn A. Comella, U Nevada - Las Vegas, USA
Participants
Construct(ivist)s of Alternative Masculinities: Pet Shop Boys Score Potemkin
Travers Scott, U of Southern California, USA
The Humor of Coming Out: A Critical Analysis of Acceptance in Coming Out Narratives
Jimmie Manning, Northern Kentucky U, USA
Jerks Without Faces: The XTube Spectacle and the Modernity of the Filipino Bakla
Omar O. Dumdum, U of the Philippines, PHILIPPINES
5142
Matters of Communication From the Tsunami of 2004: (Inter)personal/Intercultural, Mass Media,
ICTs, and Other Responses
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 313
Theme Sessions
Chair
Xiaoge Xu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Linda K. Fuller, Worcester State College, USA
Parichart Sthapitanonda, Chulalongkorn U, THAILAND
Folker Christian Hanusch, U of the Sunshine Coast, AUSTRALIA
Randy Kluver, Texas A and M U, USA
Yin-Leng Theng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Horng Jyh Wu, Singapore Internet Research Centre, SINGAPORE
Using examples from (inter)personal/intercultural, mass media, information and communication
technologies (ICTs), and more, analysis is presented of how the tsunami of December 26, 2004 offers a
classic case for how communication matters. "The world's worst recorded natural disaster," where
225,000 people were killed, 1.7 million displaced, galvanized the largest global relief effort in history, and
communication was key. Parichart Stapitananda (Chulalongkorn U, Bangkok) shares personal testimony
on how she used communication to deal with personal grief losing her entire family; Folker Hanusch (U
of Queensland, Australia) checked front page discrepancies on reportage between tourist and local deaths;
Linda K. Fuller (Worcester State College) content-analyzed The Christian Science Monitor's coverage;
Randy Kluver (Texas A&M) and Yin Leng Theng and Wu Horng Jyh (Singapore Internet Research
Centre) summarized how the Internet was deployed and used immediately after the tsunami by a variety
of actors.
5144
Health Communication: Talk About Smoking
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 325
Health Communication
Chair
Nancy Grant Harrington, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
Interpersonal Discussions About Antismoking Campaigns: Why Smokers Talk and Why It Matters
Emily Brennan, The Cancer Council Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Sarah Jane Durkin, The Cancer Council Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Melanie A. Wakefield, The Cancer Council Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Yoshihisa Kashima, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Predictive Model of Effective Antismoking Arguments Using Computerized Text Analysis: Personal,
Textual Features, and Their Interaction
Young Min Baek, U of Pennsylvannia, USA
Joseph N. Cappella, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Caryn Lerman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Andrew Strasser, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Effect of Campaign Appreciation and Exposure Frequency on Smoking Cessation
Bas van den Putte, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marco C. Yzer, U of Minnesota, USA
Gert-Jan de Bruijn, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marc C Willemsen, STIVORO, THE NETHERLANDS
The End of Secondhand Smoking in Public Places? Effects of Normative Appeal in the "Say No"
Antismoking Campaign
Minji Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
5145
Patient Perceptions and Motivations in Health Decision Making
Friday
08:30-09:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Kris A. Kirschbaum, East Carolina U, USA
Participants
Clinical Trial Enrollment Decisions for Cancer Patients and Healthy Adults: Thoughts, Emotions, or
Social Influence?
Zheng Yang, State U of New York - Buffalo, USA
Katherine A. McComas, Cornell U, USA
Geri Gay, Cornell U, USA
John P. Leonard, Cornell U, USA
Andrew J. Dannenberg, Cornell U, USA
Hildy Dillon, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, USA
Information Seeking and the Age Disparity in Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy Among Colorectal
Cancer Patients
Andy SL Tan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Katrina Armstrong, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Derek Freres, U of Pennsylvania, USA
J. Sanford Schwartz, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Stacy W Gray, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, USA
Robert Hornik, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Development and Validation of Motivational Messages to Improve Chronic Disease Patients' Adherence
With Prescribed Medications
Gary L. Kreps, George Mason U, USA
Melinda Morris Villagran, George Mason U, USA
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
Christy Ledford, George Mason U, USA
Melinda Weathers, George Mason U, USA
Brian Keefe, George Mason U, USA
Colleen McHorney, Merck and Co., Inc., USA
A Mixed-Method Study Examining Patient Expectations in a Tertiary Eye Care Centre in India
Shobha Mocherla, U of New South Wales, INDIA
Usha Raman, L V Prasad Eye Institute, INDIA
Brien Holden, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
5220
Meet the Editors of ICA Publications
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 201
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Michael J. Cody, U of Southern California, USA
Kevin B. Wright, U of Oklahoma, USA
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
Karen Ross, Liverpool U, UNITED KINGDOM
Angharad N. Valdivia, U of Illinois, USA
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Mike West, International Communication Association, USA
This panel provides the membership with the opportunity to meet the editors of ICA's journals and the
Communication Yearbook. This session is devoted to answering and addressing issues that the
membership may have about the publications.
5221
International Federation of Communication Associations (IFCA) Business Meeting
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 202
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Participant
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Representatives of the International Federation of Communication Associations (IFCA) and of national
federations meet and discuss current affairs of networking and collaboration.
5222
Journalism in Conflict and Peace
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Vandana Pednekar-Magal, Grand Valley State U, USA
Participants
Media Coverage of Postpolitical-Election Violence in Africa: An Assessment of the Kenyan Example
Uche Titus Onyebadi, Southern Illinois U, USA
Tayo Oyedeji, U of Georgia, USA
Reality and Newsworthiness: Coverage of International Terrorism by China and the United States
Pamela J. Shoemaker, Syracuse U, USA
Di Zhang, Syracuse U, USA
Xiuli Wang, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Peace Journalism: Dark Past and Hopeful Futures in News Coverage of Racial Reconciliation
Rob McMahon, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Peter Chow-White, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
The Media as a Conflict Resolution Mediator During Social Change: Fortune's Ideational Shift on Labor
Issues During the Great Depression
You Li, U of Missouri, USA
Respondent
Howard Tumber, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
5223
Conceptual Interrogations in the Study of Ethnicity, Diaspora, and Migration: A Joint Panel by
ERIC, ICA and 'Diaspora and Media', IAMCR
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 204
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Trasnationalism and Diasporas
Roza Tsagarousianou, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
Communication Ecologies: Observing New Immigrants Negotiations of Identity
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
Carmen Gonzalez, U of Southern California, USA
Cosmopolitan Challenges: Community and Biculturalism
Christina Slade, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Bodies in Space and Place: Relationality, Mobility, Identity
Hari Harindranath, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
This panel is co-organised by the Ethnicity and Race in Communication Division, ICA and the Working
Group on Media and Diaspora, IAMCR. The panel brings together four scholars who engage with key
concepts in the field of ethnicity, migration, race and diaspora and explore their limitations and relevance
in current times. They pay particular attention into theoretical and epistemological challenges presented
by human mobility and intensified communication across boundaries.
5224
Top 3 Papers in Instructional and Developmental Communication
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 205
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chair
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Assessing Change in SPCC and Instructional Effectiveness the Right Way
Georgeta Mioara Hodis, Massey U, NEW ZEALAND
Flaviu Adrian Hodis, Victoria U Wellington, NEW ZEALAND
(Re)mediating Place via Mobile Media and Neighborhood Games
Jim Mathews, U of Wisconsin, USA
When Mind, Heart, and Hands Meet: Communication Design and Designers
Ming Cheung, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Deanna Dee Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
5225
Top Three Papers in Interpersonal Communication
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Mapping the Underlying Circuits of Social Support for Bullied Victims: An Appraisal-Based Perspective
Masaki Matsunaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Hurtful Messages in Close Relationships
Shuangyue Zhang, Sam Houston State U, USA
Andy J. Merolla, Colorado State U, USA
An Initial Test of a Cognitive-Emotional Theory of Esteem Support Messages
Amanda J. Holmstrom, Michigan State U, USA
Brant R. Burleson, Purdue U, USA
Respondent
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
5226
Healthcare Discourses & Policy
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Health Communication
Chair
Han Z. Li, U of Northern British Columbia, CANADA
Participants
Features of Nonverbal Communication of Youngsters Afflicted With Asperger Syndrome
Mari Lehtinen, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Interruption and Patient Satisfaction in Resident-Patient Consultations
Han Z. Li, U of Northern British Columbia, CANADA
Young-ok Yum, Kansas State U, USA
Fate, War, Investigator, and Coordinator: Exploring Metaphors of Distant Caregiving
Vandhana Ramadurai, Texas A and M U, USA
Mom, Apple Pie, and Policy: The Social Construction of Normal Family Structures in Canadian Child
Care Policy
Melissa Elisabeth Fritz, U of Toronto, CANADA
5227
Matters of Power in Public Relations: Political Challenges in Practice
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Oyvind Ihlen, BI Norwegian School of Management, NORWAY
Participants
Derina R. Holtzhausen, Oklahoma State U, USA
Ansgar Zerfass, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Judy Margaret Motion, U of Wollongong, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Oyvind Ihlen, BI Norwegian School of Management, NORWAY
Organizations are sites of political struggle and power is the entity that integrates its various elements.
Public relations practice often is accused of only speaking on behalf of those in powerful positions and
marginalizing and disenfranchising less powerful stakeholders, making their views immaterial. This view
of public relations, however, ignores the many perspectives investigating the possibility of public relations
as a positive and affirming practice that has the potential to use power that can make marginalized voices
material. This panel looks at four philosophical/theoretical approaches to public relations that have the
potential to liberate and empower stakeholders through practice. Broadly speaking , the panel addresses
power in public relations by interrogating it through a number of themes that lay the foundation for a
rigorous debate on the topic: dialogic v dialectic communication; consensus v dissensus; local power v
structural power; and organization v self.
5228
Invisible Systems: Theorizing Media as Infrastructure
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Nicole Starosielski, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
When Satellites Fall: On the Trails of Cosmos 954 and USA 193
Lisa Parks, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Private Lines Through Public Spaces: Politics Issues Behind the Earliest Netting of the Infrastructures of
Telecommunication
Carlotta Daro, McGill, CANADA
Cable Stations: Architectures of Community and Security
Nicole Starosielski, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Strange Infrastructures: The Unusual Systems Project
Christian E. Sandvig, U of Illinois, USA
ShinJoung Yeo, U of Illinois, USA
Dawn Nafus, Intel Research, USA
Respondent
Jonathan Sterne, McGill U, CANADA
Following on research that calls for a critical attention to the systems and infrastructures that underlie and
support communication practices, this panel will present analyses of a range of media infrastructures,
exploring both historical and contemporary cases. These include a critical study of satellite infrastructure,
a discussion of telecommunications infrastructures in relation to the demarcation of public and private
spaces, a spatial analysis of submarine cable landing stations, and a project on "reverse salients" in
communication infrastructure in relation to various unusual systems. These projects will raise questions
about the specificities of different infrastructural forms for communication (for example, the diverse
effects of satellites, submarine cables, and telephones). It will also reflect on what makes communications
infrastructures usual or unusual, public or private, failures and successes, and the ways in which these
relate to broader changes in social practices.
5230
CMC and Self-Presentation
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
David Brake, U of Leicester, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Social Comparison 2.0: Examining the Effects of Online Profiles on Social Networking Sites
Nina Haferkamp, U of Münster, GERMANY
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
The Effects of Verbal vs. Photographic Self-Presentation on Impression Formation in Facebook
Brandon Van Der Heide, Ohio State U, USA
Jonathan D'Angelo, Ohio State U, USA
Erin M. Schumaker, Ohio State U, USA
International Faces: An Analysis of Self-Inflicted Face-ism in Online Profile Pictures
Skye Chance Cooley, U of Alabama, USA
Lauren M Reichart Smith, U of Alabama, USA
The Impact of Second-Party Content on Self-Presentation Within a Social Network Site Environment
Andrew Smock, Michigan State U, USA
5231
Political Campaigns and Collective Action via ICTs
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
Participants
Elections, Society, and Cyber-Political Culture: Use of New Technologies During the 2008 Spanish
General Election
Víctor Sampedro, U Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid, SPAIN
Monica Poletti, U degli Studi di Milano, ITALY
Manuel Sanchez Duarte, U Rey Juan Carlos, SPAIN
Engaging Youth Through Hyper-Local Media: A Quasi-Experiment Within the 2008 U.S. Presidential
Election
Eulalia Puig Abril, U of Wisconsin, USA
Andrew L Soth, Wisconsin Public Television, USA
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin, USA
A Modified Webstyle Analysis of Comparing Campaign Blogs and Websites: The Case Study of Taiwan's
2008 Legislative Election
Tai-Li Wang, National Taiwan U, TAIWAN
A Two-Stage Model of New Media-Based Collective Action
Jingfang Liu, U of Southern California, USA
5232
Credibility, Trust, and Social Capital
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 303
Political Communication
Mass Communication
Chair
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Emancipative Value Change and Trust in the News Media in Democratic and Authoritarian Regimes
Jan Mueller, Jacobs U, GERMANY
Multidimensions of Social Capital and Their Relationships to News Media Use
Soo Jung Moon, U of West Georgia, USA
Kideuk Hyun, U of Texas, USA
The Impact of Negative Online Media Coverage on Political Distrust Among Young Romanians
Mariuca Morariu, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Malte Carlos Hinrichsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Through the Looking Glass: Internet Users' Perceptions of Sociopolitical Blog Credibility in Singapore
Linda Heng, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Indrajit Banerjee, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Wayne Fu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Widening the Gap or Closing It? Effects of News Media Coverage on Cynicism Towards the European
Union (EU)
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5233
The Public Sphere
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 304
Political Communication
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Emily T. Metzgar, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Techno-Political Activism as Counterpublic Spheres: Discursive Networking Within Deliberative
Transnational Politics?
Yana Breindl, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Tessa J. Houghton, U of Canterbury, NEW ZEALAND
Television and Public Sphere in Belgium: What the Case of a Federal Multilingual Polity Can Contribute
to the Debate on Transnational Public Spheres, and Vice Versa
Dave Sinardet, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
The Political Implications of Arab Media
Mohamed Zayani, Georgetown U, USA
Toward a Theory of Citizen Interface With Political Discussion and News in the Public Sphere: The
"Accessibility" and "Traversability" of the Internet
Jennifer Brundidge, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Emily T. Metzgar, Indiana U, USA
5234
Friend, Foe, and Companion: Popular Media in Audience's Ordinary Life and Life Course
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
A Life Course Perspective on Fandom (Top Three Paper)
C. Lee Harrington, Miami U - Ohio, USA
Denise D. Bielby, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
What Does Media Sport Cultivate? Lessons From 'MyFootballClub'
Andy David Ruddock, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
David Rowe, U of Western Sydney, AUSTRALIA
Brett Hutchins, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
From Fans to Friends: Reconceptualising Audiences Online
Cornel Sandvoss, U of Surrey, UNITED KINGDOM
Being With the Media
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Films, TV Shows, YouTube, and the Creativity of Fan Communities
Lothar Mikos, U of Film and Television, GERMANY
This panel examines how audiences make sense of, appropriate, attached to as much as disengage from
different media and different media content in and through their everyday life practices. These practices
thereby highlight the fundamental processes through which the modern self utilises media and media
discourses in its construction and articulation of identity through belief systems, memory, narratives of
self and ordinary performances.
5235
Discourse Across the Realm of Organizational Communication
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Alison Mary Henderson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
The Language of Interests: The Contribution of Discursive Social Psychology
Andrea Whittle, Cardiff Business School, UNITED KINGDOM
Frank Mueller, U of St. Andrews, UNITED KINGDOM
Examining Dialectical Tensions in the Discourse of Organizational Telework Policies
Jennifer L. Gibbs, Rutgers U, USA
Craig R. Scott, Rutgers U, USA
Young Hoon Kim, Rutgers U, USA
Sun Kyong Lee, Rutgers U, USA
"We Maybe Have to Speak in Swahili": Language Issues in Organizational Contexts
Emilie Pelletier, U de Montréal, CANADA
Nicolas Bencherki, U de Montréal, CANADA
The Genesis of Career Capital: Children's Discourses About Work and Careers in Belgium, China,
Lebanon, and the United States
Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue U, USA
Lorraine G. Kisselburgh, Purdue U, USA
Brenda L. Berkelaar, Purdue U, USA
Normalising Neoliberalism? Understanding Knowledge Interests in Academic Discourse on Boundaryless
Careers
Juliet P. Roper, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Shiv Ganesh, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Kerr Inkson, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
5236
Strategic Uses and Analysis of ICTs for Development and Social Change
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 307
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Cara J. Wallis, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
A Multifaceted Perspective on Blogs and Society: Case Studies of Blogospheres in Southeast and East
Asia
Chih-Hui Lai, Rutgers U, USA
ICTs for Development: From the Access-centric Approach to the Capability Approach
Juhee Kang, Michigan State U, USA
The Influence of Political, Socioeconomic, and Cultural Superstructures on Forming Global Public
Interests on the Internet
Yongick Jeong, Louisiana State U, USA
Hyojung Park, U of Missouri, USA
Walled-In, Reaching Out: Benefits and Challenges of Migrant Workers' Use of ICTs for Interpersonal
Communication
Sun Sun Lim, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Minu Thomas, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
5237
Global Hollywood and Local Negotiations: New Realities and New Challenges
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
Hong Kong Cinema's Pilgrimage to Hollywood: Globalization and the Reverse Current
Anthony Y.H. Fung, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Local Against Global: Mainland China's Cultural Policy and Counter-Hegemony Strategies Toward
Global Hollywood
Weiqun (Wendy) Su, U of California - Riverside, USA
Transnational Bollywood Cinema: Negotiating Global Capital, Urban India, and Diaspora Aspirations in
the Films of Karan Johar
Tabassum Khan, U of California - Riverside, USA
"Digital Diaspora": Bollywood in Secondlife and Imagined Indian Identity
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Respondent
Toby Miller, USA
This panel seeks to explore the new realities and to respond to new challenges of "global-local dialectic"
by discussing Hollywood's relationship with film industries around the world. Through specific case
studies of mainland China, Hong Kong and India and working from the perspectives of political economy,
critical cultural studies, and post-colonial theories, Panel members analyze local strategies for negotiating
with global capital and for the construction of indigenous expression and identities. The panel raises the
issues of Hollywood's role in local societies, the alliance and the-tug-of-the war between local
societies/government and transnational capital, and what comes after cultural hybridity. As manifested in
these case studies, the complicity of global-local interplay will fundamentally change cultural landscape
of the world.
5238
Fresh Insights Into Hostile Media Effects Research
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Yariv Tsfati, U of Haifa, ISRAEL
Participants
The Hostile Media Phenomenon: Triggered by Cognitive or Affective Involvement?
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Examining the Third-person Effect and the Hostile Media Effect of Media Polls in the 2008 U.S.
Presidential Election
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
Ven-Hwei Lo, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Stella C. Chia, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
How Users' Trust in Source and In-group Status Affect the Hostile Media-Bias
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Nicolette Boskaljon, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Martin Tanis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Marco Dohle, U of Duesseldorf, GERMANY
Exploring Consequences of the Hostile Media Effect
Albert C. Gunther, U of Wisconsin, USA
According to the hostile media effect, individuals highly involved in a controversial issue see media
coverage of that issue as biased towards opposing positions, even if the coverage is actually well balanced
(Vallone, Ross, & Lepper, 1985). The hostile media effect has been well confirmed in different thematic
contexts in the past. Recent empirical research started to examine the determinants of audiences' hostile
media perceptions, as well as their consequences. The present panel provides a fresh update of these latest
studies conducted within this highly dynamic research field.
5239
The Influence of the Media on Political Knowledge and Socialization
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Participants
Collective Dynamics of the Spiral of Silence: The Role of Quasi-Statistical Monitoring
Dongyoung Sohn, Ohio State U, USA
Nick W. Geidner, Ohio State U, USA
Pathways to Political Knowledge: News Encounters With Knowledge-Inducing Information
Matthijs Elenbaas, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Internet as an Agent of Political Socialization
JungHwan Yang, U of Wisconsin, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Role of Two New Measures of Media Use in Political Socialization Responses on Youth
Jeremy J. Littau, Lehigh U, USA
Esther Thorson, U of Missouri, USA
Hyun Jee Oh, U of Missouri, USA
Mi Rosie Jahng, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Elizabeth L. Gardner, U of Missouri, USA
Hans Karl Meyer, Ohio U, USA
5240
Media Policy in China
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Participants
Casting the Ubiquitous Net of Control: Internet Surveillance in China From Golden Shield to Green Dam
Zixue Tai, U of Kentucky, USA
Controlling the Internet in China: The Real Story
Fan Dong, U of Southern California, USA
Criminal Defamation in the New Media Environment: The Case of the People's Republic of China
Mei Ning Yan, Shantou U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Chengbin Zhang, Shantou U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Reshaping the Foot to Fit the Shoe: Promoting American Free Speech Values in China
Karen M. Markin, U of Rhode Island, USA
Respondent
Jack Qiu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
5241
Avatars From Hegel to Hu Jintao
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Sabine Trepte, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Participants
Avatar Creation and Video Game Enjoyment: Effects of Life-Satisfaction, Game Competitiveness, and
Identification With the Avatar
Sabine Trepte, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Leonard Reinecke, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Katharina-Maria Behr, GERMANY
Eighteenth Century Video Games: Using the Hegelian Dialectic to Explain How Individuals' Identify
With Avatars During Game Play
Edward Downs, U of Minnesota - Duluth, USA
Factors Affecting Exercise Intentions and Self-Presence in Avatar-Based Exergames
Seung-A Annie Jin, Boston College, USA
Games With a Continuum: A Case Study on the Development of Online Game Industry in China and
Beyond
Qiaolei JIANG, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
5242
General Semantics Today: Challenges and Opportunities
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Thom Gencarelli, Manhattan College, USA
Participants
Prafulla Kar, Balvant Parekh Centre for General Semantics and Other Human Sciences, INDIA
Susan Maushart, U of Western Australia, AUSTRALIA
Lance A. Strate, IGS - Institute of General Semantics, USA
Devkumar Trivedi, Acharya Nagaraj Marg, INDIA
General semantics was introduced by Alfred Korzybski over 75 years ago, in response to the horrors of
the First World War, as a means to improve the ways in which we understand, evaluate, and act upon our
enivonment, in order to faciliate individual sanity and collective moral and ethical progress. This in turn
led to various attempts at institutionalizing the movement, such as the Institute of General Semantics, the
International Society for General Semantics (which merged with the IGS in 2004), various local societies,
and most recently the Balvant Parekh Centre for General Semantics and Other Human Sciences in Baroda,
India. The introduction of general semantics also resulted in a popular movement that peaked during the
mid-twentieth century, giving rise to and influencing a variety of psychotherapies such as NeuroLinguistic Programming and Rational-Emotive Therapy, as well as deconstruction and poststructuralism
in Europe and media ecology in North America, general systems theory and Buckminster Fuller's
synergetics, the development of computer technology and interfaces (e.g., Douglas Engelbart, Alan Kay),
literature (e.g., William S. Burroughs, A. E. van Vogt, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert), philosophy,
education, economics, finance, and business, and of course the study of human communication. As we
examine general semantics today, this panel will consider to what extent does it speak to contemporary
problems and concerns? How does general semantics relate to contemporary theory and research in
communication and related fields and disciplines? What contributions can general semantics institutions
make to scholarship, to individuals outside of academia who are looking for practical solutions to
everyday problems, and to out social systems?
5243
Individual Differences and Theories of Change in Cross-Cultural Study
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
A Cross-National Study of Social-Networking Services Between the U.S. and Korea
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yeolib Kim, U of Texas, USA
Culture, the New Ecological Paradigm, and the Environment: The Direct and Mediated Effects of Culture
on Environmentally Friendly Behaviors
Ashley A. Hanna, U of Hawaii, USA
Jennifer L. Sur, U of Hawaii, USA
Hye-ryeon Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
The Relationship Between Self-Construal, Conflict Style Preference, and Religious Identification in India
Stephen Michael Croucher, Bowling Green State U, USA
Gayatre Pillai, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Komal Agarwal, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Lalima Bose, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Pavan Choudhary, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Imran Jafri, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Vikrant Joshi, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Ashish Saldanha, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Jagruti Saxena, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
What Makes Us Care? The Impact of Cultural Values, Individual Factors, Attention to Media on
Motivation for Ethical Consumerism
Andreas Krasser, Kyung Hee U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Sooyoung Cho, Kyung Hee U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Margaret Miller Butcher, Fort Hays State U, USA
5244
The Best of Information Systems
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Discrete Affect and Extended Parallel Process Model
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Extensional Mapping-Chains for Studying Concept Drift in Political Ontologies
Shenghui Wang, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Janet Takens, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter van Atteveldt, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jan Kleinnijenhuis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Stefan Schlobach, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Mixing Advertising and Editorial Content in Radio Programs: Appreciation and Memory of Brand
Placements Versus Commercials
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Datasetting Effect: Learning Facts About the Real World From Viewing Fiction
Jan Van den Bulck, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
5245
Health Communication High Density Panel: Television, Advertising, and Public Service
Annoucements
Friday
10:00-11:15
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Influence of Self-Affirmation on Responses to Gain- vs. Loss-Framed Antismoking Messages
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
Xiaoli Nan, U of Maryland, USA
The Effectiveness of Antimarijuana Public Service Announcements: A Multilevel Replication Study
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Amber L. Westcott-Baker, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Chadd Funk, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Grace Leigh Anderson, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Effectiveness of Fear- vs. Empathy-Arousing Antismoking PSAs
Lijiang Shen, U of Georgia, USA
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising for Stigmatized Illnesses: Does It Contain Stigma Reducing Message
Components?
Hannah Kang, U of Florida, USA
Soontae An, Kansas State U, USA
How Much Do Parents' Characteristics Influence Their Children's Attitude Toward TV Snack/Fast-Food
Advertising?
Hyunjae Jay Yu, Sogang U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Role of Affect and Perceived Message Effectiveness in Understanding Message Effects on Attitudes
and Intentions Toward Marijuana Use
Brian E Weeks, U of Minnesota, USA
Jacob Bjorn Depue, U of Minnesota, USA
Marco C. Yzer, U of Minnesota, USA
The Motives and Consequences of Viewing Television Dramas
Tae Kyoung Lee, U of California - Davis, USA
Laramie D. Taylor, U of California - Davis, USA
'That's Not Reality for Me': Australian Audiences Respond to The Biggest Loser
Kate Eloise Holland, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Richard Warwick Blood, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Samantha Thomas, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Asuntha Karunaratne, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Sophie Lewis, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
5320
Virtual Worlds for Children: Salient Issues, Diverse Methods, International Perspectives
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Kirsten Drotner, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Participants
Beyond Being There: A Grounded Investigation of the Value of Virtual Worlds for Remote Family
Interaction
Lizzy Bleumers, Vrije U - Brussel, BELGIUM
An Jacobs, Vrije U - Brussel, BELGIUM
"Relieved Mommies, Happy Children": Parental Mediation of Chinese Children's Use of Mole Manor
Yuanying Cao, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Sun Sun Lim, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Virtual Junk Food Playgrounds in Europe: Advergames Targeting Children in the UK and Hungary
Katalin Lustyik, Ithaca College, USA
Arhlene A. Flowers, Ithaca College, USA
Emese Gulyas, Association of Conscious Consumers, HUNGARY
Avatar Building and Gender Formation on Sites for Tween/Teen Girls
Neil Randall, U of Waterloo, CANADA
Meredith Powell, U of Waterloo, CANADA
Respondent
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Although research on children's participation in virtual worlds is growing, more light needs to be shed on
the benefits and harms of children's participation in these engaging and increasingly popular multimedia
environments. In response to this research imperative, this panel comprises four papers which study
children's forays into online virtual worlds, focusing on the relatively understudied preschool to preteen
group, aged around 3 to 14. It investigates a range of salient issues including the constraints of children's
identity formation in virtual worlds and challenges in parental mediation of children's participation in
virtual worlds, while exploring policy responses to online junkfood advergaming and the potential of
virtual worlds in mediating inter-generational family interaction. The papers employ a diverse range of
methodologies and includes research from Asia, Europe and North America, thus offering multi-faceted
insights and international perspectives on children's online virtual experiences.
5321
Matters of Communication: Gender Identities in Eastern Europe
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 202
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Diana Iulia Nastasia, U of North Dakota, USA
Participants
Dominika Michalak, Warsaw U, POLAND
Eva Bognar, Central European U, HUNGARY
Diana Maria Cismaru, National U for Political Studies and Public Administration, ROMANIA
Yana Pelovska, Media Development Center, BULGARIA
Lina Radziuniene, Vilnius U, LITHUANIA
Kaja Tampere, U of Jyvaskyla, FINLAND
Anastasiya Grynko, Kiev Mohyla Academy, UKRAINE
Ekaterina Bondarenko, Volgograd State Pedagogical U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Agne Tonkunaite, EKT Group, LITHUANIA
Olena Goroshko, Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, UKRAINE
Ivanitchka Tontcheva Ivanova, Bulgaria News Agency, BULGARIA
Respondent
Sorin Nastasia, Southern Illinois U, USA
This round table discussion will pursue a comparative and contrastive examination of gendered identities
in eight Eastern European countries (Poland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Lithuania, Estonia, Ukraine,
and Russia). Participants will draw from historical data and interviews to refer to (1) the changes in
gender policies and practices in the process of democratization; (2) postcommunist formulations of ideals
about masculinity and femininity; and (3) postcommunist opportunities/threats for communicating
gendered identities. The discussion will reveal both efforts to set gendered relations on principles of
tolerance, and clashes between gendered identities.
5322
Participatory Journalism: Views of Citizens and Journalists
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Thorsten Quandt, U Hohenheim, GERMANY
Participants
Audience and Journalists' Views on UGC: Exploring Normative and Practical Frameworks
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Andrew James Williams, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Claire Wardle, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Between Idiosyncratic Self-Interests and Professional Standards: A Contribution to the Understanding of
Participatory Journalism in Web 2.0. Results From an Online Survey in Germany (TOP THREE
FACULTY PAPER)
Romy Frohlich, U of Munich, GERMANY
Oliver Quiring, Johannes Gutenberg-U Mainz, GERMANY
Sven Engesser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Why Contribute? Relationships Between Citizen Journalists' Motivations and Their Perceived Citizen
Journalists' Role Conceptions
Deborah S. Chung, U of Kentucky, USA
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
The Internet: The Promised Land of Participatory Journalism?
Inkyu Kang, U of Wisconsin, USA
Respondent
John Hartley, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
5323
Ethnicity and Race in Communication Business Meeting
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 204
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
5324
Instructional and Developmental Communication Division Business Meeting
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 205
Instructional & Developmental Communication
Chairs
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Participants
Kristen Harrison, U of Illinois, USA
Rebecca M. Chory, West Virginia U, USA
Laramie D. Taylor, U of California - Davis, USA
5325
Interpersonal Communication Business Meeting
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
5326
Examining Coverage and Framing in News Photography
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 207
Visual Communication Studies
Participants
Walid Afifi, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Masaki Matsunaga, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
Chair
Jelle Mast, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Participants
Shooting War Or Peace Photographs? An Examination of News Wires' Coverage of the Conflict in Gaza
(2008-2009)
Shahira S. Fahmy, U of Arizona, USA
Rico Neumann, U of Arizona, USA
The Visual Coverage of Amok School Shootings: Are Media Focusing on the Victimizer?
Marion G. Mueller, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Ognyan A. Seizov, Jacobs U - Bremen, GERMANY
Florian Wiencek, Jacobs U Bremen, GERMANY
How Did the Press Construct That Night?
Yukun Lee, UT, USA
The Presidential Image in News Photographs: Differences in Portrayals of Presidents Obama and Bush
Yung Soo Kim, U of Kentucky, USA
James David Kelly, Indiana U, USA
5327
Evolving Perspectives: Leadership, Rhetoric, Dialogue, and Engagement
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Michael L. Kent, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Public Relations as Dialogic Expertise?
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Opportunities and Pitfalls in Stakeholder Engagement and Dialogue: A Case Study From the
Pharmaceutical Industry
Johannes Christian Fieseler, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Miriam Meckel, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Christian Pieter Hoffmann, U of St. Gallen, SWITZERLAND
On Barnyard Scrambles: Towards a Rhetoric of Public Relations
Oyvind Ihlen, BI Norwegian School of Management, NORWAY
The Generalization and Universality of Public Relations Leadership: An Application of Multiple-Group
Confirmatory Factor Analysis in Assessing Measurement Invariance
Juan Meng, U of Dayton, USA
Western Public Relations Theories in China: Hegemonic Influence or Intellectual Coexistence
Ai Zhang, U of Maryland, USA
5328
Public Sphere Processes, Democratization, and De-Democratization
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Andreas Koller, New York U, USA
Participants
The Changing Public Sphere in India
Arvind Rajagopal, New York U, USA
The Public Sphere and Democracy in Malaysia and Singapore
Robin Jeffrey, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Transformation of the Public Sphere in Latin America
Daniel C. Hallin, U of California - San Diego, USA
Respondent
Andreas Koller, New York U, USA
This panel addresses three understudied issues and does so in relation to the very place and larger region
of the conference location, Singapore. First, it investigates the relationship between public sphere
processes and processes of democratization and de-democratization. Second, the panel focuses on nonWestern countries and regions, adding to the more dominant focus of public sphere research on Western
countries. Third, rather than studying non-Western cases within the framework of area studies alone, this
panel takes a comparative approach.
5330
Political, Technological, and Social Challenges in Wireless Policy
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Charles Steinfield, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
The Future of the Public Phone: A Six-Country Asian Study on Telecom Use at the BOP
Nirmali Ruth Sivapragasam, LIRNEasia, SRI LANKA
Urban Planning Unplugged: How Wireless Mobile Technology Is Influencing Design Elements in Seven
Major U.S. Cities
Jan Fernback, Temple U, USA
Gwen Lisa Shaffer, USA
Mu-Fi's Digital Divide Attempt: Bull's Eye or Achilles Heel?
Julio Angel Ortiz, Rutgers U, USA
Ubiquitous Computing From an Ecological Perspective: Policy Concerns Related to U-City in South
Korea
Dong-Hee Shin, Sungkyunkwan U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yeolib Kim, U of Texas, USA
5331
Social Implications of Multimedia
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Lee M. Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Configuring Commuters' Accessibility to Multimedia Mobile Services: The Case of Bluetooth
"Augmented" Advertising in the Paris Metro
Christian Licoppe, Telecom Paristech, FRANCE
Media Convergence Through Mobile Peer-to-Peer File Sharing in the Republic of Armenia
Katy Elizabeth Pearce, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Communication Technology Interface Proximity and User Emotion: Comparing Desktop, Laptop, and
Hand-Held Device
Wenjing Xie, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Ethnography of iPod Touch Jailbreakers in Korea
SEOL KI, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
5332
Emotion and Affect in Politics
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Hoon Lee, U of Michigan, USA
Participants
Angry But Excited, Thus Engaged
Hoon Lee, U of Michigan, USA
Impact of Celebrity Endorsement of Political Candidate on Young Voters
Nam-Hyun Um, U of Texas, USA
Terrorism in the Media: Fear, Anger, and Risk Perception in the News and in Dutch and Arab Online
Discussions
Dirk Oegema, Free U, THE NETHERLANDS
Enny Henrica Das, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
The Interplay of Affect and Cognition in Attitude Formation in Political Campaigns
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Rinaldo Kühne, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Christian Schemer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
The Affective Effect on Political Judgment: Comparing the Influences of Candidate Attributes and Issue
Congruence
H. Denis Wu, Boston U, USA
Renita Coleman, U of Texas, USA
5333
Beyond Political Systems and Media Systems? Comparative Analysis of Political Communication
Culture in Europe
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Chairs
Barbara Pfetsch, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
Anders Esmark, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Participants
Echoing the Public Will or Mere Strategic Instruments? Exploring Attitudes of Political Communication
Actors Towards Public Opinion Polls
Barbara Pfetsch, Freie U - Berlin, GERMANY
Eva Mayerhoeffer, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Serving a Greater Purpose? Democratic Values as Basis of Political Communication
Nicklas Håkansson, Halmstad U, SWEDEN
Slavko Splichal, U of Liubljana, SLOVENIA
Roles to Rule Them All: On the Differentiation and Integration of Roles in Political Communication
Mark Ørsten, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Anders Esmark, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Suspicious Minds: Explaining Political Cynicism Among Parliamentary Journalists in Europe
Arjen van Dalen, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Erik Albæk, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Professional North/Conflictual South: Western European Patterns of Interaction and Conflict Between
Politicians and Journalists
Stephanie Schwab, U of Zürich, SWITZERLAND
Juan Diez Medrano, U of Barcelona, SPAIN
Respondent
Silke Adam, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
The purpose of the panel is to explore different types of political communication culture across Europe.
Political communication culture refers to the ideas, values, roles and perceptions that guide the interaction
of journalists, editors, politicians, advisers and spokespeople. Comparative analysis of political
communication often proceeds from the assumption that the specific form and content of political
communication are strongly influenced by formal or quasi-formal attributes of national political systems
and media systems. The importance of such systemic attributes notwithstanding, the panel proceeds from
the assumption that cultural components are equally important for the media-politics relationship and its
manifest outcomes. The panel brings together papers that link formal systemic attributes with cultural
components and probe the existence of distinct national communication cultures and/or clusters of culture
through comparative analysis of attitudinal data and interaction data from various European countries.
5334
Cultural Transactions and Histories in Asia
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Lin Zhang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
"Warring Media, Conflicting Discourse": Media Construction of Egao Culture
Lin Zhang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Chinese Media Capital in Global Context
Michael Curtin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Constituting the National Cultural Economy: The KOCCA and Cultural Policy Discourses in South Korea
Jung-yup Lee, U of Massachusetts, USA
Japanese Media and Youth Consciousness in Postauthoritarian Taiwan: A Discourse Analysis of
Taiwanese Online Bulletins
Hsin-Yen Yang, U of Iowa, USA
5335
Collaboration and Knowledge Management in Organizational Communication
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Kay Yoon, DePaul U, USA
Participants
Information Insufficiency in Information Source Selection
Li Lu, U of Southern California, USA
Y. Connie Yuan, Cornell U, USA
Understanding Perceptions and Use of ICTs to Support Knowledge Management: Perspectives From the
SECI Model
Chei Sian Lee, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Dion Goh, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Kelkar Rujuta Sumant, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Size, Diversity, and Beyond: A Mediated Model of Team Composition and Performance in "Team
Science"
Meikuan Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Yun Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Drew Berkley Margolin, U of Southern California, USA
Katherine Ognyanova, U of Southern California, USA
Cuihua Shen, U of Southern California, USA
Noshir S. Contractor, Northwestern U, USA
The Dialectical Tensions in the Funding Infrastructure of Cyberinfrastructure
Kerk F. Kee, U of Texas, USA
Larry D. Browning, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Kay Yoon, DePaul U, USA
5336
Independent Media and Journalistic Strategies in China
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 307
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Xi Cui, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
Blaming Dishonest Businesses and Incompetent Bureaucrats: A Framing Analysis of Chinese Product
Recalls
Ji Pan, U of South Carolina, USA
Ran Wei, U of South Carolina, USA
Hui Liu, Beijing First International Studies U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Investigating the Editorial Process of Television News Production in the People's Republic of China
John Jirik, Lehigh U, USA
New Strength of Competition and Innovation: China's Independent Television Production
Bonnie Rui Liu, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
People's Myth: The 'Miracle' of China's Modern Media Coverage of Humanitarian Disasters
Liangen Yin, Shenzhen U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Haiyan Wang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
5337
Understanding Bollywood's Global Influence Through the Lens of Film Flows
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
Box Office and Bollywood: An Analysis of Soft Power Content in Popular Hindi Cinema
David J. Schaefer, Franciscan U - Steubenville, USA
The Big Stick Behind 'Soft Power'? The Case of Indian Films in International Markets
Sunitha Chitrapu, Sophia Shree BK Somani Polytechnic, INDIA
Bollywood at Large: Who is Watching Bollywood Films?
Anjali Roy, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, INDIA
Cultural Connections in a Globalized World: The Power of Bollywood in the United States
Kavita Karan, U of Southern Illinois - Carbondale, USA
Respondent
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
The notion that planet-wide socio-politico-cultural processes are profoundly changing daily life for
billions of people around the globe has gained increasing currency in recent decades. For South Asians,
such connectivity has meant the potential to reverse previously unequal media flows related to Asian
perspectives, culture, and values. Given this context, the scope and reach of Indian media - particularly
the Mumbai-based segment known as "Bollywood" -- has never been greater, whether through
international film festivals, film star tours, international co-productions, or global cable channels.
Bringing together four presenters and a respondent reflecting a range of methodological approaches, this
panel addresses this gap in the literature by exploring the role of popular Hindi cinema in the global flow
of soft power. Our central focus is whether Bollywood cinema truly promotes India's economic-politicalcultural interests abroad, or whether external, Westernized influences are utilizing media flows to unduly
influence Indian media and cultural practices.
5338
News Values and Conversations
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Denise Sommer, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
Participants
News Values: Approaches and Perspectives
Benjamin Fretwurst, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
News Values in Conversations About Media Content
Volker Gehrau, U of Muenster, GERMANY
News Values in Conversations About News Issues
Katharina Sommer, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
News Values in Conversations About Single News Events
Denise Sommer, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
News values have been regarded as journalists' professional selection guidelines. However, studies show
that particular news factors similarly guide the audience's reception processes. If news values are linked to
general human perception they should also play a central role in conversation and determine what type of
information (from the media) we talk about as well as how we talk about it. Thus, the panel analyzes the
role of news values in conversations about the media. It aims at understanding when and why these
conversations occur and how they are structured. The first paper discusses news value theory and its
implications for interpersonal communication from a theoretical perspective. Three empirical studies
investigate conversations about media content reaching from general media talk to specific conversations
about single news events. They inquire the characteristics of conversations about news with high and low
news value and explore how particular news factors affect conversations about news issues.
5339
Issues of Theory and Measurement in Postconvergence Media Scholarship
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Roger Cooper, Ohio U, USA
Participants
The Uses and Affordances of Online Technologies: New(er) Ways of Understanding and Measuring
Audience Activity on Networked Social Platforms
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
Theory Development and Postconvergence: Challenges and Opportunities
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
Postconvergence Social Networking: The Mobile Facebook
Emil Bakke, Ohio U, USA
Active Within Structures: Integration of Divergent Theories and Measures
Tang Tang, U of Wisconsin - Oshkosh, USA
Roger Cooper, Ohio U, USA
This panel will examine the opportunities and challenges of post-convergence media scholarship from
theoretical, methodological, and empirical perspectives. Post-convergence implies that media and
communication scholars will increasingly need to develop theories and measures that consider uses,
effects, gratifications, and structures across media forms rather than to isolate concepts to a single
medium. Today's media offer video, audio, and text for users to access when, where, and how they want
it (e.g., mobile TV, video on-demand, personalized journalism). Individuals can also use media
simultaneously, share experiences (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, YouTube), and access the same information
through a variety of delivery systems. In post-convergence, media users are more concerned about
content than the medium that delivers it. These dynamics create opportunities for theory development and
integration, yet pose challenges for how scholars conceptualize and measure media uses, effects, and
structures. Panelists will offer theoretical conceptualizations and empirical approaches for postconvergence scholarship.
5340
GLBT Studies Interest Group Business Meeting
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 311
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
5341
Building Civic Participation Through "Communal Gaming"
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Shin Mizukoshi, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Participants
Communication Infrastructure Theory and Civic Media Game Approach: Linking Theory and Practice
Joo-Young Janice Jung, International Christian U, JAPAN
Shin Mizukoshi, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Toward A New Model of Digital Storytelling Workshops: Media Conté Workshop in Local Communities
Akiko Ogawa, Aichi Shukutoku U, JAPAN
Masaaki Ito, Aichi Shukutoku U, JAPAN
"Keitai Trail": Probing and Bridging People's Video Messages by Mobile Phone
Kiyoko Toriumi, U of Tokyo, JAPAN
Experiences in Media Play: A Critical Practice on Mobile and Mobility
Tusey-jen Sophia Wu, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Respondent
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach, U of Southern California, USA
In this panel, we present four papers. First, Jung and Mizukoshi present a paper that theoretically
discusses the connection between communication infrastructure theory and civic media game approach.
The second and third papers present empirical design and practice of communal games in local
communities. Toriumi presents "Keitai Trail," an experimental workshop for collecting and networking
people's video messages recorded by mobile phones. This cultural play program derives from a Japanese
classical word play and is technically supported by a knowledge support system developed in the Exprimo
Project. Ogawa and Ito present their research on "Media Conté," which is a digital storytelling workshop
connecting members of a community through exchanges of daily life stories. Story games and crossmedia platforms were developed to encourage and support everyday people's story-telling activities in a
collaborative manner. In the fourth paper, Wu presents her work about "media play" in Taiwan. Finally,
Ball-Rokeach, who formulated the communication infrastructure theory, will present comments about the
overall panel theme and the four individual papers.
5342
International Encyclopedia Editorial Board Meeting
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
5343
Intercultural Communication Competence: Theory and Research
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
Chair
Han Z. Li, U of Northern British Columbia, CANADA
Participants
A Transmodern Perspective on Intercultural Communicative Competence
Bhavana R. Upadhyaya, U of New Mexico, USA
"Ideology of Differences": A Critique and an Alternative Approach
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
The Integrated Model of Intercultural Communication Competence (IMICC): Model Test
Lily A. Arasaratnam, Alphacrucis, AUSTRALIA
Smita C. Banerjee, Rutgers U, USA
Krzysztof Dembek, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
The Relationship Between Sensation Seeking and Intercultural Communication Competence: Further
Model Testing
Lily A. Arasaratnam, Alphacrucis, AUSTRALIA
Smita C. Banerjee, Rutgers U, USA
Krzysztof Dembek, Monash U, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
William Hughes Edwards, Columbus State U, USA
5344
Information Systems Business Meeting
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Participant
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5345
Health Communication High Density Panel: Health Information and Support Online
Friday
11:30-12:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Tracy Loh, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Creating a Bond Between Caregivers Online: Impact on Caregivers' Coping Strategies
Kang Namkoong, U of Wisconsin, USA
Lori L. DuBenske, U of Wisconsin, USA
Bret Shaw, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H. Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Robert P. Hawkins, U of Wisconsin, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fiona M. McTavish, U of Wisconsin, USA
James F. Cleary, U of Wisconsin, USA
Is There Reason for Concern? The Role of Hypochondriacal Tendencies for Online Health Information
Search
Susanne E. Baumgartner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Who Customizes Health Websites and Why?
Sampada Sameer Marathe, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Hyunjin Kang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Driven to the Internet? Satisfaction With Physician-Patient Communication as a Predictor of Consumers'
Online Information Seeking
Soyoon Kim, U of Minnesota, USA
Brian G. Southwell, U of Minnesota, USA
Computer-Mediated Social Support and Uncertainty Management for People Living With Diabetes: An
In-Depth Interview Study
Hyo Jung Kim, U of Missouri - Columbia, USA
Erin Nicole Willis, U of Missouri, USA
Impact of Endorser and Message Appeal on the Success of an Online AIDS PSA
Arti Kulkarni, Louisiana State U, USA
Yongick Jeong, Louisiana State U, USA
Empathic Exchanges in Online Cancer Support Groups: Distinguishing Message Expression and
Reception Effects
Jeong Yeob Han, U of Georgia, USA
Dhavan Shah, U of Wisconsin, USA
Eunkyung Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
Kang Namkoong, U of Wisconsin, USA
Sun-Young Lee, U of Wisconsin, USA
Tae Joon Moon, U of Wisconsin, USA
Rich Cleland, U of Wisconsin, USA
Q Lisa Bu, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fiona M. McTavish, U of Wisconsin, USA
David H. Gustafson, U of Wisconsin, USA
Trends in Online Health Information: New Conceptualizations for a New Medium
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Hyang-Sook Kim, Pennsylvania State U, USA
5414
Children, Adolescents, & Media Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Children Adolescents and Media
5414
Communication Law and Policy Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Communication Law & Policy
Participants
1. Ads Make Sense! Online Advertising on Popular Children's Websites
Xiaomei Cai, George Mason U, USA
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
Carl H. Botan, George Mason U, USA
2. Internet Safety for Children: A Study of Policy Responses in China, Japan and South Korea
Sun Sun Lim, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
3. Introducing an Investigative Framework for Young People's Commercialized Media Environment
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Laura Helen Owen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
4. The (Mis)perceivers: Gender Differences in Self-Other Body Image Discrepancies and Body
Dissatisfaction Among Chinese Emerging Adults
Fan Hu, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Mena Ning Wang, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
5. The Role of Personal Salience in Children's Implicit Processing of Brand Placements in Movies
Laura Helen Owen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Charlie Lewis, Lancaster U, UNITED KINGDOM
Susan Auty, Lancaster U, UNITED KINGDOM
Moniek Buijzen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
6. Hate Speech and the Abuse Clause in the European Human Rights Convention: A Bad Pair
Hannes Cannie, Ghent U, BELGIUM
Dirk Voorhoof, U of Gent, BELGIUM
7. American Exceptionalism, the French Exception, and Regulation of Peer-to-Peer File Sharing on
the Internet
Lyombe S. Eko, U of Iowa, USA
8. The Role of Audience Exclusivity in Media Markets
Carol Ting, Michigan State U, USA
9. The Winner-Take-All Online Search Advertising Market and Implications for Antitrust Policy
Sujin Choi, Indiana U, USA
10. What's in a Domain Name? ICANN and Semantic Legitimacy
Evelyn Bottando, U of Iowa, USA
11. How Digital Divide Policy Was Domesticated in Taiwan?
Shulin Chiang, Chinese Culture U, TAIWAN
12. ITU: Moving Towards a Global Policy Framework on ICTs and Climate Change
Catherine Candano, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Respondents
Stephen D. McDowell, Florida State U, USA
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
5414
Communication and Technology Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Communication and Technology
Participants
13. Forecasting the Experience of Future Entertainment Technology: "Interactive Storytelling" and Media
Enjoyment
Christoph Klimmt, Johannes Gutenberg U - Mainz, GERMANY
Christian Roth, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Vorderer, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Franziska Susanne Roth, U of Mainz, GERMANY
14. Conducting Social Scientific Research on the Internet: A Comparison of Offline and Online Methods
Ryan Medders, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
15. Understanding the Choice of Two Competing Browsers: Integration of Expectation Disconfirmation
and Attitudinal Theory
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
16. Measuring Diversity and Democracy in Online Search
Laura A. Granka, Stanford U, USA
17. Keyword Economy: Search Engines as Techno-Linguistic Artefacts
Han-Teng Liao, Oxford Internet Institute, UNITED KINGDOM
18. The Use of Interactive Features on News Websites: An International and Interorganizational
Comparative Study
Itai Himelboim, U of Georgia, USA
Stephen McCreery, U of Georgia, USA
19. Exploring Item Nonresponse in Public Opinion Surveys About Nanotechnology: Evidence From 21
Countries
Tsung-Jen Shih, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Elizabeth A Corley, Arizona State U, USA
20. The Diametrics and Modality of SIDE: A Review and Extension
Caleb T. Carr, Michigan State U, USA
21. Effects of ICT Affordances on Knowledge Sharing: The Role of Perspective-Taking
Chei Sian Lee, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
22. Measuring Cell Phone Use: Effects of Question Format (Decomposition and Reference Period)
Mariek Vanden Abeele, U of Leuven, BELGIUM
Keith Roe, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
23. Participatory Design of an Electronic Reminder System to Improve Breast Cancer Screening Among
Underserved Populations
Mia Liza A. Lustria, Florida State U, USA
Michelle M. Kazmer, Florida State U, USA
Robert L Glueckauf, Florida State U, USA
Robert P. Hawkins, U of Wisconsin, USA
Ebrahim Randeree, Florida State U, USA
Ivee Rosario, Florida State U, USA
Casey McLaughlin, Florida State U, USA
Sarah Redmond, Florida State U, USA
24. What is Web Traffic Worth? A Multidimensional Model for Measuring Online Attention on News
Sites
Nan Zheng, U of Texas, USA
Hsiang Iris Chyi, U of Texas, USA
Kelly Kaufhold, U of Texas, USA
25. Priming News Credibility Judgments: Interactions in the World of User-Created Content
Aaron S. Veenstra, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Emily K. Vraga, U of Wisconsin, USA
Stephanie Edgerly, U of Wisconsin, USA
Sojung Claire Kim, U of Wisconsin, USA
26. Not All Created Equal? The Content Characteristics and Usefulness of Online Consumer Reviews
Lotte Michaela Willemsen, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
27. Same Minds Think Alike: I-Sharing Promotes Social Connectedness
Daan van Bel, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Karin Smolders, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Wijnand A. Ijsselsteijn, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Yvonne de Kort, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS.
5414
Ethnicity and Race in Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chairs
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Myria Georgiou, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
28. A "Spoiled Identity": Living With HIV/AIDS in African Contexts
Khadidiatou Ndiaye, Michigan State U, USA
29. A House Divided? Christian Music in Black and White
Omotayo Banjo, U of Cincinnati, USA
Kesha Maria Morant, Howard U, USA
30. Between Resistance and Dominant Ideology: Two NGOs' Efforts to Communicate the
Movement for Roma Rights
Adina Schneeweis, Oakland U, USA
31. The Weakness of Strong Ties: In-Group Barriers to External Communication Among Female
Agronomy Associations in Postcolonial Southern Rwanda
Sarah Elizabeth Ryan, U of Texas - El Paso, USA
32. Bollywood and Turkish Film in Belgium: A Structural Comparative Approach of Diasporic
Cinema in Antwerp
Iris Vandevelde, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Kevin Smets, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Philippe Meers, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Roel Vande Winkel, U of Gent, BELGIUM
Sofie Van Bauwel, U of Gent, BELGIUM
5414
Feminist Scholarship Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Feminist Scholarship
Participants
33. Gender Differences in Impression Management Characteristics Used Amongst Malay Users in
mIRC: A Preliminary Study
Sri Azra Attan, U Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Jusang Bolong, U Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Hamisah Hasan, U Putra Malaysia, MALAYSIA
34. Advertising Phuket's Nightlife on the Internet: A Case Study of Gender Constructions in Sex
Tourism
Piengpen Na Pattalung, Phuket Rajabhat U, THAILAND
Robert C. Chandler, U of Central Florida, USA
Jeffrey Dale Hobbs, Phuket Rajabhat U, THAILAND
35. Online Self-Display as Sexual Emancipation? Sex Blogging and Lolita Costume Play in Hong
Kong, Taiwan, and China
Katrien Jacobs, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
36. Work Advice, Experts, and the Voice of Management: Constraining the Working Woman in
Glamour and Essence Magazines
Joelle Cruz, Texas A and M U, USA
5414
GLBT Interest Group Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Studies
5414
Game Studies Interest Group Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Game Studies
5414
Global Communication and Social Change Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
37. Lo Que Se Ve No Se Pregunta: "Mujercitos" in Alarma Periodicals During the '70s in Mexico
Susana Vargas Cervantes, U Nacional Autónoma de México, MEXICO
38. Problematic Provider-Patient Interactions Reported by Gay and Bisexual Men
Lance S. Rintamaki, SUNY - Buffalo, USA
David Andrew Moskowitz, U of Texas - San Antonio, USA
David Seal, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA
Participants
39. A Complete Waste of Time: Analysing the Preference for Unsuitable Video Games
Sven Joeckel, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Leyla Dogruel, Free U - Berlin, GERMANY
Ilka Siegmund, TU Ilmenau, GERMANY
40. Effect of Playing Violent Video Games Cooperatively Competitively on Subsequent
Cooperative Behavior
David R. Ewoldsen, Ohio State U, USA
Cassie Eno, U of Alabama, USA
Bradley Okdie, U of Alabama, USA
Rosanna Guadagno, U of Alabama, USA
Jamie DeCoster, U of Alabama, USA
41. How Games Improve Your Work: The Effect of Interactive vs. Noninteractive Spare Time
Media on Task Performance
Jennifer Klatt, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Leonard Reinecke, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Max Sollmann, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Elena Buksmann, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Jessica Hoepner, U of Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
42. Video Game Play: A Concept Explication
Di Zhang, Syracuse U, USA
43. ―Leveling Up" Students With Class Blogs: Engineering Active Learning Through Game
Mechanics
Kevin Lim, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
Derek J. Lackaff, U of Texas, USA
Participants
44. A Digital Get-Together: An Exploratory Study of Internet Blogging in the Arab World
Leysan Khakimova, U of Maryland, USA
45. Anonymous Review as Strategic Ritual: Examining the Rise of Anonymous Review Among
Chinese Communication Journals
Hongtao Li, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
46. Becoming an International Star: Studying the H. Stern Brand Internationalization Process
José Coelho Albino, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Alexandre de Pádua Carrieri, U Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), BRAZIL
Ana Luiza Almeida, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Bernardo Almeida, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Felipe Guimarães, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
Luiza Sepúlveda, PUC Minas, BRAZIL
47. Between the Korean Wave and the Japanese Wave: BoA and the East Asian Pop Culture Flow
Sunyoung Kwak, U of Colorado, USA
48. Facebook and Nonprofit Organizations: A Content Analysis
Antara Das, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
49. Global Capitalism and Social Control: The Power and Resistance in China's Postsocialist
Blogosphere
Shaojung Sharon Wang, U at Buffalo - SUNY, USA
50. Institutional Holes and Knowledge Production: Guanxi Mechanisms in the Operation of
Communication Journals in China
Hongtao Li, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
51. Investigation of U.S. Public Diplomacy in Iraq and Cuba in Terms of Sawa and Marti
Mohammed H. Al-Azdee, Indiana U, USA
52. Remolding the Past in the Present : An Ambiguous Tyrant in Ideological Conflict
Jennifer Kate Estava Davis, American U in Cairo, EGYPT
5414
Health Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Health Communication
5414
Information Systems Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Information Systems
Participants
53. Healthcare Perceptions and Mobile Phone Use: A Predictive Model of Text-Based Health
Communication
L. Meghan Peirce, Ohio U, USA
Emil Bakke, Ohio U, USA
54. The Targeted Speak: Defining Young Women's Involvement With Sexual Assault
Rowena Lyn Briones, U of Maryland, USA
55. A Comparison of Blood Donors and Nondonors in Terms of Social Capital and Media Usage
Jia Lu, Florida State U, USA
56. Predictors of Sexual Initiation Among Chinese College Students
Zhiwen Xiao, U of Houston, USA
57. Googling the H1N1 Flu: Investigating Media Frames in Online News Coverage of the Flu
Pandemic
Weirui Wang, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Rachel A. Smith, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Worapron Tina Worawongs, USA
58. Smoking Isn't Kool: Exploring the Impact of Black Ethnic Identity and Cultural Cues in
Antismoking PSAs
Osei Appiah, Ohio State U, USA
Catherine Elise Goodall, Ohio State U, USA
Gregory J. Hoplamazian, Ohio State, USA
59. Implied Audience, Narrative Positioning, and Identity Construction: A Study of Self-Disclosure
in a Chinese Online Depression Support Group
Qinfeng Zhu, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
60. Trust in Health Information Sources: Examining Source Trust Dimensionality
Laleah Fernandez, Michigan State U, USA
Karina Judith Garcia-Ruano, Michigan State U, USA
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Jon D. Miller, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
61. A Social Cognitive Perspective on the Flexibility of Social Comparison to Idealized Media
Images: A Review of Current Literature and Implications for Future Research
Fan Hu, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
62. Decision-Making Groups Attenuate the Discussion Bias in Favor of Shared Information: A
Meta-Analysis
Torsten Reimer, Purdue U, USA
Andrea Reimer, Purdue U, USA
Uwe Czienskowski, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, GERMANY
63. Habituation of the Orienting Response to Auditory Structural Features
Matthew Falk, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
Taylor M Wells, Indiana U, USA
64. The Impact of Dimensions of Audio Complexity on Cognitive Load
Ya Gao, Indiana U, USA
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
65. Theory Development Strategies in Communication Science
Michael D. Slater, Ohio State U, USA
Laurel Suzanne Gleason, Ohio State U, USA
66. How Can We Tell When a Heuristic Has Been Used? Models for Measurement of Heuristics
Saraswathi Bellur, Pennsylvania State U, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
5414
Instructional and Developmental Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Instructional & Developmental Communication
5414
Intercultural Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Intercultural Communication
Participants
67. Teachers' Attitudes Toward Using Web 2.0 in Teaching
Ugur Kale, West Virginia U, USA
Debbie Goh, Indiana U, USA
68. The Value of Instructional Communication in Crisis Situations: Restoring Order to Chaos
Timothy Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Deanna Dee Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Derek Ray Lane, U of Kentucky, USA
Robert Littlefield, North Dakota State U, USA
Participants
69. A Multilevel Model of Risk and Benefit Perception
Tsung-Jen Shih, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Dietram A. Scheufele, U of Wisconsin, USA
Elizabeth A Corley, Arizona State U, USA
70. China as the "Communist Bandits": Evolution of Gongfei in Taiwan's Identity Politics
Hui-Ching Chang, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
71. Comparing Consumers' Online Shopping Behaviors in Taiwan and the United States
Ming-Yi Wu, Western Illinois U, USA
72. Multinational Advertising Campaigns as Intercultural Communication: Successes and Blunders
in Mainland China
Louisa S Ha, Bowling Green State U, USA
Lina Zang, Shandong U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
73. The Two Indias: An Analysis of Indian National Identity Formation
Purba Das, Ohio U Southern, USA
74. The "Two Tales" of Marwa El Sherbini
Anna-Maria Schielicke, Technical U of Dresden, GERMANY
Cornelia Walter, Technical U of Dresden, GERMANY
Mohamed Ahmed Khalifa, Technical U of Dresden, EGYPT
5414
Intergroup Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Intergroup Communication
5414
Interpersonal Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Interpersonal Communication
5414
Journalism Studies Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Journalism Studies
Participants
75. Intergenerational Communication in the Context of Distance Caregiving
Jennifer L. Bevan, Chapman U, USA
Lisa Sparks, Chapman U, USA
76. The Impact of E-Mail and Gender on Donation Request Responses: A Field Application of SIDE
Michael Che Ming Chan, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
77. Aggressive Communication: A Life Span Perspective
Kevin B. Wright, U of Oklahoma, USA
Elizabeth Ann Craig, USA
78. The Sexual Disclosure Model: Connecting Postcoital Increases in Oxytocin to Positive
Relational Disclosures
Amanda Denes, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
79. The Role of Religion and Conflict in Romantic Relationships: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of
Uganda and Ethiopia
Courtney Vail Fletcher, California State Polytechnic U, USA
80. Who Pretends to Be Smarter? Adolescents' Performance Adjustment as a Consequence of SelfDiscrepancy Experiences
Naomi Kagawa, U of Texas - Tyler, USA
81. Measuring Relationship Maintenance Behaviors: Critique and Development of a Revised
Relationship Maintenance Behavior Scale
Laura Stafford, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
82. Agents of Change? How Western Media Assistance Impacts Journalists in Developing Countries
Susanne Fengler, Erich Brost Institute for International Journalism, GERMANY
Judith Pies, Erich Brost Institute for International Journalism, GERMANY
Ursula Goetz, Erich Brost Institute for International Journalism, GERMANY
Marlene Stube, Erich Brost Institute for International Journalism, GERMANY
83. Arts Coverage in Major Newspapers on Three Continents: A Comparative Analysis
Paul T. Alonso, U of Texas, USA
84. Capture-Recapture Analysis in Journalism Research
Sven Engesser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Benjamin Kramer, Ludwig-Maximilians U, GERMANY
85. Judgment-Heuristic or Attitude-Influenced? Explaining Perceptions of News Bias in a Regulated
Press System
Stella C. Chia, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Mark A. Cenite, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
86. The Popular Press Instills a New Public in China: A Case Study of the Dingzhou Incident
Hsiao-wen Lee, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
87. "Lucky Cloud" Over the World: Chinese Journalism and Nationalism in the Beijing Olympics
Global Torch Relay
Le Han, U of Pennsylvania, USA
88. Nuclear Facility Episodic Storytelling Themes in Syrian Press Coverage: A Content - Textual
Analysis
Mohammed H. Al-Azdee, Indiana U, USA
89. Proximity and the Mediation of Distant Suffering: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the 2003
SARS Outbreak
Stijn Joye, Ghent U, BELGIUM
90. National Memory and Political Discourses in Journalism: Discursive Constructions of "Sites of
Memory" in China Daily
Choonghee Han, U of Iowa, USA
Respondents
Jacob Groshek, Iowa State U, USA
David Cuillier, U of Arizona, USA
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff U, UNITED KINGDOM
Matthew A. Carlson, St. Louis U, USA
5414
Mass Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Mass Communication
Participants
91. Cultivating Romantic Fantasies? Exposure to Western Television and Perceptions of Romantic
Relationships in Egypt
Sherine Mahfouz El-Toukhy, U of North Carolina, USA
Jane Brown, U of North Carolina, USA
92. Defining Citizen Journalism in the Journalistic Field
Yejin Hong, U of Minnesota, USA
Thomas John Ernste, USA
93. Examining Foreign Media Use in China
Mike Z. Yao, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Zhou He, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Chin-Chuan Lee, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Francis L. F. Lee, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Wan-Ying Lin, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
94. From Community to Commodity: National Advertising in the Jewish Daily Forward in the
1920s
Brian Dolber, U of Illinois, USA
95. Joy, Sadness, and Fear: Risk and Efficacy Perception and Message Frames
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
96. Perceived Reality in Media Messages: An Explication of Its Dimensional Structure
Lyudmila Popova, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
97. Predictors of Localism in Public Television Scheduling in the United States
Amber Melissa Korbl Smallwood, U of West Georgia, USA
Soo Jung Moon, U of West Georgia, USA
98. Profiling Online Content Creators: Advancing the Paths to Democracy
Ingrid Bachmann, U of Texas, USA
Teresa Correa, U of Texas, USA
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
99. Reliability and Validity of Scene Unit Coding in the Visual Content Analysis
Yun Jung Choi, Ewha Womans U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jong Hyuk Lee, Kyung Hee U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
100. The Direct Effects of the Presence, Status, and Language of News Sources in Television News:
An Experiment
Anne Hardy, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Knut De Swert, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
101. The Textual Analytics of Foundational Literature Reviews
James A. Anderson, U of Utah, USA
Janet Colvin, Utah Valley U, USA
102. Understanding the Process of Narrative Persuasion in Entertainment-Education
Elsbeth Asbeek Brusse, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5414
Organizational Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Organizational Communication
5414
Philosophy of Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Philosophy of Communication
Participants
103. Time to be Proactive: Measuring Proactive Communication in Organizations
Luis Felipe Gomez, Texas State U - San Marcos, USA
104. The Dialogic Turn and Management Fashions
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Oliver Escobar, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
105. Expanding the Understanding of Polychronic Organizational Values: Application to the
Millennial Generation's Job Seeking
Keri Keilberg Stephens, U of Texas, USA
Jaehee Cho, U of Texas, USA
106. Organizational Dissent and Argumentativeness: A Comparative Analysis Between American and
Indian Organizations
Stephen Michael Croucher, Bowling Green State U, USA
Ramune Braziunaite, Bowling Green State U, USA
Dini Homsey, U of Oklahoma, USA
Gayatre Pillai, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Jagruti Saxena, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Ashish Saldanha, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Vikrant Joshi, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Imran Jafri, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Pavan Choudhary, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Lalima Bose, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
Komal Agarwal, Mudra Institute of Communications, INDIA
107. What Influences Trust Building in Cross-Cultural Distributed Work Teams: A Multilevel
Analysis
Meikuan Huang, Northwestern U, USA
Francois Lambotte, U Libre de Bruxelles, BELGIUM
108. How Message Characteristics Affect Identification: The Effects of Peripheral Cues in E-Mail
Messages on Cognitive and Evaluative Identification
Martin Tanis, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Camiel J. Beukeboom, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
109. Examining the Need for Reflection in Collaborative Qualitative Research
Sean Jeremy Westwood, Stanford, USA
Kathryn Segovia, Stanford U, USA
110. On Making Us Whole: The Dynamics of Fertility in the 2008 Presidential Election
Rosemary Avance, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Andrew Crocco, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Carolyn Marvin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
111. Counterpublics and Labor History: Theorizing Jewish Working-Class Media in the 20th Century
Brian Dolber, U of Illinois, USA
112. Churches in the Public Sphere: When Church Services are Broadcast via the Internet
Jong In Chang, U of Iowa, USA
113. Organizing and Reframing Technological Determinism Using Burrell and Morgan's Four
Paradigms for the Analysis of Social Theory
Fernando de la Cruz Paragas, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
5414
Language & Social Interaction Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Language & Social Interaction
5414
Political Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Political Communication
Participants
114. English Influences in Polish Conversation
Jerzy Tomaszczyk, Lodz Academy of International Studies, POLAND
115. Lying in Context: The Sequential Organisation of Hiding Misconduct
Edward Reynolds, U of Queensland, AUSTRALIA
116. Naming Power: Exploring Shifts in Contemporary Migrants' Personal Name Use During
Settlement in Canada
Diane Yvonne Dechief, U of Toronto, CANADA
117. The Alcohol Communications War: "Communications" Versus "Symbolic Meaning" in Relation
to Alcohol Consumption
Parichart Sthapitanonda, Chulalongkorn U, THAILAND
Natwipa Sinsuwarn, Chulalongkorn U, THAILAND
118. The Multiple Narrations of Recreational Drug Use: A Comparative Study of Hegemonic
Meanings of Drug Addiction in Hong Kong TV Documentaries and Drug Rehabilitation Services
Wai Sing Tsen, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
119. Agenda-Setting Effects of Incidental Exposure to Political Information on the Internet
Jae Kook Lee, Indiana U, USA
120. Automatic Mapping of Social Networks: Time Series Analysis of News Sentiment and
Presidential Job Approval
James A. Danowski, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
121. Channeling the Economy: Mass Media and Economic Perceptions
Marcel van Egmond, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Wouter van der Brug, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
122. Disagreeing With Others as a Minority: Argument Strength, Civility, and Their Impacts on
Response Favorability in Online Discussion
Jin Woo Kim, U of Pennsylvania, USA
June Woong Rhee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hye Mi Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Hyun Seung Suh, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
123. Dynamics of the Media's Issue Attention: Some Implications for Agenda Setting Research
Stefan Geiss, Johannes Gutenberg U Mainz, GERMANY
124. How Judicial Advertising Can Mobilize Voters: An Experimental Study of the 2007
Pennsylvania Judicial Election
Jeffrey A. Gottfried, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Eran N. Ben-Porath, Social Science Research Solutions, USA
James L. Gibson, Washington U in St. Louis, USA
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
125. Minority Comparison Model: Effects of Whites' Multiracial Evaluation on Symbolic Racism and
Racialized Policy Preferences
Young Min Baek, U of Pennsylvannia, USA
Angela M. Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
126. Surviving the "Mock Interview": Challenges to Political Communicative Competence in
Contemporary Televised Discourse
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Limor Shifman, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Michal Hamo, Netanya Academic College, ISRAEL
127. Taking the Copyfight Online: Comparing the Copyright Debate in Congressional Hearings, in
Newspapers, and on the Web
Bill D. Herman, Hunter College, USA
128. The Democratic Paradox? Decision Makers' Exposure to Mediation
Risto Kunelius, U of Tampere, FINLAND
Esa Reunanen, U of Tampere, FINLAND
129. Perceived Network Connection: A Reliability and Validity Assessment of an Individual-Level
Measure of Group Attachment
Nick W. Geidner, Ohio State U, USA
130. Changes in Public Opinion After a Public-Deliberation Event
Yuping Mao, U of Alberta, CANADA
Marco Adria, U of Alberta, CANADA
131. Valenced Strategy Framing in Election Campaign Coverage and Its Effects on Voters
Petya Bogdanova, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sophie Lecheler, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
132. Cyber-Campaigns in Southern Europe: Only for a Dissatisfied, Yet Very Active, Minority
Víctor Sampedro, U Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid, SPAIN
José López Rey, U de A Coruña, SPAIN
Monica Poletti, U degli Studi di Milano, ITALY
5414
Popular Communication Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Popular Communication
5414
Public Relations Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Public Relations
Participants
133. Carnival in Cyberspace: Egao as a Chinese Internet Subculture
Lin Zhang, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
134. The Practice of an Extraordinary Life: The Role of Media in the Spread of Cultural Items and
Practices Across Borders
Kyung Lee, U of Pennsylvania, USA
135. Youthful Interpretations of Social Networking Sites: Integrating Concerns in Reception Analysis
and Digital Literacies
Ranjana Das, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
136. Re-Emerging Sentiment of "Asianness": The Meaning of Korean Television Dramas in the
Japanese Fandom
Hyejung Ju, U of Oklahoma, USA
137. The Cultural Formation of Korean Popular Music in the Japanese Colonial Era
Yongwoo Lee, McGill U, CANADA
Participants
138. Effects of Issue Ownership and Issue Obtrusiveness on Corporate Reputation
Heewon Cha, Ewha Woman's U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yeonhee Song, KorCom Porter Novelli, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jangyul Robert Kim, Colorado State U, USA
139. Keeping Up With the Digital Age: How the American Red Cross Uses Social Media to Build
Relationships
Beth Kuch, U of Maryland, USA
Rowena Lyn Briones, U of Maryland, USA
Brooke Fisher Liu, U of Maryland, USA
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
140. Public Relations, Terrorism, and Critical Pedagogy in Postconflict Northern Ireland
Ian Somerville, U of Ulster, IRELAND
Andy Purcell, U of Ulster, IRELAND
Fred Morrison, U of Ulster, IRELAND
141. Situational Motivations of Information Forwarding Behavior
Zhuo Ban, Purdue U, USA
142. The Authentic Enterprise: Another Buzz Word or a True Driver of Quality Relationships?
Hongmei Shen, San Diego State U, USA
Jeong-Nam Kim, Purdue U, USA
143. Views From the Field: Public Relations Industry-Academia Relationships
I-Huei Cheng, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Federico de Gregorio, U of Akron, USA
144. "Made in China" Made in U.S. Media: Evolution of Product-Country Image of China, 19792008
Gang Han, Iowa State U, USA
Xiuli Wang, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
5414
Communication History Interest Group Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Communication History
5414
Visual Communication Studies Interactive Poster Session
Friday
13:00-14:15
Gallery
Visual Communication Studies
5520
Media With Benefits: Understanding the Positive Power and Production of Media for Youth
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 201
Children Adolescents and Media
Participants
145. History From the Middle: A Gramscian Case for Studying Jewish Working-Class Media
Brian Dolber, U of Illinois, USA
146. Mass Media and Intellectual Agenda-Setting: Some Insights From Australian Journalism History
Penelope Ann O'Donnell, U of Sydney, AUSTRALIA
David McKnight, U of New South Wales, AUSTRALIA
147. Places of the Imagination
Stijn Reijnders, Erasmus U - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
148. Look at Us: Collective Narcissism in College Student Facebook Photo Galleries
Andrew L. Mendelson, Temple U, USA
Zizi A. Papacharissi, U of Illinois - Chicago, USA
149. The Pyramid Scheme: Visual Metaphors and the USDA's Food Guides
Alison Perelman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
150. Chick Flicks Prefer Blondes: What Chick Flicks Reflect About the American Woman's Beauty
Ideal
Rocio Nunez, U of Pennsylvania, USA
151. The Evolution of Multimedia Journalism on NYTimes.com: A Preliminary Analysis
Susan L. Jacobson, Temple U, USA
152. TV Debate Nonverbal: An Explorative Analysis of the Structure and Effects of Nonverbal
Communication in the German Chancellor TV Debate in 2009
Stephanie Geise, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Isabell Boger, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Kerstin Kruppok, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Anna Maier, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Isabell Vogelsang, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Chair
Aradhna Malik, Indian Institute of Technology, INDIA
Participants
"What's TV Good For?": Views of Producers of Television for Children Around the World
Dafna Lemish, Tel Aviv U, ISRAEL
Ready or Not, Here it Comes: Disaster Preparedness Messages on Children's Websites
Erin Leigh Ryan, U of Alabama, USA
Karen Hilyard, U of Tennessee, USA
Tatjana Hocke, U of Tennessee, USA
Wii Tennis Play as Physical Activity in Low-Income African American Adolescents
Amanda Exner Staiano, Georgetown U, USA
Sandra L. Calvert, Georgetown U, USA
"When I Eat So Bad, My Pet Looks So Sad": An Initial Test of the Persuasive Effect of Feedback From a
Mobile Phone Virtual Pet on Adolescent Breakfast Intake
Sahara Byrne, Cornell U, USA
Geri Gay, Cornell U, USA
J.P. Pollak, Cornell U, USA
Daniela Retelny, Cornell U, USA
Amy L Gonzales, USA
Brian Wansink, Cornell U, USA
Respondent
Keith Roe, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
5521
Becoming the Model Political Woman: Female as Media Spectacle and National Commodity
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 202
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Sarah Banet-Weiser, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
The "Lady" Aung San Suu Kyi of Burma: Gender, Politics, and the "Amusement Society"
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
From Invisible Italian Bride to Visible Indian Mother: Patriarchy and the Politics of Sonia Gandhi's
Transformation
Radhika E. Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA
Media Deployment of Gender and Race Codes in 2008 Democratic Campaign
Eileen T Walsh, California State U - Fullerton, USA
Michelle Obama: Redefining the (White) House-wife
Khadijah White, U of Pennsylvania, USA
5522
Journalism Education
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Participants
A Plea for a Scholarly Community: Professional and Academic Culture Among Chilean JMC Educators
Claudia Mellado, U of Concepcion, CHILE
Broadcast Journalism Practices in Indonesia: A Journey Through Challenges Over Social Change and
Training Opportunities
Nurhaya Muchtar, Indiana U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Effectiveness of the Pervasive Method in Ethics Pedagogy: A Longitudinal Study of Journalism and
Mass Communication Students
Jacob Groshek, Iowa State U, USA
Mike Conway, Indiana U, USA
Teaching Journalism and Mass Communication in the Trend Toward Convergence: A Content Analysis of
Faculty Hiring Announcements With a New Media Emphasis
Ying Roselyn Du, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Michael Stuart Bromley, U of Queenslands, AUSTRALIA
5523
Transformations in Newswork: The Diffusion, Use, and Effects of Online News
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 204
Journalism Studies
Chair
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Participants
Emerging Mediascape, Same Old Theories? A Case Study of Online News Diffusion in Korea
Eun-Mee Kim, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yung-Ho Im, Pusan National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Kyungmo Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yeran Kim, Kwangwoon U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Citizen Journalism and Democracy: How User-Generated News Use Relates to Political Knowledge and
Participation
Kelly Kaufhold, U of Texas, USA
Sebastian Valenzuela, U of Texas, USA
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
The Role of Attitude Towards the Citizen Journalism News as a Mediator of Attitude Towards the Brand
and Intention: A Test of Competing Affect Transfer Hypotheses
Julian Lin, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Web Production, News Judgment, and Emerging Categories of Online Newswork in Metropolitan
Journalism
C.W. Anderson, College of Staten Island- CUNY, USA
Respondent
Zhongdang Pan, U of Wisconsin, USA
5524
Mapping the Field's Histories
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 205
Communication History
Chair
Jefferson D. Pooley, Muhlenberg College, USA
Participants
Journalism and Communication Studies in Korea for the First Ten Years After Liberation, 1945-1954
Min Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Linguistic Politics: Creating a Communication Canon Post WWII
Erin Miller, Boise State U, USA
Revisiting Critical Scholars' Alternative: A Case Study of Dallas Smythe's Praxis
Lin Yao, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
The History of the Field of Communication in China: A Meta-Analysis From 1998 to 2008
Shengxi Chen, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Respondent
Jefferson D. Pooley, Muhlenberg College, USA
5525
Challenges of Dialectics and Disclosure in Close Relationships: From Going In to Coming Out
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Amanda Denes, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Relational Dialectics During the Prewedding Phase of Lebanese Muslim Arranged Marriages
Khaled A. G. Nasser, Louisiana State U, USA
Yasmine Tarek Dabbous, Louisiana State U, USA
James M. Honeycutt, Louisiana State U, USA
Big Macs/Peanut Butter and Jelly: An Exploration of Dialectical Contradictions Experienced by the
Sandwich Generation
Julie L. Semlak, Miami U - Ohio, USA
Judy C. Pearson, South Dakota State U, USA
Queering Relationships: Perceived Relational Effects of Coming Out Conversations
Jimmie Manning, Northern Kentucky U, USA
The Second Coming Out: LGBTQ Individuals' Redisclosures of Their Sexual Identity to Their Parents
Amanda Denes, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
5526
Researching Effects of Persuasive Images
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 207
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Robert L. Craig, U of St. Thomas, USA
Participants
Attractive Endorsers in Advertising and Body Dissatisfaction: Expected and Unexpected Findings
Elsbeth Asbeek Brusse, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Cognitive Process and Persuasive Effects of Pictorial-Metaphor Advertisings
Lun Zhang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Mike Z. Yao, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
The Effects of Mobile Advertising Formats
Junghwean Kim, U at Buffalo, SUNY, USA
Daejoong Kim, U of Buffalo, USA
Insights in Processes of Visual Perception and Its Effects: Results of an Experimental Eye-Tracking Study
Using the Example of Election Posters
Stephanie Geise, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Respondent
Robert L. Craig, U of St. Thomas, USA
5527
How Much Would They Forgive? Crisis Communication Efforts and Reactions
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Magda Pieczka, Queen Margaret U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
Crisis Communication and Forgiveness: An Experimental Study on the Interrelationships Among Causal
Attribution, Message Appeal, and Forgiveness
Yunna Rhee, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Vicky(Beach) Moon, Hankuk U of Foreign Studies, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Victims of the Visuals? Exploring the Effects of Victim Visuals on Perceptions and Reactions to Crisis
Events
William Timothy Coombs, Eastern Illinois U, USA
Sherry Holladay, Eastern Illinois U, USA
How to Manage Crises Is How to Manage Anger: Exploring the Anger Management Model Based on
Organizational Crisis Response Strategies, News Frames, Negative Emotions, and Negative
Behavioral Intentions
Seon-Kyoung An, Media Research Labs, USA
Organizational Strategies to Engage Publics' Emotions in Multistaged Testing of the Integrated Crisis
Mapping Model
Augustine Pang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Yan Jin, Virginia Commonwealth U, USA
Glen T. Cameron, U of Missouri, USA
5528
Writing for Publication Workshop
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 209
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Margaret N. Zusky, Blackwell Publishing, USA
Writing for Publication Workshop Eager to submit your research for publication, but don't know where to
start? This workshop will provide new authors with practical advice on how to publish in today's
academic environment. Getting published can seem like a daunting challenge, but there are important
steps you can take to increase your chances of success. The session is hosted by senior editors and
publishers at Wiley-Blackwell, who will share insights and experience gained from years in academic
publishing.
5530
Media Multiplexity and Old/New Media Convergence
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Jan A. G. M. Van Dijk, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Communicating in the Multichannel Age: Interpersonal Communication Motivation, Interaction
Involvement, and Channel Affinity
Shaojing Sun, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Gwen Hullman, Kent State U, USA
Ying Wang, Youngstown State U, USA
Time Sense and Multiplexity of Media Use: Who is the Beneficiary of New Media Environment?
Eun Ja Her, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Jae-Hyun Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
TV and Internet Usage Among African-Americans and Their Effects on Material Values and Socialization
Processes
David J. Park, Florida International U, USA
Maria Elena Villar, Florida International U, USA
Jorge Nestor Amador, Florida International U, USA
Virtual Materiality: Collectors and Collection in the Brazilian Music Blogosphere
Lindsay Fullerton, Northwestern U, USA
Matthew Rarey, U of Wisconsin, USA
5531
Effects of Game Play
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Doohwang Lee, U of Alabama, USA
Participants
Intrinsic Motivation in Exergames: Competition, Competitiveness, and the Conditional Indirect Effect of
Presence (TOP 2 Faculty Paper)
Hayeon Song, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Jihyun Kim, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Kelly Elizabeth Tenzek, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Estimating the Effect of Direct Network Externalities on the Demand of Massively Multiplayer Online
Role-Playing Games: The Value of Social Network
Xuexin Xu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Wayne Fu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Playing Me: A Study of Gender, Gameplay, and Game Preference Effects on Avatar Selection
Robert Andrew Dunn, U of Alabama, USA
Rosanna Guadagno, U of Alabama, USA
How to Play Matters: Effects of Trait Hostility, Mapping Interface, and Character Identification on
Aggressive Thoughts and Enjoyment After Playing a Violent Video Game
Younbo Jung, Nanyang Techological U, SINGAPORE
Kwan Min Lee, U of Southern California, USA
Namkee Park, U of Oklahoma, USA
5532
The 2009 European Parliament Election: Europeanized or Domestic Contests? Empirical Evidence
From Mass Media Coverage, Parties' Campaigning, and Citizens' Voting Behavior
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Charles T. Salmon, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
The Media Coverage of the EP Elections: European, National or Mixed?
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Susan Banducci, U of Exeter, UNITED KINGDOM
Andreas Schuck, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Georgios Xezonakis, U of Exeter, UNITED KINGDOM
Matthijs Elenbaas, U Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Domestic or Europeanized Election Campaigns? The Role of Euro-Skeptic Parties in the 2009 European
Parliament Election
Silke Adam, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Michaela Maier, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Is There a "European Turnout"? Participation in Regional, Federal, and European Elections in the 2009
"Super Election Year" in Germany
Thorsten Faas, U of Mannheim, GERMANY
Does the Type of Campaign Make the Difference? An Experimental Study of Campaign Effects on
Citizens' EU Evaluations in 11 Countries
Michaela Maier, U of Koblenz-Landau, GERMANY
Silke Adam, U of Hohenheim, GERMANY
Respondent
Wolfgang Donsbach, Technical U - Dresden, GERMANY
In this panel we ask whether and if yes, under which conditions we find signs that the 2009 European
Parliament election took up European conflicts, issues and actors - and thereby moved beyond the national
level. We are looking for such signs in mass media's reporting and commentating (paper 1), in the
campaign communication of domestic parties (paper 2) and finally on the side of citizens, i.e. their
participation patterns (paper 3). Research that focuses on the supply side of information is based on the
assumption that more Europeanized forms of communication are a prerequisite to also Europeanize
citizens' voting behaviour. The fourth paper in our panel is seeking evidence for this assumption by
experimental research: Does it make a difference for citizens' reactions if campaigns are more or less
focused on EU issues, actors and conflicts?
5533
Mapping Networks of Political Communication Online: A Study of Four Countries
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 304
Political Communication
Chair
John Hartley, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Mapping the Australian Networked Public Sphere
Axel Bruns, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Jean Burgess, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Tim Highfield, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
Lars Kirchhoff, Sociomantic Labs, DENMARK
Thomas Nicolai, Sociomantic Labs GmbH, GERMANY
Who Is the Star and What Are the Contents of Comments on Cyworld? Textual Analysis of a Politician's
Mini-Hompy
Se Jung Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Sang Me Nam, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Steven Sams, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Han Woo Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Mapping Political Connections in Japan: The Functions of Hyperlinks on Japanese Diet Member Websites
Leslie M. Tkach-Kawasaki, U of Tsukuba, JAPAN
Mapping the Norwegian Blogosphere
Hallvard Moe, U of Bergen, NORWAY
Respondent
John Hartley, Queensland U of Technology, AUSTRALIA
The increasing availability and accessibility of detailed data and metadata on political engagement and
public communication through online networks and social media Websites, and the development of more
sophisticated tools and methodologies for capturing, analysing, and visualising such data, have made it
possible to explore new approaches to the study of online political networks (cf. Adamic & Glance, 2005;
Shadbolt & Berners-Lee, 2008; Kelly & Etling, 2009). Such approaches employ a combination of network
crawling and scraping technologies, large-scale hyperlink network and textual analysis, and innovative
approaches to visualising their results; in doing so, they shed new light on the level and nature of the
engagement between mainstream and marginal political actors, news and alternative media sources, and
the 'ordinary' citizens participating in everyday political discussion through a variety of social networking
sites, blogs, and other platforms. This panel presents a number of innovative projects in this field.
5534
Matters of Communication: Connections Between Meaning and Materiality in the Representation
of Political and Public Institution
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 305
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
ACOP Asociacion de Comunicacion Politica, Asociacion de Comunicacion Politica, SPAIN
Participants
Cibercampaigns in the South of Europe: Parties, Bloggers and Voters
Víctor Sampedro, U Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid, SPAIN
The Representation of the European Union in Political Advertising
Rosa Berganza, SPAIN
Comparing Media Representations of Spanish Political Leaders Throughout Crisis
Miguel Vicente-Mariño, U of Valladolid, SPAIN
'Government Reputation' as an Intangible Value for Public Institutions: Communicating Spanish Local
Governments
Mario Garcia Gurrionero, U Complutense, SPAIN
Maria Sanchez Valle, CEU San Pablo, SPAIN
Maria Jose Canel, U Complutense de Madrid, SPAIN
Karen Sanders, San Pablo U, SPAIN
Psychological Effects of Social and Political Communication in Terrorism: A Criticism Theory
Experimental Analysis.
Ubaldo Cuesta, U Complutense Madrid, SPAIN
Tania Menendez, U Complutense, SPAIN
This panel presents research that explores the significance of intangibles in political communication.
Panellists explore, first, how political values of different institutions (government, opposition and political
parties) are represented (representations in TV spots and broadcasts and blogs of government leaders and
of candidates are analyzed) during different political processes (political crisis and election campaigns).
Second, it is explored how people react to the material representation of intangible political values. From
the perspective of the concept of stakeholder, "government reputation" is analyzed examining both
outcomes of public policies and citizens' perceptions of government leadership and performance. Since
political values are embodied in media outputs, how citizens process information received through the
mass media is analyzed. The panel is an opportunity for scholars to present work which helps the academy
to understand the complex connection between meaning and materiality when talking about intangible
values in political and public institutions.
5535
Communication for Security: Strategies of Organizational Emergency Communication
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 306
Organizational Communication
Chair
Gebhard Rusch, Siegen U, GERMANY
Participants
Integrated Crisis Communication as New Approach in Crisis Management
Christian Neuhaus, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Communication Ethics in the Context Communication for Security
Christine Schütz, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Mobile Organizations for Ontological Security During Disasters
Benjamin Mangold, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Improving Human Reliability
Daniela Giebel, U of Siegen, GERMANY
The Intranet as a Crisis-Information-System
Mario Hannappel, U of Siegen, GERMANY
The Dynamics of Disasters and Communicative Intervention
Gebhard Rusch, U of Siegen, GERMANY
Respondent
Theo Hug, U of Innsbruck, AUSTRIA
The panel presents and discusses results and approaches towards emergency communication at an
organizational and public level from two research and development projects. The first one, "Proactive
Communication Management During Emergencies" (funded by RWE), analyzed new possibilities of
organizational crisis management and customer communication in cases of power outages (blackouts).
The second project is still running and is part of the German Federal Government's Security Research
Program which aims to increase civil security without limiting the freedom of citizens. The project
"Emergency Communication for Security" (funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research)
investigates and develops preventive, proactive and reactive strategies for communications support in
security and rescue operations. Communication needs and obligations are addressed at intra- and interorganizational levels. Prerequisites and modalities of robust communication and media interventions are
developed and tested using system dynamics crises and disaster models. The panelists present final and
intermediate results from both projects accentuating issues of organizational communication such as
integrated crisis management, intranets as crisis information systems, organizational communication
ethics, mobile organizations, improvements of human reliablity, dynamical disaster models and time
windows for communicative intervention.
5536
Communicating Meaning and Health Decision Making
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 307
Health Communication
Chair
Avinash Thombre, U of Arkansas - Little Rock, USA
Participants
Living Kidney Donor Decision Making and Communication
Sandi W Smith, Michigan State U, USA
Samantha Ann Nazione, Michigan State U, USA
Carolyn Kay LaPlante, Michigan State U, USA
Rose Clark-Hitt, Michigan State U, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Randall Sung, U of Michigan, USA
Alan Leichtman, U of Michigan, USA
Effects of Entertainment (Mis)education: Exposure to Entertainment Television Programs and Organ
Donation Intention
Jina H. Yoo, U of Missouri - Saint Louis, USA
Yan Tian, U of Missouri - St Louis, USA
Health Communication and Face-Negotiation Theory in the Operating Room
Kris A. Kirschbaum, East Carolina U, USA
The Function of Storysharing in Rebuilding Sichuan Earthquake-Damaged Communities
Kaibin Xu, Temple U, USA
5537
Journalism and Democracy: Strategies for Ctizens' Empowerment
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washingon U, USA
Participants
From Steamed Bun to Grass Mud Horse: E Gao as Alternative Political Discourse
Bingchun Meng, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Movements and Civic Pragmatism: Democratizing Access to the Press in Latin America
Silvio R. Waisbord, George Washingon U, USA
Political Instability and Press Freedom Violations: Extending and Updating Hallin and Mancini's Three
Models of Media and Politics
William Lafi Youmans, U of Michigan, USA
The Role of "Citizen Journalism" in China's Changing Media and Social Environment
Xin Xin, U of Westminster, UNITED KINGDOM
5538
Advertising and Persuasion in the Online World
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Lyudmila Popova, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Participants
Defined and Delivered: Social Networks, Homophily Theory, and the Risks of Online Targeted
Advertising
Lauren Kogen, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Circulation and Geographic Determinations of Advertising Placements in Internet Newspapers
Yongick Jeong, Louisiana State U, USA
Arti Kulkarni, Louisiana State U, USA
Nam Young Kim, Louisiana State U, USA
What Types of Advertisements Are Being Loved in Web 2.0 Era? A Content Analysis of Popular
Advertisements on YouTube
Hyunjae Jay Yu, Sogang U, Korea, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Yongjun Sung, U of Texas, USA
The Effect of Involvement and Source Expertise on Persuasiveness and Trustworthiness in Online Product
Reviews
Soyoung Bae, Indiana U, USA
Robert F. Potter, Indiana U, USA
5539
Media Engagement and Entertainment
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Mina Tsay, Boston U, USA
Participants
A Conceptual Model of User Engagement With Media
Jeeyun Oh, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Saraswathi Bellur, Pennsylvania State U, USA
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Emotional Gratification in Media Use: Exploring Experiential and Functional Types of Entertainment
Gratification
Anne Bartsch, Martin Luther U Halle, GERMANY
Reinhold Viehoff, Martin Luther U Halle, GERMANY
Roland Mangold, U of the Media Stuttgart, GERMANY
Guilty Pleasure or Curiosity? Consumption of Reality Programming and Common Voyeurism
Lemi Baruh, Kadir Has U, TURKEY
Moral Intuitions: Morality Subcultures in Disposition Formation
Allison L. Eden, Michigan State U, USA
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
5540
Telecommunications Governance, Investment, and Outcomes
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Sandra Braman, U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Participants
Incentivize Me! How Incumbent Carriers in the United States Attempt to Extract Greater Deregulation
and Incentives in Exchange for Making Next Generation Network Investments
Robert M. Frieden, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Metamorphoses of the State in Telecommunications - TOP THREE PAPER
Johannes M. Bauer, Michigan State U, USA
The Impact of Rural Broadband Development: Lessons From a Natural Field Experiment - TOP THREE
PAPER
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
Jennifer L. Gregg, U of Louisville, USA
Joseph D. Straubhaar, U of Texas, USA
The Paradox of Regulatory Impulse
Christopher R. Terry, U of Wisconsin, USA
Respondent
Leslie Regan Shade, Concordia U, CANADA
5541
Media Studies: The China Question and China's Perspective
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 312
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Zhengrong Hu, Presidents Office, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Local Knowledge: China's Perspective on Media Research
Dan Huang, Fudan U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
The Rise of China and Global Communication Scholarship
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
How Intercultural Persuasion Fails: A Chinese View
Wenxiang Gong, Peking U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Vision of the Past and the Present: Value and Significance of China's Experience on Communication
Studies
Yumin Wu, Shenzhen U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Global Agenda and National Image Through Cross-Cultural Communication
Benqian Li, Shanghai Jiaotong U, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
As China's influence on the world economy and politics increases, a corresponding change is also
expected in China's position in global communication. For media studies, the "China question" is moving
from the peripheral to the center, and from regional to global. "The perspective of China" is an emerging
new approach that inspires the convergence of Chinese and Western academic thoughts. To include the
China question and the perspective of China in global media studies not only makes subjective
construction of Chinese media studies possible, but also opens up more space for pluralism and diversity
in global media studies. This panel, organized by the Chinese Association of Communication, highlights
the discussion of "the China question" among the Chinese academia and the exploration of "the
perspective of China" in the field of media studies. The objective of this panel is to enhance mutual
understandings between Chinese scholars and their international counterparts through its proposition and
discussion of the perspective of China on media studies.
5543
Competitively Ranked Papers in Intercultural - Mass Communication
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Pamela Kay Morris, Loyola U, USA
Participants
Comparing Media Content Across Cultures
Patrick Roessler, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Financial Services Advertising Over the Recession: A Cross-Cultural Study of Magazine Ads in the U.S.
and Korea
Hongmin Ahn, U of Texas, USA
Young A Song, U of Texas, USA
Yongjun Sung, U of Texas, USA
Globalization, Advertising, and 2008 Summer Olympics
Yuan Yuan, Rutgers U, USA
In Search of Cultural Values: Examining Public Relations Campaigns in Multicultural Australia
Marianne D. Sison, RMIT U, AUSTRALIA
Testing Spiral of Silence Theory in Nine Countries: An Individual Differences Perspective
Jorg Matthes, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Andrew F. Hayes, Ohio State U, USA
Hernando Rojas, U of Wisconsin, USA
Fei Chris Shen, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Seong Jae Min, Pace U, USA
Ivan B Dylko, Ohio State U, USA
Respondent
Robert Shuter, Marquette U, USA
5544
C'mon, Get Happy: The Impact of Humor and Positivity on Cognitive Processing
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 325
Information Systems
Chair
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
An Appraisal Domain Analysis of Message Framing Effects
Kiwon Seo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Attitudinal Effects of Textual Characteristics of Verbal Irony
Christian Burgers, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Margot van Mulken, Radboud U, THE NETHERLANDS
Peter Jan Schellens, Radboud U - NijmegenNijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS
Positive Emotions Liberate Our Cognitive Judgment: The Influence of Positive Emotions on Context
Effect
Jihye Min, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Wooyeol Shin, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Joohan Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Processing Emotional Stimuli: The Competition Between Positivity and Negativity for Eye Movements
and Attention
Chen-Chao Tao, National Chiao Tung U, TAIWAN
Processing Humor in TV Commercials: Differential Response Latencies Between Humor Types
Kim Buffing, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Luuk Lagerwerf, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
5545
Cancer and Health Information Seeking
Friday
14:30-15:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U, USA
Participants
Accounting for Differences in Cancer Patients' Information-Seeking Behavior
Angel Bourgoin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Taressa Fraze, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Robert Hornik, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Cancer Information Disparities Between U.S.- and Foreign-Born Populations
Xiaoquan Zhao, George Mason U, USA
Information Seeking From Media and Family/Friends Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among
Cancer Patients
Nehama Lewis, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Lourdes Susana Martinez, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Derek Freres, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Rebekah Nagler, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Angel Bourgoin, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Robert Hornik, U of Pennsylvania, USA
U.S. Adults' Health Communication Channel Preferences by Class, Race, and Place
Kelly Blake, U.S. National Cancer Institute, USA
Sherrie Flynt-Wallington, Georgetown U, USA
K. Viswanath, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
5546
The Im/materiality of Terrorism: Addressing the Political and Cultural Implications of
(Counter)narratives in Strategic Communication
Friday
14:30-15:45
Theater
Theme Sessions
Chair
Pauline Hope Cheong, Arizona State U, USA
Participants
A Narrative Perspective on Extremist Im/materiality
Steven R. Corman, Arizona State U, USA
The Gendered Construction and Transmediation of a Terrorist's Life Story
Chris Lundry, Arizona State U, USA
Pauline Hope Cheong, Arizona State U, USA
Rumors and Collective Sense-Making About Security Incidents
Gregory Dalziel, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
The National Narrative and Counterterrorism in Singapore
Norm Vasu, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Respondent
Kumar Ramakrishna, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
This panel discusses the relationship between extremist communication and im/materiality, specifically
the role of narratives and counter-narratives underpinning the conflict between mainstream culture and
terrorist groups. Presenters examine the antecedents and consequences of terrorism, including the
functional appeal of master narratives, the circulation of public discourse and rumors related to terrorist
acts and actors, and the material and ideational consequences of extremist storytelling. We examine these
issues within multiple online/offline/hybridized and local/national/glocal contexts.
5646
International Communication Association Annual Awards and Presidential Address
Friday
16:00-17:15
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Barbie Zelizer, U of Pennsylvania, USA
5813
ICA's 60th Annual Conference Closing Dinner
Friday
18:00-21:00
Ballroom
Sponsored Sessions
In the tradition of Singapore, ICA is offering a conference closing dinner that will feature performances
reflecting the cultures and talents of Singapore and Singaporeans and the finest of Singapore. A four
course meal will be offered that is halal certified (no pork or pork byproducts, with beef, fish, and
vegetarian options. Join us as we celebrate the successes of the Singapore conference.
6120
2011 Conference Planning Meeting
Saturday
08:30-11:15
Room 201
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Larry Gross, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Michael L. Haley, International Communication Association, USA
Amy B. Jordan, U of Pennsylvania, USA
James E. Katz, Rutgers U, USA
Jefferson D. Pooley, Muhlenberg College, USA
Peter J. Humphreys, U of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Laura Stein, U of Texas, USA
Roopali Mukherjee, CUNY - Queens College, USA
Radhika Gajjala, Bowling Green State U, USA
Dmitri Williams, U of Southern California, USA
Vincent Doyle, IE U, SPAIN
Antonio C. La Pastina, Texas A and M U, USA
Monique Mitchell Turner, U of Maryland, USA
Elly A. Konijn, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Rebecca M. Chory, West Virginia U, USA
Steve T. Mortenson, U of Delaware, USA
Liz Jones, Griffith U, AUSTRALIA
Frank Esser, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Stephanie L. Craft, U of Missouri, USA
David Tewksbury, U of Illinois, USA
Janet Fulk, U of Southern California, USA
Claes H. De Vreese, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Paul Frosh, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
Juan-Carlos Molleda, U of Florida, USA
Michael S. Griffin, Macalester College, USA
Laurie Ouellette, U of Minnesota, USA
John P. Caughlin, U of Illinois, USA
Evelyn Y. Ho, U of San Francisco, USA
This session is for all division and special interest group program planners for the 2011 conference in
Boston. All sections need to be represented.
6121
Interpersonal and Mediated Communication: Spaces for Identity Construction and Intercultural
Dialogue?
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 202
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Saskia Witteborn, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
The Impact of Television News on Self-Conception of Jewish Diaspora
Dina A. Ibrahim, San Francisco State U, USA
Michelle A. Wolf, San Francisco State U, USA
Engaged, But Not Immersed: Tracking the Mediated Public Connection of Filipino Elite Migrants in
London
Jonathan Corpus Ong, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
Jason Vincent Cabanes, U of Leeds, UNITED KINGDOM
Communication in Workplace: The Ethnic Malays Malaysian Communication Characteristics
Hassan Abu Bakar, U of Utara - Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Che Su Mustaffa, U Utara Malaysia, MALAYSIA
Comparative Study of the American and Korean Female Elders' Perception of Subjective Age and SelfConcept and the Impact on Responses to Age Segmentation Cues (ASCs)
HyunMee Kang, Louisiana State U, USA
Hyunjae Jay Yu, Sogang U, Korea, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Efficacy of Antiracism Inoculation
Sang Yeal Lee, West Virginia U, USA
6122
Newsroom Culture and Organizational Conflict
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Mike Conway, Indiana U, USA
Participants
The Culture of a Progressive Korean Newspaper: An Ethnographic Study of the Citizen Newspaper
Yonghwan Kim, U of Texas, USA
Kang Hui Baek, U of Texas, USA
Joon Yea Lee, U of Texas, USA
Epistemological (In)differences and How the Commonplace Is Challenging the Aesthetic Thinking in
Cultural Journalism and Vice Versa (Top Student Paper)
Maarit Jaakkola, U of Tampere, FINLAND
The South Is Talking Back: With a White Face and a British Accent - Editorial Dilemmas in Al Jazeera
English
Tine Ustad Figenschou, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Rule Regimes and Organizational Identity: Crisis Decision-Making in PSB News Organizations
Eva-Karin Olsson, CRISMART, Swedish National Defence College, SWEDEN
Johanna Jaasaari, U of Helsinki, FINLAND
Respondent
Zohar Kampf, Hebrew U of Jerusalem, ISRAEL
6123
News and the State in Regulated Media Systems
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 204
Journalism Studies
Chair
Thomas Simonet, Rider U, USA
Participants
Institutional History of Journalism Award in China
Shunming Huang, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Journalism and Freedom of Expression in Turkey: Notes on the Public Sphere
Miyase Christensen, Karlstad U, SWEDEN
"World of Shadows": The Influences on Student Journalism in 21st-Century Singapore
Daniel Reimold, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Beyond Watchdogs and Mouthpieces: Taking the State-Owned Press Seriously
Bella Mody, U of Colorado, USA
Justin Maki, U of Colorado, USA
Linda J. Hofschire, RMC Research Corporation , USA
Tamara Swenson, Osaka Jogakuin College, JAPAN
Anaa Mansouri, U of Denver, USA
Respondent
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
6124
Imagi(ni)ng North / South and East / West
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 205
Visual Communication Studies
Chair
Philippe Meers, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Participants
An Agenda of Connecting, A Representation of Distancing?
Stephanie Ketterer, International Christian U, JAPAN
Humanitarian Photography in the 21st Century: New Approaches in Visual Communication From MSF,
the ICRC, and IMRC
Valerie Gorin, U of Geneva, SWITZERLAND
The Appropriation of "Asianness" in Memoirs of a Geisha
Jiayun Feng, U of New Mexico, USA
Gendered "Japan" in War: Seven Samurai and Princess Mononoke
Kaori Yoshida, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific U, JAPAN
Visualising the Other: Failures and Successes of Decolonisation.
Matthias De Groof, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Respondent
Philippe Meers, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
6125
Goals and Action in Conversation
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
Participants
Are You Doing What I'm Doing? Goal Projection in Conversation
Nicholas A. Palomares, U of California - Davis, USA
How People Respond Tactfully: Looking at Indicators and Predictors of Tact
Vida Zorah Gabe, U of California Davis, USA
Mikayla Hughes, U of California - Davis, USA
Why Koreans Are More Likely to Favor "Apology," While Americans Are More Likely to Favor "Thank
You"
Hye Eun Lee, U of Hawaii, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Towards Conceptual Convergence: An Examination of Interpersonal Adaptation
Catalina Laura Toma, Cornell U, USA
Ashley Laurel Downs, Cornell U, USA
6126
Media Discourse
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Mass Communication
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Wanda Luen Wun Siu, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Managing Affect in Talk-in-Interaction: An Analysis of Audience Experience With Baseball on
Television
Shin-Jung Ho, Fo Guang U, TAIWAN
Positive Effects of Media on Family Interactions
Elisa Pigeron, U of California - Los Angeles, USA
The Discursive Construction of a Credible Astrology in a Call-In Radio Show
Wing-Ki Ho, Chinese U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Politeness Practice and Social Distance: The Bulge Found in Bangla Social Media
Anupam Das, Indiana U, USA
6127
Beyond Boundary-Spanning: How Public Relations Impacts, and Is Shaped by, National,
Transnational, and Transitional Intersections
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
David McKie, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Premature Speculations: Looking for Theory in All the Wrong Places
Vincent Hazleton, Radford U, USA
Not in Europe and Not in America: A Third Way From a Small Island Somewhere in the Atlantic
Anne Gregory, Leeds Metropolitan U, UNITED KINGDOM
National Aspirations and Regional Tensions: A Catalan Account?
Jordi Xifra, U Pompeu Fabra, SPAIN
Breaking and Making Borders: PR Practice, the Web, and World Opinion
David McKie, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Margalit Toledano, Waikato U, NEW ZEALAND
Respondent
Milagros Rivera, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
PR has done much to redress its lack of global coverage. While work still remains, this panel extends that
literature beyond traditional boundary-spanning. It discusses how nationally, regionally, and
transnationally, PR is not only substantially shaped by material locations (especially nations), but
intersects with, and helps shape, those - often transitional - locations. Examining selective image
projections from very different places, the panel considers shifting boundaries of contemporary relevance
to PR. It pays particular attention to interplays between internal and external audiences and commonalities
and differences between differently located initiatives both inside (e.g., national PR associations seeking
better practices from transnational bodies) and/or outside (e.g., marketing nations/regions internationally).
Although offering some specific practice guidelines (e.g., for place promotion; professional PR
associations), the panel questions core assumptions of fixed limits to open discussions on challenges and
possibilities - including a possible third way for PR between European and U.S. models - raised by current
intersections.
6128
Imagining and Mobilizing Publics
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
The Cultural Sociology of Public Debate: A Comparative Perspective
Hakon Larsen, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Speaking of Publics: Speech, Defamation, Law
Andrew Kenyon, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
The Participation of Christian Religious Publics in the Controversy Over Gay Marriage in Canada: A
Rhetorical Approach
Joelle Basque, U de Montréal, CANADA
Media, Commodification, and the Imagination of Religion in Late Modernity
Stewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado, USA
This session addresses the constitution and mobilization of publics across multiple sites--defamation law,
religion, consumer culture and broadcasting. In so doing the papers engage with the possibilities and
limits of agency and dissent.
6130
Privacy Online
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Marie A. Mater, Houston Baptist U, USA
Participants
Determinants of Behavioral Responses to Online Privacy: The Effects of Concern, Risk Beliefs, SelfEfficacy, and Communication Sources on Self-Protection Strategies
Hichang Cho, National U - Singapore, SINGAPORE
Developing ChatCoder 2.0: Improving Computer Analysis of Cyber-Predation Conversations
Lynne Y. Edwards, Ursinus College, USA
April Kontostathis, Ursinus College, USA
Jennifer Bayzick, Ursinus College, USA
India McGhee, Ursinus College, USA
Kristina Moore, Ursinus College, USA
Amanda Leatherman, U of Maryland, USA
Measuring Online Privacy Concern and Protection in the (Social) Web: Development of the APCP and
APCP-18 Scale
Monika Michaela Martina Taddicken, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
How Much Is Too Much? Privacy Issues on Twitter
Lee M. Humphreys, Cornell U, USA
Balachander Krishnamurthy, AT and T Research, USA
Phillipa Gill, U of Toronto, CANADA
6131
Web 2.0 and New Media
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
S. Shyam Sundar, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Participants
Social Hyperlink Networks in Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Twitter: A Case of South Korea
Han Woo Park, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Chien-Leng Hsu, YeungNam U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Social Media Use in Response to the Virginia Tech Crisis: Moving From Chaos to Understanding
Adam W. Tyma, U of Nebraska- Omaha, USA
Deanna Dee Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Timothy Sellnow, U of Kentucky, USA
Is It Really All About Me? Social Awareness Streams on Twitter
Chih-Hui Lai, Rutgers U, USA
Jeffrey Boase, Rutgers U, USA
Mor Naaman, Rutgers U, USA
Tweeting About TV: An AEIOU Model of Sociable Television Behavior
D. Yvette Wohn, Michigan State U, USA
Eun-Kyung Na, Keio U, JAPAN
6132
Communication and Political Participation
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Participants
Explicating Mechanisms of Communication Effects on Political Participation
Nakwon Jung, U of Texas, USA
News Media Use, Citizen Communication, and Civic Participation: A Communication Mediation Model
Mingyu Kim, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jisuk Woo, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jeong Min Choi, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Online Political Participation in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election: Mobilizing or Reinforcing?
Kenneth Michael Winneg, U of Pennsylvania, USA
The Role of Communication in Political Participation: Exploring the Social Normative/Cognitive
Processes Related to Political Behavior
Yushu Zhou, Stanford U, USA
Respondent
Hajo G. Boomgaarden, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
6133
Human Resources Practices in Organizational Communication
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 304
Organizational Communication
Chair
Ted Zorn, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
Participants
Employers' Use of the Internet and New Communication Technologies to Evaluate Job Applicants: A
Theoretical Agenda
Caleb T. Carr, Michigan State U, USA
Hannah Ariane Klautke, Michigan State U, USA
Vernon D. Miller, Michigan State U, USA
Joseph B. Walther, Michigan State U, USA
A Model of Antecedents to Extractive Information Seeking Strategies Within the Hiring Process
Caleb T. Carr, Michigan State U, USA
Materializing Intersectional Approaches in Diversity Training: An Analysis of Organizational Diversity
Training Materials
Joelle Cruz, Texas A and M U, USA
More or Less Absence From Work Due to Family Matters?
Lieke ten Brummelhuis, Erasmus U - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Claartje ter Hoeven, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Menno de Jong, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Bram Peper, Erasmus U - Rotterdam , THE NETHERLANDS
Respondent
Ted Zorn, U of Waikato, NEW ZEALAND
6134
Television Realities and Imaginaries
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 305
Popular Communication
Chair
Bruno Roberto Campanella, Federal U of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), BRAZIL
Participants
Everyday Life on TV: Perspectives of Brazilian Society in a Big Brother Fan Community
Bruno Roberto Campanella, Federal U of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), BRAZIL
Racial Triumph and Success on Reality Game Shows: The American Dream on The Apprentice
Ji Hoon Park, Korea U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Renegotiating Religious Imaginations Through Transformations of "Banal Religion" in Supernatural
Line Nybro Petersen, U of Copenhagen, DENMARK
Presidential Candidate Framing and Participation in Late-Night Comedy: The Political Punditry of
Television Humor Writers
Nathan David Gilkerson, U of Minnesota, USA
6135
High Density Session: Cognitive Processing of News
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 306
Information Systems
Chair
Ashley Nicole Sanders-Jackson, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Affect Priming During the Processing of News Articles
Susanne E. Baumgartner, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Werner Wirth, U of Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Beyond Factual Knowledge: The Impact of Online News Features on Self-Perceived Knowledge
Michael Opgenhaffen, Lessius U College, BELGIUM
Leen S. J. d'Haenens, Catholic U - Leuven, BELGIUM
Effects of Readers' Comments on Internet News Sites on Construction of Social Reality
Eun-Ju Lee, Seoul National U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Effects of "Burying" the News Lead: How "Macroproposition" Placement Influences Cognitive Resource
Allocation In Reading of Paced Text
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Kevin Wise, U of Missouri, USA
Mortality Salience in News Coverage of Immigrant Criminals: Effects on Viewer's Emotional Responses,
News Evaluations, and Crime Perceptions
Po-Lin Pan, Arkansas State U, USA
Shuhua Zhou, U of Alabama, USA
Personalization in News: How Format and Narrative Engagement Influence News Selection, Learning,
and Attitude Change
Helena Bilandzic, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Matthias R. Hastall, Zeppelin U, GERMANY
Susanne Kinnebrock, RWTH Aachen U, GERMANY
Rick W. Busselle, Washington State U, USA
Combating the Thought That Helping is Hopeless: Grounding Compassion and Compassion Fatigue in
Theory
Sheetal Janak Patel, U of North Carolina, USA
6136
Influences on What We Choose to Watch
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 307
Mass Communication
Chair
Jeremy J. Littau, Lehigh U, USA
Participants
Rethinking Mood Management Theory: The Issues of Definitions and Measure About Mood and Emotion
Yen-Shen Chen, Florida State U, USA
The Appeal of Tragic Drama to Lonely Individuals: Selective Exposure to Media Content
Dohyun Ahn, U of Alabama, USA
Too Depleted to Choose? Ego Depletion, Self-Control, and Habits in Media Selection
Suzanna Hill, Michigan State U, USA
Tilo Hartmann, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Elif Yilmaz Ozkaya, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Maintaining Morality: Repeated Exposure to Narrative Entertainment and the Salience of Moral Intuitions
Allison L. Eden, Michigan State U, USA
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Matthew N Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Joel Lewis, Michigan State U, USA
Rene Weber, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
6137
Environmental Concerns: ICTs' Use and News Framing
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Participants
A Study on the News Values of International Disasters: Change of Determinants on News Coverage of
International Disasters in the U.S. News Media
Yongick Jeong, Louisiana State U, USA
Sun Young Lee, U of North Carolina, USA
Alternative American Voices in Global Climate Change Reporting
Catherine Candano, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Climate Change Communication and Regional Media Systems
Mikkel Eskjaer, The Danish Institute in Damascus, SYRIA
The Dialectic Role of ICTs in Environmental Protection: A Comparative Study of ICTs for U.S. and
Chinese Environmental Campaigns
Jingfang Liu, U of Southern California, USA
6138
Romance and Sex on the Media
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Ellen Graham McKinley, Rider U, USA
Participants
Cads and Dads on Screen: Do Film Representations of Partner Scarcity Affect Partner Preferences?
Laramie D. Taylor, U of California - Davis, USA
Japanese College Students' Media Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material, Perceptions of Women, and
Sexually Permissive Attitudes
Kikuko Omori, U of Wisconsin/Milwaukee, USA
Yan Bing Zhang, U of Kansas, USA
Hiroshi Ota, Aichi Shukutoku U, JAPAN
Makiko Imamura, U of Kansas, USA
Sexual Cues Emanating From the Anchorette Chair: Implications for Perceived Professionalism, Fitness
for Beat, and Memory for News
Maria Elizabeth Grabe, Indiana U, USA
Lelia Samson, Indiana U, USA
"Love is All You Need": A Content Analysis of Romantic Love and Sex in Chinese Entertainment
Television
Jane D. Brown, USA
6139
Success of Media Networks and Films
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
George Pavlou, European U Cyprus, CYPRUS
Participants
With All Due Respect, We Know a Little Bit More by Now
Sven Joeckel, U of Erfurt, GERMANY
Bollywood and Hollywood: A Political Economic Analysis of Coproductions
Azmat Rasul, Florida State U, USA
Jennifer M. Proffitt, Florida State U, USA
Effect of Customer-Based Brand Equity on the Use of Broadcast Networks' Web Sites
Eun Hwa Jung, U of Florida, USA
Producing Quality: A Social Network Analysis of Coproduction Relationships in High-Grossing vs.
Highly Lauded Films
Jade L. Miller, U of Southern California, USA
6140
Women and Media
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 311
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Michael Prieler, Hallym U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Gender Representations of Older People in Japanese TV Ads
Michael Prieler, Hallym U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Florian Kohlbacher, German Institute for Japanese Studies, JAPAN
Shigeru Hagiwara, Keio U, JAPAN
Akie Arima, Tokyo Woman's Christian U, JAPAN
"Looking at Herself": The Problem of "Real Women" in Women's Liberation Cinema
Sue Thornham, U of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM
An Independent Lens: The Documentary Film as a Medium of Discourse for Women in the US During
the "War on Terror"
Isra Ali, Rutgers, the State U, USA
The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same: Constructions of Gender Roles Through Online
Dating Sites and Women Users' Opinions About Gender Roles in Dating
Stephanie Helen Blake, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
6141
Players and Market Forces
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Participants
Interactive Brand Placement in Online Games: Effects on Girls
Eva van Reijmersdal, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jeroen Jansz, Erasmus U - Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Oscar Peters, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
Guda van Noort, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Promoting Intercultural Competence Through Electronic Games and Simulations
Anika Struppert, Macquarie U, AUSTRALIA
Uses and Gratifications of Social Games: Blending Social Networking and Game Play
Jinghui Hou, U of Southern California, USA
Wiimote Possibilities: The Effects of Types of Game Controller and Character Perspective
Julia Crouse, Michigan State U, USA
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
6142
Highlights of Communication Studies in Taiwan: Past, Present, and Future
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Wei-Wen Chung, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Participants
The Profile of Communication Research in Taiwan
Shieu-chi Weng, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Cultural Differences in Ad Persuasion
Chingching Chang, National Chengchi U, TAIWAN
Constructing Users-Oriented Communication Knowledge Map: A Framework of the Science of Meaning
Yaly Chao, Tamkang U, TAIWAN
Media Scholar and/or Media Reformer: Academic Work and Media Policy-Making in Taiwan
Shih-Hung Lo, National Chung Cheng U, TAIWAN
This panel gathers papers from 4 distinguished scholars from Taiwan in the field of communication
studies. From their respective areas of interests, each of the panelists will present major achievements in
communication research in Taiwan in the past decades, report key focuses at present, and project
important topics to be pursued in the future. In addition, this panel would review and explore research
done in Taiwan with a global perspective and examine how Taiwan might contribute to the developments
in communication studies in the world.
6143
Students and Intercultural Communication
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
William Hughes Edwards, Columbus State U, USA
Participants
A Transmodern Perspective on Intercultural Communicative Competence
Bhavana R. Upadhyaya, U of New Mexico, USA
Communication That Matters: A Comparison of Ethnocentrism and Willingness to Communicate in
Chinese and U.S. Students
Margaret Miller Butcher, Fort Hays State U, USA
Carrol Haggard, Fort Hays State U, USA
International Students' Communication Preferences Under Stress: People and Channels
Fan Gao, Northwestern U, USA
International Students' Communication With U.S. Faculty: A Further Examination of Anxiety/Uncertainty
Management (AUM) Theory
Yixin Chen, U at Buffalo, USA
Respondent
Xi Cui, Texas A and M U, USA
6145
Health Communication About the HPV Vaccine
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Cabral A. Bigman, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
A Theoretically Grounded Approach to Understanding Early Adopters' and Nonadopters' HPV
Vaccination Beliefs
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
An Application of the Reasoned Action Approach to Women's Intention to Be Vaccinated Against HPV
James Price Dillard, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Kiwon Seo, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Does Mother Know Best? An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of College-Age Females' HPV
Vaccination Behavior
Janice Lee Raup Krieger, Ohio State U, USA
Jennifer Andrea Kam, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Mira Katz, Ohio State, USA
Anthony Roberto, Arizona State U, USA
HPV-Campaign Effectiveness in the Light of Conflicting Messages: The Dutch Case
Enny Henrica Das, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Lydia van Leeuwen, Vrije U, FSW, THE NETHERLANDS
Ute Ritterfeld, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
6146
Online Consumer Communities: Opportunities, Impacts, and Challenges
Saturday
08:30-09:45
Theater
Theme Sessions
Chair
Andrea B. Hollingshead, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Setting the Stage: Online Consumer Communities and the Top 100 Global Brands
Young Ji Kim, U of Southern California, USA
Reconceptualizing Interactivity in Online Consumer Communities
Jingbo Meng, U of Southern California, USA
Authenticity and Expectation Violations in Online Consumer Communities
William Scott Sanders, U of Southern California, USA
Evaluating Restaurant Reviews and Reviewers on Yelp.com
Li Xiong, U of Southern California, USA
Respondent
Ronald E. Rice, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The goal of this panel is to bring together recent research on a new topic: online consumer communities,
which are online sites where consumers interact with one another about brands, products and/or services.
Little research exists on this topic and this panel helps to fill the gap. Online consumer communities can
take many forms. They can be company-created, consumer-created, or third-party created. Four empirical
papers will be presented followed by a response by former ICA President Ronald E. Rice, a recognized
expert on online communities and social media. The panel topics range from those related to the
technology that supports consumer communities (features, interactivity, innovation) to those related to
psychological, social and communicative practices (authenticity, participation, influence). Online
consumer communities can bring real value and meaning to brands and to users.
6221
Building Bridges of Meaning Across Distance and Difference: Studies of Youth-Designed Social
Networking
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 202
Children Adolescents and Media
Chair
Mark Evan Nelson, National Institute of Education, Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Space2Cre8: Lessons Learned Thus Far
Glynda A. Hull, New York U, USA
Mark Evan Nelson, National Institute of Education, Singapore, SINGAPORE
Space to Create With Social Media in Global Classrooms
Birgit Hertzberg Kaare, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Catharina Kokkim, U of Olso, NORWAY
Designful Play: Qualities of Youth Engagement With the Creation of an International Social Network
Amy Stornaiuolo, U of California, USA
Stacy Marple, U of California, USA
Creating Multiple Voices in the Classroom: Space2cre8 as a Facilitator for Negotiating Cultural Identity
Kenneth Silseth, U of Olso, NORWAY
Kristin Vasbo, U of Olso, NORWAY
Ola Erstad, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Respondent
Kirsten Drotner, U of Southern Denmark, DENMARK
The papers that comprise this panel each detail findings from an ongoing youth social networking project
called Space2Cre8, which involves teenage youth in India, South Africa, Norway and the United States in
creating their own online social community. Based on the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data
collected online and at each site of participation over a two-year period, we discuss material and
immaterial constraints on and facilitators of communication and collaboration within the network and
suggest the vital relation of sustained participation, hospitality, ingenuity, playfulness, and dialogicality to
such emerging networked literacy practices. In so doing, we aim to identify and elucidate essential
qualities of the 'new literacies' required for meaningful, equitable participation in the global, digital
present and future.
6222
Comparing Journalism Cross-Nationally
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 203
Journalism Studies
Chair
Katerina Tsetsura, U of Oklahoma, USA
Participants
Western Journalism's "Other": The Legacy of the Cold War in the Study of Media Systems
Piotr Michal Szpunar, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Does Market-Driven Journalism Lead to Sensationalism in Television News? Explaining Sensationalism
in 11 Countries
Anne Hardy, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Knut De Swert, U of Antwerpen, BELGIUM
Danielle Sadicaris, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Is the Internet 'Europeanizing' or 'Americanizing' Global Journalism? An Analysis of the Form of Danish,
French, and U.S. Online and Print Newspapers
Rodney Benson, New York U, USA
Matthew Powers, New York U, USA
Sandra Vera Zambrano, Institut D'Etudes Politiques, FRANCE
Mark Blach-Orsten, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Ida Willig, Roskilde U, DENMARK
Cross-National Newspaper Coverage of Climate Change: A Community Structure Approach
John C. Pollock, College of New Jersey, USA
Eugene Reda, College of New Jersey, USA
Alyssa Bosland, College of New Jersey, USA
Moe Hindi, College of New Jersey, USA
Dominica Zhu, College of New Jersey, USA
Respondent
Bella Mody, U of Colorado, USA
6223
Minorities and Media Production: A Space for Alternative Representation and Politics?
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 204
Ethnicity and Race in Communication
Chair
Hari Harindranath, Melbourne U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Professional Efficacy Among Arab American Journalists
Justin D. Martin, American U in Cairo, USA
Promoting Civic Engagement Through Ethnic Media
Sherry Yu, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
Daniel M. Ahadi, Simon Fraser U, CANADA
The Undercover Genre in Hong Kong Cinema: The 1997 Handover and Hong Kong Identity
Ke-Ming Lin, National United U, TAIWAN
Voice and Visibility: Self-Representation of Dumagat Tribespeople in the Philippines Through a
Participatory Photography Project (Top Paper 2nd Place)
Rishi Nueno Mandhyan, Ateneo de Manila U, PHILIPPINES
Carmina Castillo Reyes, Ateneo de Manila U, PHILIPPINES
Joshua Michael Pangilinan, Ateneo de Manila U, PHILIPPINES
Jonathan Corpus Ong, U of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
6224
Globality, Framing, Stereotypes, and Discourse in the Chinese Context
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 205
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Zhou He, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Participants
Globality and the Media in Mainland China and Hong Kong: A Cross-System Comparison
Zhou He, City U of Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Impact of Interpreting Frames on Attitude to Controversial Issue: Case of "Replacement Singing" in
Beijing Olympics
Huailin Chen, U of Macau, CHINA, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
Cultural Anxiety in Chinese Movies' International Ambition:The Case of Red Cliff
Zhaoxi Liu, U of Iowa, USA
Stereotypes of Chinese Media Use and Olympic Games
Lingling Zhang, Towson U, USA
The Issue Agendas of China's Rural-Urban Migration in the New Century: A Content Analysis of the
People's Daily, 2000-2009
Yunjuan Luo, Indiana U, USA
Uncertainty as Problem-Dynamics in Hong Kong Context and its Presentation in Media
Juana Du, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
Suk Chong Tong, Hong Kong Baptist U, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
CCTV Undressed: Authority, New Media, and Public Sphere in China
Ruoyun Bai, U of Toronto, CANADA
Beyond the Glamour and Glory: Critical Discourse Analysis of the People's Daily Editorials on Beijing
2008 Olympic Games
Weidong Zhang, Winona State U, USA
Respondent
Xiaoming Hao, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
6225
States of Play: Social Media and Interpersonal Communication in Southeast Asia
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 206
Interpersonal Communication
Chair
Bernard Leong, Thymos Capital LLP, SINGAPORE
Participants
Asia's Social Media Map and Online User Behavior
Michael Netzley, Singapore Management U, SINGAPORE
Manifestation of Cultural Values in Southeast Asia's Social Media Landscape
Meimin Ou, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Brand Monitoring and Marketing: How Technology Has (and Has Not) Changed the Game
Nicholas Aaron Khoo, CNET, SINGAPORE
Role of Social Media in Contemporary Southeast Asian Politics
Tarn How Tan, Institute of Policy Studies, SINGAPORE
The proliferation of social media in Asia has led to new media playing a more central role in the lives of
increasingly wired citizens. In particular, Southeast Asia makes for an interesting case study for social
media, especially blogs and social networking sites, because of the economic, political and cultural
diversity of the region, which influence the way social media is utilised. With its experienced academic
and industry panelists in the areas of political discourse, marketing and advertising, the panel aims to
generate discussion on how social media in Southeast Asia has made an impact on political discussions
and advertising and marketing strategies, given its affordances. Intercultural communication will be drawn
into the discussion to address the transitions of different cultures into the virtual world. The state of social
media in Southeast Asia as well as upcoming social media trends in the region and its implications on
interpersonal communication will also be discussed.
6226
Public and Private Discourse in Multilingual Malaysia: Relating Microlevel Linguistic Strategies to
Macrolevel Social Realities
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 207
Language & Social Interaction
Participants
Discourses of Advertising in Malaysia: "Think and Act Local and Global"
Azirah Hashim, U of Malaya, MALAYSIA
Malaysian Lawyers' Perceptions of Accommodation Strategies Used in Courtrooms
Maya Khemlani David, U of Malaya, MALAYSIA
Media Discourse in Malaysia: An Epistemological Critique of Language and Society
Mahmud Hasan Khan, U of Malaya, MALAYSIA
Peranakan English: A Case Study of the Informal Correspondences of Tun Dato' Sir Tan Cheng Lock
Lim Beng Soon, SIM U, SINGAPORE
Media Debate and Private Discourse on Language Policy in Malaysian Law
Richard Powell, Nihon U, JAPAN
Should sociolinguistic explanation restrict itself to micro-level motivations such as turn-taking and
lexicogrammatical constraints upon communication strategy? Or is it legitimate and productive to look
further afield to wider attitudes and perceptions shared by speech-communities and socioeconomic
groups? This panel seeks to explore wider societal influences on individual discourse within the
multilingual context of Malaysia. Touching on the domains of advertising, law, journalism, business and
politics in order to illustrate a range of sociolinguistic and pragmatic constraints upon actual language use,
the papers focus on language in private and public discourses in the varying contexts of nation building,
multiculturalism and globalization. Discourse is explored in relation to society at large as well as ethnic
and professional communities. Linguistic analysis of different kinds of discourse and forms and the
relationship between these and contextual factors are highlighted. Linguistic manifestations of the
different types of discourse indicate social, cultural, political and economic explanatory factors behind the
linguistic choices found in the texts.
6227
Campaigns and Interactive Technologies for Social Change
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 208
Public Relations
Chair
Jennifer A. Robinson, Murdoch U, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Relationship-Building by Chinese ENGOs' Websites: Education, Not Activation
Aimei Yang, U of Oklahoma, USA
Maureen Taylor, U of Oklahoma, USA
Activist Online Resource Mobilization and Tactics: Relationships Between Resource-Dependencies and
Tactical Behavior
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Oklahoma, USA
Kevin Wolfe, U of Oklahoma, USA
Christal Johnson, USA
Teen Publics and Public Relations: Toward an Intersectional, Culture-Centered Approach to Campaign
Design
Jennifer E. Vardeman-Winter, U of Houston, USA
Activist Public Relations: Activist Practitioners' Perceptions of Publics, the Internet, and Media
Erich James Sommerfeldt, U of Oklahoma, USA
Respondent
Ansgar Zerfass, U of Leipzig, GERMANY
6228
Erving Goffman Matters: Exploring the Socially Mediated in Communication Studies
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 209
Philosophy of Communication
Chair
Knut Lundby, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Participants
A Goffman for the Media and Communication Researcher
Espen Ytreberg, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Goffman, Ritualized Performance, Media Formats, and Top 40 Radio
Eric W. Rothenbuhler, Texas A&M U, USA
Erving Goffman, Arlie Hochschild, and the Issues of Communication and Control in Family Media
Studies
Lynn Schofield Clark, U of Denver, USA
Goffman's 'Participation Framework' Rethought for the Age of Facebook
Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics, UNITED KINGDOM
The work of Erving Goffman is more influential in today's media and communication studies than ever
before. However, the use of his research tends to be based on a relatively narrow selection of his books.
This panel will demonstrate Goffman's relevance to social situations and actors of historic media as well
as contemporary electronic and digital media. Espen Ytreberg (U of Oslo) introduces "A Goffman for the
media and communication researcher". Eric W. Rothenbuhler (Texas A&M U) discusses "Goffman,
ritualized performance, media formats, and Top 40 radio". Lynn Schofield Clark (U of Denver) looks at
"Erving Goffman, Arlie Hochschild, and the Issues of Communication and Control in Family Media
Studies". Finally, Sonia Livingstone (London School of Economics & Political Science) offers
"Goffman's 'participation framework' rethought for the age of Facebook".
6230
Media Effects and Avatar Power
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 301
Communication and Technology
Chair
Frank Biocca, Michigan State U, USA
Participants
"It Doesn't Matter What You Are!": Explaining Social Effects of Agents and Avatars
Astrid Marieke von der Pütten, U of Duisburg Essen, GERMANY
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Jonathan Gratch, U of Southern California, USA
Sin-Hwa Kang, U of Southern California - Institute for Creative Technologies, USA
Avatar and Maintenance of the Self: An Exploratory Study on Avatar Customization and Gratifications
Keunmin Bae, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Avatars and Emotional Engagement in Asynchronous Online Communication
Laramie D. Taylor, U of California - Davis, USA
Deception and Self-Disclosure: The Roles of Self-Awareness, Avatar Similarity and Attraction
Rosalie Hooi, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Hichang Cho, National U - Singapore, SINGAPORE
6231
Negative and Problematic ICT Use
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 302
Communication and Technology
Chair
Brandon Van Der Heide, Ohio State U, USA
Participants
The Psychological Consequences of Cyberbullying: Uncertainty in the CMC Context
Rebekah A Pure, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
A Meta-Analysis of Research on Problematic Internet Use (PIU): Testing a Composite Model of PIU
Robert Shota Tokunaga, U of Arizona, USA
Steve Rains, U of Arizona, USA
Truly Problematic or Merely Habitual? An Integrated Model of the Negative Consequences of Social
Networking
Stephanie Tom Tong, Michigan State U, USA
Jessica Vitak, Michigan State U, USA
Robert Larose, Michigan State U, USA
Ambiguous Accounts: How Media Attributes Shape Deception and Availability Management
Jeremy Birnholtz, Cornell U, USA
Jeff Hancock, Cornell U, USA
Jamie Elizabeth Guillory, USA
Natalya N. Bazarova, Cornell U, USA
6232
Individuals, Communities, and Political Engagement
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 303
Political Communication
Chair
Carol Wan Ting Soon, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Participants
Activist Bloggers and Collective Action: Collective Individualism as a Force to Contend With
Carol Wan Ting Soon, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Community and Communication Revisited: Community Pluralism, Communication Mediation, and Civic
Engagement
Seungahn Nah, U of Kentucky, USA
To Buy or Not To Buy as Political Act: Understanding Political Consumerism as a New Form of Political
Engagement
Mihye Seo, SUNY - Albany, USA
Understanding Civic Engagement: Online and Offline Networks and Weak Ties
Homero Gil de Zuniga, U of Texas, USA
Sebastian Valenzuela, U of Texas , USA
Blog Posting, Issue Involvement, and Civic Participation
Nohil Park, U of Missouri, USA
JiYeon Jeong, U of Missouri, USA
JungHo Han, Yonsei U, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
6233
Journalism and Social Change: Historical Themes
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 304
Communication History
Chair
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
Participants
A Different Fate of the Print Revolution: Why Imperial China Had No Copyright?
Seung-Hwan Mun, Northeastern Illinois U, USA
Forever Laying Low the 'Shibboleth of Freedom of the Press': The 1940s Newspaper Crisis and the
Struggle to Restructure the Fourth Estate
Victor W. Pickard, New York U, USA
From Creator of Change to Supporter of the Traditional: The Changing Role of CNN.com
Arne Haskjold Krumsvik, U of Oslo, NORWAY
Reuters and the Australian Press During World War I
Peter Putnis, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Kerry McCallum, U of Canberra, AUSTRALIA
Respondent
Philip Lodge, Edinburgh Napier U, UNITED KINGDOM
6234
Sex and Sexuality in Media Culture: Theory and Performance
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 305
Popular Communication
Feminist Scholarship
Chair
Linda Duits, ECREA - European Communication Research and Education Assoc, BELGIUM
Participants
Coming to Terms With Sexualization
Linda Duits, ECREA - European Communication Research and Education Assoc, BELGIUM
Liesbet Van Zoonen, U of Loughborough, UNITED KINGDOM
Fantasizing Sex and Sexuality: Framing Sexual Content As Product of Imagination
Manaf Bashir, Indiana U, USA
Let's (Not) Talk About Sex: An Analysis of the Verbal and Visual Coverage of Women's Beach
Volleyball During the 2008 Olympic Games
Kimberly Bissell, U of Alabama, USA
Lauren M Reichart Smith, U of Alabama, USA
Performativity and Femininity in Parco Advertisements: The Nightingale Sings for No One but Herself
Toyoko Sato, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
6235
High Density Session: Cognitive Processing of Web Interfaces
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 306
Information Systems
Chair
Annie Lang, Indiana U, USA
Participants
Engaging Beyond the Screen: Investigating Audience's Use and Appeal of Television Program Websites
Mina Tsay, Boston U, USA
K. Maja Krakowiak, U of Colorado - Colorado Springs, USA
Multitasking Within Same Modality and Between Modalities: An Examination of Task Performance and
Eye Movement
Zheng Joyce Wang, Ohio State U, USA
Jatin Srivastava, Ohio State U, USA
Prabu David, Ohio State U, USA
Jonathan D'Angelo, Ohio State U, USA
Jennifer J. Moreland, Ohio State U, USA
Christine Brady, Ohio State U, USA
Stacie Powers, Ohio State U, USA
Music and Wine Online: Background Music Increases Congruent Online Wine Sales
Camiel J. Beukeboom, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Ivar Vermeulen, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Loes Boot, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Sonja Utz, Vrije U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Enny Henrica Das, Free U - Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Predicting Gambling Behavior of South East Asian Youths With Sensation Seeking and Motivation
System Activation
Byungho Park, KAIST, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
The Interplay Between Customization and Cognition in Web Portals: The Multiple Role Hypothesis
Explanation
Sriram Kalyanaraman, U of North Carolina, USA
Mary Beth Oliver, Pennsylvania State U, USA
Robert G. Magee, Virginia Tech, USA
Examining the Effects of Credibility and Need for Cognition on Exposure to Attitude-Consistent and
Attitude-Inconsistent Web Pages on a Health Topic
Ryan Medders, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Miriam Metzger, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Elisia Eunha Sim, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
Andrew Flanagin, U of California - Santa Barbara, USA
The Limits of User-Centered Design: A Case Study of e-Government
Nalini Kotamraju, U of Twente, THE NETHERLANDS
6236
Reconceptualizing Public Memory in a Networked World
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 307
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Participants
Ubiquitous Media, Ubiquitous Memory
Andrew Hoskins, U of Warwick, UNITED KINGDOM
Construction of Discursive Entelechies of Remembering
Ingrid Volkmer, U of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Memory Cultures and Conceptions of 'Imagining'
Jian Wang, U of Southern California, USA
Public Memory, Public Diplomacy, and Virtual States
Philip M. Seib, U of Southern California, USA
Respondent
Brian McNair, U of Strathclyde, UNITED KINGDOM
In the context of the new relevance of social 'networked' communication and the need for a deeper
understanding of ontological frameworks of transnational discourse structures, a debate of processes of
remembering provides insight into the epistemological formations of networked public life. This panel
will discuss the epistemological space of 'mediated' forms of memory as a crucial new public ritual.
6237
The 2008 Olympics and the Branding of a New China
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 308
Global Communication and Social Change
Chair
Randy Kluver, Texas A and M U, USA
Participants
Control and Spontaneity in the Beijing Olympic Theater
Limin Liang, Northwestern U, USA
National Identity Construction in the Opening Ceremony of the Beijing Olympics: From the Perspective
of Media Rituals
Xi Cui, Texas A and M U, USA
The 2008 Beijing Olympics as Face Changing: From a Narrative of Transformation to a Narrative of
Nationalism
Barbara J. Walkosz, U of Colorado - Denver, USA
Sonja Foss, U of Colorado Denver, USA
The Transformation From the Chengfen Discourse to Shenjia in China: Branding and Promotional Culture
Hongmei Li, U of Pennsylvania/Georgia State U, USA
6238
Media Enjoyment
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 309
Mass Communication
Chair
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Participants
Demystifying the Sad Film Paradox: A Critical Analysis of the Question of Why People Enjoy the
Reception of Sad Films
Nicole C. Krämer, U of Duisburg - Essen, GERMANY
Thomas Witschel, U Duisburg-Essen, GERMANY
Does Tragic Drama Have Hedonic Value? The Two Aspects of Sadness and Media Enjoyment
Dohyun Ahn, U of Alabama, USA
Do Satisfied Television Viewers Watch More? Examining Moderating Influences on Television Program
Loyalty
Miao Guo, U of Florida, USA
Defining Media Enjoyment in Functional Terms
Ron Tamborini, Michigan State U, USA
Matthew N Grizzard, Michigan State U, USA
Nicholas David Bowman, Young Harris College, USA
Leonard Reinecke, U of Hamburg, GERMANY
Robert Joel Lewis, Michigan State U, USA
Allison L. Eden, Michigan State U, USA
6239
Issues of Diversity and the Media
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 310
Mass Communication
Chair
Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori, U of South Dakota, USA
Participants
Measuring Conservativeness of Dress Among Female Television News Anchors
Gwendolyn Allen Brunner, UF, USA
Mari Luz Zapata-Ramos, UF, USA
Yeonsoo Kim, U of Florida, USA
Jennifer Cox, U of Florida, USA
The Obama Effect: Representation and Portrayals of Minority Models in Magazine Advertising
Chan Yun Yoo, U of Kentucky, USA
Yung Soo Kim, U of Kentucky, USA
What Are You Laughing At? Examining White Identity and Enjoyment of Black Entertainment
Omotayo Banjo, U of Cincinnati, USA
What's Up, Bitch? Women's Use of a Derogatory Word
Martina Sarah Baldwin, Bock Communications, USA
6240
Communications Scholarship, Fair Use, and Copyright Confusion: Creative Costs of Scholarship
Foregone
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 311
Communication Law & Policy
Chair
Michael X. Delli Carpini, U of Pennsylvania, USA
Participants
Copyright and Creativity in Communications Research: The Knowledge Cost of Confusion and
Misunderstanding
Bill D. Herman, Hunter College, USA
Edward L. Carter, Brigham Young U, USA
The Ethics of Research in the Neoliberal University
Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, London U, UNITED KINGDOM
The ICA's Role in Copyright Policy for Academic Research in Communications
Sharon Strover, U of Texas, USA
Respondent
Christina Slade, City U London, UNITED KINGDOM
Communications scholars depend upon unlicensed access to copyrighted materials, including television
programs, newspaper advertisements, rap lyrics, and software, for their research. Exemptions to
monopoly ownership rights exist in all copyright policies, none so ample and flexible as the U.S.
copyright doctrine of fair use. How well do communications scholars understand and employ the
exemptions they have, especially fair use? A survey of ICA members conducted by the ICA's ad hoc
committee on fair use and academic freedom reveals a high level of insecurity about scholars' rights to
unlicensed use of copyrighted material. It also documents a direct link between copyright insecurity and
loss of scholarly research. A fifth of respondents have abandoned research underway for copyright
concerns, and nearly a third avoided research subjects or questions because of copyright concerns. This
panel discusses the survey's implications and proposes next steps to lower copyright insecurity for
communications scholars.
6241
Traditional Communication Theory in Modern Game Research
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 312
Game Studies
Chair
Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
World of Warcraft, the Aftermath: How Game Elements Transfer Into Real-Life Perceptions and
Experiences
Karolien Poels, U of Antwerp, BELGIUM
Wijnand A. Ijsselsteijn, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Yvonne de Kort, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Bart Van Iersel, Eindhoven U of Technology, THE NETHERLANDS
Cultivation Effects of Video Games: A Longer-Term Experimental Test of First- and Second-Order
Effects
Yew Mun Gabriel Chong, Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports, Singapore,
SINGAPORE
Kie Zin Scott Teng, Eyeka.Asia, SINGAPORE
Sok Cheng Amy Siew, WKW School of Communication and Information, SINGAPORE
Marko M. Skoric, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Priming Stereotypical Associations: Grand Theft Auto Video Games and African-American Depictions
Vincent Cicchirillo, U of Texas, USA
Chad Mahood, Ohio State U, USA
Osei Appiah, Ohio State U, USA
The Psychosocial Causes and Consequences of Pathological Gaming: A Longitudinal Study
Jeroen S Lemmens, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Patti M. Valkenburg, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Jochen Peter, U of Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
6242
Russian Communication
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 313
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Mira Bergelson, Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Participants
Olga Leontovich, Volgograd State Pedagogical U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Michael David Hazen, Wake Forest U, USA
Stanislav Beletskiy, Siberian Federal U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Mira Bergelson, Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Marina Gavrilova, Saint Petersberg U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Elena Nikolaeva, Moscow State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Ksenia Shilikhina, Voronezh State U, RUSSIAN FEDERATION.
6243
Intercultural Interactions: Challenges and Obstacles
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 314
Intercultural Communication
Chair
Robert M. McCann, U of Southern California, USA
Participants
Backchannel Responses and Enjoyment of the Conversation: The More Does Not Necessarily Mean the
Better
Han Z. Li, U of Northern British Columbia, CANADA
Laura Aguilera, U of Northern British Columbia, CANADA
Communication Barriers in Medical Care for Non-Japanese Patients: Through the Eyes of Medical
Interpreters
Yoko Nadamitsu, Rikkyo U, JAPAN
Fight or Flight: Intercultural Communicators' Management Strategies in Social Predicament
Xiaowen Guan, U of St. Thomas, USA
Hee Sun Park, Michigan State U, USA
Truth and Reconciliation in the Late Modern Global Public Sphere: A Case Study of Timor-Leste
Laurance Paul Strait, U of Southern California, USA
Respondent
Young Yun Kim, U of Oklahoma, USA
6245
Culture-Centered Approaches to Health Communication
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Room 326
Health Communication
Chair
Elisia L. Cohen, U of Kentucky, USA
Participants
Culture-Centered Engagement With INGO Delivery of Health Services: Negotiating Meanings of Health
Through Tzu Chi Foundation and Buddhist Philosophy
Sydney J. Dillard, Purdue U, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Family Planning (Re)defined: How Young Nepalese Women Understand and Negotiate Contraceptive
Choices
Iccha Basnyat, National U of Singapore, SINGAPORE
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Meanings, Structures and Cultural Contexts: Discourses of Traditional Healers in Rural Bangladesh
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
Raihan Jamil, Purdue, USA
Public Health, Development, and Global Surveillance: A Postcolonial Appraisal of PEPFAR
Shaunak Jagdish Sastry, Purdue U, USA
Mohan Jyoti Dutta, Purdue U, USA
6246
Burma VJ
Saturday
10:00-11:15
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chairs
Lisa B. Brooten, Southern Illinois U - Carbondale, USA
Boris H. J. M. Brummans, U of Montréal, CANADA
Francois Cooren, U de Montréal, CANADA
Going beyond the occasional news clip from Burma, the acclaimed filmmaker, Anders Østergaard, brings
us close to the video journalists who deliver the footage. Though risking torture and life in jail,
courageous young citizens of Burma live the essence of journalism as they insist on keeping up the flow
of news from their closed country. Armed with small handycams the Burma VJs stop at nothing to make
their reportages from the streets of Rangoon. Their material is smuggled out of the country and broadcast
back into Burma via satellite and offered as free usage for international media. The whole world has
witnessed single event clips made by the VJs, but for the very first time, their individual images have been
carefully put together and at once, they tell a much bigger story. The film offers a unique insight into
high-risk journalism and dissidence in a police state, while at the same time providing a thorough
documentation of the historical and dramatic days of September 2007, when the Buddhist monks started
marching.
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ICA Closing Plenary: New Media and Their Impact on Censorship
Saturday
11:30-12:45
Theater
Sponsored Sessions
Chair
Cherian George, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Participants
Censorship and Self-Censorship in a New Media Environment: Observations From China and Hong Kong
Joseph M. Chan, Chinese U - Hong Kong, CHINA, PEOPLE‘S REPUBLIC OF
The (Inevitable) Rise and Rise of Censorship of the Internet
Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological U, SINGAPORE
Censorship and Sensibility
Josephine Ho, National Central U, TAIWAN
Censorship is the intervention between a willing sender and a willing receiver by a third party who has
some power over either or both of them. In practical terms, those with political power often exert a large
say in censorship. However, the Internet is affecting the power relationship. Using examples from within
and without Asia, this panel explores how state- and self-censorship are changing as a result of the
interaction among traditional media, new media, state policies and social formation.